Letters 2013

CAUTION- This page would be about 280 pages if printed!
Letters 1/1/2013
Wishing for the happiest of New Years to all our Dutch Cousins, all across the country!
——————————————–

OLD DUTCH CUSTOM ON NEW YEARS DAY:  In the 19th century, New Yorkers celebrated New Year’s Day by calling on friends, family, and acquantances, an old Dutch custom. The gentlemen of the city sallied forth in their best dress to make their calls, while the ladies stayed at home decked out in all their finery to receive the guests. The buffet was lavish – and the punch bowl liberally laced with alcohol. It was a matter of pride how many callers the ladies received. And, of course, each gentleman caller was obliged to accept a cup of punch from his hostess. By all appearances, New Year’s Day was an elegant, albeit thinly masked, pub crawl. Philip Hone – one-time mayor and prolific diarist – lived just two blocks from the Tredwells, at the corner of Great Jones Street and Broadway. In 1843, Hone reports in his diary that he left his home at noon and made an astonishing 40-plus calls before 5 p.m. Which works out to a visit (and cup of punch) every seven and a half minutes. And, the next year, “I was out more than five hours and my girls tell me they received 169 visits.”N– JUSTIN FERATE – NY’s best tour guide
———————————————

from the HOLLAND DAMES (NY)
Second Directress Firth Haring Fabend has just published her eleventh book, New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America. All proceeds go to the work of the publisher, the New Netherland Institute in Albany, as it continues to educate the public about the early history of New York and New Jersey. It is described and may be ordered atwww.newnetherlandinstitute.org.
———————————————

Jean Simon, Huntsville, Alabama

What a lovely Xmas present in this email you sent to all of us.  Such wonderful recipes, and fun looking at the photos!  Merry Xmas & Happy New Year!

————————————————

An old Cherokee told his grandson: “My son, there is a battle between two wolves inside us all. One is evil. It is anger, jealously, greed, resentment, inferiority, lies and ego. The other is good. It is peace, joy, love, hope, humility, kindness, empathy, and truth.” The boy thought about it, and asked, “Grandfather, which wolf wins?” The old man quietly replied: “The one you feed.” (author unknown)

———————————————
Just posted book review – biggest battle of Civil War in KY – many Dutch cousins fighting on both sides – One witness said “the battlefield was enough to make angels weap” — Nearly every … church became hospitals — nothing about Old Mud tho –read it hère: http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard/Book_Reviews/Entries/2012/12/13_Perryville_Under_Fire.html

————————————————

Brouwer Genealogy
Brouwer Burials at the Reformed Dutch Church of New York – The document linked below is from the William B. Bogardus Collection. It is an extract of persons named BROUWER and BROWER (later, BREWER) handful of other names, primarily BOGARDUS and KIERSTED. Dates are from 1727 to 1804. The list was extracted from FHL film #0017777, item no. 3, “Burial Register of the Reformed Dutch Church of New York, 1726-1804,” a handwritten transcript at the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society, New York City.

CLICK HERE: http://brouwergenealogy.blogspot.com/2012/12/brouwer-burials-at-reformed-dutch.html

————————————————

David Smock,Florida
Nice recipes, Carolyn.  Thanks.
As for the Dutch language, the term “Diets” was also used to apply to the language spoken in the broader region.  Later on, the language spoken in the Netherlands was called “Nederduitsch,” and today it is called “Nederlands”.in the Dutch language, while English has preserved the old name of Germanic origin, as have the Germans, who call their language “Deutsch,”  It should also be noted that the people in the northern half of Belgium speak “Nederlands,” there  being no official difference between the language there and in the Netherlands. Historically, the Netherlands, under Charles V, was part of the so-called Holy Roman Empire, and included in addition to present-day Netherlands. Belgium and Luxemburg, comprising seventeen provinces in all.

————————————————

Bill Davidson, Potsdam, NY:
This is for the Ryker/Rikers. The December 2012 issue of the New London County (CT.) Newsletter discusses the War of 1812. There is a mention of a semi-submersible torpedo boat belonging to a Captain Berrien (a Riker relative). Then, “… possibly Captain Riker of the Eagle fame provided the torpedo.”.
The contact information is: www.newlondonhistory.org, and <info@newlondonhistory.org>.
The December article was Part Two, so remember to request Part One also.

————————————————

Judy Cassidy, Pennsylvania
Carolyn, I spoke with Diane Barth Swartz the other day, and she still has books THE DORLAND ENIGMA for sale, they would make a nice gift.  They can either be purchased from Amazon.com or from Diane. Not only  are all branches of  the Dorland/Darland family covered, but also the Vanarsdale families of Simon and Annetje Dorland as well as her sister Jannetje and John Vanarsdale plus many others and their ancestors and descendants, many of whom were members
of the Conewago and Berkeley Families from Somerset County, NJ and then down into Mercer Co. Kentucky.

————————————————

Martha Roach, Edmond OK:  just re reading this and wanted you to know our daughter gave us a kudo on christmas eve. she and our son worked to install it so we could watch netflix if the weather was bad on christmas. however, netflix had crashed, so after church, she came over and put her amazon prime program on and that has many of the same things netflix has. chuck and i watched a documentary, “antitum.”
it was interesting to see this battleground as the place where president lincoln made his first drafts for the EMANCIPATION PROCLIMATION. having seen the movie, “lincoln,” this just emphasized how much
work went into this period in our history and realize it took years to pass it. martha roach

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – I have two Martha’s on this list; Martha Roach of Oklahoma and Martha Boltz of Virginia – I keep getting them mixed up!
————————————————-

Currently Reading:The Harvey Girls – Women who opened the west by Lesley Poling-Kempes
 
Just finished: The Harvey Girls – Women who Civilized the West byd Juddi Morris
 
Just Reviewed: http://goo.gl/xg2in
Short nights of the Shadow Catcher: the epic life and immortal photographs of Edward Curtis by Timothy Egan
————————————
Letters 1/7/2013

Next Dutch Cousins Gathering!

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

————————————–
We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors, and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.

————————————–

ATTN VAN ARSDALES!  Right now, for sale on ebay (I have no connection to this, just saw it)  a VANARSDALL hotel key tag Harrodsburg KY, go here to see it and/or bid on it:  http://www.ebay.com/soc/itm/290841042193?roken=mIXZxY

Jerry Sampson says it is very VERY rare.

————————————–
Check out my webpage at www.carolynbleonard.com and read the Dutch Cousins info, and the LOWDUTCHHERITAGE
————————————–
I have not tried this and probably won’t, but wanted to let you know about it in case you wanted to try. Here is the hotlink to read about it:     http://eogn.com/wp/?p=23432
(+) (Almost) Unlimited Cell Phone Minutes for only $19 a Month
This article has nothing to do with genealogy — or LOW DUTCH history. However, one of my personal interests has always been saving money. I recently found a bargain that is almost too good to be true, so I decided to try it. I must say that I am pleased with the results in my first week of usage. Even better, I don’t even have a standard, old-fashioned telephone. I can now use the new cell phone for all my calls and pay a TOTAL of $19 a month for all telephone conversations. I am using an Android “smartphone” that not only places and receives telephone calls but also surfs the web with a built-in web browser, sends and receives text messages, reads and writes email messages, takes pictures, reads and updates my calendar, maintains a large phone book, displays maps, provides directions, plays games, and much, much more.  The above article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.
————————————–Download free genealogy stuff at http://bit.ly/Genealogystuff
Judy Cassidy, Pennsylvania:  Carolyn I received my copy of the Harrodsburg Historical Society and there was an article on page 4 about Turnpikes and Tollgates of Mercer Co., and I thought this would be of interest to those who don’t get this publication.
“The original survey of the turnpike between Harrodsburg and Danville, near GARRET BONT’S farm and Cove Spring passed through a graveyard.  It was objectionable to those who had relatives buried there, so a second survey was made to change the line about 20 or 30 feet in order to bypass the graveyard.  This old BONTA FAMILY CEMETERY, located between Harrodsburg and Cove Spring in a sharp curve on the right side of the Danville Road, continues to interfere with modern improvements on the present highway.
————————————–
David Smock, Florida:
Dorothy Koenig’s invaluable contributions to Low Dutch genealogy and New Netherland scholarship will live on far past the lives of all of us and will be treasured by many future generations who will carry forward the quest for knowledge.  A big, hearty “dank U wel,” Dorothy! Back in the 1940s, when I first began writing, about “The Influence of Dutch Settlement on American Civilization,” there was precious little reference material to be had, at least in my area. Today, it is gratifying to know that, thanks to the efforts of Dorothy Koenig and others, there is a wealth of material available, and even more to be mined as projects to translate Dutch colonial documents are carried forward. We can all be proud of the now prominent place of New Netherland and its settlers in American history, and the ever expanding contributions to Low Dutch scholarship.
=============
GENEALOGYINTIME magazine’s list of the Top 100 Genealogy Websites for 2013:
=============

Judy Cassidy, Pennsylvania: Carolyn, the South Central Pennsylvania Genealogical Society is still active.  They have some of the best publications for sale on their web site, the only problem being that people might have a problem deciding if they pertain to their ancestor.  I have used them for years as our library has many of them.  If  your family also remained in the area, as many actually did, these publications helped me find further information on them.  But they are also relevant for the time period whereby the Dutch were living in York Co.  People might be interested in taking a look a the list, which are all reasonably priced, on their website which is:  www.scpgs.org   Arthur brought them to my attention many years ago, I think he was a member.

————————————–Follow me & my posts on Twitter!  https://twitter.com/

Historic Huguenot Street, New Pfalz NY: Historic Huguenot Street
[http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?e=001djJnBbNTeiKWx7KATMlALTWXiwf3bT6g_Ex-8aGLrduESK22iaozD5eyZzp0DtvfGgYwGrLlmJHB_TfbK1Y6kIzcE1UvL-GLVSx9XmEnH19neDC6baopow==]Historic Huguenot Street
Where family is the story…
88 Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY
————————————–
Have you read my book, Who’s Your Daddy?
U No U want to!
www.CarolynBLeonard.com
order from Amazon, now $4.95 for Kindle:
http://amzn.to/orderdaddy
————————————-
Marilyn Douglas, Albany NY:  These BOOKS ARE FREE ON JANUARY 11, 2013;  GO TO AMAZON KINDLE WEB SITE
TWO NEW ILLUSTRATED E-BOOKS ON PROMINENT DUTCH AMERICANS
Author: C. Carl Pegels, Professor Emeritus, University at Buffalo, SUNY
Both books are available from Amazon for $ 2.99 each at any time.Volume I: Dutch American Achievers: Arts, Sciences and Sports
Volume II: Dutch American Achievers: Government, Military, History and Philosophy
Each book covers about 100 prominent Dutch Americans and consists of about 20 chapters focused on a professional field of the individuals. Each chapter provides an introduction and overview and is followed by biographical profiles and pictures of most of the individuals.
Some of the prominent performing artists are Humphrey Bogart, Henry and Jane Fonda, Audrey Hepburn and the Van Halen brothers. Among the graphic artists are DeKooning, Hopper and Mondrian. In the sciences there are the five Nobel Laureates, the astronomers and the five Dutch American astronauts.
Leading the government volume are the three presidents, Van Buren and the two Roosevelts.  The longest political family dynasty consists of six Dutch Americans, four U.S. Senators and two U.S. Representatives. The dynasty was uninterrupted from American Independence to the present. Their political family dynasty is not well known.
Six Dutch Americans were participants or/and signers of the three documents of American Independence. At that time the Dutch comprised a substantial part of the population of the American territories. There was more than one reason why the Dutch government was one of the first to recognize the new republic.
The books are available from the Amazon Kindle store, click on it and put “Pegels” in the search box. The cost of each book is the price of a morning cup of coffee.
Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President
New Netherland Institute
Cultural Ed Center, Room 10D45
222 Madison Avenue
Albany NY 12230
Phone 518.408.1212 (w)
Tues, Wed 518.489.0418 (h)
Fax      518.473.0472
Mobile: 518.495.5993
Email: mdouglas@mail.nysed.gov
————————————–
Letters 1/14/2013

Bob VanArsdall, Chapel Hill NC asks:

Does anyone know where the VanArsdall Hotel was in Harrodsburg and when? I looked on the Sanborn Maps for a few years and couldn’t find it…

Thanks –

——————————————————-

Daughters of Holland Dames announced that Second Directress Firth Haring Fabend (a COZINE descendant) has just published her eleventh book, New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America. All proceeds go to the work of the publisher, the New Netherland Institute in Albany, as it continues to educate the public about the early history of New York and New Jersey. It is described and may be ordered at www.newnetherlandinstitute.org.

The adv. says: The story of New Netherland is told in a highly readable fashion suitable for anyone unfamiliar with this important chapter in U.S. colonial history. From the exploration of Henry Hudson in 1609 to the final transfer of the Dutch colony to the English in 1674,this book introduces key aspects of New Netherland: the multicultural makeup of the population, the privatization of colonization, the ability to survive with meager means against overwhelming odds, and the transfer of distinctive Dutch traits, such as toleration, free trade, and social mobility, all of which persisted long after New Netherland became New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and parts of Connecticut and Pennsylvania. New Netherland in a Nutshell will satisfy the questions: who were the Dutch, why did they come here, and what did they do once they got here?

The book is $26 hardcover, $18 soft cover plus postage $4 (estimates).  Payment accepted by check, money order, or paypal.

In addition to several novels, Other books of Dutch and family history by Firth Fabend include:

Historical Books Published Since 1988:

  • Tappan: 300 Years, 1686-1986 (Tappantown Historical Society, 1988). (General Editor.)
  • A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies, 1660-1800 (New Brunswick and London: Rutgers University Press, 1991; paperback edition, 1998).
  • Zion on the Hudson: Dutch New York and New Jersey in the Age of Revivals (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 2000; rprt., 2005).
  • New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America (Albany, NY: New Netherland Institute, 2012).
  • A Catch of Grandmothers (A historical poem) (Historical Society of Rockland County, 2006).
  • Land So Fair (A historical novel), 2008.

(note from Carolyn) I especially recommend “A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies” which is specifically about the early Cozine family. She has published several articles in de Halve Maen, publication of the Holland Society of New York. Highly encourage reading “Cosyn Gerritsen van Putten: New Amsterdam’s Wheelwright,” de Halve Maen, 80:2 (Summer 2007), 23-30.

———————–

From Tamara Fulkerson, Crestwood KY:

KHS Launches Danville Tour on ‘Explore Kentucky History’ Smartphone App
URL       : http://kentucky.gov/Newsroom/history/KHS+Launches+Danville+Tour+on+Explore+Kentucky+History+Smartphone+App.htm
Date      : Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Issued By : Kentucky Historical Society
Summary   : The Kentucky Historical Society features historic downtown Danville in a new smartphone application tour. “Explore Danville, Kentucky,” includes 19 historical markers, all within walking distance of Danville’s downtown business district, pertaining to Kentucky’s pioneer past, the state’s founding, early medical advancements, education, the Civil War and more.

——————————————————-

(carolyn says:)  Was your ancestor a Cartman?  Gerrit Cozyntie COZINE (Cosynszen), 1640-1702, our 8th great grandfather was listed as a Cartman when he lived in the bowery section of Manhattan. (I think the source for Cozine as a Cartman was from one of Firth Fabend’s books, but my source info is missing.  I am hoping that Jim Cozine can fill in the source info.)

The cart men—unskilled workers who hauled goods on one horse carts—were perhaps the most important labor group in early American cities. Revised and re-issued in 2012,New York City Cartmen, 1667–1850 (NYU Press) uncovers the forgotten world of one-horse cart drivers who monopolized the movement of private and commercial goods in New York City from 1667-1850. The cart men dominated the city streets while proving politically adept at preserving and institutionalizing their economic and racial control over this entry-level occupation. The cart men possessed a hard-nosed political awareness, and because they transported essential goods, they achieved a status in New York City far above their skills or financial worth. The cart men’s culture and their relationship with New York’s municipal government are the direct ancestors of the city’s fabled taxicab drivers. This is a stirring street-level account of the growth of New York, growth made possible by the efforts of the cart men and other unskilled laborers.

——————————————————-

The year is 1910, over one hundred years ago. What a difference a century makes! Here are some statistics for the Year 1910:

  • The average life expectancy for men was 47 years.
  • Fuel for this car was sold in drug stores only.
  • Only 14 percent of the homes had a bathtub.
  • Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone.
  • There were only 8,000 cars and only 144 miles of paved roads.
  • The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.
  • The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower!
  • The average US wage in 1910 was 22 cents per hour.
  • The average US worker made between $200 and $400 per year.
  • A competent accountant could expect to earn $2000 per year, a dentist $2,500 per year, a veterinarian between $1,500 and $4,000 per year, and a mechanical engineer about $5,000 per year.
  • More than 95 percent of all births took place at HOME.
  • Ninety percent of all Doctors had NO COLLEGE EDUCATION!
  • Instead, they attended so-called medical schools, many of which were condemned in the press AND the government as ‘substandard. ‘
  • Sugar cost four cents a pound.
  • Eggs were fourteen cents a dozen.
  • Coffee was fifteen cents a pound.
  • Most women only washed their hair once a month, and used Borax or egg yolks for shampoo.
  • Canada passed a law that prohibited poor people from entering into their country for any reason.
  • The five leading causes of death were:

1.. Pneumonia and influenza

2, Tuberculosis

3.. Diarrhea

4.. Heart disease

5.. Stroke

  • The American flag had 45 stars.
  • The population of Las Vegas Nevada was only 30.
  • Crossword puzzles, canned beer, and iced tea hadn ‘t been invented yet.
  • There was no Mother ‘s Day or Father ‘s Day.
  • Two out of every 10 adults couldn ‘t read or write and only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated from high school.
  • Eighteen percent of households had at least one full-time servant or domestic help.

There were about 230 reported murders in the ENTIRE U.S.A.!

Letters 1/19/2013
UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE:
Just wanted to report that the double doors at OMMH (Our Dutch ancestors Old Mud Meeting House in Harrodsburg KY) are being milled as I type this. We tried to save as much from the 1970’s doors as we could. This is to preserve that period of history AND to help out on costs. There were some technical troubles, that has been what’s slowed this project down. Hopefully they will be hanging this winter! I’ll keep you posted.
NOTE:  The windows are now in and Jerry has promised to send photos once the doors are up
————————————–
DONNA GAINES (2013 Dutch Cousins Gathering Coordinator) will be flying to Indiana for the gathering, and was unsure of which was the best airport to fly in to before renting a car and driving to Madison.  Jon and I always enjoy the drive and have too much equipment to fly so I can’t help.  Advice from frequent flyers, please?
Also Donna said she would have the Registration forms for the gathering ready to send out in a couple weeks so be watching your mail for them.
————————————–

Ellen Stepleton of Lincoln NE:  I would be grateful to be included on the Dutch Cousins newsletter mailing list. My connection is a Banta ancestor, as follows: Hendrick Banta > Captain Daniel Banta > Henry D. Banta > Mary Banta of Switzerland County, Indiana (my great, great grandmother).

————————————–

Next Dutch Cousins Gathering!

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

————————————–

Jim Cozine <coz999@embarqmail.com> has purchased and shipped the new Dutch Cousin logo pins to Janice and Eddie Cozine so they will be available in Madison, since he may not be able to attend this year. Jim is donating the pins.  Someone is also working on a new T-shirt design. All funds go for further restoration of the Old Mud Meeting House in Mercer County KY, built by our ancestors more than 200 years ago, and where Rev. Claude Westerfield will conduct the worship services on Sunday Sept 22.  Jerry Sampson said (on Facebook this week) the windows have been installed at Old Mud and the doors soon will be.  He has promised to send photos for us to share.

 
Janice Cozine <jco@windstream.net>  has agreed to serve as Registration chairperson and I will be shipping her the box of nametags and other materials. The Lanyards, donated by the Lanyards Store, are in storage at the Harrodsburg Historical Society, Dutch Cousins Archives.
Donna Gaines <dgaines004@yahoo.com> is going great guns at getting things organized.  She has her speakers lined up and let me tell you Dutch Cousins Gathering 2013 is going to be one of the best gatherings we have ever had. Here are some of the tentative plans:

Our own VINCE AKERS agreed to be our Friday dinner speaker on “After Kentucky” and you KNOW you don’t want to miss that! Registration to pick up nametags, schedule, and maps will begin earlier on Friday the 20th.  At 1:00 Lynn Rogers is setting up a caravan tour to some Low Dutch historic spots. (Lynn is that wonderful guy who took care of the memorial stones for our veterans in 2011.) Business meeting will be at 4 pm, and then DINNER with Vince.
AT some point Pam Ellingson <ellingson.pam@gmail.com> will oversee the set up of family history tables so each family name group needs to be working on that. On Saturday Mary Jo Gohmann has agreed to present a 30-minute video presentation of our 2011 Cousins bus tour from Kentucky to New York.  What a challenge Mary Jo has! — to condense those 11 wonderful action-packed days into 30 minutes, but I am sure it will be good. Mary Jo had a new iPad on the trip and captured every exciting event, including the impromptu concert when our bus driver played the organ in those historic cherches.
 

Dr. Bob Schenck, our nationally and internationally known cousin the noted hand surgeon of Chicago, will speak to us on “Travels of a Dutchman with Genghis (Khan).”  His book, “Travels with Genghis,” is available on Amazon.com Dr. Schenck has published more than 47 articles regarding hand surgery. He planned to join us in 2011, but instead took off driving an ambulance 10,000 miles from London to Ulaanbaator, Mongolia, and then donated the ambulance to help support charity orphanages. Marcia Whitney-Schenck, his wife, is coming also. For more info on Dr. Schenck: http://www.midwestprs.com/midwestprs-blog-2/robert-r-schenck

We may have a professional impersonator for Saturday dinner, Sue Livers, performing as Mrs. Chapman Harris and “The Underground Railroad.”  Madison Ind was a center for the Underground, and many of our Dutch ancestors were involved in the activity of helping slaves escape cruel masters in the south.
Letters 1/21/2013

Jack Taylor, Kingwood, TX:

Louisville, KY is 50 miles from Madison, IN.  It’s a little closer than Cincinnati, OH. But, I don’t fly often, so I’m not familiar with either airport.
 ———————————————————–

Sorry for lhe late reply. Donna Gaines would want to fly into the Greater Cincinnati,Northern KY airport for Commercial Service. It’s in Boone County , KY,less than an hour’s drive to Madison, IN.

Rod Dempsey
 ———————————————————–
At Harrodsburg when they tore down the old courthouse a few years ago they took all those original circuit court records to Frankfort.  Since then, the Harrodsburg Historial Society has been trying to purchase microfilm copies of the records for researchers to use in the library. In the January newsletter They gave info on how that is going.  An anonymous donor recently contributed enogh to purchase ten rolls of the microfilm.  As of December 31st, the library has 220 rolls of the total 438 needed.  The microfilm costs $23 a roll and covers the years from 1780 to 1865. The Historical Society welcomes all donations earmarked for this purpose and reminds the money is tax deductible. If you want to donate, send your letter to Harrodsburg Historical Society, PO Box 316, Harrodsburg KY 40330.  I also encourage you to become a member ($20 a year) so you receive the newsletter every two months. Some great articles lately have included “”Turnpikes and Tollgates of Mercer County” and “A Short History on the Kissing Bridge.”  I have been involved with a lot of historical societies in different states, and this is one of the very best.

——————————————————-

(carolyn says:)  Was your ancestor a Cartman?  Gerrit Cozyntie COZINE (Cosynszen), 1640-1702, our 8th great grandfather was listed as a Cartman when he lived in the bowery section of Manhattan. (I think the source for Cozine as a Cartman was from one of Firth Fabend’s books, but my source info is missing.  I am hoping that Jim Cozine can fill in the source info.)

The cart men—unskilled workers who hauled goods on one horse carts—were perhaps the most important labor group in early American cities. Revised and re-issued in 2012,New York City Cartmen, 1667–1850 (NYU Press) uncovers the forgotten world of one-horse cart drivers who monopolized the movement of private and commercial goods in New York City from 1667-1850. The cart men dominated the city streets while proving politically adept at preserving and institutionalizing their economic and racial control over this entry-level occupation. The cart men possessed a hard-nosed political awareness, and because they transported essential goods, they achieved a status in New York City far above their skills or financial worth. The cart men’s culture and their relationship with New York’s municipal government are the direct ancestors of the city’s fabled taxicab drivers. This is a stirring street-level account of the growth of New York, growth made possible by the efforts of the cart men and other unskilled laborers.

Carolyn
My computer is locked up so this will be short.
1- re cartmen -look in Wooden Shoes  – many entries
From 1680 to 1709 showing Gerrit Cosyn and son Jacobus
As cartmen – all entries are from the minutes of the Common CouncilOf the city of New York 1675-1776
2- re Nutshell book by Firth -check out Pgs 106-07 – re more Cosyn Gerrittson
Jim Cozine
Sent from my iPad

——————————————————-

All:
The recent free book day, on 1/11/13 for the two volumes on Dutch Americans was quite successful. As a follow up another free day has been scheduled for Friday January 25, 2013.
BOTH BOOKS ARE FREE ON JANUARY 25, 2013
GO TO AMAZON KINDLE WEB SITE
 
TWO NEW ILLUSTRATED E-BOOKS ON PROMINENT DUTCH AMERICANS
Author: C. Carl Pegels, Professor Emeritus, University at Buffalo, SUNY
Both books are available from Amazon for $ 2.99 each at any time.
 
Volume I: Dutch American Achievers: Arts, Sciences and Sports
Volume II: Dutch American Achievers: Government, Military, History and Philosophy
The books are available from the Amazon Kindle store, click on it and put “Pegels” in the search box. The cost of each book is the price of a morning cup of coffee.
Also still available is the hard or soft copy of PROMINENT DUTCH AMERICAN ENTREPRENEURS at: http://www.infoagepub.com

 

——————————————————

We are so lucky to count FIRTH HARING FABEND, American novelist and historian, as one of us. Just google her name and see what you can learn about her work to preserve the Dutch Heritage. Fabend’s curiosity about the Dutch colonial period in New York and New Jersey was sparked at first by her learning that her father’s family had been instrumental in the settling of Rockland and Bergen counties, beginning in the 1680s. Fabend is a descendant of Cosijn (Cozine) Gerritzen Van Putten, through his daughter Grietje (Margriete) who married John P. Haring. Most of our group are descendants of Grietje’s brother, Gerrit.


“The Dutch American Farmer: ‘A Mad Rabble’ or ‘Gentlemen Standing Up for Their Rights?’” de Halve Maen (Journal of the Holland Society of New York), 63:1 (1990), 7-10.
“‘According to Holland Custome’: Jacob Leisler and the Loockermans Estate Feud,” de Halve Maen, 67:1 (1994), 1-8.
“Suffer the Little Children: Evangelical Childrearing in Reformed Dutch Households, New York and New Jersey, 1826-1876,” de Halve Maen, 68:2 (1995), 26-33.
“The Synod of Dort and the Persistence of Dutchness in 19th-Century New York and New Jersey,” New York History, 77 (July 1996), 273-300.
“William Bertholf,” American National Biography (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999). Also articles on four other seventeenth-century Reformed clergymen in ibid.
“Pious and Powerful: The Evangelical Mother in Reformed Dutch Households, New York and New Jersey, 1826-1876,” in Patterns and Portraits: A History of Women in the Reformed Church in America (Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 1999).
“New Light on New Netherland,” de Halve Maen, 73:3(Fall 2000), 51- 55.
“Church and State, Hand in Hand: Compassionate Calvinism in New Netherland,” de Halve Maen, 75:1(Spring 2002), 3-8.
“Noblewomen, City Women, and Grandmothers: Female Role Models for the Huguenot Woman in Early New York,” 400th Anniversary Commemoration of the Edict of Nantes (New York: Huguenot Society of America, 2002).
“’Nieu Amsterdam’: A Copper Engraving from the 17th Century,” New York History, 85:3 (Summer 2004), 233-246.
“Sex and the City: Relations Between Men and Women in New Netherland.” Revisiting New Netherland: Perspectives on Early Dutch America, ed. Joyce D. Goodfriend (Herndon, Va.: Brill, 2005).
“The Dutch American Farmer: ‘A Mad Rabble’ or ‘Gentlemen Standing Up for Their Rights?’” (revised version), The Hudson Valley Regional Review, 22:2 (Spring 2006), 79-90.
Letters 1/26/2013

Carla Gerding, Turner’s Station, KY
Louisville (SDF) generally has much much cheaper air fares than CVG and it isn’t that much farther. . . exit 34 off of I-71 to Bedford and follow US 421.  I would definitely check out both. . .Carla
————————-
Guy Montfort from ??
Just an FYI – Louisville airfares are often much cheaper than Cincinnati as Southwest flies there – many people from Cincinnati drive the extra two hours and fly out of Louisville to save money – it can be a huge difference in airfare
————————————-
Becky Vaught, Richmond VA
I would personally fly to Louisville, KY if I were going. Cincy is second choise depending on schedules
————————————-
Donna Gaines, (now moved and almost settled in Fallon NV)
Thank you all for your suggestions on where to fly into.  I guess the only thing left for me to do is to see which airport has the best flights and prices.  I will be flying out of Reno, NV, and greatly appreciate the time you took to reply to my query.
————————————-

Hi,
FYI only……..1/22/13

I tried to enter the ‘group code’ for the Dutch Cousins, on the hotel website, but nothing would come up. (it would say invalid)
I called and talked with someone this morning about ‘my’ reservations, just to be sure all was well.
They told me the code does not work and I could not check or verify any info through that site. A person would need to call.
They do have 15 rooms left for the DC group.
I will check on the best directions for the Cousins using Louisville Int’l Airport.
Louisville Airport IS closer than the Cincinnati  Airport.
Janice  Cozine  🙂

—————————————-
Last issue of the Letters, I asked for the source of information about ancestor Gerrit and Jacobus COZINE being Cartmen in Colonial New York/New Amsterdam.

Jim Cozine gives the source of “occupation: Cartman” as his book, Finding our Wooden Shoes, which refers to the minutes as quoted. He is now working on revising and updating his book, which is going to be a wonderful resource for all of us.

From Jim Cozine of Las Vegas:
re cartmen -look in Wooden Shoes  – many entries
From 1680 to 1709 showing Gerrit Cosyn and son Jacobus
As cartmen – all entries are from the minutes of the Common Council Of the city of New York 1675-1776

————————————-

Betty Jean and Richard Willerton   Anderson, Alabama

 
Saw in the Dutch Cousins UPDATE that Jim Cozine had donated the logo pins for the Gathering. What a wonderful idea!  Would you mind giving us the e-mail to reach Janice and Eddie?
  We (Richard is the Banta connection) won’t be able to attend. Rich has a blood clot in his right leg and is on blood thinner. He isn’t able to ride, therefore we must stay at home until this is corrected. We would like to contribute to the restoration of the Old Mud Meeting House. We could at least buy some of the pins, please?
Thank you,
————————————————————-
Click on this hotlink or copy and paste it into your browser:
 to watch a U-Tube video of Firth Haring Fabend titled “Cornmeal Mush and Other Myths: The Dutch Experience l…”(Independent Scholar), presents during the Henry Hudson, New Netherland, & Atlantic History Symposium @ SUNY New Paltz.
————————————————————-
Thank you, Carolyn, and also Jim for the nice plugs! I will be speaking tomorrow night at 7 at the Ridgewood Public Library in Ridgewood, NJ, on “The People of New Netherland: Roughnecks, Multi-taskers, Grandees, or All of the Above?”  Cosyn Gerritsen van Putten was very much a multi-tasker! Will be giving the same program at the Albany Institute of History and Art on Feb. 10 and at the Bergen County Historical Society on April 7. All to promote New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America. Only 125 pages! You can read it in a couple of sittings! 
Go to <www.newnetherlandinstitute.org>, the website will come up, and the ordering information is on the first page. You pay for it with a PayPal account. The book can also be ordered through my own website, <http://members.authorsguild.net/fhfabend/>
Firth
Big news today! You can now order New Netherland in a Nutshell: a concise history of the Dutch Colony in North America by Firth Haring Fabend and published by the New Netherland Institute in 2012 from Amazon. To go directly, click on  http://amzn.to/V824S1
—————————————-

Heaven on Earth: Shakers, Religious Revival and Social Reform in America

Siena College is accepting applications for Heaven on Earth: Shakers, Religious Revival and Social Reform in America. Two, one-week NEH Landmarks of History and Culture Workshops for 80 teachers (40 teachers per workshop) will be held in Albany, New York, July 7-13 and July 14-20, 2013. This workshop examines the history, culture and legacy of the Shakers in America.

Participants will engage in interactive seminars with scholars; investigate Shaker artifacts and primary documents at the New York State Museum and New York State Library and tour three historic Shaker sites: Watervliet Shaker Historic District, Hancock Shaker Village, and Shaker Museum Mount Lebanon. Throughout the workshop participants will brainstorm on how to apply their discoveries to curriculum and bring the fascinating history of the Shakers to life for contemporary students.

K-12 teachers in the fields of language arts, social studies, art, music, philosophy, and technology are encouraged to apply. Prior knowledge of Shaker history is neither required nor expected. Full-time and part-time classroom teachers and librarians in public, charter, independent, and religiously affiliated schools, as well as home schooling parents are eligible; other K-12 school personnel will be considered based on availability. Workshop participants will be awarded one $1,200 stipend towards program costs. For full program description and application procedures visit: www.siena.edu/shakerworkshop

Jennifer Dorsey, Ph.D., Project Director
Heaven on Earth: Shakers, Religious Revival and Social Reform in America
Email: shakerworkshop@siena.edu
Website: www.siena.edu/shakerworkshop

Please forward to any teachers who you feel may be interested in applying. Thank You

—————————————-

Carolyn,Would you please ask if any of our Dutch cousins live in the North Carolina area?  I would like to feel connected with them before the September gathering.

My name is Penny Kerhoulas (married a Greek).

I live in Mooresville NC, but am from Indiana and most of my Dutch cousins are still there. I have Demotts, VanArsdales, Hough (Huff), VanNuys, Terhune and Thompson, not sure about some of the others from Harrodsburg.

Letters 2/6/2013

from Judy Cassidy, Pennsylvania: I thought I would mention that I have an article being published in March in the North Louisiana History, a Journal of the North Louisiana Historical Association.  This article is about the Murder of William Demitt Vanarsdel as told to author John Ardis Cawthon by William’s natural son, Lucius in 1934.  Lucius was the son of William’s cook and ex-slave, Susie.  We feel, however, that Lucius and Susie are fictitious names used to protect them during times of racial strife. William Demitt Vanarsdale, who was the grandson of one of the Conewago Settlers, who moved with his brother Lucas, first to Mississippi and then William to Bossier Parish, Louisiana.  William was murdered in  1867.  In 1933 a well know author, John Ardis Cawthon interviewed William’s natural son, Lucius who was quite elderly at the time, regarding his father and the murder.  So this is a story with in a story. I was fortunate enough to have the imput of both Mr. Cawthon’s daughter and wife (who is now 95), but educators.  Elisabeth is the Associate Chair, Department of History, University of Texas at Arlington, so that was very fortunate for me.

I really would encourage members to do some research on family slaves if they know their name, because these people’s lives were often so intertwined that what effected one group, effected the other.

————————————-

While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave.

These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America’s military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin.

A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier’s family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect. Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.

A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the solider when he was killed.

According to tradition, the money left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for indigent veterans.

In the US, this practice became common during the Vietnam war, due to the political divide in the country over the war; leaving a coin was seen as a more practical way to communicate that you had visited the grave than contacting the soldier’s family, which could devolve into an uncomfortable argument over politics relating to the war.

Some Vietnam veterans would leave coins as a “down payment” to buy their fallen comrades a beer or play a hand of cards when they would finally be reunited.

The tradition of leaving coins on the headstones of military men and women can be traced to as far back as the Roman Empire.

__._,_.___

———————————————

FamilySearch.Org U.S. and Canadian Vital Records Recent Updates

The following U.S.A. & Canadian vital-records oriented databases have been recently added or updated at FamilySearch.org. The last updates were done in parts ranging from birth records on 19 November 2012 to Death and Probate records update on 11 December 2012. This blog updates all five of the Online Database groups (see below) through 24 January 2013.

We’ve also updated all five of the GenealogyBlog Online Database Links Files.
See:

  • United States Birth & Christening Records Found at FamilySearch.org
  • United States Marriage Documents & Indexes Found at FamilySearch.org
  • United States Death & Probate Records Found at FamilySearch.org
  • Canadian Vital Records Databases Posted at FamilySearch.org
  • USA State & Territorial Censuses and Tax Records Found at FamilySearch.org

——————————

Arphax Publishing Company, www.arphax.com, owned by Gregory A. Boyd, specializes in publishing the family maps series of land patent books for the United States and the Texas Land Survey Maps series.

Published books include a list of the original settlers in the counties of each state whose purchase is recorded and indexed in either the U.S. Bureau of Land Management database (www.glorecords.blm.gov) or the Texas General Land Office database (www.glo.texas.gov/cf/land-grant-search/index.cfm).
Each Deluxe edition includes: a state map identifying each county; alphabetical surname list; patent map with name of the patentee and the year applied for the patent; and three maps per township. The three maps are of homesteads and other land patents with the owner’s name; roads and rivers, creeks and railroads that existed in the time period.
Arphax recently published books for six counties in Illinois, Michigan and Texas. Boyd also owns the websiteHistorygeo.com.
For more information contact Arphax Publishing Co., 2210 Research Park Blvd., Norman, or call (800) 681-5298.

——————————-

The Albany Institute announces a public program – LECTURE AND BOOK SIGNING: Firth Fabend “The People of New Amsterdam: Roughnecks, Multitaskers, Grandees, or All of the Above?” Sunday, February 10, 2 PM 

Free with museum admission

Independent historian, Firth Fabend, is the author of the recently published book “New Netherland In A Nutshell.” She is a New York Council of the Humanities speaker and a Fellow of both the New Netherland Institute and the Holland Society of New York. Join her as she entertains and enlightens with her knowledge of people and
places of the seventeenth century Dutch colony of New Netherland.
Free with museum admission for this public program

 

——————————-

New Netherland Institute To Offer Prize For The Best Published Article

 

Beginning in 2013, the New Netherland Institute will offer an annual $1000 prize for the best published article relating to the Dutch colonial experience in the Atlantic world, with a special sensitivity to New Netherland or its legacy A committee of scholars will consider entries in the fields of history, archaeology, literature, language, geography, biography, and the arts. Entries must be based upon original research. Articles must be written in English and be published for the first time from 2010 to the present. Chapters from a monograph, works of fiction, and encyclopedia entries will not be considered. Both academic and independent scholars are invited to participate.

 

Prize-winning articles should make an important contribution to the understanding of New Netherland and its legacy, specifically or broadly defined, exhibit exceptional research and be well written. Submissions may come from self-nomination, an outside nomination, committee members, or in response to invitations to submit articles from committee members.

 

Four copies of articles for consideration (non returnable) may be submitted by the author, editor, colleague, or other interested party no later than March 1, 2013. Articles may be sent either electronically (nyslfnn@mail.nysed.gov) or in hard copy to the Article Prize Committee, New Netherland Institute, P.O. Box 2536, Empire State Plaza Station, Albany, NY 12220-0536. The winner will be notified by August 1, 2013 and the prize will be presented at the New Netherland Seminar in September.

 

If you have questions or comments about the article prize, please contact James F. Sefcik,  Trustee liaison to the Article Prize Committee at jfssrny@yahoo.com or by phone at 518-374-2747

 

 

——————————-

Technology changes rapidly. If we truly
want to preserve for the future the scanned family photo files,
stories we have written about ancestors, record transcriptions that we
have painstakingly created and any other archived files, we must
regularly take inventory to be sure that we have them stored on a
medium that can be read by current computer equipment.

Compact disks largely seem to be going the way of floppy disks. The
current – but maybe not for long – way we store portable files is on a
USB drive, also called a “thumb” drive or a “flash” drive. Many of the
newer computers do not have CD drives, especially the very small
machines like netbooks and the Mac Book Air. iPads and other tablets
don’t have CD drives or USB drives! Although they usually aren’t
employed as a primary computer, they are gaining popularity and the
soaring number of applications becoming available may change their
status in the future. The iPad or tablet may be tomorrow’s primary
computer for the average person, with cloud storage – storage on the
Internet – replacing USB drives and external hard drives as the
archival storage medium of choice.

—————————————————

Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands to abdicate for son


Continue reading the main story

Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands has announced she is abdicating in favour of her son, Prince Willem-Alexander

_65557748_jxqyrknv.jpg
Queen Beatrix (left) said her son, Prince Willem-Alexander (right) was ready to be king

 

Related Stories

Letters 2/10/2013

Next Dutch Cousins Gathering!

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013

Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

They have 30 rooms full of cousins, and have opened up a few more for us so if you have not already made reservations – better hurry!
———————————————————————————-
DUTCH COUSIN OFFICERS:
President: Claude Westerfield, Farragut IA
Vice President: John C. Westerfield, Chambersburg, PA
Secretary: Carolyn Leonard, Oklahoma City, OKC
Treasurer: Diana Davis, Jamesville, NC
Gathering Coordinator: Donna Gaines, Fallon, NV
Webmaster: Pam Ellingson2013 Chairpersons:

SILENT AUCTION – YOU?

GATHERING COORDINATOR – Donna Gaines
PUBLICITY – Carolyn Leonard
REGISTRATION & NAMETAGS- Janice Cozine  <jco@windstream.net>
TEE SHIRTS – Dennis & Carol Karwatka
HISTORIAN – Barbara Whiteside
FAMILY GROUP DISPLAYS – Pam Ellingson
LOW DUTCH REPOSITORY- Amalie Preston
NEWSLETTER FOLDING, STUFFING, MAILING – Louise & Randy Ledger
WORSHIP – Rev. Claude Westerfield
COUSIN SPEAKERS – Vince Akers, Mary Jo Gohmann, Dr. Bob Schenck
FRIDAY CARAVAN MASTER  – Lynn Rogers
DUTCH LOGO PIN SALES – Jay Westerfield
BOOK SALE & AUTOGRAPH PARTY – Joan Murray
VETERANS MEMORIAL – Mary Park
HOSPITALITY – Gene and Carol Heathcoat

———————————————————-

from Kathy Gillmore, Houston TX:

I grew up in Jeffersonville, IN which is about 40 miles downriver from Madison where I see you are having a meeting in September. We used to take fieldtrips to Clifty Falls Park when I was in school.  I never knew I was so “Dutch”–we always thought of the DeBauns as French Huguenots who went to Holland to avoid religious persecution. Now I see they were there for several generations, hence the Dutch cousins.
———————–
Letter from Amalie Preston with new Photos of Old Mud with the windows installed and inside dressed up.
Click here, or copy and paste in your browser:   http://goo.gl/OVcDD

from Judy Cassidy, bluebell, Pennsylvania

Carolyn, that first photograph of the interior of the Old Mudd really looks like a painting from Andrew Wyeth, our famous Pennsylvania and American painter.  It was breathtaking with the contrast of the red against the pews and walls.
——————————
Frm Peggy Mendoza, Golden Valley AZ
My Palatine ancestor was Johann Bernhardt (John Barney) Stagner.  1714-1777.  Arrived Philadelphia 1738 and by 1753 was in Rowan Co., NC.  on 7/13/1763 he and Daniel Boone were appointed as commissioners to lay a road from Shallow Ford on the Yadkin River to Salisbury.  Shortly before 1774 he had sworn his allegiance to the King of England.  When the Rev. war broke out, he felt that he couldn’t go back on his word to the King and his neighbors made it pretty hot for him, so he went with Boone to Kentucky in 1774.  He went on to Fort Harrod and was killed by the Indians there on 6/22/1777
——————————

 Teddi Essig, Lee’s Summit, MD:   Thank you for adding this Riker decendent to your Dutch letters MAIL LIST. This is through my husbands line. Do you have any van Dusens?  My Aunts first husband was Casper vanDusen and I an working on that line.

——————————
Rosalind Cummings, Los Angeles, CA:
Thank you  Carolyn for posting the photo’s of Old Mudd. I was nice to see the progress that is being made on the Meeting house.

——————————
From Pam Ellingson:
——————————
The Saint Nicholas Society of the City of New York
and
The Society of Daughters of Holland Dames
invite you to
A Paas Heritage Ball
A gathering of members of various Heritage Societies and their
friends to celebrate our shared interest in
the people and values that founded our great country
Friday, March 15th 2013
7:30 p.m to 11:30 p.m.
The Racquet & Tennis Club
370 Park Avenue, NYC
Dinner, Dancing and Open Bar
RSVP (212) 991-9944 or (212) 628-3060 White or Black Tie and Decorations
Tickets: $250
Patron Tickets: $500
Checks to be made payable to The Saint Nicholas Society
and mailed to The Saint Nicholas Society
20 West 44th Street, #508A, New York, New York 10036
All tickets must be prepaid and will be held at the door
—————————————

It’s been posted on a few lists but not everyone is aware that FamilySearch now has many NY Probate Records (wills and administrations) and Land Records (deeds and mortgages) on-line at their site:

Land:
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2078654

Probate:
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1920234

Those familiar with court-house indexes will have no problem finding what they want.  It’s a bit cumbersome, but a lot better than travelling across the state and paying for copies.

On Feb 19, 2013, at 3:19 PM, jacassidy22@verizon.net wrote:
This is the address for the family search land records, When clicked on you follow the directions and up comes the counties. Choose a county and then if you don’ t know the page number of the deed your are looking for, you will have a search but even a date will cut that down.  I found Lambert Dorland’s Brooklyn sale, as I had the page number which are the numbers along the side of the deeds.
You can save as well as print.  To the right of the sliding scale you will find – save, print or what ever.  These are really great because normally all you can get, if lucky are the excerpts.  In addition, you can put into a box a page number to search from, which will at least help you find a date.
Judy
———————————————–
Thanks to Bill Greer for this item:

Lambert Janse & Hermina Janse (Peters) Dorlandt

Lambert Janse & Hermina Janse (Peters) Dorlandt
        Lambert Janse Dorlandt was born in Amsterdam, Holland in 1639. He was the son of Johan Dorlandt; his mother’s name is unknown. In 1663, eleven years after his brother (or cousin) Jan Gerretse Dorlandt had arrived in America, Lambert sailed for America on the “Bontekoe” (Spotted Cow)- a vessel of the Dutch West India Company. The captain of this ship was Jan Bergen. No formal list of passengers on that trip has been preserved, but in the New York State Library at Albany there is still to be seen the original book of accounts, in Dutch script between the Dutch West India Co. and the passengers. Within a year or two of arriving in Brooklyn, New York he was married to Hermina Janse Peters, the daughter of Jans Peters in 1665. No birth or death dates have been handed down for her. She is mentioned in baptismal records as Hermia Janse and as Hermina Peters. Lambert first settled in Brooklyn and owned 40 acres of land which he farmed. Lambert also served as a Constable of Brooklyn in 1671 and later in 1673 as a Magistrate in Brooklyn.         In 1675 we find him as the defendant in a civil suit brought by one Robert Hollis, and set for trial at Gravesend, June 15. The nature of the trial is unknown, and the case was withdrawn without a trial.       On April 4, 1677, we find him signing his name Lambert Dorlandt as a witness to a disposition of two Indians, drawn up by Michil Hainelle, clerk of Brooklyn, attesting to the limits of a tract of land sold in 1686 by Sachem Ka to Jacques Bentyn and William Adriese (Bar)nett; and the incident is noteworthy from the fact the fact that original transaction in 1686 is accounted the first purchase of property looking to a settlement within the present limits of Brooklyn.         In 1680 he made an application for a grant of land on Staten Island to Governor Andros of the Colony, and he received it. I quote: “An estate most improved and fenced, and had on it a dwelling house, most comfortable as it had been the residence of the late Governor Lovelace; there was a gristmill and support for many cattle and sheep.” This was “A Patent for a Parcel of Land on the North East side of Staten Island Granted unto Lambert Janse Durland.” By looking at a map of Staten Island, one may locate the place at a point between the towns of New Brighton and Thompkinsville. Here they lived for eighteen years, and he seems to have attained and occupied a place of high standing in a very short time in his new country. For a number of years after their move in 1683, they still attended the Dutch Church in Brooklyn and did not sell their plantation there until 1696 when it was bought by Jacobus Van Deventer.         In September 1691 at a special meeting, Lambert was elected as representative of Richmond County to the Colonial Assembly which met in the city of New York; it was the first Assembly in which the popular representatives of the province convened under the direct authority of the English Crown. Lambert served several terms with other well-known Dutchmen such as Ressalaer and Cortlandt who were patroons with wast estates along the Hudson River. He was also a signer of the Protestant Freeholders of the Colony expressing their loyalty the Crown. His name appears many times among the old records of the government of New York.         In 1715 Lambert moved his family to Somerset County, New Jersey (near Harlington) where he purchased into the Great Lot 12 with Peter Cowenhoven whom he eventually bought out; this was a 9,000 acre tract of land owned by 17 Dutchmen mostly as an investment, but Lambert did build his home here and farmed the land, adding many more acres as they came up for sale. Here too is the burying place for 40 members of the Dorland family, and Lambert’s grave was marked by a “flat fieldstone projecting above the sod about 16 inches and carved with the outline of a ship (perhaps the Spotted Cow?) with masts and riggings; on the highest part of the mast is a flag with the initials “L.D.” and the figures “79”. The house is still standing, and there is a picture and description of it; in 1980 Judy Cassidy sent snap shots of it to John E. Darland after she visited Harlingen. That fall boy Scouts helped a Dorland descendant erect a fence around the burial grounds (John E. Darland was one who contributed money to pay for the materials they used). Dorlands occupied the house until 1772 when they followed other Dutchmen from their area to Kentucky or Pennsylvania. There is no recored of Hermina’s death, but Lambert died at age 79 in 1720.         Lambert was unquestionably a man of culture and education, and of much more than the average force of character. He bore himself well in all the relations of life in his day and generation; he filled worthily several posts of trust and responsibility confided to him by his fellow pioneers, and his name is honorably identified with the early history of King’s and Richmond Counties and the infant colony of New York

Children of Lambert Janse & Hermina Janse DorlandtGerret Janse b:1666Marritje (Mary) b:1672 Elsje (Elsie) b:1677 Jan (John) Dorlandt

Letters 2/27/2013

Dutch Cousins Gathering!  (There should be a link to the registration form at the bottom of this posting.)

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
They just opened a few more rooms up for us.
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

{NOTE FROM CAROLYN: I made my reservations to arrive on Thursday night thro Saturday night; then to Harrodsburg Sunday night and Monday since we will go there on Sunday for worship and Monday morning to research at Harrodsburg Historical Society Library. You can cancel at Clifty up to 4 days before the arrival date. You have to pay for the first night to hold the room, it is $112 plus tax at the group rate, $115 for the extra nights at the regular rate. Wow! A $3 discount – LOL  Make your reservations now and put the date on your calendar for next year. Stay tuned to Dutch Letters for more info as Dutch Cousins Gathering Co-ordinator Donna Gaines gets it together!

——————————————————————

NEW NETHERLAND INSTITUTE TO OFFER PRIZE FOR THE BEST PUBLISHED ARTICLE. For more information go to www.newnetherlandinstitute.org and click on the first item under ‘News and Events’

The New Netherland Institute in collaboration with the New Netherland Research Center has launched a new web site exploring America’s Dutch heritage at www.newnetherlandinstitute.org.
tantillomaquas140
In History & Heritage, explore Dutch America through documents, artifacts, people and places.  Currently featuring two new exhibits:  “Arent van Curler & the Flatts: How History, Archaeology & Art Illuminate a Life on the Hudson” and “Charting New Netherland: 1597 – 1684.”
CuracaoMap140
In Research, discover original documents through which scholars study the New Netherland era and its ongoing legacy.  Just published online:  A new translation of the memorandum book of Antony de Hooges, business manager of Rensselaerswijck, and an introductory essay by Dirk Mouw.
Beaver140
In Education, find tools for teachers and fun ways for students to explore on their own.  Now introducing lessons plans from the 2012 Summer Institute for teachers held at the New York State Museum – first in the series is “The Fur Trade: Contact and Commerce between Indians and Dutch Settlers.”
Nutshell140
In the new Shop, explore, celebrate, educate or just have fun with a basket of products related to New Netherland.  Newest Book: New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America by Firth Haring Fabend.  (The Shop now accepts Mastercard, Visa and American Express.)

——————————————————————

FROM RODNEY DEMPSEY, Shelbyville, KY
Super genealogy sleuth, Cousin Carolyn, I am in need of help. A retired Presbyterian Minster here at the Forum has asked me to find out something about the Ferree  family , who were Huguenots and probably married into the Dutch families, just like our DeMotte family did. The Frère’s settled in PA, but I am not sure they were in Adams County.  Anybody that can shed a little Light on this , please email me. I think I have retained in my file the address of the Huguenot  Society in New York, and will contact them, too. My new friends, Jim and Sarah Brown want to learn more about their Huguenot roots. We live in the Forum. Sarah tells me they are “not much” on the internet, so if you have any good Huguenots in PA sources, let me know, and I will pass them on. 
Cousin Rod
——————————————————————
UPDATE ON OLD MUD FROM Amalie Preston:

update on Old Mud doors.  The archway for around the double doors is in and was made of the wrong wood.  We sent it back and the replacement will be ready by March 4 at which time our workers will install the doors.  We are using mahogany for its weather resistance so that these repairs will last a long, long time. will send photos as soon as they are in place.

————————————-
From Carolyn
This is why (below) so many people hesitate to share information for fear of offending someone
I believe in sharing ALL info and letting each researcher weed out what they don’t like.

from Judy Cassidy:

Carolyn where did that information on Lambert Dorlant come from, there are so many errors, please print a retraction and suggest that they consult the Dorlant Enigma Solved for the correct information.
I am annoyed that you didn’t run it by me first before printing it.  We have no idea what the name of Lambert’s father was, he did not move his family to New Jersey, he did not live there, his eldest son was not Garret Janse, it was simply Garret, he did not die in New Jersey nor is he buried there.  Someone took bits and pieces of information, some from the Cremer book and patched them all together. This is terrible and you really should not be printing this kind of information.  I don’t have the time to go through and make the corrections, but the correct information is in Barbara’s book. Passing on incorrect information without checking further is irresponsible on your part.
——————————————————————
From Bill Greer/Mike VandeWoude:
Hi Judy, Sorry for the errors.  I actually pulled this data off of Ancestry.com.  I am trying to restore the grave site located in Skillman NJ.  It’s actually on the Crawford  House property which is a Halfway House for Women.  I’ve been to the gravesite, so some of this story is real?  I’m actually scheduling a meeting with Linda Leyhane who runs the program at Crawford House.  I’ve spoken to Montgomery Township, the Van Harlingen Society and anyone else who will help me restore the gravesite.  I’ve also written an email to the owner of the Dorlandt information published onAncestry.com – apparently they’re must be family members along the route somewhere publishing this information?  I did share the document with a couple of people at NNI as I recently joined as a Board Member.  I apologize for not knowing Judy Cassidy or the “Dorlandt Enigma”.   I’m confident you didn’t know Mike Vande Woude either – that’s me.  Nice to meet you.
Best Regards,

Mike

————————————-
Clifty Falls State Park
Stairs lead down a steep hillside, forming part of a trail, at Clifty Falls State Park.

Stairs lead down a steep hillside,
forming part of a trail, at Clifty Falls State Park.
National Park Service

Just west of Madison is Clifty Falls State Park. The park was founded in 1920, when an increased interest in outdoor recreation led to the creation of many Federal, State, and civic parks across the nation. The land’s natural beauty, with its four waterfalls and abandoned railroad tunnel, made it an ideal location for a park.

The 600-foot long railroad tunnel within the park dates back to 1852. While visitors to the park can no longer walk through the tunnel, there are informational signs along the trail that explain the history of the tunnel. It and other railroad related remnants in the park are known as “Brough’s Folly,” after John Brough, who led the failed railroad conquest. Had this section of railroad been completed, it would have been part of the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad.

Since its founding, the park has grown in size and now encompasses 1,519 acres. It features over 12 miles of trails, a campground, and a swimming pool. With many of the miles of trails in the park consisting of walking along, down, and through the creek bed and canyon, Clifty Falls State Park has one of the more rugged trail systems in Indiana.

The park is also home to Clifty Inn. The inn first opened at the site in 1924, offering park guests a convenient place to stay and rooms with spectacular river views. While in Madison to see the local Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in action during the Depression, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt stayed at the inn. A new, modern motel and pool replaced the original inn in 1964. After a devastating tornado ripped through the park in 1974, Clifty Inn was replaced again. Constructed in 2006 as part of a multi-million dollar park upgrade, the present hotel contains a restaurant and conference center and offers an outstanding view of the Ohio River.

Clifty Falls State Park is located at 2221 Clifty Dr., Madison, Indiana. The park is west of Downtown Madison off State Rte. 56 and State Rte. 62. It is open to the public from 7:00am to 11:00pm each day and offers numerous amenities including campgrounds, shelters, a nature center, tennis courts, swimming pool, and hiking trails. Daily admission for Indiana residents is $5.00 per car and for nonresidents is $7.00 per car. For general information about the park, call 812-273-8885. To make campground reservations, call866-622-6746 or visit Camp Indiana.

Clifty Inn, located within the park, offers lodging and its restaurant is open to the public. For more information about Clifty Inn or to make reservations, call 812-265-4135 or visit Clifty Inn’s website.

——————————————————————
Letters 3/11/2013

Next Dutch Cousins Gathering!

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013

Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.
———————————
from Lilly Martin who lives in wartorn Syria:
Attention all those who are researching, or interested in the Brouwer/Brewer genealogy.
 
I am planning to attend the next meeting in September.  I would like to prepare now a table display for that surname.  I have some ideas on how to share family history of that surname with all others attending and interested.
 
I would like to hear from anyone else who plans to attend the meeting, who is interested in this surname, and might like to correspond by emails, for the purpose of sharing information and planning the display of this family history.
 
I am not a descendant of those who went to Mercer Co, KY.  However, I have researched the entire Brouwer/Brewer family for 12 years and have a great understanding of the immigrant and most of his descendants, including the branch who left NJ to go to KY.
My own Brouwer ancestors remained in NYC until going to Missouri by 1830.
 
I don’t expect any long hours and hard work, just some sharing and feedback, so that I can make the best display of this surname.
 
However, because I live in Syria, there is a chance I would not be able to actually get to the meeting, but if I had a partner, or partners, who were corresponding with me, I could still provide my data and display plans, so that others could follow through easily and it would be shared with all.
 
Hope to hear back from anyone so interested.
Lilly Martin

———————————

from Mike Vande Woude of Maine:
Hi Carolyn, Not sure if I can make the September meeting as we usually are still in Maine.  However, is this all recreation or is there a meeting agenda for part of the weekend.  I love the fact that the New Netherland Institute is sponsoring some of the event… now that I’m on the Board.  Thank you for sharing the correspondence between Judy Cassidy and me J Each time I read it, I enjoy it more.
———————————
Larry Voreis, South Carolina
I hope you are doing well and surviving another midwest winter. All is well in South Carolina and I’m looking forward to April 1st, the start of another turkey hunting season.
Could you give me the e-mail address of Rodney Dempsey of Shelbyville. While researching the migration of Low Dutch families to Pennsylvania and Virginia in the early 1700s, I gathered some interesting information on the Fiere/Feree family, led by the matriarch Maria Warenbuer, widow of Daniel Feree. The Feree family were refugees from the Palatinate and fled to Bavaria and finally to England in 1708. Maria’s son, Daniel, and her daughter, Catherine, with their spouses and children, arrived in New York in the mass migration of Palatines 1708; Maria and the rest of the family followed in the next wave in June 1710. The Palatines were settled on Robert Livingston’s Manor in Ulster County, New York, but, being dissatisfied with the way they were treated by the English, they soon migrated to Pennsylvnia. Maria’s son, Daniel, and her son-in-law, Isaac Lefevre, purchased a 2,000-acre grant in Chester County (later Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1712. Their migration to Pennsylvania occurred at the same time many Ulster County Low Dutch families moved out of New York and settled about Philadelphia and in New Castle, Salem County, Pennsylvania (later Delaware). This migration preceeded by about 56 years the Low Dutch movement to Conewago. Several of these Low Dutch first-movers were among the earliest settlers in the Northern Neck of Virginia, in the 1730s, the Vanmeters, Newkirks, Hoods, Hoaglands, Deckers, Kuykendalls and others.
I have a fairly complete history of the Fiere/Ferree family that I think Mr. Dempsey will enjoy.
———————————
 from Jerry Sampson, Harrodsburg, KY
HI Carolyn,  Yes, I talked to Betsy and the library in Harrodsburg KY will be open Monday Sept 23rd 2013 for the LowDutchCousins to do some research.  Can’t wait for you to see Old Mud – OMMH.

———————————

Forwarded from Jerry Sampson:
Jerry,
Nice to talk to you today, and thank you for the information on the Harrodsburg Historical Society, for the setting up of a tour of the Mud Meeting House, and for the offer to pass on my email address to Carolyn Leonard.
Re the MMH tour–anytime on the Sunday or Monday, April 7 or 8, would be wonderful, as that would leave the morning of Tuesday the  9th for my visit to the Historical Society Library. Please ask whoever will be escorting me and my friend to email me.
And please pass my email address to Carolyn Leonard, along with a partial list of names of direct ancestors who once lived and/or died in Harrodsburg: DeMotte (Laurens and Peter ), Terhune (Garret and Maria ), Van Nuys ( Catherine and Isaac ), Quick (Verouchie), Thompson ( John Cornelius and Lucy Willia ), Henderson (Thomas, Jr. ).
Any information about any of these families would be so very much appreciated. I hope to see graves of some of them while in Harrodsburg, and understand that there are markers for some in the Fort.
I am looking forward to my visit to Harrodsburg , and to what I may discover anew about some of my ancestors who lived in Kentucky.
Thank you for your help.
Sincerely,
Ellie Burnaford

—————————————

From Justin Ferate of New York:
A group named The New Amsterdam Market is campaigning to create a new Public Market use for the former Fulton Fish Market at South Street Seaport. Their proposal is that the city-owned Fulton Fish Market Tin Building (1907) and New Market Building (1939) — two landmarks
of national significance — be restored & dedicated as a new wholesale and retail market that will anchor the South Street Seaport as a premier destination for  New Yorkers and visitors from around  the world. This would hopefully provide an antidote to the Howard Hughes Corporation’s proposal to refurbish nearby Pier 17 to include two big-box-size anchor tenants and several dozen other retailers within a glass-encased 250,000-square-foot mall. It would also hopefully provide an incentive for New Yorkers to actually come to the South Street Seaport.
There will be a Public Hearing on March 14, 9:30 AM in or near City Hall.
—————————————
Carolyn and Larry: My new friends are Rev. Jim Brown and Professor Sarah Brown, both retired. We live in the Forum, a retirement community in Louisville, KY My wife, Mary Lu and I, just moved here on Valentine’s Day.  I found out  at  breakfast their interest in the Forree’s, Bill’s ancestors.
Larry, they will be most interested in receiving your valuable research. I greatly appreciate your giving me the opportunity to send it to them.
Carolyn, you provide a very valuable Clearinghouse for all of us. The work you do for is wonderful,and very much appreciated.
I am going to let Jim and Sarah take it from here. They may introduce you both to Mr. Kalmy , who was recently inducted into the KY Agriculture Hall of Fame.  He too, is a Huguenot geneologist.
My Grandmother was a DeMotte Huguenot.
I am so happy things have worked out this way, and so quickly.
Thank you again, Larry and Carolyn.
Rod Dempsey
———————————————————–

Hi,

I’m writing to let you and your members know about a national Swedish Genealogy Workshop that will be held
in Lindsborg, Kansas, Sept 28 and 29.    The sessions will be led by genealogists from Sweden.  These genealogists
visit the U.S. each year but rarely come to the midwest.  In 2013, they make the one stop in Lindsborg, followed by
3 stops in California.

We appreciate you sharing this information with any of your members or patrons who might be interested.

Thank you so much.  Full details can be found on the website www.oldmillmuseum.org.  We are also happy to send
out posters and brochures if you would like.  Please feel free to contact me with any questions, 785-227-3595 or
lnoldmill@hotmail.com.

Best regards,
Lorna Nelson, Director
McPherson County Old Mill Museum
Lindsborg, KS 67456

—————————————————————–
————————————–

We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors, and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.

Have you read my book, Who’s Your Daddy?
U No U want to!

www.carolynbleonard.com

Letters 3/13/2013
Adoptees wanting to do genealogy in Oklahoma have a new possibility:
House Bill 1118, as authored by Rep. Wade Rousselot, D-Wagoner, creates the Oklahoma Truth in Adoption Act which, beginning July 1, 2014, would allow adult adoptees born in Oklahoma or their descendants to obtain a noncertified copy of their original birth certificates.

—————————————————
On Mar 13, 2013, Martha Boltz of Vienna Virginia wrote:

Sometime, send me the exact address of the cenetery at Pleasureville, please, and  of the meeting house…..if we ever get back down there, I’d like to go and see them.

Can’t wait to see the newsletter in my little hands — it is beautiful.  I  wish so much we could go, just don’t think Don will be up to it since his fall and hospitalization in January.  It sounds wonderful!!!! 

—————————————————

Posted on Dutch-Colonies mailing list:

marriage was not a sacrament in the Calvinist churches —
Reformed (including Dutch Reformed), the New England Puritans, etc.
It was, thus, a civil matter.
However, ministers could marry people, as well as could justices of the peace
or magistrates.
—————————————————
On Mar 13, 2013, at 9:11 AM, Jim Cozine of Las Vegas wrote:

FOr next newsletter? — Jim

Subject: Fwd: Obituary for husband..Quick Thinker…

A Woman goes to the local newspaper office to see that the Obituary

for her recently deceased husband is published.

The Editor informs her that there is a charge of 50 cents per word.

She pauses, reflects, and then she says, “Well then, let it read:  “Fred Brown died.”

Amused at the Woman’s thrift, the Editor tells her that there is a

seven-word minimum for all Obituaries.

She thinks it over and in a few seconds says, In that case, let it read:

“Fred Brown Died … Golf Clubs For Sale.”

—————————————————

From Tamara Fulkerson of Crestwood, KY:

This is a twitter link for a new feature on KHS app.
—————————————————–

From Ronnie Riker of  Southport CT:Does anyone know of The Emmet family…married to Riker

—————————————————
From Rod Dempsey, now of Louisville.
You all may be interested in reading this email below. Dennis  Gudorf has done a thorough job in researching the DeMotte family history back into the 16th Century.
The “Girl Cousins” visited the old DeMotte Castle a few years ago. Mary Howard has done a great job keeping our genealogy as descendents of our Grandmother, Lucy DeMotte Dempsey, together. We have a couple of family weddings coming up this year: Jonathan Gudorf/Izzy Mair and Craig Kleimeyer/(can’t find announcement of her engagement). These receptions will give us a chance to get together again. Some of us are getting old. We won’t be around for too many more. Although the younger generations may not have any interest now, some of us might be interested in learning about our  heritage, stretching back to the Revolutionary War (we re all eligible to be members of theDAR and SAR) and beyond.  

We have purchased grave markers of our Revolutionary War soldiers, Peter, son  of Laurens, and John, so of Peter,  
  at the Old Mud Meeting House, a Dutch Reformed Church  built in 1800. Most of you have heard of Shakertown, the Demotte’s gave land to them and some of the family lived there. Both Shakertown and the Old Mud Meeting house are in Mercer County. Since a lot of us plan to attend the reception at Beverly Burke’s  and Ricky’s for Jon an Izzy, it might be fun to take a tour to the Old Mud Meeting House, which is a Historical Shrine, and have lunch and a tour of Shakertown. It may be our only chance to see where our ancestors lived. Tours are also available at certain times, of the old DeMotte family home in Harrodsburg.  The Harrodsburg Historical Society is open during the week, and they have extensive histories of the early Dutch Settlers, which included the DeMottes.
Just a thought. 

—————————————————

From Janice HARDIN Oster in Louisville Ky

 Hi Carolyn –     Just to refresh you,  I met you & your husband several years ago at the Henry co Historical bldg in New Castle Ky one afternoon when you were there for a Low Dutch gathering over in Shelbyville I think –   I was there with my mother & father –  My mother & I were just beginning to getting serious about researching our SHUCK line on her side of the family & you were so helpful to us & took time to talk when you were on a limited schedule yourself –    You have kept me on your mailing list all these years & I really appreciate all the information you go thru & pass on –   You do a wonderful job & service to so many people –   –    I was stunned that someone could be so arrogant when  she could have just voiced her opinion or differing info in a polite manner –   Applause to Mike Vande Woude for his well written reply –      Thank you so much for everything you have sent me over the years  –

—————————————————

From Lynn Rogers:  The display of the 200 year old Ryker bible might be a draw for the reunion.

The 200 year old bible of Gerardus and Leah Ryker is now in the temporary custody of Lynn Rogers, Dayton OH, many thanks to Judy, daughter of Franklin Ryker, who stored it for decades.  Judy typed her father’s book.  The bible will be on display at the 2013 Dutch Cousins Reunion, indeed a rare opportunity for descendants.  Advice on scanning the family record pages and conserving the bible and also on permanent custody will be given by the Rare Books Section of the Indiana Historical Society. Images of the family record pages are included in Franklin Ryker’s 1976 book pages 112 thru 115; there is an error in the transcript for F-6 on p. 109.  Franklin’s book and a lot of other Ryker genealogical material will be available at the reunion.

When I put on the white cotton gloves and opened the bible to the front, the first surviving page had at the top “he marrieth Leah and Rachael.”  (*Gen 29*)  The bible belonged to Leah, and those two names are very common in the Ryker family.

Inside the front cover was a deed from Robert Balz(?) to Jarred Ryker, Sep 7 1842, Deed Bk U(?) p. 77; and an ad for a sale of John G. Ryker in the newspaper of Sep 6 1864.

—————————————————

If you have a good digital camera you can take a photo, without flash, and get a great copy that won’t harm the old Bible.

carolyn
—————————————————
From Donna Gaines, Fallon NV: Thanks for the information.  I have 2 of my family Bibles from different sides of my family, both are about the same age.  I would say if you could get digital photo’s that would be the best way.  I think scanning it would be too dangerous.  I’m not an expert, so hopefully someone will have a good idea.  You might be able to hold a ruler or something on the page to flatten it out a bit.  That is less harsh than laying it flat on a scanner.  Just a suggestion.  I think the spine is the most fragile thing along with the paper it was printed on.  My pages on the bibles I have are fairly thick for the family information, so it holds up better than the thin bible pages.

—————————————————

from Mary Park, Baltimore, Maryland:
What good news! I always wondered where the Bible was. Now I know it is in goods hands.
I can’t wait to see it.
—————————————————
From Donna Gaines, Fallon, Nevada:
Wow, digital photo’s to send around for people like me would be great too. That way we could look at the book without really touching it.  That’s great that it’s in Lee’s custody.  I’m excited to be seeing it soon.  Thanks for the information.
—————————————————
Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is:877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

————————————–
On Sunday we will go from Madison to Harrodsburg for an early afternoon worship service, and on the way we will stop at the OTHER dutch meeting house near Pleasureville in Henry County, built by our Dutch after they left Harrodsburg – and before they went to Madison. Called Six-Mile Meeting, the frame was discovered inside a barn a few years ago, then moved where it is now and restored as a wool and yarn shop.  We went there in 2007 when our gathering was held at Shelbyville and it is lovely.  Anyway, it is less than a hundred miles (two hours driving) from Madison to Harrodsburg, and since we think probably most people will be heading home from there, the plan is to caravan.  Having said that, if you don’t want to drive, I think we could ask if there are people who plan to return to Madison that evening and if they would take some riders to Harrodsburg and back. 
Vince has contacted the owners of 6 mile Meeting house, and has arranged to have it open when we caravan to Harrodsburg non Sunday Sept 22.  We are planning on 30 – 45 minutes for the stop, and Vince will give us a little history of the building,and area, etc.  After that, we will continue our journey, and stop at the 19th Hole restaurant in Harrodsburg, for a bite of lunch, in case anyone wants to join us there.  After that we will proceed to Old Mud for our church service which will happen around 2:30 PM.
——————————————————–
From Rodney Dempsey, Kentucky
Thank you, Lynn and Larry. 
Lynn, all of us who have participated to any extent in the restoration of the Old Mud Meeting House ad all the visitors from all over the world who visit there will benefit from the work you did and the money you spent, buying and setting the memorial stones of deceased Low Dutch  settlers who participated in the Revolutionary War. This will be a lasting tribute we Low dutch ancestors will always enjoy. 
Reverend and Mrs. Brown are waiting until spring arrives in Kentucky to visit Hammer Smith in Henry County. Hopefully their close friend, John Kalmy will be able to join them. Mr. Kalmy is an avid genealogist, the Brown’s are just beginning to develop a greater interest in their family trees.
Larry you must be one of the most prominent of the Low Dutch Genealogist. You have a great storehouse of information.  I would like to know more about you and your background. 
My email address is rod_dempsey@msn.com. My physical address is 137 Hillside Way, Louisville, KY 40243, telephone 502-384-6829. I am just a rank amateur at genealogy but, I find your research very exciting reading. 
If you ever come across any history of the Demotte Family, please let me know. I have many “blanks” to fill in.  I hope to meet and talk with you at  Madison Indiana at the Low Duth Reunion.
Thank you Lynn and Carolyn for putting us together.
——————————————————–
March 8, 2013 – Austin, TX. Online registration is now open for the 2013 Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference, scheduled for 21-24 August 2013 in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Register at http://www.fgsconference.org by 1 July 2013 for an early-bird discount. This year’s conference theme is “Journey through Generations,” and the local hosts are the Allen County Public Library (ACPL) and the Allen County Genealogical Society of Indiana (ACGSI).This year’s FGS conference offers an exciting opportunity for anyone interested in researching their family history. This conference will offer over 160 educational sessions on records, strategies, and tools for genealogists of all levels. Ten different sponsored luncheons will provide opportunities for networking.Session sponsors include FamilySearch, findmypast.comAncestry.comArchives.com, Fold3, Association of Professional Genealogists, Genealogical Speakers Guild, National Archives and Records Administration, and the Indiana Historical Society.——————————————————–

The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States

The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States, by Gary Boyd Roberts, represents a massive endeavor covering hundreds of works. These individuals, 688 in actuality, represent what the author calls the “gateway ancestry that links modern America to the ancient and feudal world.” As kings and conquerors had children, elder sons usually took the crown or leadership, while younger sons and son-in-laws received lands and titles. These had children, where again the younger siblings took lesser roles and lesser titles. In England, Scotland or Wales the younger sons and son-in-laws became leading merchants, lords mayor or aldermen, clergymen, Anglican bishops and early Puritan leaders, lawyers, bureaucrats, etc. It is from these lesser titles and positions from which come the “royally descended elite that settled the American colonies”

 
————
We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors, and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.
———————————————
Letters 3/21/2013

THE 2013 Dutch Cousins NEWSLETTER IS AT THE PRINTERS. Excitement is growing for the gathering in September in Madison, IN. I’m getting so excited I hope I don’t explode! The registration blank will be an easy pull out from the newsletter, for you to complete and send, so do it soon and we will be able to report as received on numbers coming and where from.

==========================================================
Talked to Diana Hand, Office Manager at the Jefferson County Historical Society Research Library in Madison. They are housed in a restored Railroad Depot, and it is a fantastic place with lots of info about the history of Madison and Jefferson county. No charge but they accept donations. You will want to include that on your list of places to visit, and perhaps there will be more information about what’s available there coming soon.
==========================================================

from John David Buckingham of Seabring, Florida:

Remember Dave and Bea (Cozine) Buckingham who were so much fun to be with in Shelbyville in 2007?

We lost Bea in 2009, but Dave came to join us at Harrodsburg in 2009 and he is still handling the online Cozine family tree. Dave has been fighting Parkinsons for some time now, but wait till you see what he sent for the cousins’ enjoyment. He parachuted out of a perfectly good airplane and thought it was fun!

 
Here’s what he said when I asked if it was okay to share:
Yes. that was my third jump and instructor said he would not let me solo.  That’s better, my speech recognition is working now.  I have always had a fear of heights also but it’s very easy when you are hooked to the instructor and he jumps.  You kind of have to go with him.  That was close to the top of my bucket list and several of the things I wanted to do require more coordination then I now have.  Barbara already saw the tape and I will not tell you what she said.  I’ve really enjoyed it (all three) and a winter member of the church wants to go with me when he gets back from Alaska.  We’ll have to see what God has in store for me.  Not because of, but since the jumps, my disease is progressing rapidly.  I just hope I can make Clifty Falls (bucket list). I have been blessed by knowing Bea and the rest of you crazy Dutch folks.  God will put us back together in his time, not ours.
 Love Dave
==========================================================
From Frances Johnson-Feldmann of Hoboken, NJ:

I have just confirmed that I am a descendant of Gerardus Riker who was a Dutch settlers in Kentucky.

 I am very interested in learning more of life in the Dutch colonies .
Please place me on the list for newsletters and events. How do I become a member and are their dues?
 I have been to web sites and have made plans to attend the meeting in September in Indiana.
I had been 2 years searching for information on my descendant’s via Geertie Charity Ryker (Gerardus Ryker Jr. was her brother, their father Gerardus died in the Revolutionary War) .
 I just  found the missing link to complete my line thought the Ryker Historical Society which led me to Peggy Mendoza and then she referred me to the Dutch cousins in KY.
 so thanks again.
NOTE: WELCOME Frances! Please send your complete contact info. I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone. We voted to require dues, but so far we have not needed to. Our biennial gathering in Kentucky registration and donations from cousins have kept us in the black.  You may be interested to know a special memorial service is being scheduled for Gerardus Riker Jr, veteran of War of 1812, to be held at the Cousins gathering in Madison Indiana this september. The newsletter with more information about the gathering will be mailed in the next couple of weeks.
 
==========================================================
 Oklahoma Tourism <OklahomaTourism@e.TravelOK.com>  Order your free guide –

==========================================================

from Ellie Burnaford of Kiawah  Island SC
Thank you for connecting me with Wanza in Oklahoma. We are starting an exchange of emails about our Henderson line in Mercer Co Kentucky. And I am attempting to connect with Penny for a long phone conversation about the mutual ancestors we share. So, finding you and the Cousins will make a big difference in my quest for “my people”, I can already tell. Just made my reservation at Clifty Falls and am looking forward to meeting all of my newly-discovered Dutch Cousins at the Gathering this fall.
==========================================================
from Mike Vande Woude of Skillman NJ:
Hi Carolyn. Thought you all might be interested in NNI.  We have a exciting new website. NNI focus is on learning about our Dutch heritage in the US from the beginning in 1609. I invite you to look at the website www.newnetherlandinstitute.org. It’s fascinating and interesting.
Best Regards,
MIKE
==========================================================

From Thomas Hill of Terrebonne, OR:

Hello Carolyn: Looking forward to the 2013 reunion, especially after missing the 2011 reunion. Franklin, Indiana is 75 miles NE of Madison, Indiana. If a group of cousins were interested in doing a semi-formal genealogy tour of Johnson County the day before or after the Gathering I would be happy to see what I could put together. Stops to consider would include the site of the original Shilo church, school and cemetery. Many headstones of our early cousins and family members are still legible. The cemetery appears to be all Dutch cousins. The Shilo church cornerstone with all the founding members names is all that is left of the Shilo church. In Franklin is the restored residence of Judge Banta and an interesting historical  society. The Hopewell church and community are a short drive from Franklin. Franklin is very close to Indianapolis. [Let me know if] If this pre or post gathering fun-trek is of interest. See you in September!!!! Tom Hill
NOTE: THAT’S a great idea Tom, Jon and I would love to be part of that if you get it together. We visited Hopewell Church (daughter of Old Mud) at Franklin a few years ago and were enchanted with the cemetery and all those familiar names and their story.  You know what – that might be a good place to consider for the 2015 Gathering, too.
————————————————————————-
 
UPDATE ON OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE FROM AMALIE PRESTON, Harrodsburg KY:
The molding that goes on the outer edge of the door jamb is being re-made.  It needed to be wider.  Will take a good final photo for you just as soon as it is installed.  We are having monsoon rains today–no outside work.  Hope Oklahoma is having some rain.
Other good news:  The Kentucky Dry Laid Stone Conservancy is holding their spring workshop at Old Mud and will repair a section of the cemetery wall May 5.
We are getting quotes for a good security system for Old Mud.  Vince Akers, bless his heart, has proposed to fund this.  You might get his permission before you print this?
Lastly, the Mercer County School System has scheduled a field trip to Old Mud (and other Mercer County points of interest) for the entire freshman class in April!  Isn’t this great?  A good step toward getting the next generation to love and respect Old Mud.
Amalie

————————————————————————-

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956.

——————————————————————–

From Howard Staats of Jacksonville, FL

I ONCE HAD MY NAME IN YOUR LIST.   i HAVE BEEN GOING ALL OVER THE COUNTRY TRYING TO GET GENEALOGY INFORMATION.
I DON’T REMEMBER IF  YOU MEAN ONLY “LOW STAATS.”  I HAVE USED MY “DAD’ WITH SEAN STAATS ,NEAR HOUSTON TEXAS AND HAVE ETABLISH OUR ‘LINK’ WITH  JAN PIETERZEN VAN HUSUM AND HIS TWO SONS TOOK THE NAME OF “STAATS” WHEN THEY TOOK THEY TOOTH OF ALLLEGENCIE WHEN BRITISH  TOOK OVER NEW AMSEREDAM AND “NEW YORK” WAS NAMED  I BEGAN TO  THINK I WAS REALLY A STEP SON TO THE “”STAATS” NAME. SEAN AND I LEARNED WE WERE RELATED .  MY GREAT,GREAT GRANDSTAATS  RELATED TO SEAN STAATS.  HE HAD TWO SONS AND THEY SPLIT .
IT HAS BEEN PROVEN VAN HUYSM THAT HE WAS FIRST IN NEW YORK AREA BEFORE ABRAHAM STAATS WHO LOCATED AROUNG ED AROUND ALBANTY.
[WISH YOU WELL AND CONTACT ANY TIME.          HOWARD ELLIOTT STAATS

——————————————————————–

From Firth Haring Fabend, author, of Montclair, NJ:
WE have a special invitation to a book signing and lecture at the New Amsterdam History Center in New york.
Dear Friends and Family,
I hope you can join us for a happy occasion!
Very best,
Firth
 
I can’t get the very impressive invitation to reproduce here, but you can find more info at  http://newamsterdamhistorycenter.org/support
Sponsored by the Consul General of the Netherlands and the New Amsterdam History Center
RSVP to Ashley Nemeth: anemeth@collegiatechurch.org  (212) 233-2312 
Wednesday-APRIL 10, 2013-6:00 to 8:00 PM
With the participation of two historians and notable authors on the history of the Dutch in America
Firth Haring Fabend
Independent Historian
NEW NETHERLAND IN A NUTSHELL
A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America
and
Evan Haefeli
Associate Professor, Columbia University
THE DUTCH ORIGINS OF AMERICAN RELIGIOUS FREEDOM
A Comprehensive & Nuanced History of a Conflict Integral to the Histories of the Dutch Republic,
Early America & Religious Tolerance
Reception
Q & A and book signing will follow
Consulate-General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
666 Third Avenue, 19th Floor
——————————————————————–
Our tour guide in 2011 New York city, Justin Ferate, sent the hotlink to these amazing photos of the big apple, from New Amsterdam days to the last century. As you look at the photos, remember how it looked when we were there September 2011.

<http://fineprintnyc.com/blog/evolution-of-new-york-city-part-1-1490-1900>

——————————————————————–
THE TUNNELS OF UNDERGROUND NYC

<http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2013/02/the-tunnels-of-nycs-east-side-access-project/100462/>

A huge public works project is currently under construction in New York City, connecting Long Island to Manhattan’s East Side. Deep underground, rail tunnels are extending from Sunnyside, Queens, to a new Long Island Rail Road terminal being excavated beneath Grand Central Terminal. Construction began in 2007, with an estimated cost of $6.3 billion and completion date of 2013. Since then, the cost estimate has been raised to $8.4 billion, and the completion date moved back to 2019. When finished, the line will accommodate 24 trains per hour at peak traffic, cutting down on commute times from Long Island, and opening up access to John F. Kennedy International Airport from Manhattan’s East Side. Collected here are images of the progress to date, deep beneath Queens and Manhattan

——————————————————————–

Letters 3/25/2013
We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors, and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.
——————————————–
THE 2013 LOW DUTCH COUSINS NEWSLETTERS ARE finally PRINTED AND THE PRINTING CHAIRPERSON (LOUISE LEDGER) IS SLAPPING ON ADDRESS LABELS & STAMPS! KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR MAILBOX!
——————————————–
From Lee Rogers, Madison, IN (Ryker descendant)
If anyone sends their snail address, I would mail them a Madison brochure.  Lots of great old architecture and interesting history here. I am a long time volunteer at the Jefferson county Historical Society.  I will try to be available on Friday  during the reunion and help with the archives ane library.  We have a lot of Ryker material and allied families, and some other genealogy material.  Also, bunches of local history stuff.  Also, Janice  Barnes at the Madison Jefferson County Library has bunches of geneology and local history  material.  They are open on Friday and Saturday.  I am interested in the Sedam family.  They were also Low Dutch with a spelling similar Seudym,?  Thanks.  Lee Rogers
——————————————–

from Sandy Flax, London, OH:

Hello Carolyn,
I’ve enjoyed reading your update, reports, etc. I am currently in transition, regular address-wise, but if you need, you can put down my new address. I will be moving there in a month or two, staying there (to avoid another year’s lease here) until I find the new home I’m looking for. If you don’t send hard copy, it’s ok, and am still happy to get the email updates. That’s another change. Thank you for all you do for everyone’s family history!

——————————————–
From Louise Ledger, Oklahoma city:

“On 15 Aug 1795, Samuel Durie signed a petition together with Hendrick Banta, John Smock, Albert Banta, Garret Dorland, Isaac Van Nuys, Cornelius A. Van Arsdale and Abraham Brewer, to The Classis of New Brunswick in New Jersey, requesting appointment of a minister “of our Low Dutch Reformed church by the consent of our Low Dutch Society at Salt River Mercer County, in the State of Kentucky, ” one who would preach both English and Dutch. It also stated that there were upwards of 40 children to be baptized. The Reverend Peter LaLabagh was sent as a missionary in 1796 and he organized the church that year. It was not until 1801 that the first building was erected on a plot of three acres near the Dry Fork of Salt River, purchased 22 Dec 1800 from David Adams. It stands facing the stream and has a graveyard area in the rear. Because of its construction of sticks and mortar between the uprights it became known as the “Mud Meeting House.” Presently located a short distant west of the Dry Branch Road, the church and cemetery are distant about 2 1/2 miles southwest of Harrodsburg.”Source: ” The Durie Family” by Howard I. Durie

——————————————–
Alice Hostetter of Spokane Valley, Washington:
Hi, Carolyn:I am wondering if you could recommend a good researcher in Switzerland Co., IN? I have had conflicting information on the deaths and burials of my ancestors, Abraham Smock and Mary (Polly) Stagg Smock. Some
information said they died and were buried in Harrodsburg, PA and other info said it took place in Switzerland Co., IN. A lady at the Harrodsburg Historical Society found no records there. I did find that Mary lived in Pleasant, Switzerland Co., IN in 1850 (1850 census) in the home of her daughter, Jane Padget. I assume that Abraham died prior to that. Mary was 75 years old.
I thought you might be a good resource for getting this information.
Thanks for any help or suggestions you might have. I’m looking forward to the reunion in September.
——————————————–
From Ruth Oneson, Edmond OK

Here are some Great Genealogy Web Sites to play with (very DAR)

——————————————–
Remember the old “Home Demonstration Clubs” around the nation, sponsored by the County Agents of rural America in the 1950s-2000, probably as early as 1910.  Now they are call the “HOME AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION”.  OHCE is working with a volunteer who trains cadaver dogs to locate unmarked graves in Oklahoma County cemeteries.
Jan Beattie and the team recently discovered over more than 100 unmarked graves at Benge/Old Pioneer Cemetery located north of Memorial on County Line Road in Oklahoma County, OK
The cemetery had been previously surveyed using dowsing techniques.
The cadaver dog team was also helpful in identifying unmarked graves at the Union Soldiers’ Cemetery.
The society hopes to learn the identity of the soldiers and have military monuments erected for these soldiers.
For more information about the society and cemetery project go to www.ohcegenealogy.com, email Jan Beattie at jan80@sbcglobal.net or call 513-4014.
——————————————–
From Kerin Smith of Wichita Kansas:
Hi Carolyn:  I have yet to be able to manage attending the Dutch Cousins gathering, somehow just never can work it out.  But I will eventually, it is high on my “bucket list”.
We have visited several times in Franklin, Ind. and it is always a learning experience.  The folks at the genealogy museum are wonderful, have been so helpful to me in the past.  We found lots of great information there, helped me piece together my line in the Covert family.
The Shiloh cemetery is a great stop.  Many of my great (etc) grandparents lived in this community.  The Low Dutch folks that settled that community married into my Winchester and Good families which brought my grandmother Eleanor Good Henderson to us.  The discovery that my GG grandfather John Winchester died in the area when a well caved in on him was not one of the happier revelations.  He is buried in Shiloh with his first wife Harriet Bruner Demeree.
Anyone who plans to visit this area should read the “Making of a Neighborhood” document by D.D. Banta.  I am a descendent of the first daughter of Henry and Antjin (Demeree) Banta, Rachel and her first husband Theodorus Williamson and their only daughter Maria (Williamson) List.  Maria and George List”s daughter, Margaret (List) Demaree is the “Aunt Peggy” mentioned in the above writing.
I have not been inside the Hopewell Church, but have spent a lot of time in the cemetery there.  Anna, widow of Isaac Covert, and her son Simon and wife Mary (Voorhies) Covert are buried there.  Good Covert info in the genealogy museum there.  There is also a stained glass memorial window in the Hopewell Church to Simon and Mary Covert.  I am really wondering what other memorial windows are in this church!  If anyone finds that out, please post the information and photos for the rest of us.  The book on the Hopewell history has lots of great stories and information in it, and can be accessed at the genealogy museum as well.
On my first visit to Shiloh, the discovery of the legible stones of Serril and Mary Ann Winchester were like visiting old friends.
I have visited Old Mud several times, and would love to see the restoration process.  Can’t wait to see the remains of that gorgeous pulpit dumped in a pile on the floor of the church restored and standing upright.  Will get there again eventually.
——————————————–
FROM: the Making of a Neighborhood 26 May 1887 by D. D. BANTA.
After the close of the (Revolutionrary War) many of the [LOW DUTCH} set their faces to the Western sun, ultimately took up their abode in Kentucky, most of them at the first in Mercer county. It is doubtless true the original purpose when they left New Jersey was to cross the mountains sooner or later, and it is certain this was accomplished as soon as it became apparent the Kentucky pioneers by thrir numbers, gave promise of protection from the Indians. Doubtless there was more than one migration into Kentucky from Conewago but all were connected by ties of nationality by a common faith and most of them were akin. Of these old Conewago families that moved to Kentucky the following are familiar as househod words to all of us:  BREWERS, BRUNERS, BANTAS, BICES, BERGENS, CARNINES, COVERT,S DEMAREES, DEMOTTS, LAGRANGES, LISTS, LUYSTERS, MONFORT, SHUCKS, SMOCKS, VANNUYSES, VANARSDALLS, VANDIVERS, VORISES.
——————————————–
From Wanza Merrifield, Ponca City, OK:
I  wrote for and received the Harrodburg Quarterly–July/Aug, 2011, asking for the pg. about the Mann candlesticks. I thought the info about the Smocks and VanArsdales might be of interest to your readers. I will type it here for your readers:
THE MANN CANDLESTICKS
By Dianna Rose
 The Mann candlesticks are about 171/2 ” in height, have a graceful baluster turning and a well proportioned broad base which is octagonal in its footing.  They were given, by my father’s eldest and favorite Aunt Cordelia “Delia” Anna Mann (1847-1813), to the father and mother of Mr. Lloyd Bolton Mann, jr. of Beech Grove, Indiana, on their first visit to Primrose Hill Farm, the Mann homestead (now the Sherwood country Club property) following their marriage (01 Oct 1910).
Aunt Selia told my mother that these candlesticks had been a wedding present to her own grandfather and grandmother when they were married 18 Dec 1823.  As this great-great grandfather (Andrew Curry Mann) had married Sallie Smock, whose mother had been born Ann (or Anna) Vanarsdall (etc.) and whose grandmother had been Sally Fontaine, there is a good possibility that the candlesticks could have been the gift of either Jackson Mann (1775-1858) and his wife Mary Adams Mann (called “Sally” 1778-1823): or John Smock, jr. and his wife Anne Vanarsdall  Smock.  Anyway, according to my father’s beloved “Aunt Delia’, the candlesticks came to Indian Primrose Hill Farm in 1825 when her grandfather, John Jackson Mann ) left Ky. because of the slavery issue.
The  SMOCKS, Van ARSDALES, and other Dutch-French Hugeuenots were much opposed to slavery. Witness the erstwhile, “Slave Gallery” which the Manns, Adamses, and other leading presbyterians incorporated in the Old Mud Meeting House when they altered it to suit their own needs.
——————————————–
FROM Ruby Bishop Ingram, Glendale KY:
Here is a salad recipe from me-the dressing won’t be skinny but is out-of-this-world good!
Use bow-tie or rotini pasta, cherry or grape tomatoes, green pepper, red onion and cucumber in the salad and then I use Kraft roasted red
pepper italian dressing or the sun dried tomato italian dressing. Unbelievably delicious.
When I asked for more detailed directions, here is what Ruby said: “I just sort of pitch it together, depending on the amount I need and

if it is just for me or many.  Assemble the amount of ingredients you need and add a little bit of the dressing at a time about an hour
before serving-stir again right before serving.  You can judge how much dressing you need by the way it looks-not too dry nor too weepy.”

So there you have it!

——————————————–
Rick Steves EUROPE:

Amsterdam’s Virtues and Vices Dance Cheek to Cheek

——————————————–
from the HARRODSBURG HISTORICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER “OLDE TOWN LEDGER” Jan-Feb 2013
An anonymous donor contributed ten rols of Mercer County Circuit Court Records on microfilm. We apreciate all donations! Our total as of December 31 stands at 20 rolls of the total 438 needed. These records were removed from Meercer County to Frankfort and are available on microfilm only for $23 per roll. The records cover the years from 1780 until 1865. Please consider a TAX DEDUCTIBLE donation. Additional purchases will be acknowledged in future ledgers.
——————————————–
Letters 3/31/2013
THE 2013 LOW DUTCH COUSINS NEWSLETTERS ARE finally PRINTED AND THE PRINTING CHAIRPERSON (LOUISE LEDGER) IS SLAPPING ON ADDRESS LABELS & STAMPS today! KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR MAILBOX! We pared our formerly 800-member mailing list down to 475 – but that is still a LOT of stuffing, sealing, and slapping. After all that work – DON’T YOU DARE throw that newsletter away! After you are finished reading it and copying the registration blank to send in, pass it on to someone who may be interested, donate it to your local genealogy society or historical society or public library.
——————————————–
Our Mission Statement
We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors, and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.

——————————————–

From Lynn Rogers of Dayton, Ohio
Re:Alice Hostetter of Spokane Valley, Washington in Dutch letters 03/25/2013.
I presently have {my brother] Lee Rogers’ copy of:
Wanda L. Morford (deceased), Switzerland County, Indiana Cemetery Inscriptions 1817-1985, Cincinnati OH, 1986 (out of print).
The index has Smock p. 344 & p. 364 (the only Smock entries).
p. 344 has:  (Pleasant Grove Cem) Smock, Joseph E., son of J. & N., d. Feb. 23, 1868; aged 3y 6 m 4 d; down.
p. 364 has: (Zion Cem) Smock, Hattie Ann, wife of Wm. G., d Feb. 8, 1865, aged 25 y 6 m 1 d.  Clarra Jane, dau of W.G. & H.A., d May 18, 1865, aged 9 m 14 d.

——————————————–
From James Streeter of Scottsville, KY:
Carolyn,
I might be of some help to Alice Hostetter with Mary Stagg Smock, my great aunt. I have the same results as she has as to where Mary lived in 1850, with her daughter Jane and her husband John Padget and family. In 1860 US census, Jane, family and mother Mary moved to Shelby tsp, Jefferson County, IN, Mary is 84 years old. In 1870 US census, Jane and youngest son move back to Pleasant tsp, Switzerland County, IN and are living with daughter Mary Buchannan and family, sans husband John and mother Mary.
The only answer is to go to Jefferson Court House, find the death records, find the Shelby property if they owned it, find all the cemeterys in a 5 mile radius, and walk the cemeterys. In 1880 US census, Jane Padget is living in Ripley County on a farm, can,t find her in 1900 as yet. I will be looking in September or sooner, as my grandparents, James D. and Mary Reynerson Stagg are buried in Ripley County and they have lost their monuments also.
jim Streeter,
Carolyn, you may forward.
——————————————–
Frim Alice Hostetter of Spokane Valley, WA:
Hi, James & Carolyn:
 Thanks so much for your reply. I have been so busy this last week with church music (being an organist) I had to shelve this temporarily. I guess now my next thing to pursue is research in Jefferson Co.
 Thanks again,

 

——————————————–
from Martha Roach, Edmond, OK
carolyn,
i transferred to the OKC VA hospital in 1956.  for almost a year, i was housed in their nurses dorm, but it was later closed and i rented a furnished room from ibby (elizabeth. i think) bruner,
just east of the hospital on NE 14 or NE 15th.  was she one of those DUTCH COUSINS?
——————————————–

Attention all you wandering Dutch Cousins!!

One of the certain highlights of our Dutch Cousins Gathering in September will be the tour of Low Dutch sights in Madison and Jefferson County Indiana on Friday afternoon.  This will be a comprehensive tour, lasting about two hours with stops.  Carla Gerding (after I twisted her arm up around her neck) checked into chartering a comfortable coach with PA system, so that everyone could relax and enjoy the tour and be able to hear each tidbit of narration. Lynn Rogers, who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge near Madison, has scoped out the Dutch history, checked out the possibilities, mapped out the roads and even did a test drive or two.  He agreed to handle narration, while Carla is taking charge of transportation.

This tour is a first-come, first-served event, and we are only chartering one 48 passenger bus. In the past, our bus tours were filled to overflowing with last minute attendees and some were very  disappointed. Don’t let it happen to you!  Sign up now by sending your check for $18 per person to Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane,Turners Station KY  40075. (this bus tour was organized too late to include in The registration, so it is an extra charge. 47 passenger motor coach is $650.00; 55 passenger $750.0 plus Driver gratuity, but by all of us sharing the cost it can be affordable. Any extra funds will go into the “Saving Old Mud” fund.)

——————————————–
From David SMOCK of Florida in regard to CONEWAGO
Hello Carolyn,
Since the demise of Arthur Weaner, the Dutch Cousins will be pleased to know that Don Lott has stepped in once again to do what he can personally to support and oversee the maintenance of the two Low Dutch cemeteries in Conewago, which are of such great historical and genealogical importance to all of us.  The task is, however, greater than one man can manage on his own, but if everyone contributed even a modest sum to support this worthy cause, then we could rest assured that the cemeteries would be preserved in good condition for everyone to visit and appreciate. 
Tax deductible contributions may be made by check, payable to the Low Dutch Cemeteries Improvement Fund, and sent to Don at his home address:
Donald J. Lott
140 Westview Drive
Elizabethtown, PA 17022-9794
I have dealt with Don Lott for years and can vouch for his integrity and dedication to the preservation of the Low Dutch cemeteries.
 Best regards to all,
David Smock
Florida
 
NOTE from Carolyn:  I have been working hard to get our Low Dutch ancestor’s graves listed correctly on findagrave for this cemetery. The site is free. Use this hotlink to see if your ancestor is there: http://goo.gl/f09ef   Thank you so much our cousin David Smock for posting this information.
=================  
From Ruby Bishop Ingram, Glendale, KY:
Easiest Peanut Butter Fudge EVER
2 cups sugar
1/2 cup milk
¾ cup peanut butter
1 tsp. vanilla
Bring sugar and milk to a boil and boil for 2 ½ minutes.  Remove from
heat and stir in peanut butter and vanilla.  Pour into pan or pie
plate that has lightly sprayed with Pam and let cool slightly and then
slice. Recipe can also be divided in half and boil for 1 ¼ minutes instead.

——————————————–

From Tamara Fulkerson of Crestwood, KY:

Series of Cemetery Preservation Workshops in Southern and Eastern Kentucky
:http://kentucky.gov/Newsroom/history/KHS+to+Host+Series+of+Cemetery+Preservation+Workshops+in+Southern+and+Eastern+Kentucky.htm
Date      : Monday, March 25, 2013
Issued By : Kentucky Historical Society
Summary   : This spring and summer, the Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) Cemetery Preservation Program will host a series of 10 workshops throughout southern and eastern Kentucky to help Kentuckians preserve their local cemeteries.

————————————————————————————

From Martha Roach of Edmond, OK
dear carolyn,
This week in the, MILITARY OFFICER magazine my husband receives, there is an article on a partnership of the VA and Ancestry. com, to index the cemetery ledgers and make the information abaiable to the general public.  The records include the name, rank, company/regiment, date of death, age at death, date of burial, and grave number of the deceased. these ledgers, mostly are from the National Archives and Records Administration.  There are some 9,300 pages and 113,000 individual records  from the Civil War through the mid 20th century of servicemembers interred in national cemeteries.  these handwritten records are now preserved through this process.
————————————————————————————
(Correction from last Dutch Letters:  HARRODSBURG HISTORICAL SOCIETY (HHS), Kentucky, HAS 220 (TWO HUNDRED TWENTY – not just 20) of the 438 rolls — 217 more rolls needed.)
from the  HHS NEWSLETTER “OLDE TOWN LEDGER” Jan-Feb 2013
An anonymous donor contributed ten rolls of Mercer County Circuit Court Records on microfilm. We apreciate all donations! Our total as of December 31 stands at 220 rolls of the total 438 needed. These records were removed from Meercer County to Frankfort and are available on microfilm only for $23 per roll. The records cover the years from 1780 until 1865. Please consider a TAX DEDUCTIBLE donation. Additional purchases will be acknowledged in future ledgers.
——————————————–

Mardel’s Expresso Book Machine Opportunity!

*Mardel Christian & Education stores, nationwide.

Great idea for limited edition printing of family genealogy!  You could do it in time for the gathering in September.  (Note I have no connection with Mardel’s and this is not a paid ad, just wanted to pass on the info in case someone has their family info ready to print and is not sure how to move forward with it)

Have you seen the Espresso Book Machine at Mardel’s store? Mart Green opened the first Mardel retail location on June 1, 1981 in Oklahoma City, OK. Currently there are 35 retail locations across seven states including: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Lousiana and Texas.  If none of these are near you but you are interested, just search for “expresso book machines” or something similar – Books Printed In Minutes At Point Of Sale For Immediate Pick Up Or Delivery.

I didn’t get to see the book machine in operation, but just the thought of it is exciting. Sounds like it would be perfect for someone wanting to do a limited printing of a genealogy book. Cost? The base rate at Mardel’s is $5 plus four and a half cents per page; a 100-page book would cost $9.50 per book. They say the EBM prints most books in about five minutes. You can watch as they print it and then they just hand it to you – hot off the press. I think they offer both hardbound or softbound. They have locations all over the US.  Read more about it here: http://www.ondemandbooks.com/

——————————————–
You gotta SEE this truck!  I think it was built by a DUTCHMAN!
 YOUR next DIY project?
——————————————–
Letters 4/8/2013
BUS TOUR OPPORTUNITY

Attention all you wandering Dutch Cousins!!

One of the certain highlights of our Dutch Cousins Gathering in September will be the tour of Low Dutch sights in Madison and Jefferson County Indiana on Friday afternoon.  This will be a comprehensive tour, lasting about two hours with stops.  Carla Gerding (after I twisted her arm up around her neck) checked into chartering a comfortable coach with PA system, so that everyone could relax and enjoy the tour and be able to hear each tidbit of narration. Lynn Rogers, who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge near Madison, has scoped out the Dutch history, checked out the possibilities, mapped out the roads and even did a test drive or two.  He has agreed to handle narration, while Carla is taking charge of transportation.

This tour is a first-come, first-served event, and we are only chartering one 48 passenger bus. In the past, our bus tours were filled to overflowing with last minute attendees and some were very  disappointed. Don’t let it happen to you!  Sign up now by sending your check for $18 per person to (Bus chairperson) Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane,Turners Station KY  40075. This bus tour was organized too late to include cost of the tickets in the registration package, so it is “in addition to”. 

——————————————-

From Janice  Cozine  🙂  Dutch Cousins Registration  Chair
Hi to Everyone,
It’s still early,  but the registration forms are starting to come in.
Don’t wait…..send yours in today!
Hope everyone received their News Letter and is planning on a fun-filled Dutch Cousins Gathering.
Our early bird registrants so far are;
John & Phyllis Westerfield from PA.,  Frances Johnson-Feldmann from NJ.,
King & Sharon Cole from TX.,  Joan & Richard Murray from IL.,
Alice Hostetter & Jan Whaley from WA., and Eddie & Janice Cozine from KY.Looking forward to September!!

——————————————-

THE 2013 LOW DUTCH COUSINS NEWSLETTERS ARE finally PRINTED AND THE PRINTING CHAIRPERSON (LOUISE LEDGER) IS SLAPPING ON ADDRESS LABELS & STAMPS today! KEEP AN EYE ON YOUR MAILBOX! We pared our formerly 800-member mailing list down to 475 – but that is still a LOT of stuffing, sealing, and slapping. After all that work – DON’T YOU DARE throw that newsletter away! After you are finished reading it and copying the registration blank to send in, pass it on to someone who may be interested, donate it to your local genealogy society or historical society or public library.

——————————————-
(From Carolyn Leonard, OKC)
LOOK AT WHAT I LEARNED HOW TO DO TODAY!
Let me know if this works for you!  This should open quickly, especially if you are on broadband or higher speed internet. You should be able to click on the picture of the Dutch Cousins newsletter on my website and then it expands to full screen and you can read the full newsletter IN COLOR without downloading or anything. PS – the newsletter is much more impressive in color. The officers have tried it out with no problems and say they enjoyed seeing the newsletter that way.  Let me know if you try it, what type of computer and browser you use.
Click here:
Next:  How to fill out the registration online and pay with paypal.  That may happenb in time for the NEXT Dutch Cousins gathering in 2015!.
——————————————-
from Don Large of Florida:
CONEWAGO COLONY LOW DUTCH CEMETERY:
Tax deductible contributions may be made by check, payable to the Low Dutch Cemeteries Improvement Fund, and sent to Don at his home address:
Donald J. Lott
Low Dutch Cemeteries Fund
140 Westview Drive
Elizabethtown, PA 17022-9794
 To facilitate future communication (receipts for donations, status report, etc.), please ask donors to provide their e-mail address to Don Lott.  Thanks.
NOTE from Carolyn:  to see if your ancestors are listed there at the Conewago cemetery, google the free sitewww.findagrave.com, then search for “Northern Low Dutch Cemetery” in Pennsylvania — or click this hotlink:http://goo.gl/f09ef   I have Donald Lott’s  email address and phone, if you need it send me a request.
——————————————-
Reservations as of April 1 2013 at CLIFTY INN for Dutch Cousins Sept 20, 2013. We don’t know who the two rooms are reserved in the name of Dutch Cousins.  Only three rooms left in our block so if your name is not on this list, better get your reservations in quickly.  There are several nice places to stay in Madison, including some B&Bs.  Let us know where you have reservations if not at the Clifty Inn.
136544 Akers, Vincent
143324 Anderson, Renee
148173 Burnaford, Eloise
147362 Cole, Sharon
137795 Cozine, Janice
143532 Cozine, Larry
144103 Cozine, Sheila
142720 Demaree, Anna
133296 Dutch Cousins, .
146717 Dutch Cousins, .
140220 Ellingson, Pam
136748 Gaines, Donna
142749 Gohmann, Mary Joe
138779 Heathcoat, Donley
137761 Hostetter, Alice
148025 Johnson, Francis
141389 Karwatka, Carol
137737 Leonard, Carolyn
138740 Merideth, Barbara
142752 Metcalf, Sharon
142325 Murray, Richard
142311 Park, Mary
137882 Pranger, Janice
142985 Reynerson, Marc
143495 Ryker, Steve
146959 Schenck, Robert
147462 Schwetke, Cathy
147783 Swaim, Nancy
142798 Taylor, Jack
143588 Villines, Jeff
136540 Voreis, Larry
142753 Walker, Johnnie
138838 Westerfield, Gerald
138017 Westerfield, Jay
138708 Westerfield, John
138117 Westerfield, Larry
143090 Woodfill, James

——————————————-

Nominations now being accepted for the 2013 Kenney award for contributions to colonial Dutch studies and to undertstanding the Dutch significance in North America.  Deadline is April 8th.  Details below.

The New Netherland Institute is the recipient of an annual grant from the Alice P. Kenney Memorial Trust Fund. This grant now enables the Institute to award an annualprize of $1,000 to an individual or group which has made a significant contribution to colonial Dutch studies and/or has encouraged understanding of the significance of the Dutch colonial experience in North America by research, teaching, writing, speaking, or in other ways. Reasonable travel expenses will be reimbursed. Persons or groups to be considered for this award can be involved in any pursuit of any aspect of Dutch colonial life in North America. Emphasis is on those activities which reach a broad, popular audience in the same way that Alice P. Kenney’s activities did.

For more information and application process go to www.newnetherlandinstitute.org

Nominations:
Candidates for the award can be nominated by members of the New Netherland Institute, by historical organizations, or by the general public.
Nominations should be in the form of a nominating letter or statement (1-2 pages long) detailing how the nominator became aware of the nominee, which of the nominee’s activities led to the nomination, how those activities qualify for the award, and what the perceived impact is of the nominee’s activities.
Nominations may also include illustrative materials which demonstrate the nominee’s activities such as maps, brochures, photographs of exhibits.
Nominations may also include up to three one-page letters of support from other persons.
Three copies of all material must be submitted.
Selection:
The winner shall be selected by a three-person committee consisting of two members of the New Netherland Institute and a representative of the Alice P. Kenney Memorial Trust Fund.
The committee shall consider (1) if the nominee qualifies for the award, (2) how significant the nominee’s contributions are, (3) how large the audience is, (4) how great the chances are for continued influence, and (5) whether the materials are historically accurate and based on the most recent primary and secondary research.
——————————————-
(next year) From the Holland Society, via Jim Cozine of Las Vegas:

The Netherlands Just in Time for

The Holland Society Plans to Return to
Tulip Season in April 2014
Exploratory conversations are now underway to return to the Netherlands, our first
trip since the highly successful Society sponsored trip to the Netherlands in 1999. As
your President I would like to explore how many members may wish to join this marvelous
trip utilizing a Viking/Holland America barge commencing in Amsterdam and visiting
a host of small communities and larger cities that possess major museums, beautiful
botanical gardens, as well as historic sites that date back to the 1600s, and the many
windmills that dot the countryside. The trip would start and end in Amsterdam. Usually
buses meet the members at the airport and provide transportation directly to and from
your accommodations on the canal barge.
Many of you enjoyed earlier trips to the Netherlands, and this trip promises to be
full of fun, camaraderie, great meals on and off the barge, and returning each evening for
cocktails and dinner and time to enjoy each other or just catch up with your reading or
correspondence.
Kindly provide the information requested below and send us a return e-mail so
that we might gain a list of the members who wish to explore the possibility of visiting
the Netherlands at the height of the annual tulip season. Based on recent trips for 7 to 10
days, the cost is about $2,500 pp, which includes all accommodations and meals plus
transportation to historical sites and gardens away from the barge. The stated costs do
not include the cost of airline fares to and from the United States and Amsterdam. Exact
dates, costs, etc., will be forthcoming if there is enough interest.
Sending each of our Members, Fellows, and Friends every best wish as spring
arrives,
Charles Zabriskie, Jr.
President
NOTE:  Jon and I went there in 1995 (can that REALLY be eighteen years ago?) and still treasure the memories of that trip. The beauty of the Keukenhoff Tulip Gardens is something everyone should see at least once in their lifetime!

——————————————-

The Society of Daughters of Holland Dames
Descendants of the Ancient and Honorable
Families of New Netherland
Directress General, Mrs. Peter Kimmelman
Board of Directors and Patroonesses
Invite you to attend
The 119th Annual Meeting & Tea
for
Members, Associates & Invited Guests
Wednesday, April 24, 2013
Two to five o’clock p.m.
The Colony Club
Program
“Dutch-Influence in New York Silver”
Speaker: Mr. Adam Brandow, Specialist for Christie’s
The Meeting Will Take Place in the Small Ballroom on the First Floor
Please be Prompt
R.S.V.P. Acceptances Only by April 19, 2013 The Colony Club
Mrs. Ellan Thorson, Corresponding Secretary 564 Park Avenue at 62nd Street
ellanwt@aol.com or 410.268.9249 New York City
Although Contributions are Welcome, this Event is Free to Holland Dames Members, Associates and Invited Guests
——————————————-

From Louise Ledger of Oklahoma City (and mailing chairperson for Dutch Cousins!), descendant of DURIE,  Jean Durier   1654-1698

Jean Durier, the first Durie family in America, was baptized 12 November 1654 in the Walloon Church, Utrecht, Holland, son of Pierre Durier and Marguerite Charoy.

Jean Durier, came to America shortly before 1686 and joined the Huguenot Colony founded by the Demarest family on land along the east side of the Hackensack River in what is now New Milford in Bergen County, New Jersey. On 27 July 1686, Jean received a Patent from the Proprietors of East Jersey for a tract of 261 acres of land west of the river in what was the Essex County, later made a part of Bergen County in 1710; lying partly in present River Edge and Paramus. He established his home on the easterly part in present River Edge, at a site between the early “Kinderkamack” Road and the river.

Jean married either prior to his arrival or shortly afterward, Jeanne Hersulier. She died about 1691 after the birth of their second child (Pierre) and was buried in the French Cemetery in New Milford. Jean married in 1692, Rachel Cresson, widow of David Demarest, Jr. She was born about 1656 in Delft, Holland, daughter of Pierre Cresson and Rachel Close. After the second marriage, Jean lived on the Demarest land on the east side of the river in present New Milford, where he resided until his death. According to the church entries at the time of their marriage, the four children were all born in “Hackensack” intended to mean within the jurisdiction of the Dutch Church at that place.

Jean Durie and his two wives (Jeanne Hersulier & Rachel Cresson) were members of the French Protestant Church established on the Demarest Colony about 1682 and which existed until 1695. At its dissolution, he and his second wife joined the Dutch Church at Hackensack by letter 10 July 1696. He was elected a Deacon there on 22 May 1698, but died before he was ordained. Jean acted in a legal capacity of his two Demarest step-children, as their guardian and trustee in the management of the large amount of land they inherited from their grandfather, David Demarest, Sr, in 1693. Because of his educational background and status in the community, he was appointed a “Justice of the Bergen County Court” on 5 Febuary 1693.

Jean Durie died in June 1698 shortly after making his last will and testament on 10 June which was proved 2 Sept at Perth Amboy. In it he mentioned his second wife and the four children. He was buried in the French Cemetery with his first wife Jeanne Hersulier.  Rachel married 25 April 1702 at Hackensack, Roelof Vanderlinda, widower of Susanna Brinkerhoff, of Teaneck, where she and her family subsequently lived. She is believed to have died prior to 1719.
Source: “The Durie Family” by Howard I. Durie

——————————————-

Check gas prices by town or zip code anywhere in U.S. — it is FREE.

http://www.kmov.com/traffic/gas-buddy

——————————————-

Getting it wrong makes your research better

By getting your research wrong, realising it, and correcting it, you end up being a far more diligent researcher. Having got it wrong once, you know the pain and embarrassment of sawing off large boughs of your family tree, and then staring at the weedy twig that’s left behind.

Letters 4/29/2013
To print out a copy of the registration blank for the Dutch Cousins gathering in September, double click here:  http://goo.gl/CBB83
Just FYI – So you remember to say thank you to your leaders this year…
2013 DUTCH COUSIN OFFICERS:
President: Claude Westerfield, Farragut IA
Vice President: John C. Westerfield, Chambersburg, PA
Secretary: Carolyn Leonard, Oklahoma City, OKC
Treasurer: Diana Davis, Jamesville, NC
Gathering Coordinator: Donna Gaines, Fallon, NV
Webmaster: Pam Ellingson, Lakewood, WI
2013 Chairpersons:

WELCOME – Barbie Abbott Hammon, KY

  HOSPITALITY – Gene and Carol Heathcoat, TX
SILENT AUCTION – John C & Phyllis Westerfield,PA
GATHERING COORDINATOR – Donna Gaines, NV
PUBLICITY – Carolyn Leonard,OK
REGISTRATION & NAMETAGS- Janice Cozine, KY
TEE SHIRTS – Dennis & Carol Karwatka,KY
HISTORIAN – Barbara Whiteside, IN
FAMILY GROUP DISPLAYS – Pam Ellingson, WI
LOW DUTCH REPOSITORY- Amalie Preston,KY
NEWSLETTER FOLDING, STUFFING, MAILING – Louise & Randy Ledger,OK
WORSHIP – Rev. Claude Westerfield,IA
COUSIN SPEAKERS – Vince Akers,IN; Mary Jo Gohmann,IN, Dr. Bob Schenck,IL
FRIDAY CARAVAN MASTER  – Lynn Rogers,OH
DUTCH LOGO PIN SALES – Jay Westerfield,IN
BOOK SALE & AUTOGRAPH PARTY – Joan Murray,IL
VETERANS MEMORIAL – Mary Woodfill Park,MD
———————————————–
Don’t forget — Next DUTCH COUSINS GATHERING:

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371

Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

——————————————–

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956. They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.

——————————————–

Send your check for the Friday bus tour of Madison area Indiana; narrator Lynn Rogers who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, Tour chairman Carla Gerding. This is a late add-on so the $18 is in addition to registration.

You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send to 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075 — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round … 

———————————————–

Posted on Dutch-Colonies mailing list:

Marriage was not a sacrament in the Calvinist churches — Reformed (including Dutch Reformed), the New England Puritans, etc. It was, thus, a civil matter.
However, ministers could marry people, as well as could justices of the peace or magistrates.

———————————————–

To send an email with info to share in the next issue of Dutch Letters, just hit reply and enter the message you want to share.
———————————————–
A DAR officer friend sent this following info knowing I would be interested, and I think my cousins will be too.  This site will be helpful in proving Revolutionary war service for your ancestor, so you can become a member of descendants organization.  Often you KNOW they were involved, but PROVING it is something else.
Genealogy Committee Policy 2012-06, Revolutionary Service Based on Payment of Taxes, describes which tax lists are accepted to prove patriotic service.  The Policy manual is available on line, click on the Genealogy Tab on the SAR home page, and go from there.  Basically, if your lists meet certain criteria, then they will be accepted. Compatriot John Sinks has conducted a great deal of on-going research in this area, so expect modifications (expansion) of the tax list after Leadership  meetings.

Larry P. Cornwell, Genealogist General

Chris  Smithson, Historian, MDSSAR, asked: Is there a current listing of which state tax  lists that the SAR is currently accepting? I know of New Jersey,  Maryland and Pennsylvania.
———————————————–
Here is the schedule so far, but it will probably change a little:
 Sept 20th FRIDAY— 9 am: Memorial Service for Low Dutch Veterans of 1812 War at Clifty Inn
10 – 2  Coffee, Registration at Clifty Inn Meeting room,  Set up family History Tables, Pick up nametags, schedules, etc.,  Set up Silent Auction items, Prepare for business meeting. Lunch on your own.
1:00 BUSINESS MEETING;
3:00 Caravan tour to Dutch settlement near Pleasant Church: 5:30 return
(alternative: Bill Demaree of Madison will lead a walking tour of beautiful Historic Downtown Madison and the Ohio Riverfront area, maps at desk if you prefer to go on your own)
7:00 pm: Dinner Buffet at Clifty Inn; Speaker — Vince Akers – “After Kentucky–Migration to Indiana”
————————————————-
*  Sept 21st-SATURDAY — 9:00 a.m: coffee – Clifty Inn Meeting Room,
10 am Welcome by Mayor, Meet your Cousins, Family Genealogy tables, Networking, Silent auction
Noon lunch: Speakers: Dr. Bob Schenck “Travels with a Dutchman”
Video “Dutch New York by Mary Jo Gohmann;
4:00-5:00 pm- Book sale & Autograph Party; 5:00 pm-Silent Auction ends.
7 p.m. Dinner buffet  – Speaker – Patsy Harris – “Low Dutch & the Underground Railroad”
——————————————–
*  Sept 22-SUNDAY — 9 am Checkout & leave Clifty for Caravan to Six-Mile, Pleasureville, & Harrodsburg KY
10:30-11:30  History talk at Six-Mile by Vince Akers.
12:45 Lunch at 19th Hole, Harrodsburg KY.
2:30 pm Worship at Old Mud Meeting Hs, Harrodsburg, KY, Rev. Claude Westerfield – PUBLIC INVITED
 Sept 23-Monday 10to3 — Free Research time at Harrodsburg Historical Library for cousins.
—————————————————————————————–
From Robert Banta of Sarasota, FL:

………..Joseph BANTA is the site administrator of the MyFamily.com Banta website and has been doing Banta genealogy for decades. We discussed the possibility of attending the next meeting of the Dutch Cousins in September so I wanted to be sure he is on your mailing list.

———————————————–
FROM COR SNABEL, new subscriber, in the NETHERLANDS

To me it’s amazing to see graves as old as 1750 or even older. Here in the Netherlands a grave from 1950 is an rare exception. Because we have so little space in our overcrowded country, one can only rent a grave for a limited time. We know two kinds of graves, the general grave and the private grave.

 In a general grave, which is most common, two or three people are buried, who were usually (during their lifetime) strangers to each other. They each have their own small gravestone close to each other. After ten years these graves are removed to make place for someone else.

 The private grave or family grave is also rented, but one can rent it for  10, 20 or 30 years. After that period the rent can be extended with another 10 or 20 years. And the contractant is free to decide who will be buried there. There are only a few eternal graves. Those graves last until the graveyard stops to excist. But that option is no longer possible.

In those days (the 1600s) most people were buried inside the church. And as close to the altar as possible. Those around the altar were of course the most expensive graves. Suicides, non-baptized babies, heretics and those who died by the hand of the executioner, were not allowed to be buried inside the church. They were buried in a special part of the graveyard next to the church. The other part was for the poor.

The graves were not emptied, which caused a lot of problems, especially inside the churches.

The church authorities had to perform divine services on a regular base, but also a growing number of rich families, who wanted their relative to be buried inside the church. So they had to store the corpses till there was an opportunity for the funeral. If the city was struck by an epidemic, the problems were huge. During the divine services even perfume was not effective enough, so the situation was unbearable. Authorities decided, that the funerals would be performed in the evening, after all services and masses were over.

It lasted until Napoleon occupied the Netherlands and he declared an offical ban on church funerals in 1804. When the French left in 1813 people started church funerals again, but in 1829 king Willem 1 signed a law against burials inside the church. New graveyards had to be outside the city, although some of those have already been ‘swallowed’ by city expansion.

———————————————–
From Jim Cozine of Las Vegas:
Carolyn for the Dutch cousins
Next Tuesday at 10AM the Netherlands will have a new King –
Willem-Alexander – for the first time in 122 yrs.
30 April 2013 is Troonswisseling Day ( Throne Exchange Day
aka Investiture)
Now since he only has 3 daughters his oldest girl, Amalia, will become
the Princess of Orange- heir to her father’s crown….
just google it for more details.
Jim
———————————————–
Currently reading: Killing Kennedy – by O’Reilly. (Had the audio version which is good, but put me to sleep every time. Give me a hardcopy!)

Gave up on Reading: The Harvey Girls – Women Who Opened the West by Lesley Poling-Kempes (slow reading, tedious)

Just finished: The Harvey Girls – Women Who Civilized the West by Juddi Morris (EXCELLENT)

Just Reviewed on my webpage: http://goo.gl/xg2in
Short nights of the Shadow Catcher: the epic life and immortal photographs of Edward Curtis by Timothy Egan (WONDERFUL!)

** Read my book reviews on Amazon at http://goo.gl/195Gi   or on my webpage: CarolynBLeonard.com

Letters 5/6/2013
Mary Woodfill Park, Veterans memorial Chairman, announces the 2013 Dutch Cousins gathering will have a special memorial ceremony honoring Low Dutch veteran Gerardus Riker/Ryker, Jr. who served in both the American Revolution and in the War of 1812.
The ceremony will take place at 9:00 A.M. on Friday, September 20, at the Clifty Inn in Madison, Indiana.
Descendants will be special guests and include members of the DAR, SAR, Society of the War of 1812 and U.S. Daughters of 1812.
The Publc is invited to attend. A facsimile of the marker will be on display at the memorial, with placement at Gerardus Riker’s actual grave on Ryker’s Ridge at a later date.
——————————————
FREE BOOK = ONE DAY ONLY IN CELEBRATION OF THE NEW DUTCH KING, INAUGURATED  the last day of April this year, THERE WILL BE ONE DAY WHEN YOU CAN GET AT NO COST TO YOU on one day only – Monday may 6, 2013: DUTCH AMERICAN ACHIEVERS: ARTS, SCIENCE AND SPORTS, 2012 Kindle Edition, available at the Amazon Kindle store on the web.
To access the E-books, google:  Amazon Kindle Store, then insert Pegels in search box.
If you don’t have a Kindle, Ipad or Nook reader you can access the book by googling the  Amazon Kindle store, and download a free program which lets you use your home computer or laptop as an E-book reader.
Happy reading !!!

Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President
New Netherland Institute
——————————————
The KEUKENHOF GARDEN Tulips are in full bloom. Most beautiful gardens  in the world. Jon and I were there in 1995 – hard to believe almost 20 years ago – but I will never forget how beautiful they were.  Thank you, cousin jean simon, for sending those stunning photos. In the 15th century, this place – Keukenhof -was the palace garden. It is easy to see how the beautiful tulips came to dominate the lives of our Holland ancestors after being introduced in the 1590s. Tulip mania quickly followed with selling of tulip bulbs as the first STOCK MARKET, and a single bulb could sell for thousands of dollars – as much as the price of a house. The market collapsed in 1637– hmmmm that’s around the time our first Cozine is found in New Amsterdam – and he was a farmer.  Wonder if there is a connection?
——————————————
To all Dutch Cousins,
For those interested in a Dutch TV news summary of the events of 30 April 2013 in the Netherlands (abdication of Queen Beatrix and investiture of King Willem-Alexander), please refer to the following web site:
Met vriendelijke groeten,
David Smock
Florida
——————————————
Don’t forget — Next DUTCH COUSINS GATHERING:

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371

Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

——————————————–

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956 or800-559-2956. They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.

——————————————–

Send your check for the Friday bus tour of Madison area Indiana; narrator Lynn Rogers who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, Tour chairman Carla Gerding. This is a late add-on so the $18 is in addition to registration.

You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send to Dutch tour leader Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075 — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round … 

———————————————–

From Janice Cozine, Dutch Cousins Registration Chair for Sept 20-22, 2013
Registrations received so far are;
Gerald & Nancy Westerfield, Dennis & Carole Karwatka from KY, Sharon Metcalf from KY, Larry Westerfield from TN, Lee Rogers & Wanda Jackson from IN, Jon & Carolyn Leonard Heavener from OK, William and Ann Riker from SC, Barbara Whiteside from IN, Janice Pranger from IL, Pam Ellingson from WI.
STATES that are represented (so far) are:
KY – 5, TN – 1, IN – 3, OK – 2, SC – 2, IL -3, WI – 1, PA – 2, NJ – 1, WA – 2, TX – 2.
Looking forward to seeing everyone in September!!
Janice Cozine 🙂
———————————————–
To learn more about our Dutch heritage in the US from the beginning in 1609, look at the website www.newnetherlandinstitute.org.
———————————————–
JUST INFO FOR YOU TO THINK ABOUT
THINK before you give. 
The American Red CrossPresident and CEO Marsha J. Evans’ salary for the year was $651,957 plus expenses
MARCH OF DIMESIt is called the March of Dimes because only a dime for every 1 dollar is given to the needy.
The United WayPresident Brian Gallagherreceives a $375,000 base salary along with numerous expense benefits.
as compared to:
The Salvation ArmyCommissioner, Todd Bassett receives a small salary of only$13,000 per year(plus housing) for managing this $2 billion dollar organization. 96 percent of donated dollars go to the cause.
TheDisabled American VeteransNational Commander receives a$0.00 zero salary.
Your donations go to help Veterans and their families and youth!
St. Jude Research Hospital100% goes towards funding and helping Children with Cancer who have no insurance and cannot afford to pay.
——————————————
My total hip replacement surgery is this week at St Anthony’s Bone & Joint.
Looking forward to getting the operation over with, getting back on my feet and getting rid of the wheeled walker assistant, so you may not hear from me for a few weeks.
If you get concerned, my daughter’s email is Mills Judith & Geo <gjmills@cox.net>.  Can’t wait to be walking again and busily rescheduling those writing workshops and teaching the genealogy classes that have been postponed since last August, and selling books. My legs are wobbly from lack of use!. I try to keep a stiff upper lip (Low Dutch & old New England English heritage you know).  Most of all, I am counting on seeing my Dutch Cousins in September. I’m thankful for walkers — and oxycodone– and friends.
We are not expecting any problems, but just in case — Donna, Janice and Barbara each have a copy of the Dutch mailing list, updated to a couple months ago, and everything should be ready to go for the cousins gathering in September.
Hugs, carolyn
———————————————–
Letters 5/8/2013
See Great new photos and an update from Amalie Preston of Harrodsburg showing the work that has been done since we were there,
 Click here   http://goo.gl/64aCf
———————————–
From Mary Jo & John Gohmann of Floyds Knobs Indiana:
Dear Carolyn and Cousins,
We are so sorry to have to cancel our reservation at Clifty Falls for what sounded like a great suite. If anyone would like to reserve a suite with all the amenities of home I encourage them to check it out.
We would not miss a Dutch cousins gathering but the marriage of our dear niece calls us to Colorado that same weekend. The DVD of the Dutch cousins Trip to New York will be at the gathering and I wish I could hear all the giggles and memories it is likely to elicit !
Thinking of Carolyn and Jon especially in light of tomorrow’s challenge. We send our very best to them.
Hugs, Mary Jo
———————————–
From Carolyn My apologies, see next note, Martha Boltz let me know I gave out some wrong info on the previous LETTERS. It seems times have changed since I was involved with the United Way campaign; some of the charities are doing better on administrative costs with a much higher percentage going to the recipients of the charity.  This is good news but I would still encourage you to check before you donate.
From Martha Boltz of Vienna Virginia:  Hi Carolyn — I just ran snopes.com on several of these, which have been circulating, it says, since 2005.  Most are deemed inaccurate or just plain wrong.  March of Dimes is one — I think it was 77% goes to actual charitable work, far higher than a dime!  People are good about finding this stuff and bombarding us with it, and I like to double check!!  All these charities could do better (so should we all) but they don’t exactly deserve the bad bit either!
!———————————–
From Carolyn in OKC
Wanted to share this GENEALOGICAL CODICIL.  I found an outline, and wrote one up. Sadly none of my family want to continue with the research though they enjoy the stories. Feel free to copy for yourself.

Genealogical Codicil to My Last Will and Testament:

To my spouse, children, guardian, administrator and/or executor:

Upon my demise it is requested that you DO NOT dispose of any or all of my genealogical records, both those prepared personally by me and those records prepared by others which may be in my possession, including but not limited to books, files, notebooks or computer programs for a period of two years. During this time period, please attempt to identify one or more persons who would be willing to take custody of the said materials and the responsibility of maintaining and continuing the family histories.

Everything pertaining to the Low Dutch history, including research books and files, is promised to:
Harrodsburg Historical Society, Low Dutch Archives
Email library@harrodsburghistorical.org
Phone 859-734-5985
220 South Chiles St
Harrodsburg, KY 40330

In the event you do not find anyone to accept these materials, please contact the following genealogical organizations that I have been a member of and determine if they will accept some parts or all of my genealogical materials.
Edmond Genealogical Society, Sara Memmott, 405-341-2107
Oklahoma Historical Society, Bill Welge, Archives, 405-522-5206
Meigs Co, Ohio Historical Society, Margaret Parker, 740-992-3810
Chester Courthouse, Ohio: Kay Fick, 740-992-2622

Please remember that my genealogical endeavors consumed a great deal of time, travel, and money. Therefore it is my desire that the products of these endeavors be allowed to continue in a manner that will make them available to others in the future.

Signature ___________________________
Date ___________
Witness ____________________________
Date ___________
Witness ____________________________
Date ___________

———————————–
OKAY This really is the last email for a while. Just had to share the photos. Have to be at the hospital by nine am, surgery around 10:30.
Letters 5/27/2013
Dear Cousins,

Just a note to let you all know THIS Dutch Cousin in tornado-ravaged OKlahoma is quite okay! In answer to the many emails and calls received, (and those who wondered but were too shy to ask) we are in NW OKC, and the tornado went across SW OKC – pretty much the same path as the 1999 May 3 tornado but much worse. It is about 20-25 miles from us – but Oklahomans are all family. My husband Jon Heavener is working every day in the disaster area with our Crossings church group, so you might see him there. I would be there too, but am not strong enough yet. The surgery went very well and I am recovering quickly — and planning what to pack for our trip to Indiana and Kentucky this fall.  See Ya There!

Just posted my Blog for June – It is titled “24 Hours Under the Oklahoma Standard”.  Have a look – here’s a hotlink:

Hugs, carolyn

——————————————–
Don’t forget — Next DUTCH COUSINS GATHERING:

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371

Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.


——————————————–

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956. They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.

——————————————–

Send your check for the Friday bus tour of Madison area Indiana; narrator Lynn Rogers who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, Tour chairman Carla Gerding. This is a late add-on so the $18 is in addition to registration.

You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send to Dutch tour leader Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075 — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round … 

———————————————–

BIG NEWS – BIG NEWS –BIG NEWS – BIG NEWS -BIG NEWS – BIG NEWS -BIG NEWS – BIG NEWS -BIG NEWS – BIG NEWS -BIG NEWS –

From Harrodsburg Historical Society treasurer Richard Bauer

Ms. Leonard:
    I have gone back into our records to determine how much the Dutch Cousins have contributed over the past five or six years.  The year 2012 was the ONLY year when we received a donation directly from the Dutch Cousins in the form of one check.  In all prior years I examined, we received contributions from individuals and they would identity their contribution as from the Dutch Cousins by marking that in the memo line of their check.  Each of those individuals would have received a receipt for their contribution in the year it was given. 
    Here is what I have for the past several years.  Please keep in mind that I only included those who identified on their check that their contribution was from the Dutch Cousins.  While other checks might have been from a member of your organization, I have no way of telling without some notation on the check or a note with the check. For 2011 there were two contributions totaling $200.  For 2010 there was one contribution of $1,000.  For 2009, there were none.  For 2008 there were 29 contributions totaling $7,540.  Vince Akers matched all contributions in 2008.  In 2007, there was one contribution of $1,000.
    I hope this provides the information you requested.  Please contact me if you need any additional information. I trust that your surgery went well and that you are now on the road to recovery.  Best wishes!
Dick Bauer
Treasurer, Harrodsburg Historical Sociery
 
NOTE FROM CAROLYN: WE donated $7,000 from our savings account of 2011, they received it in December 2012.  I get a total of $24,200 including the matching funds of $7540 from Vince Akers in 2008.  Here is a hotlink, in case you missed it in last “letters” to photos of the restored Old Mud Meetinghouse:  http://goo.gl/64aCf
——————————————————————

from Rosalind Cummings

Hi Amalie, It’s wonderful to see the progress and hear about what’s happening to the Old Meeting House and Cemetery.The Meeting House looks wonderful. If your fortunate enough to discover to whom the recently found grave stones belong to, please let us know. Thank you for all that you and the Historical Society have done to restore and preserve Old Mud and the Cemetery for future generations to enjoy.

 
——————————————————————
from barbara whiteside
Anyone interested in Mary Jo’s suite that is available…we can attest to how nice they are…..kitchen….[though no stove, it has microwave, fridge, sink, dishes, table and chairs.] nice living area]….nice bedroom area and huge bath with both large shower and separate tub…..we stayed in one at Clifty for an anniversary a couple of years ago…..will miss seeing you Mary Jo…have a safe and fun trip at the wedding.  barb.
——————————————————————
from Barbara and Paul Terhune
Unfortunately Paul and I are unable to join our Dutch Cousins in Indiana this summer.  Paul is recovering from a 26 Feb open-heart surgery that was complicated by an undetected stroke during surgery that left him partially paralyzed (but thankfully only temporarily) …then further complicated by a disastrous fall on 13 March that left him with 2 facial fractures and a brain bleed.
He has no memory of the events between 16 Feb and 26 March, but otherwise his memory is fine.  He finally came home on Apr 6; and he IS making a miraculous recovery.
However, having lost 30 pounds, much of it muscle, it will be some time before he regains his former strength and stamina.  We hope that all of you have a TERRIFIC time, and you will be in our hearts and thoughts.
——————————————————————
 
From Jim Cozine of LasVegas:
Letters 6/4/2013
Hi to all!!
We have more Cousins signed up for our DC weekend Gathering!
Barbara Merideth from MO, Rogene Smith & Cheryl Bradley from MO,
Larry & Suzanne Voreis from SC,  Larry & Geri Cozine from IN, Ellie Burnaford from SC,  Denise Merideth Perry from TN, Jack & Sue Taylor from TX and
Diana Davis from NC.
Keep the registration forms comin’ in.  We are looking forward to another great re-union in Madison, IN.Our states that are represented so far;
KY, TN, IN, OK, SC, IL, WI, PA, NJ, WA, TX, NC & MO.Looking forward to September!!
Janice Cozine 🙂
Dutch Cousins

Registration  Chair
—————————————————————————————–
From Donna Gaines, 2013 DC Gathering Coordinator, Fallon, Nevada:
Here’s the latest count.  41 rooms/43 reservations/85 people.   I’ll have to contact Clifty to understand the different numbers.
———————————————————————-

Don’t forget — Next DUTCH COUSINS GATHERING:

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371

Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.


——————————————–

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956. They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.

——————————————–

Send your check for the Friday bus tour of Madison area Indiana; narrator Lynn Rogers who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, Tour chairman Carla Gerding. This is a late add-on so the $18 is in addition to registration.

You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send to Dutch tour leader Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075 — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round … 
 

———————————————————————-

Here is the schedule so far, but will probably change a little:
 Sept 20th FRIDAY— 9 am: Memorial Service for Low Dutch Veteran of 1812 War & Rev. War at Clifty Inn, Gerardus Riker Jr
10 – 2  Coffee, Registration at Clifty Inn Meeting room,  Set up family History Tables, Pick up nametags, schedules, etc.,  Set up Silent Auction items, Prepare for business meeting. Lunch on your own.
1:00 BUSINESS MEETING;
3:00 Caravan tour to Dutch settlement near Pleasant Church: 5:30 return
(alternative: Bill Demaree of Madison will lead a walking tour of beautiful Historic Downtown Madison and the Ohio Riverfront area, maps at desk if you prefer to go on your own)
7:00 pm: Dinner Buffet at Clifty Inn; Speaker — Vince Akers – “After Kentucky–Migration to Indiana”
————————————————-
*  Sept 21st-SATURDAY — 9:00 a.m: coffee – Clifty Inn Meeting Room,
10 am Welcome by Mayor, Meet your Cousins, Family Genealogy tables, Networking, Silent auction
Noon lunch: Speakers: Dr. Bob Schenck “Travels with a Dutchman”
Video “Dutch New York by Mary Jo Gohmann;
4:00-5:00 pm- Book sale & Autograph Party; 5:00 pm-Silent Auction ends.
7 p.m. Dinner buffet  – Speaker – Patsy Harris – “Low Dutch & the Underground Railroad”
——————————————–
*  Sept 22-SUNDAY — 9 am Checkout & leave Clifty for Caravan to Six-Mile, Pleasureville, & Harrodsburg KY
10:30-11:30  History talk at Six-Mile by Vince Akers.
12:45 Lunch on your own at 19th Hole, Harrodsburg KY.
2:30 pm Worship at Old Mud Meeting Hs, Harrodsburg, KY, Rev. Claude Westerfield – PUBLIC INVITED
 Sept 23-Monday 10to3 — Free Research time at Harrodsburg Historical Library for cousins.
—————————————————————————————–

To read the 2013 newsletter in full color online, click here: http://goo.gl/MLnha
For more information check with our official webpage,www.DutchCousins.org
On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage
We also have a facebook page, Dutch Cousins of Kentucky
———————————————————————-

From Barbara Terhune, Debary, Florida:
Glass Plate Photos From Civil War. Read the captions for the details of each picture.    These are pretty amazing considering they were taken over to 150 years ago:

Run the cursor over the photograph and the picture caption will pop up.

Click photo to enlargeand to read the rest of the caption.

*Click here please* <http://www.mikelynaugh.com/VirtualCivilWar/New/Originals2/index.html>
———————————————————————-
From Virginia Mears, Annandale VA:

Glad to hear that you and your family are ok after the tornado.  I was also glad to hear that my family in Norman and other parts of Okla. We’re also ok.
Virginia Mears (my daughter married Will Hilyerd, Barbara’s son.  I met you a few years ago.)

———————————————————————-

From Anna Jackson of Paducah KY
Thanks so much for the update.  And so glad to hear that you are OK.  And so glad that you will be able to make the t rip to Indiana and Kentucky later this year.
My daughter, Melanie Zoeller, lives in Heavener, OK … on the eastern edge, as you probably already know.  I was glad to hear that they had some wind, but not much damage (none to the house); and they got a lot of rain.  We all need rain, here in the mid-section of the country.  Is your husband of the family who settled the town Heavener?  I had to get Melanie to tell me how to pronounce the name!  I was saying “HEAVEN-er!”  She corrected me to say “HEEVEN-er.”  We have town names around here that are not pronounced like they look, or like the town the name was taken from, such as Cairo, IL … it is pronounced here as CARE-O.  Vienna, IL is pronounced “VI-anna.”  I guess we do well at that, knowing that Paducah is halfway between Monkey’s Eyebrow, KY and Possum Trott, KY!
So glad you are getting better!NOTE FROM CAROLYN: Yes it was a blacksheep great uncle of my hubby, Jon Heavener, who gave the name to the eastern OK town. He came west from VA, married an Indian woman and took her allotment – that was the right of husbands in that day. — and changed the pronouncing of the name.  One of Jon’s aunts said she wanted to HEAVE every time she heard it pronounced that way!
———————————————————————-

The New York Genealogical and Biological Society is pleased to present Dr. Firth Haring Fabend (member of the Society of Daughters of Holland Dames), who will talk about her new book New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America; the lecture will be illustrated with a slideshow of exceptional images. This volume has been endorsed by two of the giants in New Netherland history and research — Charles Gehring, Director of the New Netherland Research Center, and Russell Shorto, author of The Island at the Center of the World. Dr. Fabend will sell and sign copies of her book. This program is free and open to the public, but numbers are limited.

When: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 – 5:30pm

Venue: The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society, 36 West 44th Street, 7th FloorTo register please call 212-755-8532, ext. 206, or e-mail rsvp@nygbs.org.

———————————————————————-

From Rosalind Cummins, Los Angeles
I am glad to hear you and John are ok. Rosalind
———————————————————————-
From Jim Cozine, Las Vegas

 I really enjoyed this book and she mentions our Cosyn Gerritsen in the book.

You are invited to a book talk by Firth Haring Fabend on Wednesday, June 5, 2013, at 5:30 pm.

The New York Genealogical and Biological Society is pleased to present Firth Haring Fabend, who will talk about her new book New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise History of the Dutch Colony in North America; the lecture will be illustrated with a slideshow of exceptional images.  This volume has been endorsed by two of the giants in New Netherland history and research — Charles Gehring, Director of the New Netherland Research Center, and Russell Shorto, author of The Island at the Center of the World.  Ms. Fabend will sell and sign copies of her book.  This program is free and open to the public, but numbers are limited. To register please call 212-755-8532, ext. 206, or e-mail rsvp@nygbs.org.When: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 – 5:30p
Venue: The New York Genealogical & Biographical Society, 36 West 44th Street, 7th Floor

———————————————————————-

From Deborah Magan, Shelbyville, KY
So glad you are safe.
Debby
———————————————————————-
From Gary Craig, Sorrento, Florida
I sure hope you guys are all in one piece and the same with your family and all of your homes…. this has really been a crazy weather year …. your old Craig Family distant cousin… Gary
———————————————————————-
 Just updated my blog for June about the Tornado volunteer workers with more pics.  To visit, just click on the links below or paste the URLs into your browser.
24 Hours under the Oklahoma Standard
(from the main page, double click on “My Blog”

———————————————————————-

Want to kmow how to save money and still do genealogy research?

  • Know that free sites often have sponsored links (they have to pay the bills somehow), which may not be obviously ads: You click on a database title or type your name into a search box, and you end up on a subscription site, which can be frustrating if that’s not what you expected. Just hit the back button until you get back to the site you started on (or if the site opened in a new browser tab, go back to the tab you were on).
  • Look for free-for-a-limited-time databases around holidays. Recently, for example, four sites offered free online military records for Memorial Day. Find out about these offers by reading genealogy blogs (such as this one) and newsletters (such as the Genealogy Insider newsletter), sign up for genealogy websites’ email programs, and befriend those sites on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Sites such as Archives.comAncestry.com and findmypast.com offer free trials, usually for 14 days. Just make sure you read the terms and cancel on time if you don’t intend to subscribe.
—————————————————————————————–
From Darwin Saylor, San Diego, CA

During its Golden Age, the Dutch Republic of the Seven United Netherlands had settlements around the world, including a monopoly on trade with Japan, Jakarta, Java and Asia.

They invented a way of financing these endeavors without taxes.

People could buys shares in the Dutch East India Company whose ships sailed to Indonesia or Japan.

Shares could be bought and sold at the Amsterdam Stock Exchange – the first modern stock market.

And in case the ships sank, the Dutch invented “insurance” companies.

The Dutch started a Dutch West India Company which sent Henry Hudson to find a water route west across America to the Pacific.

Though unsuccessful, Hudson claimed the land along the “Hudson” River, and founded the New Netherlands Colony, receiving its charter JUNE 3, 1621.

There the Dutch began a New Amsterdam Stock Exchange which met along a street near the wall of their settlement.

In 1624, the Chamber of Amsterdam wrote articles for the Dutch Colony, establishing the Dutch Reformed denomination:

“They shall within their territory practice no other form of divine worship than that of the Reformed Religion

and thus by their Christian life and conduct seek to draw the Indians and other blind people to the knowledge of God and His word, without, however, persecuting any on account of his faith, but leaving each one the use of his conscience.”

The New Amsterdam Charter of Freedoms, June 7, 1629, gave land to wealthy “Patroons” who helped 50 families emigrate, stating:

“Colonists shall…in the speediest manner…find out ways and means whereby they may support a Minister and Schoolmaster, that thus the service of God and zeal for religion may not grow cool.

Beginning in 1639, Lutheran Germans, Swedes and Finns, as well as Anglicans from England, began immigrating, numbering 500 of the colony’s 3,500 population in 1655.


Presbyterians erected their first meeting house on Eastern Long Island in 1640, and the first Jews arrived in the colony in 1654.

In 1664, the British took control and changed the colony’s name to New York.

The New Amsterdam Stock Exchange then became the New York Stock Exchange, referred to as Wall Street.

Though British established the Anglican ChurchFrench Protestant Huguenots began arriving in 1680.

The New York Charter of Liberties and Privileges, (paragraph 27), passed October 30, 1683, stated:

“That no person or persons which profess faith in God by Jesus Christ shall at any time be any ways molested…But that…every such person…fully enjoy his or their…consciences in matters of religion…not using this Liberty to Licentiousness…

The respective Christian Churches now in practice within the City of New York….shall…enjoy…freedoms of their Religion in Divine Worship and Church discipline.”

The first Methodist meeting in the American Colonies was in New York City in 1766.

In 1781, was the first mention of a public Catholic worship service in New York.

In 1811, the New York Supreme Court’s Chief Justice, Chancellor Kent, stated in the case of Peoples v Ruggles:

“The people of this State, in common with the people of this country, profess the general doctrines of Christianity

We are a Christian people, and the morality of the country is deeply engrafted upon Christianity, and not upon the doctrines or worship of those impostors.”

Letters 6/10/2013

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371

Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.


——————————————–

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956or 800-559-2956. They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.

——————————————–

Send your check for the Friday bus tour of Madison area Indiana; narrator Lynn Rogers who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, Tour chairman Carla Gerding. This is a late add-on so the $18 is in addition to registration.

You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send to Dutch tour leader Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075 — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round …
——————————————–
From Carla Gerding, coordinator for the Friday Bus Tour:
need to make plans with Miller before too long so we are assured of a bus. . . they REALLY do need to get the reservations in! 31 signed up so far:

Bus Reservations for Dutch Cousins

Pam Ellingson                   1

Joan Murray                                    2

Everett Cole                                    2

Jerry Westerfield                  2

Larry Westerfield                  1

Alice Hostetter                                    2

John Westerfield                  2

Dennis Karwatka                  2

Bill Gaines                                    2

Janice Pranger                                    2

Frances Feldmann                  1

Carolyn Leonard                  2

Emily Welches                                    2

Rogene Smith                                    2

Larry Vories                                    2

Diana Davis                                    1

Barb Whitesides                  1

Eloise Burnaford                  1

Barbara Meredith                  1

——————————————–
From Sharon Leezer of Scottsdale, AZ
Good morning, Carolyn.

I am unable to attend the reunion.  I have a new email and  I don’t want to miss any newsletters from you.  I enjoy reading about the research everyone is doing on our Dutch ancestors.  Thank you so much for all of your work.

Sincerely, Sharon LeezerWestervelt/Cosine
——————————————–
From JEAN SIMON, Huntsville, Alabama
Thank you so much, Carolyn, for all the wealth of info below, especially for your free or inexpensive genealogy sources info.  Also, for your info about the Dutch Patroons, including my Dutch patroon ancestor, Cornelis Melyn of Staten Island, New York City (New Amsterdam), who owned all of Staten Island but one farm, and who became the 2nd of 2 husbands of Mariken Hatfield, daughter of Matthias Hatfield (Hetfeld), latter progenitor of the Nova Scotia, Canada and USA Hatfields in North America, in the 1600s.  Mariken’s first husband was killed by the Indians.
 —————————————
Whiteside, Indiana
I’ll be there, though not named on the list…I am with Diana Davis………
barb w
 —————————————
Registration for Dutch Cousins 2013 http://bit.ly/13GLhu1
 —————————————
From Donna Gaines, Fallon NV (Coordinator for 2013 gathering)
I’ve posted a list of alternative hotels on the Dutch Cousins website, and also did a personal check of the reservations this morning.  Reason being is that someone had posted the inn was full.  It isn’t full, but I’ll bet they didn’t give the code.  We had a block originally of 48 rooms, and Kim added one more, so that brought our total to 49.  We only have 41 rooms reserved, so that leaves us 8 rooms left to fill. I also posted that number and the reservation phone number and code.  I reiterated that they need to give the code or the inn will say it’s full.  Hopefully this will help those that still want to make reservations.
Here’s a list of hotels I got from the Madison Visitors and Convention bureau.  I have also posted that list on the Dutch Cousins website.  I mentioned that I cannot recommend any of them  as I personally don’t know anything about them, but stated where I got the information.  Here’s the list so you may include it on your next newsletter.
Hugs,
Donna
Alternate hotels to Clifty Inn in Madison for the gathering are:
1. Riverboat Inn. 906 East First St. 812-265-2361
2. Holiday Inn Express. 300 Franks Dr. 812-265-1111 or 800-HOLIDAY
3. Country Hearth Inn & Suites. 308 Demaree Drive. 812-273-0757 or 866-503-5191
4. Bestway Inn. 700 Clifty Drive. 812-273-5151
5. Hillside Inn. 831 East Main St. 812-265-3221 or 877-265-3232
6. Comfort Inn. 3767 Clifty Drive. 812-273-4443This list is taken from the Madison Visitors Bureau, but I can’t personally say I know anything about any of them or can recommend any of them.

—————————————

Jerry L Sampson, Harrodsburg KY (President of the Harrodsburg Historical Society)
So much work has takne place at Old Mud in the past two years. Its amazing to think of all the work that has been done. Thanks to everyone who has helped out. You know who you are. Thanks to an a very generous donor we will soon have a state of the art security system. We’ve been talking of doing some landscaping on the road frontage surrounding OMMH. We need an arborist for the cemetery and over time a volunteer will continue to work on the stone wall. So that is some good news. Road frontage is very thick and over grown and posses a danger to OMMH by being too secluded. We’re looking at really cleaning out all the common scrub and doing mass plantings of hostas and buttercups. Maybe installing some pernament art projects? Along with other shade loving plants, provided we retain that much shade. All mature trees will remain. Sound off some ideas on what you’d like to see. Would you be willing to pay for or send plants or bulbs? Of course we need to find someone with a landscaping company that can really, in a few days time, clear out the junk. As always money is problem. Keep in mind that this is a major project and outside the realm of boy scouts or local green thumbs. There will be massive amounts to haul off and some extensive grading and much planting. Think park like instead of wild woods. Let me know.

—————————————

YIPPEE: PBS announced it will add the new series GENEALOGY ROADSHOW to its fall lineup. Part detective story, part emotional journey, GENEALOGY ROADSHOW will combine history and science to uncover the fascinating stories of diverse Americans. Each individual’s past will link to a larger COMMUNITY history, revealing the rich cultural tapestry of America. GENEALOGY ROADSHOW will air Mondays, September 23-October 14, 9:00-10:00 p.m. ET. …..will feature participants from four American cities — Nashville, Austin, Detroit and San Francisco — who want to explore unverified genealogical claims, passed down through family history, that may (or may not) connect them to an event or a historical figure. These cities were chosen as American crossroads of culture, diversity, industry and history, with deep pools of potential participants and stories.
LATEST NEWS TODAY:
 

RTE Sells Genealogy Roadshow Format Rights to PBS for US Remake 

RTE, Ireland’s national television and radio broadcaster, has licensed its popular “Genealogy
Roadshow” program to PBS. “A new version of the programme, in which a team of travelling
experts attempt to piece together ordinary people’s family histories, will now premiere in the
US in September.” 

 

 —————————————

What a museum did to attract visitors

The Rijksmuseum in Holland had an idea:

Let’s bring the art to the people and then, hopefully,

thew will come to see more – at the museum.

They took one painting of Rembrandt’s from 1642,

“Guards of the Night” and brought to life the characters in it,

placed them in a busy mall and the rest you can see for yourself!

 —————————————
Letters 6/18/2013
Hi Carolyn,
There are 81 people with Clifty Inn reservations, but only 46 reservations for the Dutch Cousins.
Janice Cozine, Dutch Cousins Registrations chair
———
From Carolyn:  Better get your reservations sent in folks –  Deadline is little over a month away, and the number of reservations usually determines much of our program – the more people who attend, the more we can afford to do and the better the price we get on things, etc.  If we only have 50 that would be the SMALLEST gathering in ten years.  I have noticed several people I know are planning to attend but not on the list yet, such as some of our officers! Click here for a downloadable registration blank.   http://bit.ly/13GLhu1
——–
Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.
——–
Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.
————–
Send your check for the Friday bus tour of Madison area Indiana; narrator Lynn Rogers who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, Tour chairman Carla Gerding. This is a late add-on so the $18 is in addition to registration.
You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.
NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send to Dutch tour leader Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075 — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round … 
———————————————————
From Jerry Westerfield, Russell Springs, Kentucky:
Carolyn, I see my name down for two reservations for the Friday bus tour at Madison.  I did M make one.  I’m not sure I will be able to make the get together.
NOTE FROM CAROLYN:  If I remember right – we have TWO Jerry Westerfields on the list – but I think the other one is spelled Gerry.  Carla, could you double check on this please?
———————————————————-
You may want to come to Madison a few days early or stay a few days after  at this fabulous B&B in Vevay Indiana  You may want to stay here while you are in Indiana this September!  Just up the river about 20 miles according to Mapquest.  Looks like a lovely drive too. and the name is … drumroll … SCHENCK mansion B&B!


———————————————————-
From Jean Simon, Huntsville, Alabama:
Hello Van Norden and Hatfield Dutch Cousins.  I tried sending the email below to a Peter Dutton, Jr., manager of the Geni.com website page from which I got my information about an Elcey Van Norden born 1779 and died 1779, to my ancestor, Mary Van Norden and ancestor Jacob Lyon Hatfield of Tusket, Yarmouth Co., Nova Scotia, Canada.  I don’t do Facebrook or Twitter, so I was out of luck.
Do any of you have the email address for this Peter Dutton Jr.?  I would like it, please, so I could send him my email of June 10 12:28 p.m. below.  Thank you very much in advance.
 
———————————————————–
From nancy Jenson of Madison, Indiana:
 I am the niece of Bill Demaree (Madison, Indiana).
Uncle Bill just sent me your wonderful April 2013 newsletter.
Could you please add me to your newsletter list?  I am hoping to attend the reunion in September in Madison.  I also noticed there is a DC area weekender.  Since my husband and I live in Northern Virginia, we would love to attend if it’s not too late.  I would need the particulars.
Dear Peter Dutton, Jr.,
Thank you for your info about my apparent uncle, Elcey Van Norden.  I am a direct descendant of Elcey Van Norden’s sister, Mary Van Norden, she born 13 Feb 1772.  Since my ancestor, Elcey’s mother, nee Janette Westervelt (Westerfelt), died the same year, in 1779, I wonder if she died of childbirth, or perhaps even some unfortunate disease.  I note that the blank photo of Elcey shows Elcey as a male.  I don’t speak Dutch, so I wonder if Elcey could have been Elsie, or even L. C.!  The latter not probably at all.  Do you have any indication that Elcey was a son of Janette Westervelt and Gabriel Van Norden?  I descend from the Nova Scotia Van Nordens, and Janette Westervelt (Westerfelt) was my dad’s (Dr. Judson Stewart MacGregor)’s great grandparents.  I was born in Cambridge, Mass., but my dad and his parents were born in Nova Scotia.
Love to hear your thoughts and your reply.
Cordial greetings, Jean Simon
Huntsville, Alabama, Tenn. Valley Scottish Soc. Board Mbr

———————————————————–

From Mary Townsend Bates
My name is Mary Bates and my heritage from my maternal grandfather, Baker Ewing Terhune, goes back to colnial times.  I have a copy of the Van Nuys Genealogy book by Carrie E. Allen which which was published in 1916.  I love reading about the Mud Meeting House in it and the families that came to Kentucky.  I am 10th generation and my mother, Louise Terhune Townsend, born Dec. 16, 1903, is listed in the book.
My family is buried in Danville, KY in the Terhune family plot.  It is a beautiful cemetary in the heart of the town and is maintained so well.  The last time I was in Danville, the whole town was getting ready for a big party.  There was bunting everywhere and American flags in abundance decorating the whole town.  Center College was hosting the vice presidential debates the next week.  Every lamp post was being painted and every farm into the town had American flags lining the way.  It was all so festive and whatever party you supported, it made you proud to be an American and a Kentuckian, to boot.
I would love to join my Dutch cousins and to meet you at one of the meetings in the future and learn about the restoration of the Mud Meeting House.

———————————————————–

From Jim Cozine of Las Vegas:

I’m passing this on – you will see

some info about Dr Bob Schenck  on the last page

( our Holland Society speaker for Dutch Cousins) etc.
The Holland Society
of New York, President’s Letter
Spring 2013
page 4
Dr. Bob Schenck from Chicago recently assumed the
chairmanship of the Membership Committee and quickly discovered
that in a 24-month period of time the Society had lost more
than fifty members and a number of Friends due to their nonpayment
of dues. Realizing that the years since 2008 have been tough on
employment and income for a number of members, he dispatched a
letter requesting the Branch Presidents to encourage the reactivation
of their membership in the year 2013. To date, more than 20 percent
have paid their dues and reestablished their membership. Should
you wish to enjoy the benefits, camaraderie, and appreciation of our
ancestors, who provided each of us with the opportunities we have
had in the past, I urge you to reach out and contact Dr. Robert
Schenck at rschenckmd@gmail.com or (312) 371-1535. Once
again, Dr. Bob urges each of us to examine our relatives and descendants
to see if there are any potential members for The Holland
Society. If you have any questions concerning membership, please do
not hesitate to reach out to Bob Schenck at the contacts listed above.

———————————————————–

 
Fascinting story here about a Revolutionary period crypt in a park in New York.  Wow That U-tube tells a fascinating story.  I wonder how many of our Dutch ancestors are buried there.
 
HISTORY LOST THROUGH THE YEARS, UNFORTUNATELY.
NYC’s Mass Grave at Fort Greene Park in NYC
———————————————————–
From Wendy Stroh, St John, US VIRGIN ISLANDS:
thank you for adding me to the Dutch cousins Email list.  As I mentioned to you  my maiden name is Coleman, and although born in Michigan my husband and I presently live on the island of Tortola in the Caribbean.  On that note I’m not sure I will be able to attend the Dutch cousins gathering this year. Actually I’ve been trying to make it to Harrodsburg, Ky now for the past year and haven’t been able to make that happen yet either.  Hopefully soon!!
on that note, my paternal Grandmother’s maiden name was Montgomery, and her Mother’s maiden name was Ransdell.  I truly look forward to connecting with you more,  will send you a friend request on Facebook.  Any help you can offer me researching back past the reverend Cornelius Cozine is certainly welcome. My cousin and I recently just became members of the DAR with John Montgomery( Fincastle) as our Patriot.  My guess is that you are a member of various similar organizations if not the DAR too.
Look forward to hearing more from you,
 

I just found the grave of 

Kiliaen van Ransselaer
on findagrave, buried in Amsterdam at the Oude Kirk (old church). We have some descendants of him in our group, and he was very important to our Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam in the early 1600s. He was a diamond and pearl merchant, one of the founders and directors of the Dutch West India Company, in fact probably the only Patroon to become successful. He founded the Manor of Rensselaerswyck in what is now mainly New York’s Capital District. His estate remained throughout the Dutch and British colonial era and the American Revolution, as a legal entity until the 1840s.  The American van Rensselaers all descend from Kiliaen’s son Jeremias and the subsequent family is noted for being a very powerful and wealthy influence in the history of New York and the Northeastern United States producing multiple State Legislators, Congressmen, and two Lieutenant Governors in New York. The name Van Rensselaer is said to translate as  ‘Deer’s Lair’.  Kiliaen van Ransselaer founded the colony of Rensselaerswyck [ now Albany, NY], that extended 24 miles N and S along the Hudson River and 24 miles back into the forest on each side of the river.)
Why do I care?
    
Kiliaen van Ransselaer could depend on the indirect support of his nephew Wouter van Twiller, who had been appointed Director of New Netherland in 1632, and with whom he engaged in friendly correspondence at a time when Dutch directors opposed the patroons in every way.  It appears that Cosyn Gerritsen van Putten (Cosyn, son of Gerrit, from Putten) who many of our group -including Westerfield/velts-claim as their immigrant ancestor,  had important family friends from the Netherland homelands.
(“Cosyn Gerritsen van Putten: New Amsterdam’s Wheelwright,” de Halve Maen, 80:2 (Summer 2007), 23-30.)  “In the days before English rule in New Amsterdam from the records Cosyn seemed to avoid problems with the three different Dutch Governors even when his friends and neighbors were in conflict.  So far as we know, Cosyn was not a member of the nobility or rich burgher (merchant) class but must have been in favor with them. His ability to buy the Van Twiller farm is, evidence because it was likely the next best property in New Amsterdam at that time, after Peter Styversant’s farm.”
Cosyn bought the 10-acre lot and house which had been built in 1633 for Director Gen. Wouter van Twiller, just NW of Cosyn’s farm – before the English came into power in 1665.
Jim Cozine of Las Vegas said Cosyn Gerritsen van Putten (from Gelderland in the Netherlands) was one of those few who received a grant for sizeable acreage. Cosyn’s land was on Manhattan Island,  (bouwerie No. 41 on the Manatus Map), although Manhattan land was supposed to be reserved for WIC officers, which he was not.
Cosyn’s formal patent dates from 1647, which means that he had “sowed or mowed” the land as early as 1637.   Cosyn’s bouwerie (farm) on the Manatus Map consisted of 34 morgens of land, about 68 acres, in the area between today’s Astor Place and the New York University campus, and his grant for it included as well a lot for a house and garden on today’s Broadway. (Firth Haring Fabend article, online: http://bit.ly/19ngGaS)  Later, John J. Astor bought the Cozine farm for $20,000 and sold it in 1911 for $23 Million. The Cozine farm (Cosyn’s Wagon Way) was located roughly Broadway to the Hudson River and 54th to 58th street.  Central Park NYC was then the town of Bloomingdale NY. The history of Bloomingdale contains lots of references to both COZINE and WESTERFIELD.  Cozyn Garritsen had some pretty high class associates for a garden variety wheel-wright.  Here is a good info on him in this excellent article by our family expert – Firth Haring Fabend. http://bit.ly/19ngGaS
Posted courtesy of The Holland Society of New York and Firth Haring Fabend.
The 1639 Manatus map is the earliest portrayal of Manhattan and its environs, depicts plantations and small farms. These widely dispersed settlements are keyed by number in the lower right-hand corner to a list of land occupants..  Numbers 10 and 41 belong to Wouter van Twiller and Cosyn Gerritsen.
The Castello Plan (map) of 1660 is the first known street map of Manhattan. This map is wonderful – http://imgur.com/sCu0VDC   It was commissioned by then Dutch Governor Peter Stuyvesant.  The ramparts of Wall Street are seen at right.  In case you didn’t know, there really used to be a “wall” at Wall Street.  The Dutch built it to keep out the hostile natives.  In the left of the map, Fort Amsterdam — the structure that looks like a star — stands just next to the present site of Bowling Green Park, that little strip of grass just right of the star where we stood two years ago on our Dutch Footprints to New York bus tour.  The map, drawn by Jacques Cortelyou, shows a charming little settlement with canals along Broad Street and a real 12-foot-tall wall at Wall Street. This map is interactive and zooms, to show the niumbered houses and lots.  In Block C are three lots on present day lower Broadway, that were later purchased by Cosyn Gerritsen van Putten. 
 

Want to know what NYC looked like in 1650-1660?  Go here: http://nc-chap.org/castello/

Great map of Manhattan in 1660 from the book “The Legend of New Amsterdam” by Peter Spier:  http://www.teachout.org/vna/map.html
This list shows the owners of the property in 1660, when the CastelloPlan Map was drawn.  http://patricia.rootsweb.ancestry.com/nytristate/castello.htm

This one is a little better arranged (same list) http://nc-chap.org/castello/lots.php
 lot numbers given are based on “The Key to the Castello Plan, by STOKES
These web pages are from the excellent New Castle, Delaware, Community History and Archaelogy Program (NC-chap.org)
 
Kiliaen van Ransselaer’s  memorial stone states he was buried in the church on October 7, 1643.
(This information above is excerpted from my book-in-progress, The Long Hard Journey of Low Dutch – from New Amsterdam NY to Kentucky Frontier)
 
Birth: 1580
Death: 1644

One of the founders of New York, owning much of the property there. But apparently he never visited (it was managed on his behalf by a relative).Search Amazon for Kiliaen van Ransselaer
Burial:
Oude Kerk (Old Church)
Amsterdam
Amsterdam Municipality
Noord-Holland, Netherlands
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Maintained by: Find A Grave
Record added: Aug 09, 2000
Find A Grave Memorial# 11589
Letters 7/2/2013

From Carla Gerding:  The reservation {for the Madison bus tour} is for Gerry and Nancy Westerfield.  (my spelling mistake) no reservation for Jerry Westerfield.

BUS TOUR: I am thinking that we need to book our bus now.   We have currently 38 signed up for the trip plus the Tour Guide.  I am going to book the 44 passenger which means ONLY FIVE SEATS REMAIN so anyone who wants to go with us better sign up quickly!


Send your check for the Friday bus tour to Dutch tour leader Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075. NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send  — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round … 

 
Lynn Rogers, who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, will narrate the tour of Madison Indiana area.

Carla Gerding is tour chairman. This is a late add-on to registration so the $18 is in addition to registration.You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind for free, but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.

————————————————————

 
From Janice Cozine:  Carolyn, on your next few DC letters,  would you add a request for me?
‘If you are ordering tee-shirts and do not copy the 2nd page of the registration form with the tee-shirts sizes, please add the ‘SIZE’ any where, to the front of your form’.
I have needed to call or email several cousins to get this information.
Thanks!
Janice  🙂
Dutch Cousins Registration Chair
————————————————————-
VANARSDEL MURDERED!
“The Murder of William D. Vanarsdel,” (by Judy Cassidy) is in the Winter-Spring 2013 issue of North Louisiana History with information on the Historic African-American Vanarsdel Family. The story begins on page 151 through 167 of that issue. The family name of VanArsdel is found with MANY spellings, but most descend from Symon Janse Van Artsdalen, born 1628, the immigrant from Flanders who settled in Flatlands (now Brooklyn) in 1653. In fact, he was Magistrate Of Flatlands LI 1661 and 1686.

North Louisiana History is published two times a year by the North Louisiana Historical Association, Inc.  Past issues of North Louisiana History and The Journal of the North Louisiana Historical Association may be viewed online through the EBSCO Amerce: History & Life with Full Text Database.  This service is available through libraries that subscribe to the EBSCO database.  Please contact your local library to see if they have access to this service.

You can order a copy of the article only (pages 151 through 167 of the Winter-Spring 2013 issue of North Louisiana History) on interlibrary loan from your local library. Interlibrary loans are free through my OKC Metro Library, but I just learned the loan is fee-based at some libraries, so ask first.

Single copies of North Louisiana History are $4.00 per issue plus $2 mailing.  For the complete Winter-Spring 2013 Journal, send your request and a check or money order for $6 payable to the North Louisiana Historical Association and mail to Treasurer, P. O. Box 6701, Shreveport, LA 71136-6701.
Here is a hotlink to the North LA website: http://northlouisianahistory.org
————————————————————-

From Jack & Sue TAYLOR of Kingwood, TX:

I wonder if some of us that reserved did not reserve under the group name?
In a message dated 6/19/2013 12:59:23 A.M. Central Daylight Time, editor234@gmail.com writes:

 

 

Hi Carolyn,
There are 81 people with Clifty Inn reservations, but only 46 reservations for the Dutch Cousins.
Janice Cozine, Dutch Cousins Registrations chair
———
From Carolyn:  Better get your reservations sent in folks –  Deadline is less than a month away, and the number of reservations usually determines much of our program – the more people who attend, the more we can afford to do and the better the price we get on things, etc.  If we only have 50 that would be the SMALLEST gathering in ten years.  I have noticed several people I know are planning to attend but not on the list yet, such as some of our officers! Click here for a downloadable registration blank.   http://bit.ly/13GLhu1
——–
Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is:877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.
 
————————————————————-
Latest report from Gathering Coordinator Donna Gaines in Nevada:
Here’s the latest count.  We have 44 rooms reserved.  That means we have ONLY FIVE ROOMS LEFT AT CLIFTY INN.  This doesn’t count who may have made reservations at other hotels, or are staying with relatives.
from CAROLYN – WHAT NO BANTAS?
Akres, Vincent 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 05/24/2012
Anderson, Renee 09/20/2013 09/23/2013 001 2/0 Active 11/12/2012
Bishop, Deandra 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 06/24/2013
Bradley, Cheryl 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 05/03/2013
Burnaford, Eloise 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 03/20/2013
Cole, Sharon 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 02/28/2013
Cozine, Janice 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 06/26/2012
Cozine, Larry 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 11/19/2012
Cozine, Sheila 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 12/11/2012
Davis, Diana 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 04/09/2013
Demaree, Anna 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 10/23/2012
Dutch Cousins, . 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 03/02/2012
Dutch Cousins, . 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 02/13/2013
Ellingson, Pam 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 08/26/2012
Gaines, Donna 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 05/30/2012
Gohmann, Mary Joe 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 Cancelled 10/24/2012
Green, Tom 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 05/12/2013
Heathcoat, Donley 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 07/23/2012
Henry, Steve 09/20/2013 09/21/2013 001 2/1 Active 05/07/2013
Hostetter, Alice (Whaley, J) 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 06/25/2012
Johnson, Francis 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 1/0 Active 03/16/2013
Karwatka, Carol 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 09/24/2012
Leonard, Carolyn&JonHeavener 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 06/24/2012
Merideth, Barbara 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 07/21/2012
Metcalf, Sharon 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 10/24/2012
Murray, Richard 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 10/13/2012
Park, Mary 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 1/0 Active 10/13/2012
Pranger, Janice 09/19/2013 09/23/2013 001 2/0 Active 06/28/2012
Reynerson, Marc 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 10/31/2012
Riker, Ann 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 04/05/2013
Ryker, Steve 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 11/18/2012
Schenck, Robert 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 02/18/2013
Schwetke, Cathy 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 03/03/2013
Swaim, Nancy 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 03/13/2013
Taylor, Jack 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 10/26/2012
Villines, Jeff 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 11/21/2012
Voreis, Larry 09/18/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 05/24/2012
Voreis, Larry 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 Cancelled 05/24/2012
Walker, Johnnie 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 10/24/2012
Westerfield, Claude 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 06/17/2013
Westerfield, Gerald 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 07/23/2012
Westerfield, Jay 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 07/03/2012
Westerfield, John 09/19/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 07/20/2012
Westerfield, Larry 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 07/05/2012
Westerfield, Marilyn 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 06/27/2013
Woodfill, James 09/20/2013 09/22/2013 001 2/0 Active 11/03/2012
Total Reservations: 46 Total Rooms: 44 Total Room Nights: 100

—————————————————–

If you are thinking of going a few days early or staying a few days late, you may want to check out the SCHENCK mansion Bed and Breakfast in Vevay Indiana, just a pleasant 20 mile drive along the Ohio River from Madison. We have a famous Dutch hand surgeon coming to join us and speak at the Gathering – named Dr. Bob Schenck. When we were in New York in 2011, our Dutch group got to see the 1600s Schenck house which was torn down and rebuilt inside the Brooklyn Museum. Here is what i learned about this Schenck house in Vevay, besides it has 35 rooms and five bedrooms each with private bath.
 
The mansion was originally built in 1874 by Benjamin Franklin Schenck, a steamboat captain, (wonder if we have any relatives in our group?) and was a marvel in its time then too. It has a four story tower, which I had the chance to climb inside, which Captain Schenck had built so his children could see his steamboat returning from its latest voyage.
Schenck Mansion
The Schenck Mansion Bed & Breakfast Inn is truely on of Indiana’s treasures of the past. Listed on the National Registry of Historic Places.  Our room are a step back in time when elegance was a way of life. 1)The B.F.Schenck suite has a sitting room with sofa bed, television and small refrigerator. The bedroom has a king size sleigh bed and working gas log fireplace. The dressing room has a clawfoot bathtub and wash basin. Small bath with shower stall also built under stairway. Designed for the comfort of 2, but sofa bed can be used for additional guest. 2) Corrine’s room has a queen size canopy bed, gas log fireplace, televison , and large private bath. One of the original copper bathtubs with walnut casing is one of the vocal points of this beautifuly decorated room. 3) Justine’s room is large and spacious with a king size 1/2 tester bed, televison, and private bathroom with copper tub. Great view of the gazebo and Indiana nature. 4) Eugenia’s room is a large room with ornate king size bed, gas log fireplace, television, and copper tub in the bathroom. There is a second bedroom that you can add on to this room for a group of four.  The second bedroom has a queen size bed, and televison. If you choose to add this bedroom it shares the bath.  5) Wiesman room has a king size canopy bed in this very large first floor room. Once the music room in this grand old mansion, you won’t be short on space. The private bath has one of the original copper tubs with walnut casing. Private sitting porch overlooking Indiana nature.  All room rates come with a full breakfast consisting of hot entree, fresh fruit, sweet bread or cereal, coffee, and juice. The double parlors and library are common areas for your enjoyment. Upper veranda is a favorite place to escape the everyday world.  Listen to the water flow in the gardens and let your cares float away.  Vevay is a unique little river town with charming shops and resturants. Only 7 miles from Belterra Casino Resort, 15 miles from the Kentucky Speedway, and 20 miles from Madison, Indiana.  You will be taking a step back in time when you come to Vevay and The Schenck Mansion.
 
See their facebook page too.
 

host(s):Jerry & Lisa FisherWeb Site:www.schenckmansion.comEmail:jlefisher@hotmail.comAddress:206 West Turnpike St
Vevay, Indiana 47043Phone 812-427-2787Guest Rooms:5Bathrooms: 5Rates:$100 – $200

 
—————————————————–
FROM EDGAR ALAN NUTT –
Ronnie Riker of  of Southport CT was looking for the parents of “The Honorable Richard Riker 1813 Recorder for NYC”  . If he has not already obtained that information
(plus his ancestral line and his career, including his duel, I would be glad to provide it. Edgar Alan Nutt <edalnutt@earthlink.net>

—————————————————–

Mary Ann Banta:

One of our members reports she/he has received several invitations to connect on Linked IN from a Mary Ann Banta.  I have many Bantas on the Dutch Cousins list, but no Mary Ann so if you receive an invite from her … just be cautious.

—————————————————–
WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? BEGINS THIS MONTH!

According to the most recent Eastmans Genealogy newsletter, TLC has announced the celebrities to appear on the new series beginning July 23. They are: Christina Applegate, Kelly Clarkson, Cindy Crawford, Zooey Deschanel, Chelsea Handler, Chris O’Donnell, Jim Parsons and Trisha Yearwood.

TLC-WDYTYA

Details may be found on TLC’s web site at http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are/videos/who-do-you-think-you-are.htm

—————————————————–
NAMING A ROYAL BABY
As Prince William and his wife KATE (The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge) prepare to welcome their first child into the world this month, there is much speculation about what the child will be named. Excitement across Britain and the rest of the world is mounting.
 
Usually, for titled members of the Royal Family, boys are given four names and girls are given three names. The Queen is Elizabeth Alexandra Mary, Prince William is William Arthur Philip Louis, for example. Queen Victoria ordered that all her descendants bear the name Albert somewhere in their names if male and Victoria if female, but that rule has not always been followed. Even though the royal baby will be officially known by its first name, it will likely have a nickname like most royal children. The Queen was and still is known as ‘Lillibet’, Prince charles was “Bonny Prince Charlie,” Prince William was known as Wills from the beginning and of course the rowdy red haired Prince Henry of Wales is, to everyone, Harry.  The royal baby will have NO official surname. Though if one is needed it would be Mountbatten-Windsor, though more likely  Cambridge would be used or perhaps Wales.
 
The Royal Horse Artillery fired a 41-gun salute in Hyde Park to proclaim the birth of Prince William on 21 June 1982, and there is no doubt that the birth of this Royal Baby will be announced in the same way. Gossips are speculating that the top tier of the Royal couple’s wedding cake will be served at the Baby’s christening.
—————————————————–
INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES IN FORT WORTH?
Our quarterly event, Citizen Archivist program, is right around the corner.  From July 24th -26th, our Citizen Archivists will focus on indexing and digitizing slave manifests from 1808-1860. Space is limited to only 3 archivists! Apply simply by sending your contact information and a paragraph stating why you want to become a Citizen Archivist to ftworth.education@nara.gov by July 17th. Please share this with anyone who would be interested in our program.
Many thanks!
Meg
Meg Hacker
Director, Regional Archives
National Archives at Fort Worth
1400 John Burgess Drive
Fort Worth, TX 76140
Phone Number: 817-551-2033

Letters 7/16/2013

From Carla Gerding of Kentucky:

The bus is now charted for the Madison area tour!!!  As of today, As of today,s mail we have 44 seats occupied on the bus.  Don’t forget tto save a seat for our narrator!   Only three left. We can’t get a bigger bus, it couldn’t make the backroads!  Checks for bus money should come to me.  Thanks. .

———————————

From Barbara Cozine of New Jersey:
I have  finally gotten a handle on the Cozine web site.  I added a counter and a guestbook, Jim’s email is on the table of contents page also.  Would you please send the link to the cousins and invite them to visit.  Please mention that those living individual’s names will not display. Of course we would appreciate feedback if they are so inclined.
———————————
From Mary Jo Gohmann:
This is so totally breathtaking—enjoy! 
These horses were originally bred as “war horses,” in the days of knights and armor.        
As armor got heavier, bigger horses were needed and the Friesian almost became extinct. 

They are back, and are one of the prettiest horses in stature, as well as gait.
What gorgeous animals!! Just watching them becomes an emotional experience. Can you imagine what it would  be like to ride one?Their manes and tails are the longest that I have seen–and I noticed that when performing on grass, their hoofs do not kick up a divot (they land flat footed).
Creatures such as these are what makes this world so special.These horses are native to the Netherlands.
 
——————————–

“About 1765, Dutch colonists from New Jersey began to pour into York and Adams Counties in the southern borders of Pennsylvania and west of the Susquehanna. These soon organized the Conewago and Hanover congregations in these respective counties. The church of Conewago was located about three miles south of Gettysburg and near the famous battleground of 1863. It consisted of about 150 families and 700 souls.

“From its baptismal records, yet preserved, extending from 1768-1803, it appears that the Cossats and Montforts of Millstone [or Harlinger] NJ, and the Bantas and Westervelts of Bergen Co., NJ, were among the earliest settlers. Other Dutch names–such as Bruner, Covert, Van Nuys, Schomp, Demarest, Bremer, DeMott, Bergen, Smock, Van Arsdale and others–occur in these records. The first Conewago deed for land is to a Van Arsdale and is dated 1768. The Demarests came from Bergen Co. in 1771.

“But about 1781 emigration began from this field to Kentucky and the Gennesee country, NY, and continued until these Dutch settlements and churches were entirely broken up. In 1793, during Brinckerhoff’s ministry, almost the whole congregation moved away to these two new fields. Those going to Central New York were the Brinckerhoffs, Jansens or Johnsons, Bodines, Van Tines, Daters, Parcelles, and Lysters.

“By 1800 Conewago was so depleted as to furnish but a very small congregation for Sundayservices. In 1817, only five Dutch families remained. Permission was then obtained to sell the old church building, with the proceeds build a wall around the burial ground. The sum realized was $288.20.”

From: A Manual of the Reformed church in America by Edward Tanjore Corwin, D. D. (New York: Board of Publication of the Ref. Prot. Dutch Church, 61 Franklin Street, 1859) p. 956.

We think this is wrong: The church of Conewago was located about three miles south of Gettysburg and near the famous battleground of 1863. 
The church was actually three miles northeast of Gettysburg on the old York Road.
From Jim Cozine of Las Vegas: Mr Weaner was clearly the expert on this — I even have in my files a copy of

his proposal to have a State Historic landmark set at the site—
he showed the site he believed to be the location of the church on a present day plate map
at the junction of York and Coleman roads. ( a spot 3 miles SW to G-Burg and 5 miles NW to New Oxford).
The text he suggested for the marker was:

“Holland Dutch families from New Jersey settled this area
in the late 18th century and removed in post Revolutionary
War years to Kentucky and New York. Latshell’s Tavern and
their church existed near this site. The walled burial ground
is at 900 Swift Run Road.”
Wonder how we could get the Pennsylvania Dept of roads to put up that sign?  Clearly they should.
from Vince Akers of Indianapolis:
Hi Carolyn!
The church was not south of Gettysburg and certainly was not west of Gettysburg.  It was about five and a half miles east-north-east of the center of Gettyburg along the Gettysburg-York Turnpike (now US 30).  US 30 runs east from Gettysburg to New Oxford.  The church was roughly midway between the two, a little closer to New Oxford.  I think the precise location may be unclear, but I can’t find my file of Arther Weaner’s maps to see if he came to a final difinitive spot.  The map I did locate has it on the north side of US 30 just west of Coleman Road that tees into US 30 from the north a little to the east of where the Low Dutch Road tees into US 30 from the south.  Hope that helps!
Vince
Letters 7/20/2013
from Judy Cassidy of Pennsylvania:
 I am looking for SALTER/SORTORE descendants who might be able to tell me if Thomas K. Salter, age 49 in the 1860 Lancaster, Gerrard Co. KY Census and his wife Martha formerly Martha Simpson age 35 are descendants or related to the Low Dutch Salter/Sorters?  He was a wealthy land owner and breeder of championship livestock.  
I would appreciate any help or information on this man.
 
This might be of interest to the Cousins, interested in where their ancestor was buried in York Co., PA.Arthur discovered this document when “working” in Reading Township.  In a survey dated 1765 Round Hill is listed as a “Presbyterian Meeting House Ld. (ld.)”  A survey, which I have for this burial ground reads as follows:
 
Surveyed the 13th day of September 1786, situate in Reading and Tyrone townships for Wm Mackey & GARRET DORLAND in Trust for the Round Hill Burying Ground, dated the 5th of Sept. 1786. The burying ground which now has a small church located on the grounds abuts the land of William Mackey and is located not far from the lands of John Vanarsdale and Gerret Dorland in Berwick Township, however several other members of the Low Dutch Congregation also lived in these three townships.  Arthur Weaner felt that there would have been no reason for Garret to be a Trustee unless at this point he intended to remain in York County and felt that burials in the northern cemetery were simply to difficult to access in winter, the cemetery had no further space and/or spring months when the weather was so bad, the roads were impassable etc.  The Southern Cemetery was much to far away for these people. Since this was a Presbyterian Church, it is possible that Reverend Brinkerhoff might have taken a turn as a supply minister to this Church which seemed to serve the surrounding residents, it is quite small. While it is possible that his wife Jannetje Hael and other members of his family, as well as other Low Dutch members who remained in the area are buried in this cemetery, the records of the burials which do not begin until a later date do not reflect that information.  
 
I have been to this cemetery several times over the past years but since the Dutch were marking their graves with homemade stones until the 1800’s, any gravestones would have probably been lost to time.  Cousins should however, keep this cemetery in mind as a possible burial location for missing ancestors.  Gerret sold his land and property and moved to Kentucky in 1790.
 
Judy Cassidy
Letters 7/28/2013
——————————————————————————————–
NOTICE:  THE BUS FOR THE MADISON AREA TOUR TO PLEASANT IS PACKED FULL, every seat is filled and we have a waiting list. I feel sorry for those missing out, but we’ve had a reminder on every Dutch Letters — and I am not giving up my seat.  I am not THAT nice!
We are setting up a guided walking tour of beautiful historic Madison for those who missed the bus.
——————————————————————————————–
 
On Jul 28, 2013, at 2:37 PM, Fran Salyer of Oklahoma wrote:

I would appreciate it so much if your could send the me the contact information so I can try to make arrangements.

 Carolyn, I just recently found some of my kin who would like to attend the Dutch Cousin Reunion in September. I think I saw from one of your letter where all the rooms had been taken but I was wondering if there might be a cancelation or two or somewhere close we could stay.

Thanks so very much

——————————————————————————————–
Just 3 days to register and save five bucks! Click on this hotlink to see the newsletter, and after that a downloadable registration form. 

(The program doesn’t seem to allow the newsletter itself to be downloaded for some reason)

Dutch Cousins: Gathering 2013 http://bit.ly/DutchCousinsUpdates
 
I think Clifty Inn is full, but call anyway, and maybe you can get on a waiting list in case there is a cancellation.

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371

Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.
——————————————–

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956. They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.

——————————————————————————————–
Here is the schedule so far, but will probably change a little:
 Sept 20th FRIDAY— 9 am: Memorial Service for Low Dutch Veterans of 1812 War at Clifty Inn
10 – 2  Coffee, Registration at Clifty Inn Meeting room,  Set up family History Tables, Pick up nametags, schedules, etc.,  Set up Silent Auction items, Prepare for business meeting. Lunch on your own.
1:00 BUSINESS MEETING;
3:00 Caravan tour to Dutch settlement near Pleasant Church: 5:30 return
(alternative: Bill Demaree of Madison will lead a walking tour of beautiful Historic Downtown Madison and the Ohio Riverfront area, maps at desk if you prefer to go on your own)
7:00 pm: Dinner Buffet at Clifty Inn; Speaker — Vince Akers – “After Kentucky–Migration to Indiana”
————————————————-
*  Sept 21st-SATURDAY — 9:00 a.m: coffee – Clifty Inn Meeting Room,
10 am Welcome by Mayor, Meet your Cousins, Family Genealogy tables, Networking, Silent auction
Noon lunch: Speakers: Dr. Bob Schenck “Travels with a Dutchman”
Video “Dutch New York by Mary Jo Gohmann;
4:00-5:00 pm- Book sale & Autograph Party; 5:00 pm-Silent Auction ends.
7 p.m. Dinner buffet  – Speaker – Patsy Harris – “Low Dutch & the Underground Railroad”
——————————————–
*  Sept 22-SUNDAY — 9 am Checkout & leave Clifty for Caravan to Six-Mile, Pleasureville, & Harrodsburg KY
10:30-11:30  History talk at Six-Mile by Vince Akers.
12:45 Lunch at 19th Hole, Harrodsburg KY.
2:30 pm Worship at Old Mud Meeting Hs, Harrodsburg, KY, Rev. Claude Westerfield – PUBLIC INVITED
 Sept 23-Monday 10to3 — Free Research time at Harrodsburg Historical Library for cousins.
—————————————————————————————-
 Our first three days of the Low Dutch Cousins 2013 Gathering will be at Clifty Inn, Madison, Indiana September 19. We’ve written about that before, and it is going to be an unforgettable three days. Then we caravan to Harrodsburg KY, about a 2 hour drive, to worship at our special treasure, the restored Old Mud Meetinghouse built by our Low Dutch ancestors more than 200 years ago.
PLEASUREVILLE, KY:  On the way to Harrodsburg we will stop and tour the SECOND Dutch meetinghouse built in Kentucky near Pleasureville in Henry County at the edge of Shelby County, on the old Low Dutch Tract, orginally around 8,000 acres. At the meetinghouse, our Low Dutch guru Vincent Akers will speak to us about the history. The present owners, and perhaps other interested local people, will be there to greet us and to hear Vince’s talk on the history of this church and the Low Dutch Tract in Henry and Shelby Counties.
—————————————————————————————-
HARRODSBURG KY SEPT 22-23, 2013
Home of the Low Dutch Old Mud Meetinghouse, built 1800, newly RESTORED!
HARRODSBURG KY:  Located in the heart of Kentucky’s famed Bluegrass region, the Harrodsburg/Mercer County Historical Society Research Library in Harrodsburg (http://kymercer.heliohost.org/hhs/) will open their incredible research facility just for us on Monday Sept 23 from 10 to 3, ALL FREE including their NEW special collection of our Low Dutch Archives. Can’t wait to see what all has been added since we were there two years ago. I highly recommend HHS Membership, $20.00 per year which includes a bi-monthly newsletter 8 to 12 pages in length. Currently running a series listing the guardian bonds of early Mercer Co., Ky. Queries free to members, use of the library is always free in their limited hours to members, with a nominal fee for non-members.The Genealogical Committee will do research @ $15.00 per hour plus the cost of 20¢ per page for copies. They have a large collection of family records & original documents in addition to a sizable collection of Kentucky books, and HHS now has Mrs. Ison’s research records indexed and filed for us to peruse – can’t wait to see these! She was the most amazing genealogy researcher I ever met and she knew EVERYTHING about the history of Harrodsburg area.
 
MERCER CO GENEALOGY: For a sample of things available to see online as well as at the HHS, go here:  http://kymercer.heliohost.org
—————————————————————————————-
-HARRODSBURG RESERVATIONS — SPECIAL RATES:  For those needing reservations at Harrodsburg, KY (my favorite place in the world!) for Sunday night September 22, I contacted Country Hearth, 105 Commercial Drive, Harrodsburg which has always been our gathering place in the past. The owner, Nate Patel, is happy to hear we are coming back and he let me know they have completely renovated the motel with all new furniture, bedding, carpet, everything. They are working on new TV sets for each room now. There was a water leakage problem when we were there in 2011, but they finally found the cause and got it fixed, so the Inn is now definitely dry and clean. Nate said their new manager, Leanna and staff, are excellent and he gave me his personal cell phone to call if there are any issues this year. This Inn has been selected to receive the top Gold Award for the entire Country Hearth chain and Nate will be going to their headquarters to receive the honor in October.  It is small, only two story but no elevator so if you can’t climb stairs ask for ground floor. It’s not the Taj Mahal, but it is friendly and convenient.  Nate is giving us special rates about $20 off the regular rates, but you have to call their local number and you have to state you are with the Dutch Cousins to get the rate, which runs from lowest, 1 bed-2 persons $60 on up to hottub suites and more.  I reserved about half their available rooms for our group. Here is the webpage address to see pictures, but Don’t make reservations online, he can’t change that higher rate once you dohttp://www.countryhearthharrodsburg.com  and the phone: 859-734-2400
OTHER PLACES:  There are lots of other options in and around Harrodsburg, including small bed and breakfasts, lake houses, other motels, etc. — and an option to get a room at Pleasant Hill, the restored Shaker Village.  I always want to do that, but again this year because of handicap concerns won’t be able to – maybe next time. For more info contact the Mercer County Tourist Bureau. (see their incredible webpage-http://www.harrodsburgky.com)
 Phone 1-800-355-9192 or email: tourism@harrodsburgky.com  They will send you a free brochure if requested.
STAY FOR A WEEK or MORE!  Harrodsburg is an amazing place with so much to see and do, all within a day’s driving range. Like –
  • Boonesboro Living History with Daniel Boone and Davy Crocket at the restored Fort, where some of our ancestors stayed at times for protection from Indian attacks; Living history, costumed guides, lectures, museum, store.   http://www.boonesboro.com
  • Old Fort Harrod at Harrodsburg: A full-scale replica of the fort, built by James Harrod in 1774, Cabins and blockhouses are furnished with handmade utensils, furniture, crude tools and implements used by the pioneers. Living history, costumed guides, store. The park complex also features Mansion Museum, George Rogers Clark Federal Monument, Lincoln Marriage Temple, and oldest cemetery west of the Alleghenies.
  • Perryville Battlefield state park & Museum, the site of the most destructive Civil War battle in the state which left more than 7,600 killed, wounded or missing.
  • Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, the largest restored Shaker community in America, tour the buildings and make reservations at the Trustees Office for the most incredible dinner you’ll ever eat. (reservations required) Take a ride on the authentic 115-passenger Dixie Belle sternwheeler, providing an up-close view of one of the most unique ecosystems in the country at the geologically ancient Kentucky River Palisades (You will want at least a full day here. We have been there three times and still haven’t seen all of it we wanted to.)
  • Spend some time in Harrodsburg, a town that bursts with historic charm. See the 1865 Dedman’s Drugstore and soda fountain, streets lined with architectural treasures, shops given over to period crafts, restaurants dishing up traditional Southern cooking. I LOVE this place our ancestors founded!
  • If you only have time to stop at one store, be sure it is J. Sampson Antiques, Books & Appraisals. The proprietor, Jerry Sampson, is president of HHS and has been a special presenter for the Dutch Cousins everytime we come to Harrodsburg. He has a facebook page and his store is located at 107 South Main Street, Harrodsburg, KY.
  • Just eight miles from Harrodsburg at Danville is the Golden Lion B&B, owned & operated by Jerry & Nancy Jones. What makes the Golden Lion special for us is not only a beautiful 1840 Greek Revival home listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to serving as a general Bed & Breakfast, The Golden Lion provides genealogical resources to those interested in researching the JONES surname and other difficult surnames. Jon & I have not stayed there, but we toured the beautiful  and enjoyed their genealogy displays. For reservations: 859-583-1895.  They also have a facebook page, or email: jonesgenealogist@aol.com
  • The Burgin Barn, for $10 you can eat and listen to a good house band, The Kentucky Strangers, playing mostly country and gospel music –open on Friday nights only. Operated by octogenarian Tommy Hurst – who also plays the bass. No alcohol or smoking allowed – just good music and music lovers. For more info read an article about the Barn in Louisville Magazine: http://www.theburginbarn.com/article.html and check out their facebook page “the-Burgin-Barn.” When they have special guests admission is two bucks more. Food is served at 6 pm as long as it lasts and the music starts at 7. Reservations recommended: 859-748-9689 or 859-265-1415
LOW DUTCH STATION HISTORY:  At the Golden Lion B&B in Danville KY a few years ago I first realized our Old Mud Meetinghouse might not be  the first one in KY as we had believed.  In a booklet by the owner, Jerry Jones, “Ken-Tah-The: The Life and Times of Walker Daniel,”District Court met at Harrodsburg on 4 Mar 1783 and adjourned to the “Dutch Meetinghouse” to complete the session.”  Our Mud Meetinhouse was not built until 1800, almost 20 years later. I called Mr. Jones this morning to get a clarification.  I tell you the man is a walking encyclopedia of early Kentucky history! 
 
Jones said in that early day there were two Dutch meetinghouses, the upper and the lower.  We decided the upper was probably the one near Louisville sometimes called “Holland Station,” and we have previously discussed the historical marker there.  Jones reminded me that on the earliest map of Kentucky, the 1784 Filson map, is the designation near Fort Harrod, “Low Dutch Station.” I had assumed that was our Old Mud, but Jones said by overlaying a present day map there are crossroads of at least five trails at that point, and the location of the meetinghouse would be present day Burgin. Jones does THIRTEEN blogs believe it or not, but the one most interesting to me – and probably to my readers- is this one centered on Danville area history: http://historicdanvilleky.blogspot.com/2012/05/beginning.html
Letters 8/7/2013
Hey Everyone!!
We have SEVENTEEN more Cousins signed up for our DC weekend Gathering next month! TOTAL 82 SO FAR.
Lora Westerfield from KY,

Donna & Bill Gaines from NV,
Bill & Betty Demaree from IN,
Lee Rogers & Wanda Jackson from IN,
Thelma Miller from KS,
Jim & Carolyn Burruss from AL,
 Jan & Tim Laughlin from WA,
Jim Woodfill from CA,
Deandra & Lela Bishop from WA,

Jeff & Jo Ellen Villines from IN.

TWENTY ONE DIFFERENT STATES represented so far,  this is great!!!
KY, TN, IN, OK, SC, IL, WI, PA, NJ, WA, TX, NC, MO, IA, MD, VA, CA, AL, NV, KS, OH.

We would like to see more people get on board for this great event.
We are looking forward to our wonderful Speakers and  great topics they have planned for us this year.
You won’t want to miss them!

Don’t forget to add your tee-shirt sizes on your registration forms.

On Donna’s updated hotel list she sent a few days ago, I counted 88 people in the Clifty Inn rooms.

That still leaves several people who have not registered with me. (or else we have a lot of NON-cousins taking advantage of the lower rate! LOL and not planning on participating in our event.)
Looks like I will have some late people that could change their mind, in case something comes up.
Lets hope the rest come in soon…….I’ll keep you posted.

Hoping to see ‘YOU’ there!!
Janice Cozine 🙂
Dutch Cousins

Registration  Chair

==========================================

HELP– Attendees of the upcoming Dutch Cousins Gathering– Who is planning to bring materials for the Family Displays? So far I have positive replies for only the following 2 families: Cozine, Demaree, and reference books (Joan Murray). These displays provide information and inspiration for all of your cousins.

Please let me know if you can bring something so that we know how many tables to set up.

Thanks, Pam Ellingson- ellingson.pam@gmail.com

==========================================
This may have been sent out earlier.
Nice to talk to you today, and thank you for the information on the Harrodsburg Historical Society, for the setting up of a tour of the Mud Meeting House, and for the offer to pass on my email address to Carolyn Leonard.
Re the MMH tour–anytime on the Sunday or Monday, April 7 or 8, would be wonderful, as that would leave the morning of Tuesday the  9th for my visit to the Historical Society Library. Please ask whoever will be escorting me and my friend to email me.
And please pass my email address to Carolyn Leonard, along with a partial list of names of direct ancestors who once lived and/or died in Harrodsburg: DeMotte (Laurens and Peter ), Terhune (Garret and Maria ), Van Nuys ( Catherine and Isaac ), Quick (Verouchie), Thompson ( John Cornelius and Lucy Willia ), Henderson (Thomas, Jr. ).
Any information about any of these families would be so very much appreciated. I hope to see graves of some of them while in Harrodsburg, and understand that there are markers for some in the Fort.
I am looking forward to my visit to Harrodsburg , and to what I may discover anew about some of my ancestors who lived in Kentucky.
Thank you for your help.
Sincerely,
Ellie Burnaford
Sent from my iPad
==========================================
 I am writing a paper on Slavery and the Low Dutch members of Conewago and Kentucky.  If anyone has family information that they would like to contribute, that would be appreciated; naturally you would be credited for your information if I can use it.  Slavery was prominent among the Dutch from New Netherlands onward, it is an important part of their history and a story worth telling.
In addition, are there any Banta’s who can identify Allie Banta who signed the first covenant on 12 March 1780 at Pleasant Hill?
Thanks
Judy Cassidy
==========================================
from Dave Demaree of Danville, KY:
You might like to know a little about me.  I grew up in Madison, Indiana and moved to Danville, Kentucky in 1977.  Two branches of the Demaree family lived in Madison as I grew to manhood.  Both families have the common ancestors of Samuel Demaree (Fourth Generation in America) and  his second wife, Lea Demarest.  My line came from the oldest son, Petrus, born of that union in 1737 and the other branch of the family came from his youngest brother, Samuel Jr., born in 1754.  My mother also has Demaree roots.  Her father’s maternal grandmother, Sarah Frances Demaree Barns is a descendant of the Samuel Jr. branch.   Some family trivia that might be of interest to you is that my great grandmother Demaree, Mary Ida Buchanan, was the grandniece of President James Buchanan.  I remember some of her relatives, from North Carolina, visiting my family when I was in high school.  Of further interest, my grandmother Demaree, Helen Cooney, had Irish uncles, The Cooney Brothers, masonry contractors who did the original masonry work on the Madison Fountain dedicated in 1886.
The Demaree name is one of over one hundred eighty Anglicized names derived from the original French name, desMarets.  My original American immigrant ancestor, David desMarets, a French Huguenot who fled with his family from France to protestant Holland, moved to Germany, and moved back to Holland prior to immigrating to New Amsterdam, America in 1663.  The French protestant minority integrated into the Dutch protestant majority by marriage.  The result is a genealogy of many Dutch Cousins.
Attached is a copy of my family tree.  My research came from the book, “The Demarest Family”, along with the Second Edition and Supplement were a Christmas Gift to my wife and I from my parents in 1978.  The first edition was written and published by Dr. William Henry Steel Demarest, a Dutch Reform Minister, and his sister, Mary Arthur Demarest in 1938.  The Second Edition and Supplements were written by Voorhis D. Demarest, President of the Demarest Family Association, and last published in 1971.  Let me Know of any common central Kentucky ancestors.
—————————————————————-
List of those registered so far. If your name is not on here, better contact Janice Cozine and get signed up!

REGISTRATION NAMES IN ORDER, AS OF 8/6/13

2 Akers, Vince & Green, Lisa
2 Anderson, Renee & Welches, Emily
2 Bishop, Deandra & Lela
1 Burnaford, Ellie
2 Burruss, Jim & Carolyn
2 Cole, King & Sharon
2 Cozine, Eddie & Janice
2 Cozine, Larry & Geri
1 Davis, Diana
2 Demaree, Bill & Betty
1 Ellingson, Pam
1 F-Johnson-Feldmann, Frances
2 Gaines, Donna & Bill
1 Gerding, Carla
2 Heathcoat,  Gene & Carol
2 Heavener, Jon & Carolyn Leonard
2 Hostetter, Alice / Whaley, Jan
2 Karwatka, Carole & Dennis
2 Laughlin, Jan & Tim
1 Merideth, Barbara
1 Metcalf, Sharon
1 Miller, Thelma
2 Murray, Joan & Richard
1 Park, Mary Woodfill
1 Perry, Denise Merideth
2 Pranger, Janice & Kozon, Ed
2 Riker, William & Ann
1 Rogers, (Mr) Lynn
2 Rogers, Lee & Jackson, Wanda
2 Schwetke, Cat & Jessie
2 Smith, Rogene & Bradley, Cheryl
2 Taylor, Jack & Sue
2 Villines, Jeff & Jo Ellen
2 Voreis, Larry & Suzanne
2 Westerfield, Charles & Marilyn
2 Westerfield, Claude & Kathy
2 Westerfield, Gerald & Nancy
2 Westerfield, John & Phyllis
1 Westerfield, Larry
1 Westerfield, Lora Jane
1 Whiteside, Barbara
1 Woodfill, Jim
69 TOTAL

—————————————————————-

While taking part in a BBC family history show, award-winning actress Minnie Driver was shocked to find out that her mother was actually her father’s mistress, and he had a secret double life and family living elsewhere.

Miss Driver found out when she was 12 that her father, Ronnie Driver, had another wife and children, but she never knew much about them. Mr. Driver set them up in a U.K. flat, and for many years his other family never knew they even existed, The Telegraph reported.

REad the full story here:

—————————————————————-

Letters 8/14/2013
FROM DARRELL LIVINGSTON, Gettysburg PA (owner of the Banta Cabin at Conewago)
Heard from Darrell Livingston who owns the Henry Banta Cabin at Conewago near the Northern Low Dutch cemetery. Instead of selling the cabin as he had hoped a couple years ago, he is now living there, at least for the time being. He would still love to restore the cabin to its original glory. He did have a new evaluation of the structure, by a man whose business is restoring historial buildings. This expert says the cabin does date to early 1700s just as we thought and as Mr. Weaner said.  Darrell is still hoping for funding for the restoration, and this is good news for our group. With so many descendants of Henry Banta in our group, and knowing what this structure means to the Dutch Cousins group – it is good to know the cabin is going to stay around.  I wonder if we could help influence the Adams county historical society to put up a marker for the cabin as well as the cemetery and the location of the church. I still have not received a reply from them for my first letter. If anyone in our group has information on how to get funds for restoring historic buildings like this, please speak up.
—————————————————————————–
FROM JIM CASSATT (COSSART)

Carolyn, Ken Sell, who is a distant cousin of mine forwarded me your information.  My name is Jim Cassatt and my family came from Hunterstown/Gettysburg, PA.  Could you please add me to your e-mail newsletters.

—————————————————————————–

From David Smock of Westin, FL:  I would like nothing better than to attend the Dutch Cousins gathering, Carolyn, especially since there are no Smocks in attendance, but medical problems have kept me grounded, close to home, for a number of years.  I will be with you all in spirit, however, am keenly interested in monitoring all the activities and comments on Dutch Letters, and pleased, as always, to share information. It is gratifying that the group has become so well organized, with members from so many states, all interested in our common Low Dutch heritage.   
 I hope that this finds you and your family in good health and spirits.
——————————————————————————————–
Readington Reformed church – the low dutch connection
Willempte Wyckoff was raised at her father’s “Mountain Farm” 3 or 4 miles from Whitehouse in Hunterdon Co., NJ. Willeptje kept a record of her family. It was written in Dutch and about 7 pages long. These pages have been pasted into a historical scrapbook prepared some years ago for the Readington Reformed Dutch Church in NJ. It lists her four children by Peter COZINE, all baptized at the Conewago Colony, and 6 children by Abraham Voorhees, her second husband, of Hunterdon Co., NJ. When we were at Readington church in 2011, I got a photo of our tour guide, Fred Sisser, beside the tombstone of his ancestor Abraham Voorhees in the Readington NJ churchyard. Willempte is buried in the DAR cemetery at Rockaway Dutch Reformed Church at Whitehouse Station, near Readington. For more info: http://bit.ly/13vXLE1
 

——————————————————————————————–

Clarks Run is a branch of the Dick’s River that flows through the southern part of what is now Danville KY.  Its name would suggest that the Clark family were the first to settle this area since they could name the creek.   By 1779 landmarks were “Boiling Spring” [James Harrod’s settlement, NOW Harrodsburg] and “Knob Lick” [what was to become Issac Shelby’s settlement (Danville)].  A “road” existed connecting both settlements which would be close to old 127 highway today which runs through the city of Danville.
——————————————————————————————–
NOTICE:  THE BUS FOR THE MADISON AREA TOUR TO PLEASANT IS PACKED FULL, every seat is filled and we have a waiting list. I feel sorry for those missing out, but we’ve had a reminder on every Dutch Letters — and I am not giving up my seat.  I am not THAT nice!
We are setting up a guided walking tour of beautiful historic Madison for those who missed the bus.
——————————————————————————————–
Click here for a downloadable registration form. http://

bit.ly/13GLhu1

 

Click on this hotlink to see the Gathering 2013 newsletter:  http://bit.ly/DutchCousinsUpdates

 (The program doesn’t seem to allow the newsletter itself to be downloaded for some reason)

—————————————————————————————————————————————-

I think our block of rooms at Clifty Inn is filled up, but call anyway, and maybe they have a regular price room, or you can get on a waiting list in case there is a cancellation.

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371

Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC to see if there are rooms at our special rate.
——————————————–

Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956. They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.

—————————————————————————————————————————————-

Want to know more about our Low Dutch Heritage?

Just click on the links below or paste the URLs into your browser.

Book Review: Taxables! (The Dutch at Conewago) http://bit.ly/MyBookReviews
My Blog: The Cousins are Coming!  http://bit.ly/myblogs2012
LowDutchHeritage: The Church at Conewago  http://bit.ly/1bO7c8a
Dutch Cousins: Gathering 2013 http://bit.ly/DutchCousinsUpdates
Writers Reminder: http://bit.ly/16TyESp
——————————————————————————————–
Here is the schedule so far, but will probably change a little:
 Sept 20th FRIDAY— 9 am: Memorial Service for Low Dutch Veterans of 1812 War at Clifty Inn
10 – 2  Coffee, Registration at Clifty Inn Meeting room,  Set up family History Tables, Pick up nametags, schedules, etc.,  Set up Silent Auction items, Prepare for business meeting. Lunch on your own.
1:00 BUSINESS MEETING;
3:00 Caravan tour to Dutch settlement near Pleasant Church: 5:30 return
(alternative: Bill Demaree of Madison will lead a walking tour of beautiful Historic Downtown Madison and the Ohio Riverfront area, maps at desk if you prefer to go on your own)
7:00 pm: Dinner Buffet at Clifty Inn; Speaker — Vince Akers – “After Kentucky–Migration to Indiana”
————————————————-
*  Sept 21st-SATURDAY — 9:00 a.m: coffee – Clifty Inn Meeting Room,
10 am Welcome by Mayor, Meet your Cousins, Family Genealogy tables, Networking, Silent auction
Noon lunch: Speakers: Dr. Bob Schenck “Travels with a Dutchman”
Video “Dutch New York by Mary Jo Gohmann;
4:00-5:00 pm- Book sale & Autograph Party; 5:00 pm-Silent Auction ends.
7 p.m. Dinner buffet  – Speaker – Patsy Harris – “Low Dutch & the Underground Railroad”
——————————————–
*  Sept 22-SUNDAY — 9 am Checkout & leave Clifty for Caravan to Six-Mile, Pleasureville, & Harrodsburg KY
10:30-11:30  History talk at Six-Mile by Vince Akers.
12:45 Lunch at 19th Hole, Harrodsburg KY.
2:30 pm Worship at Old Mud Meeting Hs, Harrodsburg, KY, Rev. Claude Westerfield – PUBLIC INVITED
 Sept 23-Monday 10to3 — Free Research time at Harrodsburg Historical Library for cousins.
—————————————————————————————-
 Our first three days of the Low Dutch Cousins 2013 Gathering will be at Clifty Inn, Madison, Indiana September 19. We’ve written about that before, and it is going to be an unforgettable three days. Then we caravan to Harrodsburg KY, about a 2 hour drive, to worship at our special treasure, the restored Old Mud Meetinghouse built by our Low Dutch ancestors more than 200 years ago.
PLEASUREVILLE, KY:  On the way to Harrodsburg we will stop and tour the SECOND Dutch meetinghouse built in Kentucky near Pleasureville in Henry County at the edge of Shelby County, on the old Low Dutch Tract, orginally around 8,000 acres. At the meetinghouse, our Low Dutch guru Vincent Akers will speak to us about the history. The present owners, and perhaps other interested local people, will be there to greet us and to hear Vince’s talk on the history of this church and the Low Dutch Tract in Henry and Shelby Counties.
—————————————————————————————-
HARRODSBURG KY SEPT 22-23, 2013
Home of the Low Dutch Old Mud Meetinghouse, built 1800, newly RESTORED!
-HARRODSBURG RESERVATIONS — SPECIAL RATES:  For those needing reservations at Harrodsburg, KY (my favorite place in the world!) for Sunday night September 22, I contacted Country Hearth, 105 Commercial Drive, Harrodsburg which has always been our gathering place in the past. The owner, Nate Patel, is happy to hear we are coming back and he let me know they have completely renovated the motel with all new furniture, bedding, carpet, everything. Small, only two story with no elevator so if you can’t climb stairs ask for ground floor. friendly and convenient.  You have to call their local number and you have to state you are with the Dutch Cousins to get the rate, which runs from lowest, 1 bed-2 persons $60 on up to hottub suites and more.  I reserved about half their available rooms for our group. Here is the webpage address to see pictures, but Don’t make reservations online, he can’t change that higher rate once you dohttp://www.countryhearthharrodsburg.com  and the phone: 859-734-2400
Stay a week or more in Harrodsburg! So much to see and do:  For more info contact the Mercer County Tourist Bureau. (see their incredible webpage-http://www.harrodsburgky.com)
 Phone 1-800-355-9192 or email: tourism@harrodsburgky.com  They will send you a free brochure if requested.
Letters 8/28/2013
Hi Everyone, The time is drawing near……..
Here are more Dutch Cousins getting ready for the Gathering in Madison.
Bob Demaree from IN, Carla Gerding from KY, Dave & Dena M Demaree
from KY and  Paula Harman from OK, Paula didn’t give me her companion’s name.
This week is the dead line for ordering your DC tee-shirts.  If you want to order, now’s the time.Looking forward to September!!
Janice  Cozine  🙂

——————————————————-
NEEDING A ROOM AT CLIFTY INN?
One room is available. Ann Demaree is unable to attend due to pending surgery, so instead of cancelling she wanted to offer another cousin a change at it. She will wait till Saturday to cancel so if interested, contact her immediately <ademaree35@yahoo.com>
—————————————-
ATTENTION AUTHORS!!!
Attention authors:  The Book Sale/Autograph Party scheduled on Saturday, September 21, 2013 will take place from 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm.   Any Dutch Cousins having books and/or publications for sale at the upcoming Dutch Cousins Reunion are encouraged to participate.  Please notify joanemurray74@gmail.com with your name and the title/s of your publications.  Carolyn will soon be preparing a news release for the reunion and would like to have the information to include in her release.  Thank you.   Joan Murray

SO FAR–

I WILL bring some more copies of WHO’S YOUR DADDY? Guide to Genealogy from Start to Finish.  Still working on the two that had been scheduled for publication this summer:  I AM SARA, story of Sara Cozine, Granddaughter of Reverend Cornelius Cozine who was kidnapped by Indians and held captive for five years; and THE LONG HARD JOURNEY OF THE LOW DUTCH from New Amsterdam to Kentucky. Probably not much chance they will be ready for this year’s gathering!
————-
Joan is bringing:  “The Bantas of Pleasant Hill, Kentucky,”  and a few copies of “Bunnell and Allied Families,” which contains another group of Dutch and Huguenots, not associated with the Dutch Cousins group, also a few flyers on my “England Family in Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri and Illinois,”  which has to be ordered through Heritage Press. The Englands arrived in Kentucky (Mercer) in 1783.
——————–
We are counting on Vince Akers to bring copies of his popular and informative booklet,

Low Dutch Company: A History of the Holland Dutch Settlements of the Kentucky Frontier by Vincent Akers (Jun 1985)-

I saw Amazon has a copy of that booklet for sale in paperback for $49, or unknown binding $210; but Vince usually sells copies at the Dutch Cousins gatherings for under $10. (and no waiting for shipping!)

————–

Okay … authors, sign up! Contact  joanemurray74@gmail.com with your name and the title/s of your publications.

——————————————————-
HELP– Attendees of the upcoming Dutch Cousins Gathering– Who is planning to bring materials for the Family Displays? So far I have positive replies for only the following 2 families: Cozine, Demaree, and reference books (Joan Murray). These displays provide information and inspiration for all of your cousins.

Please let me know if you can bring something so that we know how many tables to set up.

Thanks, Pam Ellingson- ellingson.pam@gmail.com

==========================================
Phyllis and John Westerfield are in charge of the silent auction this year, so start thinking what you would like to contribute. I am selecting some of my Dutch research books to bring.  What do you have in mind?  Let me know!
————————————————————
NOTE FROM OUR COORDINATOR DONNA GAINES!
Dear cousins, please be aware we are all living in different time zones and think about that before calling Donna to ask a question.  She is on the west coast and was awakened before sunup the other morning with someone wanting to know the Saturday lunch menu! Someone also asked if they could come and buy things at the silent auction without paying registration or attending the gathering. hmmmmm. WE will have drawings for free gifts, but only registered guests will be eligible to receive them, attend the lectures or participate in the activities. Registered guests may bring and pay for family members to attend the meals and hear the guest speaker.  Come on cousins!  Registration is only $25 for three days! The booksale will be open to the public, and also the family history displays.  All money collected goes to pay for the expense of the gathering. Any extra goes to support restoration of our Old Mud meetinghouse.
THINK ABOUT IT!
————————————————————————————————————-
HeritageQuest is a subscription service obtainable only by libraries.  Patrons holding a Public Library card can usually access that website for free from home.   The resources available include PERSI (Periodical Source Index) where you can search thousands of genealogy and local history periodicals and then purchase copies of the articles of interest.  In addition to PERSI, you can see the records in the federal census, the Revolutionary War and the Freedman’s Bank, look for books on family and local histories and search the Memorials, Petitions and Private Relief Actions of the US Congress. Ancestry.com is famous for its millions of genealogical records of all sorts from around the world.  Free access to it is available in many public libraries and as members as some genealogy groups around the country.
——————————————————————–
Hello from Mary Jo Gohmann of Kentucky:
My daughter and I are planning a trip to Amsterdam, Holland this October. Are there any suggestions on where to stay in Amsterdam ? We are hopefully going to do some research on Epke Jacobe Banta. Can any of the cousins suggest where to go and how to get to the area in whichever he lived in Friesland? We will be traveling by Train from Paris and hope to use public transportation while there. We will appreciate our Low Dutch  Cousins suggestions!
——————————————————————–

Guardianship Records

As recently as the early 20th century, the death of a father meant his children were orphans, even if their mother survived.  Laws assumed a woman could not provide for or manage the welfare of her children.
The courts became involved by assigning one or more guardians for these children who were responsible for their care and welfare even if they continued to live with their mother. The guardian might be a male relative or a couple related to either parent.  Several siblings might be sent to live with different guardians.
If the father was wealthy, he might have created a trust to care for a minor child’s welfare.  When an appropriate guardian could not be found for children from a poor family, they might be sent to an orphanage or other facility. Guardianship records are part of the probate records of the parent’s estate.

——————————————————————–
from me – Carolyn Leonard:  WE GOT HOME yesterday evening from our six day trip to Indiana for a genealogy conference. It was good practice to see what I need to do on the Kentucky trip next month to the Dutch cousins, and then on to John’s “large” family reunion in Virginia. We traveled by air this time but plan to drive to Kentucky & Virginia, and will be gone much longer. The air travel was okay after I moved up to business class. I learmed I sure tire out quickly and will need to pace myself carefully. And walking?  … well can’t do much of that at all without upping the pain level. Maybe another month will make a big difference. Sure hope so.  I am off the walker but took a folding cane with me in my carry on and was really glad I did. We did have a good trip and learned some new computer tricks as well as researching in the world largest public genealogy library – and making some new friends.
—————————————————-
ARE YOU READY CHAIRPERSONS?  IT IS ALMOST TIME!
2013 Chairpersons:
  WELCOME – Barbie Abbott Hammon, KY
  HOSPITALITY – Gene and Carol Heathcoat, TX
SILENT AUCTION – John C & Phyllis Westerfield,PA
GATHERING COORDINATOR – Donna Gaines, NV
PUBLICITY – Carolyn Leonard,OK
REGISTRATION & NAMETAGS- Janice Cozine, KY
TEE SHIRTS – Dennis & Carol Karwatka,KY
HISTORIAN – Barbara Whiteside, IN
FAMILY GROUP DISPLAYS – Pam Ellingson, WI
LOW DUTCH REPOSITORY- Amalie Preston,KY
NEWSLETTER FOLDING, STUFFING, MAILING – Louise & Randy Ledger,OK
WORSHIP – Rev. Claude Westerfield,IA
COUSIN SPEAKERS – Vince Akers,IN; Mary Jo Gohmann,IN, Dr. Bob Schenck,IL
FRIDAY CARAVAN MASTER  – Lynn Rogers,OH

Madison Bus Tour: Carla Gerding, KY

DUTCH LOGO PIN SALES – Jay Westerfield,IN
BOOK SALE & AUTOGRAPH PARTY – Joan Murray,IL
VETERANS MEMORIAL – Mary Woodfill Park,MD

———————————————————

Letters 9/2/2013
MADISON INDIANA:  Our first two days of the Low Dutch Cousins 2013 Gathering  (Fri, September20 and Sat, Sept 21) will be at Clifty Inn, Madison, Indiana. (see phone number below) We’ve written about that before in detail, and it is going to be an unforgettable time. Then on Sunday the 22nd, we leave Madison and caravan to Pleasureville KY’s 6-mile Meetinghouse, continuing to Harrodsburg KY, about a 2 hour drive total, to worship at our special treasure, the restored Old Mud Meetinghouse built by our Low Dutch ancestors more than 200 years ago, the first known Dutch Reformed Meetinghouse in Kentucky. On Monday the Harrodsburg Historical Research Library will have special hours open for us — the ONLY Low Dutch repository in the nation! (see information below about a good place to stay in Harrodsburg)
 
—————————————————————————
You have registered for the gathering haven’t you?  I don’t have a list of those registered handy, but here is a hotlink to the newsletter and a downloadable registration blank so our chairperson can have your nametags ready and be properly welcomed when you arrive.
The newsletter with information about the gathering and daily schedule is:  http://bit.ly/159uEYT ; 
Registration forms can be downloaded from http://bit.ly/13GLhu1
The number of reservations usually determines much of our program – the more people who attend, the more we can afford to do and the better the price we get on things, etc.  I believe there are around 80 people registered at this time.
 
The newsletter with information about the gathering and daily schedule is:  http://bit.ly/159uEYT ; 
Registration forms can be downloaded from http://bit.ly/13GLhu1
 
If that doesn’t work for you, Go here:
CarolynBLeonard http://www.carolynbleonard.com
and choose the Dutch Cousins page. Then scroll down to the newsletter & the registration pages.
 
Click here for a downloadable registration blank.   http://bit.ly/13GLhu1
I hope every one understands we do not make money on the meals, we have to include a dollar or two extra to pay for the room with speaking equipment and other meal expense. Everyone is a volunteer in this group — even the speakers and organizers!
—————————————————————————
MADISON, INDIANA:  
Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is:877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  DepartingSunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full. 
(They probably are full by now but you can still try if you wish.)
If Clifty Falls is full, contact the Madison Tourist Bureau 800-559-2956 or812-265-2956
 
HARRODSBURG KY: Sunday Sept 22, 2013 and Monday Sept 23, 2013:  Nate Patel owner of the Country Hearth, 105 Commercial Drive, Harrodsburg  called this morning to let me know he will be making a cutoff soon on the our SPECIAL RATES at  Harrodsburg, KY (my favorite place in the world!) so if you have not made your reservations yet, better do it now.  Nate is giving us special rates about $20 off the regular rates, but you have to call their local number and you have to state you are with the Dutch Cousins to get the rate, which runs from lowest, 1 bed-2 persons $60 on up to hottub suites and more.  I reserved about half their available rooms for our group. Here is the webpage address to see pictures, but don’t make reservations online, he can’t change that higher rate once you dohttp://www.countryhearthharrodsburg.com . Call this number to make your reservation and be sure to say you are with the Dutch Cousins– the phone: 859-734-2400
 
—————————————————————————
Book Review: Taxables! (The Dutch at Conewago) http://bit.ly/MyBookReviews
 
My Blog: The Cousins are Coming!  http://bit.ly/myblogs2012
 
LowDutchHeritage: The Church at Conewago:    http://bit.ly/1bO7c8a
 
Dutch Cousins: Gathering 2013:   http://bit.ly/DutchCousinsUpdates
 
Writers Reminder: http://bit.ly/16TyESp
 
—————————————————————————
 
 
REGISTRATIONS: I am working on adding engraved stick on family name ribbons for each person to add to their nametag.  Will send you a link to my blog that will have a photo of what I have in mind.
 
OUR REGISTRATIONS Chairperson, Janice Cozine, sent me this note about adding the family names:
as of today, I have 80 people registered
different family affiliated names listed are;
BANTA – 2
DEMAREE – 6
VORIS – 2
DEMOTT – 1
WESTERFIELD – 10
VAN WESTERFELT – 1
COZINE – 5
RYKER – 8
RIKER – 1
DUREE – 1
SMOCK – 1
SEDANE – 1 (who is this ?)
LUYSTER – 1
REYNERSON – 2
COMMINGORE – 1
VOORHOES – 1
MONTFORT – 2
Not everyone has posted their family affiliation.
—————————————————————————
 
ARE YOU READY CHAIRPERSONS?  IT IS ALMOST TIME! Hope you will each continue giving a brief update of what you have planned and how it is going for the next “Letters.” Claude will let us know how plans are going for worship at Old Mud.  I hear that Lynn Rogers has made arrangements for the Mayor of Madison to welcome us!  Now that is BIG.

2013 Chairpersons:
  WELCOME – Barbie Abbott Hammon, KY
  HOSPITALITY – Gene and Carol Heathcoat, TX
SILENT AUCTION – John C & Phyllis Westerfield,PA
GATHERING COORDINATOR – Donna Gaines, NV
PUBLICITY – Carolyn Leonard,OK
REGISTRATION & NAMETAGS- Janice Cozine, KY
TEE SHIRTS – Dennis & Carol Karwatka,KY
HISTORIAN – Barbara Whiteside, IN
FAMILY GROUP DISPLAYS – Pam Ellingson, WI
LOW DUTCH REPOSITORY- Amalie Preston,KY
NEWSLETTER FOLDING, STUFFING, MAILING – Louise & Randy Ledger,OK
WORSHIP – Rev. Claude Westerfield,IA
COUSIN SPEAKERS – Vince Akers,IN; Mary Jo Gohmann,IN, Dr. Bob Schenck,IL
FRIDAY CARAVAN MASTER  – Lynn Rogers,OH

 Madison Bus Tour: Carla Gerding, KY

DUTCH LOGO PIN SALES – Jay Westerfield,IN
BOOK SALE & AUTOGRAPH PARTY – Joan Murray,IL
VETERANS MEMORIAL – Mary Woodfill Park,MD

PHOTOGRAPHER- Bill Demaree, IN

—————————————————–
COPIER
The Clifty Inn has a copier and will make copies for 10 cents each, but if anyone else has a copier they could bring that would be great. I have a Flip-Pal Scanner I will bring. (Carolyn speaking here)
The Flip-Pal is great for copying photos 5×7 size or smaller.  What can you bring?
 
—————————————————–
FAMILY HISTORY DISPLAYS
Are you working on a display for your Low Dutch family name group?  They need to be freestanding if possible. Let Pam Ellingson know what you are bringing so she can plan the space. pam ellingson <ellingson.pam@gmail.com> I did hear that Bob Woodfill is bringing some of Maj. Sam. Woodfill’s WWI artifacts (Ryker line), and that Joan Murray is bringing some reference books to share (Banta line I think). I am working on a Cozine display. What are you bringing to share about your family group (see some of the family group names above)?
 
—————————————————–
 
HOSPITALITY:
Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will be available Thursday, Friday andSaturday to welcome the cousins. They plan to serve coffee and pastries in their room  on Saturday morning. Lynn Rogers is bringing a 30-cup coffee pot – Does anyone else have one to bring? I was going to bring one we loaned to the Genealogy Society but they need it that week. If no one else has one, I will buy another one and donate it to the group. Gene & Carol will pick up anything and everything needed like paper plates, coffee, goodies and napkins after they get to Madison at the local Kroger’s grocery store or at a local bakery.
 
—————————————————–
 
VIDEO – DUTCH FOOTPRINTS TO NEW AMSTERDAM
I just received the video prepared and narrated by Mary Jo Banta Gohmann of Floyds Knobs, Indiana to be presented on Saturday called “Low Dutch Cousins Footprints to New Amsterdam”.  It is amazing! I don’t know how Mary Jo managed to pack all that 11 day trip into such a compelling 30 minute show — but she did. She must have spent all her time in the two years since the trip to make this outstanding video. Whether you were one of the cousins on the trip and in the photos or not – you won’t want to miss this. It will be the fastest half an hour of the whole weekend!
 
—————————————————————————
VOLUNTEER NEEDED
We need a volunteer to step up to coordinate the next Dutch Cousins reunion in 2015.  That is, assuming the group votes to continue the gatherings when we meet on Friday September 20, 1 pm at Clifty Inn for the business meeting.  I hope you will be thinking about this important decision and let me know your thoughts, please.  We must have new volunteers if the group is to carry on.  This is such a great group it would be a shame to let the enthusiasm drop.
 
I AM SORRY to pass on this message from Donna Gaines, who volunteered to be coordinator for this 2013 event in Madison, as she says, “back when she was all in one piece.” (I sure know how that is!) 
 
from Donna Gaines of Nevada: Due to a prior heart condition that I’ve lived with for the past 26 years, and two recent unexpected heart procedures, I feel that I am unable to commit to 2015 as the Gathering Coordinator, as I don’t know if I will need another procedure in the future. I feel fortunate to have been able to do this for this year, however this is the right time to back away and take care of my health.  Thank you for all of your support.  This is a team effort, and we have an awesome team. Thank you for letting me be a part of this. 
 
—————————————————–
ABOUT THE BOOKSALE/AUTOGRAPH PARTY IN MADISON, FROM DONNA GAINES:

 Village Bookstore in Madison is coming and will bring 3 separate books. They will need a table and an electrical source to plug in a small cash register. Nathan said he’d be there about 3:30 on Saturday to set up.  Joan Murray of Illinois is coordinating this event.

 
From the Village Lights Bookstore <info@villagelightsbooks.com>:  Getting back to you to finalize details for books and signing on Sept 21. Of the three authors I had in mind, two are unable to participate. I would, however, have their books on hand (both general books on Madison history). Fortunately, Ben Newell, the author of the book on your second cousin Maj. Sam Woodfill, is willing and able to participate.
“Madison”, by Ron Grimes and Jane Ammeson (Arcadia Press, pub.)
“Madison on the Ohio, 1809-2009: Remembering Two Hundred Years”, by Camille Fif-Salmon and Ron Grimes (Madison Courier, pub.)
“Major Sam Woodfill: The Greatest Soldier of WWI”, by Ben Newell (locally published)
Ben Newell will be present to sign his books, and Nathan will be present to conduct sales for the bookstore books.

 

—————————————————–

ABOUT THE SILENT AUCTION:
 
Hello every one, my name is Phyllis Westerfield and I will be doing the  Silent Auction for the reunion.  I will surely need your help with the auction, so let’s begin.  If you have any items to go on the table just send a description and name of the item to me soon, if possible, so I will have an idea before the reunion of what will be on the table.  In the past it has been a great success and lots of fun too.  My e-mail address is JCW44@Juno.Com.
HUGS! and God Bless,
 Phyllis
—————————————————–
PHOTOGRAPHER, Clifty Inn, Satuday Sept 21, noon, Bill Demaree – chairperson
Michael Heitz of Madison (812-701-1392)
$100 for a couple hours hanging around taking pictures and then he will sell the group photos at $10 each.  And he will give us a couple of discs with the photos to use for publicity and for newsletters at no extra charge.
—————————————————–
VETERAN RECOGNITION CEREMONY
I, together with other descendants, would like to receive permission to place a marker at the grave site of Gerardus Ryker (1767-1839) memorializing his military service in the Revolution, the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794, the Kentucky Cornstalk Militia in 1796, and the War of 1812.  His grave site is in the row farthest from the road, and 75 yards north of the south edge and 50 yards east of the west edge of the Cemetery.  The granite marker would be approximately 12 inches by 24 inches, and would be mounted flush with the ground such that a lawn mower could mow over it and there would not be any grass trimming required.  Mowing would not damage the stone nor would it damage the mower.  Mr Lynn Rogers, DAYTON OH 45459
—————————————————–
200 YEAR OLD RYKER BIBLE TO BE DISPLAYED!
Lynn Rogers is bringing the 200-year old Bible of Gerardus and leah Ryker to display.The bible will be on display at the 2013 Dutch Cousins Reunion, indeed a rare opportunity for descendants.  Advice on scanning the family record pages and conserving the bible and also on permanent custody will be given by the Rare Books Section of the Indiana Historical Society.  Images of the family record pages are included in Franklin Ryker’s 1976 book pages 112 thru 115; there is an error in the transcript for F-6 on p. 109.  Franklin’s book and a lot of other Ryker genealogical material will be available at the reunion.Lynn said when he put on the white cotton gloves and opened the bible to the front, the first surviving page had at the top “he marrieth Leah and Rachael.”  (*Gen 29*)  The bible belonged to Leah, and those two names are very common in the Ryker family.

Inside the front cover was a deed from Robert Balz(?) to Jarred Ryker, Sep 7 1842, Deed Bk U(?) p. 77; and an ad for a sale of John G. Ryker in the newspaper of Sep 6 1864.

 
—————————————————–
SIX MILE MEETINGHOUSE 
ON 13 January 2013, Vince Akers said: JoAnn Adams who owns the Low Dutch Meetinghouse near Pleasureville.  She has put Sunday morning,September 22nd, on her calendar.  She is really looking forward to having the Dutch Cousins stop and see the meetinghouse on their way as they caravan from Madison to Old Mud.  She will have her unique woolen business open too for the Cousins.  I’ll be happy to give a little history of the meetinghouse and its rediscovery in 2003 and restoration in 2004-05 while we are there.  We should get a big group photo while there too.  I can also give a little preview the night before (Saturday night) of what to expect when the caravan stops.  In fact, Saturday night might be a good time to talk briefly about both Six Mile’s and Old Mud’s restorations.  I’m sure the Cousins would enjoy an update on Old Mud before the visit on Sunday.  Two different days of hands on touring to actual places our families lived and verbal history on both.  Priceless I think.
Letters 9/8/2013
VIDEO – DUTCH FOOTPRINTS TO NEW AMSTERDAM – new info
The video prepared and narrated by Mary Jo Banta Gohmann of Floyds Knobs, Indiana to be presented on Saturday called “Low Dutch Cousins Footprints to New Amsterdam” is amazing! I don’t know how Mary Jo managed to pack all that 11 day trip into such a compelling 30 minute show — but she did. She must have spent all her time in the two years since the trip to make this outstanding video. Whether you were one of the cousins on the trip and in the photos or not – you won’t want to miss this. It will be the fastest half an hour of the whole weekend!  Mary Jo made 20 copies of the DVD to be sold at $10 each with money going to the Cousins funds. Two have already been reserved, so only 18 left. We haven’t come up with an idea to duplicate any more of these. If you want a copy, better send a reply now to reserve one and pay for it on arrival at Clifty.
 
—————————————————————————————-

BOOKSALE AND AUTOGRAPH PARTY: DR. ROBERT SCHENCK, our noon Saturday speaker, will have his book “TRAVELS WITH GENGHIS”  now in soft cover and will sell to our group and guests for $20.00 (his cost). The book is beautiful, well illustrated and concerns his journey a couple years ago driving an ambulance from London to Mongolia, for Charity. The ambulance was donated to the hospital there after driving through 17 countries and more than 10 thousand miles.  It was quite an adventure!
Somehow Dr. Schenck had dropped off the mailing list and had not heard from us since early May. Oh the wonders of the internet.  I am so glad he let us know.
—————————————————————————————-
STAGG FAMILY
Hello,
We are certainly looking forward to coming to Indiana and Ky.  We arrive on Thursday.  I plan to bring a Civil War diary written by my great grandfather ( he was the son of Mary Ann Stagg /Rynearson). I also have other papers from that time that may be of interest.  I have another paper that I really don’t know why it was included with the diary because it is of Francois I and writings are in French.  Hoping those of you who are more experienced in genealogy sleuthing can give me direction.
See you soon and thanks for all the updates!
Sharon Cole

—————————————————————————————-

FAMILY HISTORY DISPLAYS

Family Displays– I have heard from a few more Dutch Cousins that are planning to bring items for the family displays: Cozine, Demaree/Demarest, Durie, Lyster/Wychoff, Montfort, Ryker/Riker, Stagg and Reference Books

I am hoping that more will be bringing items to share. Will any WESTERFIELDS be displaying things?
Please e-mail Pam if you plan to bring something: ellingson.pam@gmail.com
—————————————————————————————-
From Barbie Abbott Hamman, Louisville KY
I don’t have a reservation for a hotel the whole weekend because I live so close to Madison, Rod and I are just going up every day, so I can meet anyone anywhere and get what is needed. I can also work the reservations table Thursday night.  I feel a lot of folks would LOVE to pick their stuff up on Thursday night and that would help out a lot on Friday morning with anyone else that’s coming in that day, so if it’s OK with everyone else, and I have what I need, I’m happy to do that for us. Just let me know!  I just Can’t WAIT for everyone to see Madison!  It’s just the CUTEST Little Town!
Barbie (THE Little Dutch Girl)
—————————————————————————————-

from MR. Lynn ROGERS, Centerville, OH

I am bringing 3 or 4 coffee pots, household 12 cups ea.

—————————————————————————————-

 Jay Westerfield volunteered to handle sales & delivery of the lapel pins and the DVDs, but has a health issue and can only be there from Friday noon to Saturday noon. Barbie Abbott Hammon volunteered to handle that duty along with helping with registration.  She is coming to Clifty Inn Thursday after noon to do early registration.

—————————————————————————————-

PREPARING GIFT BAGS, HELPING WITH REGISTRATION, SELLING DVDs:
Carolyn,
It would be my honor to do that for you!!!  If you would like to send the (things) to me I’ll get the rest, have them “goodied-up” and wrapped with a pretty bow (orange?) and made ready for the weekend. Sound OK?  If you have another idea, or need something else, just let me know.  Oh, and I have sent in my reservation.  ‘Bout time, don’t you think?
Hugs, Hugs, HUGS!  Can’t wait to see you!
Barbie
—————————————————————————————-

From Martha Roach, OKC

carolyn,
I have a large coffee pot gathering dust.  would be happy to donate it to the cousins if still needed.  could bring it to you tomorrow.

—————————————————————————————-

from Carole Karwatka:
I am willing to continue with the Tee-Shirts if they turn out OK this year.  If not, someone else can please be selected!!!
Have a nice weekend.
Carole

—————————————————————————————-
From Carolyn – DONE!  This is an AWESOME group of people to work with!
—————————————————————————————-

From Jim Cozine of Las Vegas:
Excerpt from last Dutch Letters: “We need a volunteer to step up to coordinate the next Dutch Cousins reunion in 2015.  That is, assuming the group votes to continue the gatherings when we meet on Friday September 20, 1 pm at Clifty Inn for the business meeting.  I hope you will be thinking about this important decision and let me know your thoughts, please.  We must have new volunteers if the group is to carry on.  This is such a great group it would be a shame to let the enthusiasm drop.”

Carolyn
The note about the future caught my eye. My thoughts:
Clearly the old guard has been on duty long enough- without any new names to take over then the best option is to widen the time gap till the next gathering with the same team– make it 3 yrs ( vs 2).
– Our strongest base is in the Northern Kentucky area – the further we get away from there the harder it’s going to be to hold the full 3 day Gathering..  I would suggest Frankfort as a site.
– The old management saying goes that a group gets 90 percent of it’s results after 3 meetings, etc.
-with Old Mud being the main goal of our group  – I would say we have hit the 90% mark and that all future Gatherings will continue to see a decline in support & benefits.
– If we agree to disband – I can understand & accept that. 
We can be proud of what we have been & done – after accounts are settled then donate ALL the remaining funds to H’burg HS for Old Mud. yet I would hope for one more mini-gathering at Old Mud in 1 or 2 yrs time – to give all the cousins fair warning of our intention to disband and allow for one more fund raising effort for Old Mud.
I like to think about what was gained by our group and not think of what will be lost once it’s gone.
I feel warm inside when I think of my many Dutch Cousins, and that I got to know them.

Jim

—————————————————————————————-

From Barbie Hamman:
I think the ribbons are a WONDERFUL addition, and am happy to pay for mine!  I think everything looks good, and commend you for all the hard work you put in.  No one has any idea how much work you do for us and I don’t see how we could POSSIBLY have such an event without you. 
Hey, I DID read the Newsletter and went over it again last night and realized the CD you’re talking about is the one of your trip, so I’m definitely in!  I’ll put my name on the reserved list and pay for it when we I get there. Good Luck getting all the last minute things done, and I can’t wait to see you all.  I wish you safe travels and will ask for many angels to travel with you in my prayers.
Until we meet again, My love and prayers are with you my sweet cousin!
Barbie
—————————————————————————————-
From Carolyn Leonard:  My idea is we give everyone registered ONE ribbon – either their ancestor name or state or something. Then they can buy any others they want and we would have to figure out how much to charge for the additionals so we don’t go in the hole. These badge ribbons were free at the FGS Conference Jon and I attending in August, but we paid $100 a day to attend (no meals either), so they could afford to give the ribbons! Of course I am sure their speakers were high dollar where ours (bless their hearts) not only donate their time and talents, they also have to pay their own way.  
Diana – I have no idea how we are doing on our budget – can you give me some idea? I know our meals and room charges this year are more, and we did not raise fees, so we may be upside down.  I hope everyone will let me know their thoughts on charging for the ribbons.
—————————————————————————————-
from Jan Pranger:
I’m not going to be able to be away from home this month, so will have to cancel my reservations at
Cliffty Falls Inn.  So there will be a Clifty Inn room available, if anyone is interested.  I am very sorry to miss this event and wish you all a wonderful gathering,
(note from carolyn – Jan also gave up her two seats reserved on the bus – and we had two people on the waiting list who will be happy to pay for them. )
—————————————————————————————-
Hello! Carolyn:  It was a pleasure to meet you at THE FEDERATION OF GENEALOGICAL SOCIETIES (FGS) CONFERENCE in Ft Wayne Indiana last week.  I just wanted to send an email and follow up about the possibility of an article about the Dutch settlement in York County for our newsletter, Penn in Hand.  I think there are many people with Dutch heritage who would be very interested to know more about the details and any relevant genealogical information you’ve been able to find.  If it’s still of interest, could you please let myself and our editor (who I’ve copied on this email) know?   Thanks for being willing and hope you had a safe trip back from FGS and a great holiday weekend!
Joyce Homan, Executive Director
Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania Website: www.GenPa.org
(from carolyn to PA – SURE! I will add that to my to-do list and send asap (grin).)
—————————————————————————————-

From Eastman’s letter (copy info)
Kristie Wells wrote an interesting article in the Ancestry.com Blog describing all the work that went into the recent Who Do You Think You Are? episode shown on the TLC channel in the United States. Kristie’s article describes the months of research required to display only a part of Cindy’s tree on the program. In fact, much, much more research was required than what could be shown in a one-hour program. It really seemed more like a 35-minute program accompanied by 25 minutes of commercials to me. However, a program showing all the research performed would require hours and hours. Only the records that were essential stepping stones could be included in her story and a few important steps taken along the way didn’t make the final cut. In the case of Cindy Crawford, 1,000 hours of research needed to be compressed into a 35 minute program. That means that much had to be omitted in the on-the-air broadcast. Just because you didn’t see all the research exposed in the 35-minute program, please do not assume that research wasn’t done.We also hear that each featured celebrity receives a book showing all research performed and all ancestors found, even those who were not mentioned in the on-the-air broadcast. You can also watch the full episode featuring Cindy Crawford onTLC.com at: http://www.tlc.com/tv-shows/who-do-you-think-you-are/videos/cindy-crawford-.htm.
You may want to read Kristie Wells’ interesting article,
Cindy Crawford: Turning 1,000 Hours of Research into One Hour of Television, athttp://goo.gl/woBF75.

—————————————————————————————-
From ADAMS COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY INRE: Arthur Weaner papers:

Thank you for your note. Our administrative assistant forwarded your email to me. I’m not sure how much information has already been provided to you based on the email chain below, but Arthur Weaner donated a significant amount of his research to the Adams County Historical Society when he passed away. You are correct that it was being stored in the milk house on his farm when we retrieved it. We currently have about 46 boxes of files and research, as well as well over 100 maps, from his donation. So far we have a rough inventory of the material we accepted. Both I and the Director, Ben Neely, made the selections on site and boxed things following his organizational system. We do not yet have a finding aid for the material because of the vast quantity of papers. However, if you or the Dutch Cousins group wish to use the collection for research, we can do our best to locate the materials you are looking for. Hopefully this fall we will have a better opportunity to document everything in Arthur Weaner’s collection.
Lauren Roedner
Gettysburg, PA 17325
717-334-4723 ext. 204
www.achs-pa.org
—————————————————————————————-
I received a letter from David Paul Davenport, Ph.D. who has written a 480 page book based on the Civil War “adventures” of HENRY BANTA who lived in Collamer, Indiana, in 1860, and Dr. Davenport did some genealogical research to be able to explain various passages in Henry’s Civil War diary, passages in which he referenced the death of his father John and visitng with his brothers John and Frederick while stationed in Chattanooga in 1864-65 (where Henry was a member of the 1st Veteran Volunteer Engineers). Davenport is asking for help documenting  a relationship Henry mentioned in a March, 1864, passage as he traveled from Collamer to Indianapolis after a furlough. He mentions visiting a “uncle” (his word), but the only family near Logansport that this might be (at least in my mind) is that of Beaufort Banta. that Beaufort’s father and Henry’s presumed grand-father Abraham, were first cousins. Abraham is in fact buried west of Logansport, at Curveton, within a couple of hundred feet of Beaufort Banta’s farm (as it existed in 1860). He has copies of the Compiled Military Service Records and pension applications for John (Sr.), Warren, Frederick, Henry, and John Emerson Banta and would be happy to provide copies of these and the voluminous research I have accomplished on the lives of Henry, Frederick, and Isaac while they lived in Fresno.

I know we have many BANTA descendants in this group, and some who have done extensive research. If you can help Mr. Davenport on this project, please let me kmow and I will help you two get together. Just hit “reply” now and explain your interest in this.
—————————————————————————————-
Letters 9/11/2013 Ryker Descendants in Madison

Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers of Centerville, OH

Published in ROUNDABOUT Entertainment Guide by Kentuckiana Publishing Co

September 2013

Descendants to meet in Madison
to honor ancestors

Local resident Rogers
to take part in the family event

By Helen E. McKinney

ROUNDABOUT ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE

This article was first published in the September 2013 edition of the RoundAbout Entertainment Guide. RE-published by permission.

(September 2013) – Lee Rogers of Madison, Ind., did not become interested in genealogy until he retired. Now at age 88, he’s gearing up to attend what promises to be a huge reunion of sorts.

After retiring from his job as a Medical Technologist, he volunteered at a local museum and his interest in history “snowballed from there,” he said. Since 1985, Rogers has volunteered at the Jefferson County (Ind.) Historical Society and has acquired a “special interest in local history.”
Along with his brother, Lynn, and other family members, Rogers has spent time researching their ancestors in the Jefferson County area, compiling a wealth of information. He was a member of the Ryker Historical Society for several years.
Rogers’ ancestor, Gerardus Ryker, was a Revolutionary War patriot and part of the Cornstalk Militia of the War of 1812. He married Leah Smock, and they had 14 children.
Ryker helped build a fort at age 12, stood guard at age 14 and spent his 15th birthday on the Second Expedition of Gen. George Rogers Clark to the Miami Indian towns on the Little Miami River in Ohio, said Lynn Rogers.

Rogers

Rogers

Leah was as brave as her husband. She was scalped by the Indians but lived and “wore a little leather cap the rest of her life,” he said. The couple is buried at the Ryker Ridge Cemetery.

“One of Leah’s brothers was Samuel Smock, the founder of Smockville, located at the intersection of State Road 62 and Hwy. 56, west of Hanover,” said Lynn. He was the first postmaster in Jefferson County, a judge, a member of the state Constitutional Convention and a significant contributor to the start of Hanover College.

Gerardus Ryker and his two brothers settled in Jefferson County, Ind., by 1810. Between the three brothers, they had 20 sons, “giving the Ryker name a large presence in early Jefferson County,” said Lynn. His ancestors’ “hardships are pretty much typical of all early Indiana and Kentucky pioneers,” said Lynn.

The Ryker family were descendants of the Low Dutch community, so-called because they originally migrated from the lowlands of Europe or the Netherlands. In the 1780s, 200 men, women, and children who were living in Pennsylvania, risked their lives to form a Dutch-speaking colony along the Kentucky frontier.

Both Lee and Lynn Rogers will be attending the Sept. 20-23 Low Dutch Cousins 2013 Gathering at Clifty Inn in Madison. “It is going to be an unforgettable three days,” said Carolyn Leonard, one of the organizers of the event.
The event will kick off at 9.a.m Friday with a Memorial Service for Low Dutch Veterans of the War of 1812. This will include the Rogers’ ancestor, Gerardus Ryker.

Special guest speaker, Vince Akers, will present a program titled, “After Kentucky – Migration to Indiana,” at 7 p.m. Akers is a well-known expert on the Low Dutch community. Some of his ancestors were of Low Dutch descent and settled in Henry County, Ky.
Lee Rogers said the part of the event that he is most looking forward to is “Vince Akers and his program. I’m interested in the settlement of frontier Indiana.”

A full day is planned for Saturday, with a 10 a.m. welcome by Madison Mayor Damon Welch. Attendees will be able to “Meet Your Cousins,” swap family genealogies and network. The guest speaker for the evening will be Patsy Harris, who will present a program on “Low Dutch and the Underground Railroad.”

Sunday will include a caravan to Six-Mile, Pleasureville and Harrodsburg, Ky. The latter location is where the Old Mud Meeting House, a restored church built by the Low Dutch more than 200 years ago, is located. A special worship service is planned for 2:30 p.m.

Pleasureville in Henry County, Ky., is where the second Low Dutch meetinghouse was built in Kentucky. It is located near the Shelby County line on what was the old Low Dutch Tract containing around 8,000 acres, which the Low Dutch purchased from Squire Boone, younger brother of Daniel Boone. Akers will speak again at this site about the history of the church and the Low Dutch Tract.
Due to conflicting land claims and continuing Indian hostilities, many members of the Low Dutch community decided to move north of the Ohio River into present day Indiana in the early 1800s. By 1817, a Low Dutch Settlement had formed around Pleasant, near the Switzerland-Jefferson County line. It didn’t take long for some of the families to settle near Madison, Canaan, Manville and Hanover.
Rogers says this is going to be the experience of a lifetime for him. “I’m looking forward to it and to meeting people,” he said.
Letters 9/13/2013

Dear Family, To make our Fifth Dutch Cousins gathering on Sept. 20-23 the best ever,  we want a bit of help.

— FIRST, Of course your most important contribution is to be with us.

— SECOND, Call or tell in person anyone on your side of the family without email about the international Dutch Cousins.

We are looking forward to our wonderful Speakers and  great topics they have planned for us this year.
You won’t want to miss them!

——————————————–
from Jim Cozine of Las Vegas:
1- I’m willing to remain a Director
2- I suggest Pella, IA in 2015 at Tulip time  May 1-3? ( I could make that)
I bought $500 worth of airplane tickets this yr
to go there and it snowed a foot in Pella the day we were to leave home – so we did’t go.
——————————————–
from Pam Ellingson of Lakewood Wisconsin:
I am willing to continue to maintain the website. I should have more time to do work on it.
Agenda topic- Should we continue to have both DutchCousins.org and Dutch Cousins.info? In March I renewed .info for $20. for 1 year. The .org is good for 2 more years. Pam also is willing to continue chairing the family history displays.
——————————————–
from Janice Cozine of Mt Washington KY:
If no one steps up for the registration job……I will consider it again.
If you want me.
Janice  🙂 (IF we want her?  What a joker! Janice has done a MOUNTAIN of work this year)
——————————————–
from Carole Karwatka of Morehead, KY:
I am willing to continue with the Tee-Shirts if they turn out OK this year.  If not, someone else can please be selected!!!  (Everyone be sure to tell Carole how much we love the shirts!) Everyone is gonna be SO JEALOUS cause Carole is making me a Dutch dress for the gathering. I can’t wait to see it.  If you have a Dutch costume please wear it too.
——————————————–
Amalie Preston, Archives & REpository chair, called tonight to promise to send an update for the gathering. I forgot to ask, but I think she will continue in this office. She can’t come to Madison  because she is presenting the life of her ancestor JANE MCAFEE for the DAR at the Graveyard Tales in Harrodsburg, and … Oh Amalie is involved in so many things you can’t count them – and she does all things well. But she is spending Sunday and Mondaywith her Dutch Cousins in Harrodsburg and at Old Mud.  Amalie is one of the most wonderful people I ever met and we are so thankful she is our cousin.  Two years ago Amalie brought us a giant Cushaw melon from her garden.  Jon carefully saved the seeds and this year he has two ENORMOUS cushaws that would probably win at the state fair – but we will be in Kentucky instead. We enjoyed Cushaw pudding, Cushaw custard, Cushaw casserole and Cushaw pie on previous trips to Harrodsburg.  Hope my cooking can do it justice!  Soon I will send you a picture.
——————————————–
Rev. Claude Westerfield will be President Emeritus after the meeting this year, but he promised to continue as worship chairman and will continue planning and conducting the worship service.
——————————————–
NO COMMENT SO FAR FROM:
TREASURER Diana Davis
Board member Vince Akers
Board member & Historian chair Barbara Whiteside
Hospitality, Gene & Carol Heathcoat
Newsletter mailing, Louise & Randy Ledger
Book Sale/Autograph party, Joan Murray
Veterans Memorial, Lynn Rogers & Mary Park
other offices available:
Publicity
Newsletter
Coordinator of the 2015 Gathering
Planner of the 2015 Gathering
AND the Vice President job is available since John C Westerfield is President/Chairman Elect.  John will be a great person to work with.
Com’on guys, let us know your thoughts. Speak up and say what you would like to try.  This is an awesome group to work with, and without new volunteers it cannot happen.

——————————————–

From Sharon Cole of Spicewood TX (Stagg descendant):  Have you tried the idea of having people bring their own USB thumb drive (or flash drive) that could be inserted into your computer and download documents or other info, including the DVD presentation?  They could take the drive home and print or otherwise access as they wish.  This would save paper, ink, the need for blank DVD’s,printers, DVD writers etc.Just a thought.
—————————————————————-

from Pam Ellingson of Lakewood WI (Westerfield):I might be able to duplicate the DVD on my laptop. I downloaded some software and successfully duplicated a family DVD. How many orders have been placed? Save one for me.
I might be buying a copier/scanner/printer on my way to Madison. I also have a flip-pal. But what would people save scans from that to? Everyone would have to have their own sd card.

—————————————————————-
ANYONE KNOW FRANKLYN FRICK?
From Charles Vanorsdale of Saudi Arabia:
The emails about Arthur Weaner stirred a memory, and I think this list may be an ideal venue for this question. Franklyn Frick was another great researcher of the Dutch families (from NY to VA/KY) and had amassed a tremendous library and genealogical collection. He passed away about 10 years ago. I was curious as to whether anyone on the list knew what became of Franklyn’s collection? Thanks, Charles Vanorsdale (a very distant Dutch cousin in Saudi Arabia).
—————————————————————-
FAMILY HISTORY DISPLAYS
From Pam Ellingson, Lakewood WI:
I haven’t had any Westerfields say that they are bringing things. A few responders agreed to bring something, but they didn’t want to “be in charge” and didn’t want to do a formal speech.
Families that have been represented in the past and are NOT displaying this year:
Banta
Bruner
Comingore
Coovert
Cozart
DeMotte
Dorland
Sartore
Smock
Terhune
The VANs
VanderVeer
Voris
(So if your ancestral name is not listed – you must be signed up for a display.)
—————————————————————-
from Barbara Whiteside of Clarksville, IN:
Bringing a small scanner and hope I can remember how to use it…not had it for very long…..also my laptop for anyone interested in knowing more about facebook site for the Dutch Cousins…….

Sent info on stuff for silent auction to the one in charge….finishing up the scrapbook as much as possible…got ideas for the major brochures….just got to figure out how to get it done..doubt before the meeting…..but the photo album will be ready..two of them.
—————————————————————-

From Diana Davis, of Jamestown NC, Treasurer Dutch Cousins:

I will get you a financial report as soon as possible, but it may not be by Thursday. My son broke his hand over the weekend and since then I have been negotiating with drs. and hospital over the price of his surgery, which is set for tomorrow morning at 7:30am. Right now I am a basket case and cannot even think about DC or anything else for that matter. He is in pain, we are all stressed over the cost, and all the stress has caused my Fibromyalgia to flare. I hurt from the top of my head to my feet, literally! They are  operating on his hand to put a pin in what ever bone it is that broke. This has caused him to be out of work and broke, at least for the next four weeks. So, right now, I hate to say this, but the treasurers report is the least of my problems. I will get it to you when I can.

—————————————————————-
from Barbara Whiteside of Clarksville, IN:
ok…directions {to Clifty Inn and Madison Indiana}…if coming east on I 64…..you want to take the I 265 exit east just north of New Albany…its as you are coming down the big cut towards Louisville and you will need to be in the far left lane to exit…follow it around New Albany and over I 65…..to exit 10 B to Charlestown/State Road 62………when you get to end of exit ramp….go right and follow through east side of Charlestown, IN, through New Washington, IN and Chelsea, IN….62 will T into state road 56….take right through Hanover and into Madison……there is a Y as you get to Madison…to the right takes you into Madison….just across from the power plant is the entry on the left into Clifty Falls State Park…follow signs to the lodge.  If for some reason you veer left at the Y, never fear…it takes you to the north entry into Clifty Falls on the right of the hwy…….and again follow signs to the lodge.

If coming from the south, be aware we are daily being told of changes in lanes due to the building of the Bridge No One Wanted next to the JFK/Kennedy/I 65 Bridge…..so heads up on the orange signs.  Rush hour is normally around 4 but expect it to be busy by 3 ish……when you cross the bridge….take the 10th Street Exit and stay on it…this is Hwy 62 and will take you through Jeffersonville…..with it ending at a T at state road 56…turn right and follow to Madison, as above.

Driving south on I 65….two ways…..one is exit at Austin to state road 256 east….this will follow into Madison or just come south to I 265 east and follow as above……to hwy 56, turn right and follow through Hanover into Madison.
Hope this will help.barb w.

—————————————————————-
From Cor Snabel of The Netherlands:  Over the years I’ve been collecting marriage intention records of
Amsterdam, because they contain a lot of information about the couple and
their family, like their age, the place they came from, profession, often
the names of the parents, siblings or even the grandparents.

Now I’ve transcribed about 2500 of them and translated them into English to
make them useful for non-Dutch speaking researchers. On our website you
also find an index of more than 10,000 names which are mentioned in those
records, dated between 1578 and 1700. Several names will sound familiar to
N.N.-researchers like: Grevenraet, Waldron, Bencken, van Rensselaer, van
Immen, Provoost, Kerfbyl, Wyncoop, van Foreest etc.
Go to:http://17thcenturyhollanders.pbworks.com/w/page/68364961/Intro%20Ondertrouw%20Amsterdam
Have fun with it.

—————————————————————-

Our Dutch Cousin, Lilly Martin, lives in Syria and she says our news reporters are not telling the truth about what is happening there. Altho I have not met Lilly in person, (actually I have not met most of the cousins on this email list!) we have corresponded for some time about the Dutch history and she gave me info about her ancestor’s mill (Brouwer’s Mill) in (now) Brooklyn, near the Old Stone House museum, and my 9th great grandfather Claes Arense Veghte actually built and lived in the original Old Stone House (which was an important location in the Battle of Brooklyn during the Revolutionary War. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Stone_House_(Brooklyn,_New_York)
Our Dutch group visited the Old Stone House in 2011. The docent pointed out on a map where the mill was in relation to the museum. Lilly had hoped to come to the Dutch cousins gathering in Madison, next week, but because of all this military action, she was unable to come. I worry about her safety, especially because of her openness in speaking out, but admire her greatly for it. She is intelligent, well educated and articulate. She has researched the Brouwer family since 2000. Her ancestor, Adam Brouwer’s descendant Daniel Brewer left NJ to go thru PA and on to Mercer County KY.
Lilly married Nezar Sahiounie 37 years ago in Fresno, Ca.  He left Syria when he was 14 yr old and became an American citizen, then he grew up and they married in Calif. They lived until 1992 in Fresno, where Nezar was a real estate developer, and Lilly a Diabetes Educator (medical professional). Syria has been their home for more than 20 years, and their two sons are in the University there.
Lilly said it is not true that their president Assad gassed his own people.

Here is what she says: The media, like CNN, BBC and the rest, usually never reply to any of my comments, even though I always identify myself as an American, living permanently in Syria, a medical professional and a human rights activist in Syria. They don’t reply because their version of the news is propaganda.  They do not report facts, but made up fiction.  Sometimes their reporting is better than others, and sometimes they get some of the truth out, and rarely do they report fairly.
she posted this news report:

“Two Europeans who were abducted and held hostage for several months in Syria claim they overheard an exchange between their captors which proves that rebels were behind the recent chemical attack.
In a number of interviews to European news outlets, the former hostages – Belgian teacher Pierre Piccinin and Italian journalist Domenico Quiric – said they overheard an English-language Skype conversation between their captors and other men which suggested it was rebel forces, not the government, that used chemical weapons on Syria’s civilian population in an August 21 attack near Damascus.
“It is a moral duty to say this. The government of Bashar al-Assad did not use sarin gas or other types of gas in the outskirts of Damascus,” Piccinin said during an interview with Belgium’s RTL radio station.
Piccinin stressed that while being held captive, he and fellow prisoner Quirico were secluded from the outside world and had no idea that chemical weapons were deployed. But the conversation which both men overheard suggested that the use of the weapons was a strategic move by the opposition, aimed at getting the West to intervene.
“In this conversation, they said that the gas attack on two neighborhoods of Damascus was launched by the rebels as a provocation to lead the West to intervene militarily,” Quirico told Italy’s La Stampa. “We were unaware of everything that was going on during our detention in Syria, and therefore also with the gas attack in Damascus.”
While stating that the rebels most likely exaggerated the accident’s death toll, the Italian journalist stressed that he could not vouch whether “the conversation was based on real facts.” However, he said that one of the three people in the alleged conversation identified himself as a Free Syrian Army general, La Stampa reported.

To be continued…..
All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing. ..Edmond Burke
—————————————————————-

Another from Cor Snabel of THE NETHERLANDS: (WOW – this is great! Thanks Cor. Cor.  Remember … might not be the same person or even the same family, but interesting co-incidences.)
Cor said “Jan Jansz or Jan Jansen was the most common name in the Netherlands. Thousands of men had that name. If you look at any page in any baptism book you will find at least 2 or 3 fathers called Jan Jansen or Jan Jansz among the 30 to 40 fathers on each page.”
In 1656 the West Indies Company had been financially set back and could not
pay their investors. The directors arranged a financial settlement with
them and more than 324 investors signed this agreement. I have transcribed
and translated this document with all these names. Apart from a lot of rich
‘Amsterdammers’, I found at least one N.N.-colonist who had invested in the
W.I.C.: Jurgen Probasco from Breslau.
Maybe you will find more familiar names among these investors.
Go to:
http://17thcenturyhollanders.pbworks.com/w/page/68807454/Investors%20of%20the%20West%20Indies%20Company
If you find one, please let us know.
I found:
 Anneke Jans (richest widow in New Amsterdam in 1637)
Jan Janssen (father of Anneke, he married Tryntje Jonas (Roelof)
Jan Jansz the younger? (probably son of Anneke?)
this is the mark of Sibeltgen Ariaens widow of Jan Janssen
this is the mark of Saertje Reynders (Later Reynerson?)
Pieter Quick for Willem Jacobsz P..proo… t (Belitje Jacobsen QUICK married Gerrit Cosynszen (Cozine) 1673
Pieter Laur~ Basten the elder (Bastiaen was the name of a freed black who received land, a plot suitable for a house and a garden, on Cosyn Gerritsen’s Wagon Way on March 26, 1647.)(Howard Swain 2009)
Hendric Coesvelt (wonder if that is later Roosevelt?)
for my sister the widow Kieft (Wm Kieft was Director of New Netherland from 1638 until 1647 – (Wikipedia)
Johannes Antonides van der Linden, doct. & prof. med. (Vincentius Antonides was Domine in Brooklyn, and presided over the wedding of Gerrit Cosynszen’s widow Belitje Jacobz Quick to Theunis Janse in 1706) A decendent of Vincentius joined us part of the day in Brooklyn (he works at the Brooklyn museum) John Antonides.
Tobias de Koning (Marytje, daughter of Arie KONING and widow of Stephen Van Orden, married the Rev. Cornelius COZINE as his second wife about 1772 in Conewego Colony, PA.)
—————————————————————-
and MORE from Cor:
Over the years I’ve been collecting marriage intention records of
Amsterdam, because they contain a lot of information about the couple and
their family, like their age, the place they came from, profession, often
the names of the parents, siblings or even the grandparents.Now I’ve transcribed about 2500 of them and translated them into English to
make them useful for non-Dutch speaking researchers. On our website you
also find an index of more than 10,000 names which are mentioned in those
records, dated between 1578 and 1700. Several names will sound familiar to
N.N.-researchers like: Grevenraet, Waldron, Bencken, van Rensselaer, van
Immen, Provoost, Kerfbyl, Wyncoop, van Foreest etc.Go to:http://17thcenturyhollanders.pbworks.com/w/page/68364961/Intro%20Ondertrouw%20AmsterdamHave fun with it.
————————————————————-
My line of Dutch descent is : Dorland, Van Liew/Van Lewen, Vanarsdalen, and Peterson.  Judy Cassidy

————————————————————-

from Della Nash, about the OKC Ryker descendants at Madison

What a wonderful story. Loved this.

————————————————————-

from Anna Jackson, Paducah Kentucky: about the Ryker descendants at Madison

Thanks for sharing that article with us!

Subject: Dutch Letters – Ryker descendants at Madison – Roundabout article
Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers of Centerville, OH
Published in ROUNDABOUT Entertainment Guide by Kentuckiana Publishing Co
September 2013
Low Dutch Cousins Reunion
Descendants to meet in Madison
to honor ancestors
————————————————————-
There’s more … but I am out of time and space!
Hugs to all!

Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers of Centerville, OH

Published in ROUNDABOUT Entertainment Guide by Kentuckiana Publishing Co

September 2013

Descendants to meet in Madison
to honor ancestors

Local resident Rogers
to take part in the family event

By Helen E. McKinney

ROUNDABOUT ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE

This article was first published in the September 2013 edition of the RoundAbout Entertainment Guide. RE-published by permission.

(September 2013) – Lee Rogers of Madison, Ind., did not become interested in genealogy until he retired. Now at age 88, he’s gearing up to attend what promises to be a huge reunion of sorts.

After retiring from his job as a Medical Technologist, he volunteered at a local museum and his interest in history “snowballed from there,” he said. Since 1985, Rogers has volunteered at the Jefferson County (Ind.) Historical Society and has acquired a “special interest in local history.”
Along with his brother, Lynn, and other family members, Rogers has spent time researching their ancestors in the Jefferson County area, compiling a wealth of information. He was a member of the Ryker Historical Society for several years.
Rogers’ ancestor, Gerardus Ryker, was a Revolutionary War patriot and part of the Cornstalk Militia of the War of 1812. He married Leah Smock, and they had 14 children.
Ryker helped build a fort at age 12, stood guard at age 14 and spent his 15th birthday on the Second Expedition of Gen. George Rogers Clark to the Miami Indian towns on the Little Miami River in Ohio, said Lynn Rogers.

Rogers

Rogers

Leah was as brave as her husband. She was scalped by the Indians but lived and “wore a little leather cap the rest of her life,” he said. The couple is buried at the Ryker Ridge Cemetery.

“One of Leah’s brothers was Samuel Smock, the founder of Smockville, located at the intersection of State Road 62 and Hwy. 56, west of Hanover,” said Lynn. He was the first postmaster in Jefferson County, a judge, a member of the state Constitutional Convention and a significant contributor to the start of Hanover College.

Gerardus Ryker and his two brothers settled in Jefferson County, Ind., by 1810. Between the three brothers, they had 20 sons, “giving the Ryker name a large presence in early Jefferson County,” said Lynn. His ancestors’ “hardships are pretty much typical of all early Indiana and Kentucky pioneers,” said Lynn.

The Ryker family were descendants of the Low Dutch community, so-called because they originally migrated from the lowlands of Europe or the Netherlands. In the 1780s, 200 men, women, and children who were living in Pennsylvania, risked their lives to form a Dutch-speaking colony along the Kentucky frontier.

Both Lee and Lynn Rogers will be attending the Sept. 20-23 Low Dutch Cousins 2013 Gathering at Clifty Inn in Madison. “It is going to be an unforgettable three days,” said Carolyn Leonard, one of the organizers of the event.
The event will kick off at 9.a.m Friday with a Memorial Service for Low Dutch Veterans of the War of 1812. This will include the Rogers’ ancestor, Gerardus Ryker.

Special guest speaker, Vince Akers, will present a program titled, “After Kentucky – Migration to Indiana,” at 7 p.m. Akers is a well-known expert on the Low Dutch community. Some of his ancestors were of Low Dutch descent and settled in Henry County, Ky.
Lee Rogers said the part of the event that he is most looking forward to is “Vince Akers and his program. I’m interested in the settlement of frontier Indiana.”

A full day is planned for Saturday, with a 10 a.m. welcome by Madison Mayor Damon Welch. Attendees will be able to “Meet Your Cousins,” swap family genealogies and network. The guest speaker for the evening will be Patsy Harris, who will present a program on “Low Dutch and the Underground Railroad.”

Sunday will include a caravan to Six-Mile, Pleasureville and Harrodsburg, Ky. The latter location is where the Old Mud Meeting House, a restored church built by the Low Dutch more than 200 years ago, is located. A special worship service is planned for 2:30 p.m.

Pleasureville in Henry County, Ky., is where the second Low Dutch meetinghouse was built in Kentucky. It is located near the Shelby County line on what was the old Low Dutch Tract containing around 8,000 acres, which the Low Dutch purchased from Squire Boone, younger brother of Daniel Boone. Akers will speak again at this site about the history of the church and the Low Dutch Tract.
Due to conflicting land claims and continuing Indian hostilities, many members of the Low Dutch community decided to move north of the Ohio River into present day Indiana in the early 1800s. By 1817, a Low Dutch Settlement had formed around Pleasant, near the Switzerland-Jefferson County line. It didn’t take long for some of the families to settle near Madison, Canaan, Manville and Hanover.
Rogers says this is going to be the experience of a lifetime for him. “I’m looking forward to it and to meeting people,” he said.
Letters 9/15/2013
MADISON INDIANA:  Our first two days of the Low Dutch Cousins 2013 Gathering  (Fri, September20 and Sat, Sept 21) will be at Clifty Inn, Madison, Indiana. (see phone number below) We’ve written about that before in detail, and it is going to be an unforgettable time. Then on Sunday the 22nd, we leave Madison and caravan to Pleasureville KY’s 6-mile Meetinghouse, continuing to Harrodsburg KY, about a 2 hour drive total, to worship at our special treasure, the restored Old Mud Meetinghouse built by our Low Dutch ancestors more than 200 years ago, the first known Dutch Reformed Meetinghouse in Kentucky. On Monday the Harrodsburg Historical Research Library will have special hours open for us — the ONLY Low Dutch repository in the nation!
—————————————————–
MADISON, INDIANA:  
Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full. 

Call this number to make your reservation and be sure to say you are with the Dutch Cousins– the phone: 859-734-2400 If Clifty Falls is full, contact the Madison Tourist Bureau 800-559-2956 or 812-265-2956

 
HARRODSBURG KY: Sunday Sept 22, 2013 and Monday Sept 23, 2013: 

Call this number to make your reservation and be sure to say you are with the Dutch Cousins TO GET THE SPECIAL REDUCED RATE — the phone: 859-734-2400

Country Hearth, 105 Commercial Drive, Harrodsburg

———————————————————————————-from Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, KY (our professional photographer member!)

I have the duplication equipment for DVD’s and CD’s. Would be glad to bring it if that would help.

Thanks Charlie, that would be great!

—————————————–

 Mr Lynn Rogers of Centerville, OH

I second the suggestion of everyone bring a flash/thumb drive.  I have been dreading the 4 hour chore of duping Ryker PDF files to bring.
—————————————–
from Joan Murray, Palatine, Ill
I will be displaying a small amount of Banta family material on my table along with my reference books.  I will also be happy to chair the Book Sales/Autograph Party again for next time around.  In regard to Franklyn Frick’s materials: Near the end of his life,he did send me quite a number of the books/booklets he published, but he never did say anything about where he was donating all his materials.  Joan Murray
—————————————————–
from Michael McCoy, Midwest City, OK
Please travel safely, you and Jon…  you both mean a lot to many people…
Thank you both for being yourselves and for being  beacons of light in the sometimes darkness we face..
—————————————————–
From Mary Park of Baltimore, MD
Sorry not to respond sooner. As far as I know I can stay on {as Veteran memorial chair}.
Thanks again for making this happen. And I want to nominate we return to Harrodsburg for the next Dutch Cousins.
—————————————————–

from Diana Davis of North Carolina:

I will not be keeping the Treasurer position.
—————————————————–

from Barbara Merideth of Caeruthersville, MO:  I have a printer scanner copier that will save to a jump drive or different memory cards. That may be safer than sharing jump cards to computers. You never know what virus’ may be lurking on different computers and stuff. We are driving and I think we can get it in the car. Would also save on having to have so much ink to print with. The only problem with it is that it does not copy legal size documents. But you can always piece it together.

That’s great Barb – We should be in good shape with at least two printer-scanner-copiers, and Pam Ellingson said she might be bringing one too.  I have so much stuff boxed up to bring we may not be able to squeeze in our suitcases!

—————————————————–
From Beth Higgins of Cary NC:
I hope you all have a great time at the cousins gathering.  Some day when my children are older, I hope you all are still going strong and getting together!!  I so appreciate all the good information and stories that are circulated on the newsletter! (one paragraph censored) Again, thanks for all you do for the newsletter and all the cousins!!  I look forward to each email!!
—————————————————–
ATTN CHARLES VANORSDALE OF SAUDI ARABIA:  @FRANKLIN FRICK
from Robert Adlet of Pembroke Pines, FL Several years ago I acquired a booklet titled “The History of the Low Dutch Colony of Conowago” by Rev Dr Demarest including “In 1978 Edith List prepared these thirty four pages for publication. Handwriting by Franklyn Frick; also typewriting in the margins. Inside was a letter dated July 24, 1997 to “Dear Rev Lydecker, Enclosed is another gift. Religion was very important to our Dutch forefathers. I am 88 years old. Respectfully, (signed) Franklyn Frick” It has what I assume are comments written in the margins by Franklyn Frick. I can copy and mail to anyone wishing a copy. Let me know.
 
—————————————————–
Phone call with Steve Henry tonight. They will be at the Clifty Inn with us Friday and Saturday. Actually while we were on the phone, Steve told me they were at the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City — I am so out of it I didn’t even know that was tonight!  So now I am watching to see if I see Steve and Heather! Miss America 2000. Proud to call them cousins!
——————————————————-
fromPaul & Barb Terhune of Debary FL:
Wishing you and all of the Dutch-Cousins a happy, safe, healthy and productive gathering. Paul & I are both in “recovery mode”… but it is soooooo terribly slow. I’m sure you will agree that those “Golden Years” we heard about in our youth – were NOT designed for the “weak.”  “Survival of the fittest” takes on a whole new meaning  after that 70th birthday!!!!!  Paul & I just hit 80….  For over a decade we have been working on a trilogy of historical/genealogical books associated with the early Dutch settlers of Mercer County, KY. Below is a description of the subject matter and contents.
————————
WEST of the SALT
 
EARLY TERHUNEs of MERCER COUNTY, KENTUCKY and
Their Dutch Kin and Scot-Irish Neighbors
-3 volume set –

Volume I – 290 pages of text, with 109 figures or photographs, 26 of which are in color. A short early history of the area (Harrodsburg, Mercer Co., KY- 30 pages). The story/history of 20 families, concentrating on Terhunes, Cozines, VanArsdalls, Brewers, Bantas, Demarees and discussing about 15 other families, mostly Dutch.
Volume II – a CD of 12 map images plus 12 paper copies (8.5″ x 11″) for easy reference. The CD images can be enlarged on a computer for enhanced viewing. They can also be printed, using this CD, at Kinko, Office Depot, et. al. in the original large format 18” x 24” or 24” x 30” [scale: 1″= 100 poles or 1650 ft.]. These maps show the area about Harrodsburg of the original Virginia land patents and later, the farms of the settlers, generation by generation based on the Kentucky deeds.
Volume III – 490 pages
Standard genealogy format of many of the 20 families, emphasizing Kentucky settlers and including their ancestry as we know it.

—-                                      ——————-                                         ———————–

And Barb’s earlier book: EARLY DUTCH FAMILY TIES

Terhune – Van Sycklyn – Frelinghuysen and Others of Kings Co., NY and Somerset Co., NJ

This work is the product of many years of genealogy research, presenting major corrections to Terhune, Van Voorhees and Wyckoff genealogies, as well as additions to the early Terhunes of Gravesend and Flatlands. It is a compendium of three disparate, yet related topics. 107 pages, indexed, 13 maps/illustrations, FULLY SOURCED with 19 pages of detailed footnotes.

Terhune Genealogy – 1637 to 1850, Dutch Colony History – 1624 to 1710, Reformed Dutch Church History – 1628 to 1770
—————————————————–

PS from Carolyn of OKC:  I have these books (they are massive, with incredible information) and will bring them to show at the gathering, we will have ordering info there, or if you cannot come, send me an email and I will forward to Barb and Paul. Thanks to Paul & Barbara Terhune, they corrected a mistake that had been repeated in MANY family histories over the years – including my records. Now we know that: Rev. Cozine’s 2nd wife ca 1784 Conewago, York Co, Pennsyvania

Mary (Marytje) KONING (The Widow of Stephen Van Orden).  Mary Koning Van Orden Cozine (after the Rev. Cozine’s death) m.3rd 1790, David Samuel Demerest of Bergen Co.NJ

———————————————————————————-
from Carolyn Leonard:  Just relaxing while I work to the sweet joyful, reassuring sound of RONNIE BLACKWELL singing “Heaven’s Sounding Sweeter All the Time.  He has given us his voice at the Old Mud Meetinghouse in Harrodsburg KY before – hoping he will again. And I managed to get one of his CDs.  He has a velvet voice.  I found a youtube to share so you can hear it too.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7JJFHcfeJs
———————————————————————————-
from Judi Rill of Pleasant Hill, Calif
I appreciate your intent when you shared Lilly’s comments about Syria.  However, I’m wondering what her source is.  Did she interview the captives?  Is this what the Syrian newspapers are reporting?  If you share any more of her comments, it would be great if you’d include her sources. I just read the story in U.S. News, dated 9/10/2013.  Quirico reportedly told La Stampa, the Italian newspaper for which he reports, that “the information cannot be officially verified and thus can only be regarded as conjecture.”  He goes on to say “We heard some people we didn’t know talking through a half-closed door. It’s impossible to know whether what was said was based on real fact or just hearsay.”   The U.S. News article is at http://www.usnews.com/news/newsgram/articles/2013/09/10/freed-hostages-reveal-information-on-chemical-attacks-in-syria  
———————————————————————————-
more from Barb Terhune (oldbat) of Debary FL:

BTW while in Harrodsburg:

From your schedule of activities:
Sept 23-Monday 10to3 — Free Research time at Harrodsburg Historical
Library for cousins.

Please don’t forget to tell all of the cousins about one of Harrodsburg’s
BEST KEPT SECRETS – The Olde Bus Station Cafe – just ask Barbara Whiteside.
Nothing elaborate – just GREAT food – where the locals go.
Paul & I always ate breakfast there (try the home fries)…their hamburgers and fish
fry are terrific…and they make the World’s Greatest chocolate meringue pie.

If some cousins hanker for BBQ ribs to die for – go to the restaurant next to
Beaumont Inn – I think the name is the Owl’s Roost.

I know you must be getting really excited – just a few more days now. Have a safe journey and please tell all the cousins that we’ll be there with you, –if only in spirit.

———————————————————————————-
Judy Cassidy of Pennsylvania
Carolyn could  you please post or let people know that I sent my collection of  several deeds and wills for non-Dorland Conewago persons to the Mercer County Historical Society and they should be available for Cousins to use; I also donated a lot of my early deeds and documents for Dorland from New Netherland through Kentucky and those are also available,  I can’t recall the names at the moment for the Conewago documents, but I bought quite a few when I was writing the Deacons and the Journey.  For those people who will not be able to access them here in PA perhaps they will be family information that they are looking for.  I believe that they are not cataloged, but Amalie Preston will know.
———————————————————————————-
From Barb Terhune of Florida:
About their WEST OF THE SALT books, the Harrodsburg Historical Society DOES HAVE a copy if folks want to see them, check the families covered, etc.
———————————————————————————-
SEE YOU AT CLIFTY INN – AND THEN KENTUCKY!
Letters 9/22/2012

Just a note to catch you up on what has been happening in this editor’s life recently. Most of you know I have been fighting breast cancer since Diagnosis on Valentine’s Day 2010. I think I dodged the bullet but you never know for sure. On August 26th my kids hosted a “High Tea” celebration for my 75th birthday and the recovery from Cancer because all chemo was completed and the markers were good.  On the 27th I went to my Oncologist for 3-month check up and he discovered a spot on a lung (that may be nothing). On the 28th I headed down the highway going the Apple store and at the intersection 10 minutes from home my 7-year-old “Silver Bullet” Buick was hit by a red Toyota driven by an 86 year old female (no jokes please!). Both cars totaled.

Busted hip, surgery 20 days in hospital, home now; home health involved – and it is all working out. Got a new 4-wheel walker today with a basket to carry things and a seat when I get tired. Not quite as desirable as a new Buick but probably a lot safer.  Onward and upward, every day in every way I am getting better and better!

Hugs, Carolyn

 

Life changes happen in a split second don’t they??’!!!!!!

—————————————

Next Dutch Cousins Gathering!

Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is:877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013 (notice – it is not THIS year)
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.

————————————–

Alert – your trees on Ancestry may be opened to the public.  Read below.

This is verified by Dear Myrtle (popular genealogy info site)http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2009/12/mundia-oh-no-ancestrycom-strikes-again.html
On Aug 26, 2012, at 8:07 PM, Julie G wrote:

I don’t know if you’ve put your hard-earned family tree on Ancestry (I have not and will not) —= but there is a bad wind ablowin over Mundia.com which they own.  It is a free, worldwide, social networking site, which allows people access to Ancestry trees!  Very little has been said by Ancestry about it.  If one joins Mundia, everything is fair game….all your personal info, your friends and family’s info (even the living), as well as trees.  Nothing is sourced, as I understand it.  It will make for “cut and paste” genealogy for many people.  If you invite someone to see your info on Mundia, they CAN be labeled an Editor, at which point they can EDIT YOUR TREE and the edits will also take place on Ancestry.  Scary!!!!!!!!

There is a board buried on Ancestry full of seething questions.

———————————-
Note from Pam Ellingson:
I have registered us and have access to the  www.DutchCousins.org website for the next 5 years!
Check it out.
——————————
From Tamara Fulkerson:

Subject: [Kentucky.gov] Commonwealth News Center – News Flash

Commonwealth News Center Update

The following articles were found matching your subscription profile.

New Press Releases:

Monument Rededication Ceremony at Perryville Battlefield
URL       : http://kentucky.gov/Newsroom/parks/perryvillemonument2012.htm
Date      : Tuesday, September 18, 2012
Issued By : Department of Parks
Summary   : Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site will host a monument rededication ceremony Monday, Oct. 8, as part of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War battle.

——————————

Lois Johnson of Wilmington, DE , says her son forwarded this story to her.
Begin forwarded message:
The following account, contributed to the Shelby Courant, Shelbyville, Kentucky, May 15, 1873, by George W. Demaree, refers to this William Gordon:

“A hunter, named William Gordon, married a sister of Daniel Banta and became a member of the Dutch community about the year 1800.  among his many adventures with wild beasts, I give the following, which are every way reliable:  Gordon and his brother-in-law, Dan Banta, were out hunting and had separated temporarity, when Banta heard the crack of Gordon’s rifle, and knowing that the latter never wasted his powder and lead for nothing, hastened to the spot from whence the sound came.  When he arrived, he found Gordon lying on the ground terribly mangled and nearly lifeless.  A few feet from him a large bear wallowing in his own blood was already stretched in death; and a short distance from the two, Gordon’s faithful dog was whining and tumbling about, badly used up.  Gordon was carried home on a litter, and so dangerous were his wounds thought to be that his friends sent to Shelbyville for Dr. Morse-if I am not wrongly informed, the first physician located in that place-who dressed his wounds, and gave encouragement of his recovery.  As soon as Gordon was able to converse, he gave the following version of his adventures:  He had left Banta but a little while when he met the bear and shot him, but the ball failing to do its work completely, he was attacked furiously by the bear before he could reload his gun.  He drew his hungting-knife, and the fight eommenced in good earnest.  When the bear would close on Gordon, the dog would assault him in the rear with desperate courage and force him to divide his attention between him and his master.  After several rounds in this way, Gordon, cutting and hacking all the while, got in a dealy thrust with his knife and ended the conflict-but not till after himself and dog were terribly used up, as above described.  He always gave his faithful dog the credit of saving his life.  Some time after the above occurrence Gordon was a few steps in advance of his wife, when he heard a scream behind him.  On turning around he espied a panther crouched on a limb of a tree in the act of springing on his wife.  He commanded her to stand still, knowing that his wife’s life depended on his skill as a marksman.  Gordon was equal to the emergency; raising his gun, with quick eye and unerring touch, a sharp report, and the once dangerous animal tumbled to the ground harmless at his wife’s feet.

———————
And Lois also sent this this blog about the Bantas and the Demarees in Kentucky.

http://maddiesancestorsearch.blogspot.com/2011_02_20_archive.html

——————–
Greene, Schoharie and Schenectady County NY biographies
(including Dutch families) going online (Robert Sullivan)
The first batch of biographical sketches from the 1899 collection
Biographical Review: Greene, Schoharie and Schenectady Counties is now
online.More than 60 biographies are available, some with portraits, with the
rest gradually going up by the end of the year.  I have included an
index for each county.  A number of the individuals are descended from
early Dutch families.<http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/people/brgss/index.html>
—————————————————-
Letters, Special 2013 Gathering Issue
MADISON INDIANA:  Our first three days of the Low Dutch Cousins 2013 Gathering will be at Clifty Inn, Madison, Indiana September 19. We’ve written about that before, and it is going to be an unforgettable three days. Then we caravan to Harrodsburg KY, about a 2 hour drive, to worship at our special treasure, the restored Old Mud Meetinghouse built by our Low Dutch ancestors more than 200 years ago.
PLEASUREVILLE, KY:  On the way to Harrodsburg we will stop and tour the SECOND Dutch meetinghouse built in Kentucky near Pleasureville in Henry County at the edge of Shelby County, on the old Low Dutch Tract, orginally around 8,000 acres. At the meetinghouse, our Low Dutch guru Vincent Akers will speak to us about the history. The present owners, and perhaps other interested local people, will be there to greet us and to hear Vince’s talk on the history of this church and the Low Dutch Tract in Henry and Shelby Counties.
HARRODSBURG KY:  Located in the heart of Kentucky’s famed Bluegrass region, the Harrodsburg/Mercer County Historical Society Research Library in Harrodsburg (http://kymercer.heliohost.org/hhs/) will open their incredible research facility just for us on Monday Sept 23 from 10 to 3, ALL FREE including their NEW special collection of our Low Dutch Archives. Can’t wait to see what all has been added since we were there two years ago. I highly recommend HHS Membership, $20.00 per year which includes a bi-monthly newsletter 8 to 12 pages in length. Currently running a series listing the guardian bonds of early Mercer Co., Ky. Queries free to members, use of the library is always free in their limited hours to members, with a nominal fee for non-members.The Genealogical Committee will do research @ $15.00 per hour plus the cost of 20¢ per page for copies. They have a large collection of family records & original documents in addition to a sizable collection of Kentucky books, and HHS now has Mrs. Ison’s research records indexed and filed for us to peruse – can’t wait to see these! She was the most amazing genealogy researcher I ever met and she knew EVERYTHING about the history of Harrodsburg area.
 
MERCER CO GENEALOGY: For a sample of things available to see online as well as at the HHS, go here:  http://kymercer.heliohost.org
HARRODSBURG RESERVATIONS — SPECIAL RATES:  For those needing reservations at Harrodsburg, KY (my favorite place in the world!) for Sunday night September 22, I contacted Country Hearth, 105 Commercial Drive, Harrodsburg which has always been our gathering place in the past. The owner, Nate Patel, is happy to hear we are coming back and he let me know they have completely renovated the motel with all new furniture, bedding, carpet, everything. They are working on new TV sets for each room now. There was a water leakage problem when we were there in 2011, but they finally found the cause and got it fixed, so the Inn is now definitely dry and clean. Nate said their new manager, Leanna and staff, are excellent and he gave me his personal cell phone to call if there are any issues this year. This Inn has been selected to receive the top Gold Award for the entire Country Hearth chain and Nate will be going to their headquarters to receive the honor in October.  It is small, only two story but no elevator so if you can’t climb stairs ask for ground floor. It’s not the Taj Mahal, but it is friendly and convenient.  Nate is giving us special rates about $20 off the regular rates, but you have to call their local number and you have to state you are with the Dutch Cousins to get the rate, which runs from lowest, 1 bed-2 persons $60 on up to hottub suites and more.  I reserved about half their available rooms for our group. Here is the webpage address to see pictures, but Don’t make reservations online, he can’t change that higher rate once you dohttp://www.countryhearthharrodsburg.com  and the phone: 859-734-2400
OTHER PLACES:  There are lots of other options in and around Harrodsburg, including small bed and breakfasts, lake houses, other motels, etc. — and an option to get a room at Pleasant Hill, the restored Shaker Village.  I always want to do that, but again this year because of handicap concerns won’t be able to – maybe next time. For more info contact the Mercer County Tourist Bureau. (see their incrediblewebpage-http://www.harrodsburgky.com)
 Phone 1-800-355-9192 or email: tourism@harrodsburgky.com  They will send you a free brochure if requested.
STAY FOR A WEEK or MORE!  Harrodsburg is an amazing place with so much to see and do, all within a day’s driving range. Like –
  • Boonesboro Living History with Daniel Boone and Davy Crocket at the restored Fort, where some of our ancestors stayed at times for protection from Indian attacks; Living history, costumed guides, lectures, museum, store.   http://www.boonesboro.com
  • Old Fort Harrod at Harrodsburg: A full-scale replica of the fort, built by James Harrod in 1774, Cabins and blockhouses are furnished with handmade utensils, furniture, crude tools and implements used by the pioneers. Living history, costumed guides, store. The park complex also features Mansion Museum, George Rogers Clark Federal Monument, Lincoln Marriage Temple, and oldest cemetery west of the Alleghenies.
  • Perryville Battlefield state park & Museum, the site of the most destructive Civil War battle in the state which left more than 7,600 killed, wounded or missing.
  • Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, the largest restored Shaker community in America, tour the buildings and make reservations at the Trustees Office for the most incredible dinner you’ll ever eat. (reservations required) Take a ride on the authentic 115-passenger Dixie Belle sternwheeler, providing an up-close view of one of the most unique ecosystems in the country at the geologically ancient Kentucky River Palisades (You will want at least a full day here. We have been there three times and still haven’t seen all of it we wanted to.)
  • Spend some time in Harrodsburg, a town that bursts with historic charm. See the 1865 Dedman’s Drugstore and soda fountain, streets lined with architectural treasures, shops given over to period crafts, restaurants dishing up traditional Southern cooking. I LOVE this place our ancestors founded!
  • If you only have time to stop at one store, be sure it is J. Sampson Antiques, Books & Appraisals. The proprietor, Jerry Sampson, is president of HHS and has been a special presenter for the Dutch Cousins everytime we come to Harrodsburg. He has a facebook page and his store is located at 107 South Main Street, Harrodsburg, KY.
  • Just eight miles from Harrodsburg at Danville is the Golden Lion B&B, owned & operated by Jerry & Nancy Jones. What makes the Golden Lion special for us is not only a beautiful 1840 Greek Revival home listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to serving as a general Bed & Breakfast, The Golden Lion provides genealogical resources to those interested in researching the JONES surname and other difficult surnames. Jon & I have not stayed there, but we toured the beautiful  and enjoyed their genealogy displays. For reservations: 859-583-1895.  They also have a facebook page, or email: jonesgenealogist@aol.com
  • The Burgin Barn, for $10 you can eat and listen to a good house band, The Kentucky Strangers, playing mostly country and gospel music –open on Friday nights only. Operated by octogenarian Tommy Hurst – who also plays the bass. No alcohol or smoking allowed – just good music and music lovers. For more info read an article about the Barn in Louisville Magazine: http://www.theburginbarn.com/article.html and check out their facebook page “the-Burgin-Barn.” When they have special guests admission is two bucks more. Food is served at 6 pm as long as it lasts and the music starts at 7. Reservations recommended: 859-748-9689 or 859-265-1415
LOW DUTCH STATION HISTORY:  It was at the Golden Lion B&B a few years ago I first realized Old Mud might not be the FIRST Dutch meetinghouse. It was at the Golden Lion I learned our Old Mud Meetinghouse was apparently NOT the first one in KY as we had believed.  In a booklet by the owner, Jerry Jones, “Ken-Tah-The: The Life and Times of Walker Daniel,”District Court met at Harrodsburg on 4 Mar 1783 and adjourned to the “Dutch Meetinghouse” to complete the session.”  Our Mud Meetinhouse was not built until 1800, almost 20 years later. I called Mr. Jones this morning to get a clarification.  I tell you the man is a walking encyclopedia of early Kentucky history! 
 
Jones said in that early day there were two Dutch meetinghouses, the upper and the lower.  We decided the upper was probably the one near Louisville sometimes called “Holland Station,” and we have previously discussed the historical marker there.  Jones reminded me that on the earliest map of Kentucky, the 1784 Filson map, is the designation near Fort Harrod, “Low Dutch Station.” I had assumed that was our Old Mud, but Jones said by overlaying a present day map there are crossroads of at least five trails at that point, and the location of the meetinghouse would be present day Burgin. Jones does THIRTEEN blogs believe it or not, but the one most interesting to me – and probably to my readers- is this one centered on Danville area history: http://historicdanvilleky.blogspot.com/2012/05/beginning.html
 
To read the 2013 Dutch Cousins newsletter with info of the September meeting in full color online, click here: http://goo.gl/MLnha
For more information about Dutch Cousins check with our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org (webmaster Pam Ellingson)
On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage
We have a facebook page, Dutch Cousins of Kentucky, maintained by Barb Whiteside
To be added to the Dutch Letters, weekly round robin email, contactCarolynLeonard@me.com
Don’t forget — Next DUTCH COUSINS GATHERING:
Clifty Falls Inn (Indiana State Parks) Reservations phone number is: 877.563.4371
Special rates for arriving Friday September 20 2013 –  Departing Sunday Sept 22, 2013
Give the code Group #0920 DC or the inn will say they’re full.
 
Request a free brochure online at visitmadison.org  or order a brochure by phone just by calling 812-265-2956 or 800-559-2956
They will also help you find another place to stay if Clifty Inn is full.
Send your check for the Friday bus tour of Madison area Indiana; narrator Lynn Rogers who grew up on Ryker’s Ridge, Tour chairman Carla Gerding. This is a late add-on so the $18 is in addition to registration.
You don’t have to ride in the bus, you can drive along behind but won’t have benefit of the tour leader – and the last time we tried it (Shelbyville 2007) the cars got separated from the bus and we lost them.
NOTE: $18 each, make checks to Dutch Cousins for the tour, send to Dutch tour leader Carla Gerding, 326 Bishop Lane, Turner’s Station KY 40075 — and the wheels on the bus will go round and round … 
To visit my webpage, just click on the links below or paste the URLs into your browser.
Welcome: http://bit.ly/CarolynBLeonard
Writers Reminder: http://bit.ly/16TyESp
MyBlog: http://bit.ly/myblogs2012
Website Winners: http://bit.ly/websitewinners
or Book Reviews: http://bit.ly/MyBookReviews
Letters 10/14/2103 & Gathering Report
or (short hotlink)  http://bit.ly/17BsksN
Dear cousins, I intended to give a brief summary of the 2013 Dutch Cousins gathering Sept 20-22 at Clifty Inn State Park in Indiana and followup at the Six-mile Dutch meetinghouse and on to Harrodsburg KY and the Old Mud Meetinghouse Sept 22-24 – but I don’t even know where to begin!  As usual it was a delightful time full of laughter, networking, informative talks and displays, entertainment, hugs and more hugs with cousins – some we didn’t even know a year ago.
So just let me say first – Our Dutch Cousins are THE GREATEST.
ATTENDANCE: I believe the final count was about 100 cousins attending from some 24 states around the nation and from many of the 50 or more different family groups. Each of the chairpersons did a wonderful job. The Friday bus tour, narrated and coordinated by Mr. Lynn Rogers, was a big favorite. And Lynn was our real go-to person this year.  Even tho he lives in Ohio, he acted like our local host. Lynn furnished coffee pots, ran out for doughnuts for the hospitality chairpersons Gene & Carol Heathcoat.  Lynn even drove 2 hours to Harrodsburg to pick up items we needed for the gathering.  (I hope he filed a bill with the treasurer and got reimbursed for everything – Lynn let me know, please?)
NAMETAGS: Janice Cozine did an incredible job of keeping registration organized and under control. Everyone seemed to love the colorful “I’m proud of my ancestor” stick-on name tags – and the funny tags too, like “Troublemaker” or “I’m the Big Cheese”. They showed up well on this year’s white tee-shirts with yellow lettering – Thanks to Carole K.
WELCOME: Our own Forever Miss America, Heather French Henry of Kentucky, showed up and sang “God Bless America” to open our Saturday meeting before the Mayor’s welcome. We thanked our cousin Dr. Steve Henry for having the good sense to marry her. His reply? “Westerfields always did appreciate beautiful women.” (and the Westerfield men all wisely agreed). Mary Woodfill Park led a touching Veteran Memorial service.
ENTERTAINMENT: As usual our own famous Low Dutch expert Vince Akers took us on an incredible Dutch journey of “After Kentucky” with the why and how our Dutch moved into this area of Indiana in the early 1800s, and then again he spoke on Sunday at the Six-mile Meetinghouse. (PDFs available).  Dr. Bob Schenck carried us along on his enjoyable powerpoint road trip to deliver an ambulance to Mongolia for charity, peppering his story with tales of Ghengis Khan. Mary Jo Gohmann’s video of the “Dutch Footprints to New York” trip in 2011 left everyone begging for another Dutch tour. (by the way, copies of the NY tour DVD are also available from Charlie Westerfield, see below, for $15 each).
The Saturday banquet entertainment by Sue Livers in costume on the “Dutch and the Underground Railroad” was great.  I think Donna Gaines, coordinator, may have paid the full bill for Livers’ performance – talk to the treasurer, Donna. Joan Murray was well prepared for the autograph party. About six or eight authors autographed a lot of books and it was a busy hour. Phyllis Westerfield handled the silent auction and I think she took in over $300. All funds in excess of expenses go to restoration of Old Mud. Barb Whitesides had scrapbooks of our group’s history on display.
COMPLAINT: Heard only one complaint about the gathering. We needed a bigger area and room to spread out more.  The biggest meeting room at Clifty was reserved for a wedding next to us on Saturday night and we almost felt like we were part of it with the dance music and fun we all experienced. Next time -2015 in Frankfurt- Coordinator Barbie, please make a note — we need more room for people and at least ten tables or more just for displays and silent auction. Also noted we had some communication problems this year; several people missed the announcements about group photo shots, and others missed info on being able to buy the photo CDs and what time things were happening. How can we improve that next time? (Note — we did have a schedule posted in a couple places – and I think everyone showed up on time for meals!)
HARRODSBURG:  Amalie had Old Mud all set up for us when we arrived Sunday in Harrodsburg, and about 75 cousins attended the worship service, which was great with Ronnie Blackwell, Eddie Sherrow, and another local pastor singing several songs and our own pastor Claude Westerfield leading the worship assisted by his wife Kathy (she is a doll).
AFTER WORSHIP: Lee and brother Lynn Rogers, Barbie & Rod, Eddie and Janice, all stayed late Sunday to help move all the boxes back to storage in the H-burg Historical center (HHS), and of course Amalie had to stay too, to let us in. She was late picking up her 90-year-old uncle for evening church. Hope he forgives us.
RESEARCH AT HHS: On Monday The Coles – King and Sharon- from Texas, my cousin Jan & her hubby from Washington state, Alice Hostetter & friends from Seattle, Malcolm & Betty Banta from Florida, our new VP Tommy Green & wife (OK), Claude & Kathy (Iowa), Barbara Merideth (MO), Denise Perry (TN) and Pam Ellingson (Wisc) all researched at the HHS – there may have been more, I was too busy to count.  Remember this is the ONLY Low Dutch repository in the nation?
It was fun having so many of us staying in the little Country Hearth – kind of like a big slumber party. Of course the best part for me was getting to spend time with cousin Jan after so many years, and we tried out several great eating places – Shakertown’s Trustee House is still the best. Their fresh lemon pie is to die for and I will share the recipe later.
BTW – did I say our Dutch Cousins are the greatest?  At Clifty Inn Sharon Cole and I commisserated about our limp hair one damp morning – so she went to town and came back with hairspray for me.  Then I mentioned I had been unable to find a unique plastic toothpick with a curved end, recommended by my dentist. When we arrived home, we had a package from King & Sharon – enclosing two BOXES of said toothpicks. Oh gosh, how can I repay them?
BUSINESS MEETING BRIEF:  I am so excited about our new slate of officers and chairs – we really are becoming one big wonderful DUTCH family, and it is great to welcome the many Ryker/Riker members into our Low Dutch Cousin events. John C. Westerfield of Pennsylvania is our new president and Tommy Green of Oklahoma, a Ryker descendant, is the new Vice President. Nobody volunteered for Secretary so I am still “it” and Diana is continuing as treasurer. Vince agreed to be finance chair and Barbie Hamman volunteered as gathering coordinator. Most of the chairpersons from this year are staying on, so that is GREAT news, because I saw fantastic team work this year. I will be sending out the minutes  when I have time to get my head together and find the recorder. BUT  I have only received two committee reports – these from Carole K, the Tee-shirt lady and Janice – our registration queen. Come on guys, we need those reports.
THANKS: Thanks and congratulations to everyone for producing a really great and joyful get-together! Hope I haven’t forgotten anything or anyone.

Hugs, Carolyn

 

(who just got home Thursday night -Oct 10- after four weeks on the road including driving through four states to the 2013 Dutch Cousins Gathering at Clifty Falls state park in Indiana – then Kentucky to worship at Old Mud and research at the Harrodsburg Historical Society, through West Virginia for a long weekend in the coal-mining region of Appalachia Virginia for Jon’s family reunion, on to Tennessee to visit Jon’s bachelor cousin, back to Virginia for a week of research on Jon’s genealogy in the Blue Ridge, back  I-40’s rough highway across the long state of Tennessee, then taking a slow “red” 2-lane through Arkansas to avoid road repair and a terrible traffic tie-up – and finally back on I-40 Oklahoma City – tired but happy! As Dorothy said in the Wizard of Oz, “There’s just no place like home.”)

________________________________________

Travel tip!  Always stop at the welcome centers of the state you are entering. They offer clean restrooms, free maps and literature, details on traffic and road repairs/detours, and motel coupons for incredible moneysaving — and most have a great photo op with the state name sign.  At the Oklahoma welcome center, our welcome people asked us to let Gov. Mary Fallin know they did not have such a name sign photo-op. I am a big fan of Gov Fallin, so I sent her an email – next time you come into the great state of Oklahoma  – check to see if the sign is there.

________________________________________

From Ellie Burnaford:

The 2013  Dutch Cousins Gathering was definitely a wonderful experience, and I am already thinking about 2015 and seeing everyone again in Frankfort. Could you clarify something? In a recent newsletter there was a bit that started ” ATTN CHARLES VANORSDALE OF SAUDI ARABIA : @FRANKLIN FRICK” …Did Robert Adlet of Pembroke Pines, FL say, as I understand, that he will copy and mail copies of booklet “The history of the Low Dutch Colony of Conewago” to those who ask for it? If “yes”, please send me his email address or give him my email address, so that I can request a copy of the booklet.Thank you.And thank you for all you do and have done for all the Dutch Cousins, including me!
(email info sent)

Received today: Carolyn,

Thank you for forwarding my address to Robert Adlet. He just contacted me with an offer to copy and send me the booklet. Aren’t genealogists kind?!
Ellie

________________________________________

from Penny Kerhoulas
You had forwarded an article some time ago from Robert Adlet of Pembroke Pines, FL  He said he would copy and send a copy of a booklet he has about the Low Dutch of Conewago. I would be so excited to see that booklet since I am a Vanarsall descendant   Please send me his email address, so that I can request a copy of the booklet.
Thank you. I so appreciate learning about the Dutch Cousins and plan on joining you at the next reunion.
(email info sent)
________________________________________
From Carolyn:
We had contracted with a photographer in Madison for $150 to appear for an hour or so at noon on Saturday for the group picture, take a few shots for him to sell at $10 each. Best deal we could find at the time.  Then our wonderful Dutch cousin Charlie Westerfield, pro photog, agreed to come and take pics all weekend. He has had a photo studio since 1969 in Louisville, according to his logo. Charlie would not accept our gratuity, AND he is offering to make a CD of the weekend pics, AND a DVD of the Old Mud church service and mail it out AT HIS COST of $15. Our Dutch Cousins are the greatest people!  So if you want to get in on this unbelievable deal, send a money order to Charlie at his studio and be sure to include your full contact info:
3913 Jenica Way
Louisville KY 40241-1530
BTW Note from Carolyn:  I got my package today. That cousin does GREAT work.
————————————————–
from Charlie Westerfield:

JCO & Carolyn,

I sent out 21 CD’s and DVD’s today. I will send out the one to Barbara Whiteside this afternoon. Not sure if hers was paid for, but I will send it anyway.
Thanks for the hard work you folks do!
________________________________________
from Martha Roach
Carolyn,
do hope your trip was great.
my daughter and I went to the quilt show at the logan county fairgrounds today.  it is also on tomorrow (Saturday)
as we were wandering through and admiring the quilts on display, one of the grand champion ribbons was placed on a beautiful
quilt done by a sue banta.  beautiful, but thought she might be one of those dutch cousins.
________________________________________
from Amalie Preston:
This is a brief update on the “LDR” [the low Dutch Repository].   The lateral filing cabinets housing the Low Dutch materials is now the first stop for anyone arriving at the Harrodsburg Historical Society researching their Dutch ancestry.  Both family and topical files are represented in the repository.  This continues to be a work in progress with new information being added regularly.  The growth of the repository is primarily due to your (Dutch Cousins) continued donations of genealogical and historical materials.  We are honored to learn that housing this repository gives Harrodsburg another first, the first and only Low Dutch Repository in the USA!  Thanks!

NOTE FROM CAROLYN TO AMALIE:  Can you tell us a little more about what is in there and how it is filed? Looked pretty tightly stuffed!  I intended to look for the Paul and Barbara Terhune materials. I did not see them – but didn’t spend much time looking — too many other things to see even tho this is about my 10th visit.  For things that relate to several different family group names, how are they identified?

________________________________________
Barbara Merideth was so generous to share her scanner/printer which allowed scanning documents directly to a flash drive, and Denise Merideth Perry even gave me a flashdrive when I could not find mine.  Our Dutch Cousins are the best people! Besides that, Barbara sat in the same area of Old Mud worship service and now I know one of our cousins who will be invited to sing a special at the next gathering. Amalie Preston is another cousin with a great voice.
________________________________________
from Denise Merideth Perry:
Hi Carolyn:
I see where you traveled quite a bit after the reunion.  Thank you for it all. It was a great reunion and I loved the time at Harrodsburg.
Barbara and I are going to Baltimore for a cruise and had two days to spend at the National Archives, and guess what, it is closed.
We thought about driving up to Conowago, its about 2 hours from our hotel.
Is there a guide or map that would show up what we could see while we are there?
I visited the Dutch cousins website and saw a little but I wasn’t sure if there  was something else that might direct us on some areas to visit.
Thanks so much and so glad you made it safely homoe.
God Bless
A Dutch cousin of yours.
NOTE FROM CAROLYN: I will do a special “letters” on Conewago and the recent change of Findagrave being purchased by Ancestry.com in the near future.
________________________________________
From Jan Pranger
I’m sorry to have missed the gathering…I was especially looking forward to seeing Old Mud and to the service there.  But I’m sure there will be pictures, and I’ll be looking forward to seeing them.
You must be exhausted after a month on the road!  I hope you were successful in your research at Harrodsburg and  in Virginia.  I knocked down a very old brick wall in my tree through a surrogate’s notice in an old newspaper on FultonHistory.com just about two weeks ago, and have been having so much fun working back from my new great great grandfather.
Thank you for thinking about me.  I’m happy to hear you are home safe from your travels,
________________________________________
Can anyone recommend a good inexpensive E-Mail Manager ? My provider only allows a maximum of 30 addresses at a time and under 200 in 24 hour period to be sent, so every time I send out a  Dutch Cousins Letters I have to make about 20 copies of each and sometimes it takes two days to get them sent. Suggestions please. I am looking at Mail Chimp – other suggestions? I tried MacMassMail – supposed to be the easiest, but couldn’t get it to work. I will keep trying so you may get two copies of this Letter.
________________________________________
from Janice Cozine:

I will enjoy working with Barbie and I think Frankfort will be a nice place for sure.

Eddie talks about you, Jon and Jim Cozine often.  He has been very excited getting to know all of you. Just think, a little article in the news paper has come this far. Eddie LOVES stories and any info on his family history and all of this is contributed by all of you.

Eddie is going to the farm to cut hay for the next 5 days and I have the 4 grandkids for the next 4 days.  We’re trying to decide what they would like to do, while they are here.

________________________________________
from Jane VanArsdale:
Note my change of email address.  Wishing you well,
________________________________________
from Rogene Smith:
Hello to Carolyn,  Haven’t heard anything from you since the reunion.  I hope you and Jon made it home OK and I hope you are well.  I have received the DVD from Westerfield; but haven’t looked at it yet.I enjoyed the reunion as did my daughter.  She is not a genalogist; but enjoyed the programs and meeting.She helped with the silent auction.
 Madison’s business district really looked good and the walk along the river was nice.  There were benches along the walk, a shelter, and names engraved in the bricks of people who had donated to the walk.
I’m glad we did not arrive after dark, because of the road to the motel.  It was a beautiful setting and just think we    almost were in the wedding.  I would have liked to go on to Harrodsburg, but didn’t want to take my daughter away from her home any longer.  I hope I am still able to attend the next reuniion.
 Thanks to everyone for their hard work in planning the reunion.
________________________________________
from King and Sharon Cole – first-timers at the Dutch Cousins this year –
We had a wonderful experience at our first Dutch Cousins meeting. Everything about it was truly enjoyable. I know that you and others spent a lot of time planning and organizing all the different speakers, bus trip, t-shirts and research. Prior to the meeting, we thought it might be a one-time trip, but we both are looking forward to the next meeting. I am glad we are cousins. We look forward to seeing you all again.
NOTE from Carolyn – this note was tucked in a package we received today from the Coles – along with TWO boxes of curved plastic toothpicks (long funny story here), so now I owe them for the toothpicks AND a can of hairspray! Our Dutch Cousins are the greatest people!
________________________________________
from Larry and Suzanne Voreis:
Just wanted to send this picture [Jon & Carolyn Heavener with Vince Akers – ] and tell you how much we appreciate all you have done to make the Dutch Cousin’s Reunion such a special occasion. This year was the best ever! I was especially gratiified to see so many new faces. As I talked to the newcomers, I asked them how they heard about us, and nearly all of them said they found out about us from the internet. So, thanks also to those who publish Dutch Cousin’s news on the web.

(See the pic on my blog 

Ignore my crooked hat, but NOTICE my darling Dutch dress, made by Dutch Cousin Carole Karwatka of Morehead KY, with only my emailed measurements — the dress fit perfectly!  The scarf was a gift from Mary W. Park, past president of Daughters of Holland Dames. Amazing. Our Dutch Cousins are the greatest people!  Jon and I got our hats in Holland Michigan a few years ago.
_____________________________________
Letters 10/21/2013

I am trying this new mail manager so please let me know if you receive it okay, and if the hotlinks and Vince’s pdfs are on here.

The Finest Pioneers: The Low Dutch in Kentucky

Beyond Kentucky: the Low Dutch Migration into Indiana

 

Hugs to all, Carolyn

from Jim Woodfill

Carolyn, I just wanted to say that I had a great time at this year’s Dutch Cousins gathering, both at the Clifty Inn and at Harrodsburg and Old Mud.  I got to renew old acquaintances, make new friends, and learn even more about my Dutch ancestry.  The bits of history I learned at the previous gatherings, plus the people who made them, are starting to come together and form a much clearer picture to me now, than was apparent to me at the earlier meetings.  I also got to spend considerable time with my Woodfill cousins Bob, Mary, Donna, and Tommy.

I followed Donna & Bill’s lead and stayed Sunday night at the Beaumont Inn in Harrodsburg, a stately old antebellum building that started out as a women’s college before the civil war.  It was a little pricier than the Country Hearth, but I think it was worth it.  Their dining room was closed on Sunday, but they had a very nice breakfast on Monday morning, one of the best I’ve ever had.  It was free, except for the expensive stuff which I didn’t bother with, and it was served to you, none of this continental buffet stuff like in the smaller hotels.  That in itself made the stayover worthwhile.

Something unusual happened to me on the last day at the Clifty.  I was just finishing breakfast there in the restaurant, and asked the waitress for my check.  She told me that a young lady had already picked up my check and paid it.  I asked who the young lady was, and the waitress looked around but said she was gone now.  I racked my brain, trying to figure out who she might be, but came up totally empty.  If she is a member of our group, would she please come forward and identify herself, so that I can properly thank her, and possibly return the favor at the next gathering?  Could it be I have a secret admirer?  Or a fairy godmother?  (Ha!  At my age?  That’ll be the day!)

———————————————————————-

 

From Alice Hostetter:

I just want to repeat my “thank you” for the spendid Dutch Cousin Reunion. It went way beyond my expectations.I will sum it up by saying that not only did I feel a strong “cousin” connection but there was a feeling of spiritual connection as well that made me feel as though I had never left home. Jan Whaley, my friend, and I are going to give a presentation next month at our Valley Clan Diggers meeting of our experiences at the Dutch Cousin reunion. I would truly love to be able to have Vince Akers’ very informative lectures in writing.

———————————————————————-

From Barbara Fineisen

For the past couple of years I have been researching my Harris ancestry.  My father was an only child who had one first cousin, so I didn’t know very much about his family.  I wish I had been more interested when he was alive so I could have picked his brain.  I’m sure that if I had asked the right questions, he would have known more than he thought.  So, starting with ancestry.com, my grandparents and my great grandfather who lived in Louisville, I have managed to go back to Daniel Harris and Elizabeth DEMAREST–my 5th great grandparents.  I was very surprised to learn that I had Dutch ancestors–not to mention Shakers!

I have been in contact several times with Jan Pranger, who gave me your email address.  I would like very much to be included in the Low Dutch mailing list and would enjoy meeting my Low Dutch cousins in Madison, IN next Sept.

———————————————————————-

[Note from Carolyn – does anyone have more info on John Smock and Elizabeth Ann Bradshaw of Mercer Co KY?

from Jan Schrouf:

Carolyn, I rec’d your emails from Dina Deupree….she is in my DAR group…I’d said that we had not proved a Rev Patriot in my husband’s Smock/Demaree(Demarest) family and the story of the Low Dutch Colony in KY.

You spoke to his [Ron Schrouf’s] OKC SARs chapter… This I discovered after the fact!  When I mentioned this at DAR, Dina recalled my interest and sent the info to me.  Hopefully, we will be able to attend the next reunion in 2015.

 

Ron’s grgrgrandmother was Mary Ann “Mattie” Smock, dau. of John Smock and Elizabeth Ann Bradshaw, buried in Mercer Co.

Mattie m. John King Finnell 4 Feb 1850 in Mercer Co, KY.  The Finnells went to Missouri and are buried there.

I have an article by A.M. Tuttle “Notes on Two Revolutionary Ancestors, JACOB SMOCK and GERARDUS RYKER, and on some of their decendants.”  I think I found it in Frankfort, KY abt 35 yrs ago.  It gives an account from PIONEERS OF JEFFERSON COUNTY.  BY JOHN SMOCK…June 26, 1874.

 

Another of Rons family was the late Landon Wills who was the editor of Bluegrass Roots.  They are related on the Gen. Samuel B Ireland tree.(also of Mercer,Shelby,Henry Counties, KY). His grmother Frances Dove Finnell (dau of John B. and Annie Laurie Ireland Finnell-Johns mother was Mary Ann Smock).  I have a letter written to Dove’s(Nanny) sister Pearl Finnell Smith from Pinkie Pearson Smock Taubman in 1938, of Lexington, MO which gives pertinent info. She states her grandfather was John Smock so i.e…..John Smock was Mary Ann’s grandfather. She mentions Abraham, Isaac, John and Wm ….Abe and Ike drove the stage coach from Harrodsbur to Danville, KY for many years.  Pinkie tells Pearl that John was her ” grgrandfather and thats something…some dont know their own daddy (unreadable) something too.”  She goes on to identify the decendants of John.

**(Pearl’s son, John Lucien Smith was the 1st Congressional Medal of Honor recepient of WWII from Oklahoma.  He has been inducted into the Oklahoma Military Hall of Fame.)

 

If you would put me on the Low Dutch Colony etc. mailings we would be very appreciative.

———————————————————————-

From Deborah Dustman:

May I please receive a PDF of the following presentation?  Thank you!!!

“incredible Dutch journey of “After Kentucky” with the why and how our Dutch moved into this area of Indiana in the early 1800s, and then again he spoke on Sunday at the Six-mile Meetinghouse. (PDFs available).”

———————————————————————-

from Della Ford Nash

I enjoyed reading your whole report. Really fun and makes me wish I had a Low Dutch Cousin.

So much going on, CDs, pictures, costumes, singing, services and a lot of genealogy. Della

———————————————————————-

from Marge Delaney:

Thanks so much for sending me a copy of the account of  your recent travels, and of the Dutch Cousins Reunion.

Jackie had told me that you and Jon had gone, and are now back home.  All was very interesting to read about.

Hope your new hip held up well. I didn’t read of any “breakdowns” so am guessing all was well with you and the hip!

I have asked Dr Ponder about you several times, and he has given positive reports, for which I am very thankful.

———————————————————————-

from Beverly Sullivan

On Oct 14, 2013, at 2:44 PM, damebev@aol.com wrote:

HI Carolyn!  I just got the email about the Gathering this year.  Sounds like I missed a really great gathering.  At the time of the meeting I was having some health problems.  But my friends and I did get to go to VA on Sept. 27th.  Sounds like we may have been in the same areas some!  Jean Pollard did not get to go with us this year and we missed her.  I just got home on Sat. from VA/TN after two weeks going around VA, ending up in Knoxville, TN.  BUT the interesting thing I saw on your note was I bet you were right here where I live!!!   Remember I live right over the MS River bridge in Marion, AR!  It depends on which two lane highway you took home, but if it was Hwy 64, which is a favorite of a lot of people around here, you were about 10 blocks from my home!!  If it was Hwy 70 you were still close to me.   Too bad we did not know it and could get to see each other.

———————————————————————-

Dear Carolyn:

1) I was there

2) I enjoyed the camaraderie

3) I gave a talk, “Travels with Genghis”

Best wishes,

Dr. Robert Schenck

Membership Chairman

The Holland Society of New York

———————————————————————-

from Sam Mendenhall:

Robert Adlet of Pembroke Pines, FL say, as I understand, that he will copy and mail copies of booklet “The history of the Low Dutch Colony of Conewago” to those who ask for it?

 

If “yes”, please send me his e-mail address or give him my e-mail address, so that I can request a copy of the booklet and pay him for his efforts.

 

Thank you.  Sam Mendenhall

———————————————————————-

On Oct 15, 2013, at 7:59 AM, David Smock wrote:

Thank you,Carolyn for the fulsome report on the Dutch Cousins reunion, which is so useful, especially to those of us who were unable to attend the reunion. Regarding the statement (or is it a question?) that the Harrodsburg  Historical Society is the “only Low Dutch repository in the nation,” some Dutch Cousins may not be aware of The Holland Society of New York, which has collected information on New Netherland and its inhabitants and their descendants since its founding in 1885, and has an extensive library. Information about the Holland Society is available on the internet.  There may be other repositories as well, but I certainly agree, however, that it is entirely appropriate for us to deal with the Harrodsburg Historical Society.

David Smock

Florida Branch,

The Holland Society of New York

Dutch Cousins Point of Contact for

the Smock Family

Thanks David –  I know about the Holland Society, but never thought of them as being as repository since they are so restrictive on membership and visitation.  However, I will add this info to the next letters.

carolyn

———————————————————————-

from Bob Cossart, author of THE COSSART CHRONICLES (my book review here: http://bit.ly/GXcing)

Here it is late October, and I just now saw your email below.  It was somehow mistakenly filed in an email folder I seldom access.  You are correct; the house below appears to be a very different one than the one in my book, and your photo does match the one in “The Cossairt Family” by Joseph A. Cossairt.  I am feeling rather embarrassed now.  The house I photographed was on the west side of the road a short distance south of the lower Low Dutch Cemetery.  This being my first visit to the area and having no map and no photo with me at the time, my memory failed me, and I made a wrong assumption about the house I photographed.  I wanted to stop and inquire within, but there was a “Beware of Dog” sign prominently displayed near the drive, and I didn’t want to become a chew toy for the family pet.  LOL!  Do you have a map showing the exact location or the actual postal address of the correct house?  At some point I would like to get back there for another visit.

There have been one or two other minor issues raised by other researchers, and I may at some point want to publish a revised edition.  Including the correct photo of Cossart’s Dream home will top the list of changes.  It’s embarrassing, to say the least, and I the last thing I want to do is mislead or confuse other researchers.

I’m sorry I missed the Dutch Cousins get-together.  I have had some health issues this summer that kept me from travel, but things are under control now.  We just returned from a visit to the Florida panhandle, and we plan a visit to Colorado to see our daughter and grandson in a couple of weeks.  I doubt we will make it back to Pennsylvania this winter, but perhaps will make a visit in the Spring next year.  Next time, I will have a good map in hand.  J  I see from the hot link you sent you have already added photos of Francis’ grave stone.

It’s good to hear from you, cousin.  Best wishes for the upcoming Holiday season.

Cousin Bob

——————————————————————-

Letters 10/24/2013

Dear Dutch Cousins,

As you can see from the responses below – some people received the PDFs with no problem, others either did not receive them or could not open them.  If you are willing to try DROPBOX, it is free and I have used it for some time.  I put Vince Akers’ PDFs of his speeches in a Dropbox folder. Friends who click the link below will get an instant preview of the file or folder through their browser, and the option to download the files to their computer. The recipient doesn’t need to be a Dropbox user.  Let me know if it works for you.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/2zlbikhdqvg5slf/N6hRlv4_ie

If you want to send the files or a picture or anything else you wish to share to someone else, save a copy of the file someplace in your Dropbox folder. Find the file, Click on the file name to select it, then right-click and select SHARE LINK from the Dropbox menu. Then you can paste that address into an email message, IM, text message…you name it.

——————————————————————

from Robin BArnett

Thank you. September was a crazy month and I was unable to attend this year’s gathering. Please keep me on the mailing list.

Sincerely,

Robin

——————————————————————

from Jack Taylor:

I received your Email with 2 attachments that formatted perfectly when down loaded.

The Vince AKERS printed presentation was a very welcome important part of our “putting muscle on the bones of our ancestors.”  Vince had already become a legend in our REYNERSON Family by helping with details of  “A Genealogy of the REYNIERSEN Family”  by Peter RINEARSON & Art RYNEARSON 1991.  I was amazed at how young he was.  We need more injection of youngsters to keep our family history alive!

 

If attending a similar “KY Dutch Cousins” Clan Gathering in the future I will be happy to audio record such presentations.  I did get a good audio recording of Sue Livers as “Patsy Harris”  that Lynn ROGERS  wanted and would like to send it to him for his use as he and Sue agree upon.  But, I don’t have his Email or Snail Mail address.

Jack “Johannes’ TAYLOR

 

——————————————————————

from Gladys Dorrell:

Homer passed away Oct. 19th . The funeral was yesterday and many beside those conducting the service spoke of their experience and appreciating Homer life service and example living God service. His life was focused on service and spreading the gospel etc I will miss him but I know he is in heaven.

Gladys Dorrell

Gladys, please accept my deepest sympathy and also the sympathy of the group. I am so glad we had the opportunity to know Homer and you, and thank you so much for all you two did for the Dutch Cousins group. –Carolyn

——————————————————————

Got the email just fine and the links worked too. However, the pdfs wouldn’t open.

Tommy

——————————————————————

from Thelma Little:

Thank you for keeping us Dutch cousins notified of all those special activities and events. Will you add me to the mailing  of the Conewago Colony history booklet. by Mr Akers.

Lammentje Covenhoven, Conover bap:Oct 10,1779 by Domine Cornelius Cozine of Straben York/Adams co PA RDC.

AKA: Emelia Conover Ferguson, Bur:Aug 21, 1851 at Rose twp. Beaver Run Cem. Pg.52  Row 4  Clarion Co.PA. in book

Cemerey Hoppin’ by Pat Steele of Jefferson co.PA.

She was younger sister of Martje Covenhoven Stagg… They moved to Harrodsburg Colony.

Her parents are buried in Straben Cemetery. JOHN Covenhoven b:1747 -1832 and Caty Catherine Coevert.D:1822.

Emelia m: William Ferguson b:1779-1851. Haven’t found their marriage record and date.

They and their 6 children moved to Beaver Twp Armstrong/Clarion co PA about 1824. All children born in Adams co.PA.

Sincerely,

Thelma

——————————————————————

from Betty Hersey

I received it but the .pdfs didn’t open.

——————————————————————

from Sue

The attachments were stripped from my regular primary email account but I opened my “alternate” Hotmail e-mail account, and received both PDF files.

So I just opened and printed, and I am now off to “happy reading.”

Thank you!!!  Sue

——————————————————————

from Lee Rogers

Carolyn:  I am having trouble opening the pdf to copy Vince Akers Speeches. I really, really want a copy of them.  I think they are the best thing that tells the story in this chapter of the Low Dutch Iin Kentucky.  Let me know.  Thanks.  Lee

——————————————————————

Hotlinks and Vince’s pdfs are missing from my email.

Linda Hayes

——————————————————————

from Carla Gerding:

Got it fine. . .didnt know if you received my email to you??  I too felt that it was the BEST ever reunion.  Of course, it had its kinks. . . It always will, but on the whole, I think it went smoothly.  Remember when we tried to register in the country hearth lobby??  Okay!!!  We are improving!

Hope you are recovered.  Love Carla

——————————————————————

from David Smock:

Your message with the attachments opened fine in the iMAC but not in the old Dell (which is on its last legs anyhow).  Many thanks for keeping us so well informed of a great reunion, which I could attend experience only  “spiritually” and through written reports.

 

Best regards,

 

David

——————————————————————

from Mary Jo Gohmann

I received your mailing perfectly and now I am in the process of downloading the PDFs from Vince Akers. Anxious to read all I missed September 22.

I am back in the states again as I left my daughter to her studies in Paris.  I  arrived home on Saturday and adjusting from the jet lag. Now in the process of downloading photos and jotting down more notes as I wait on the washing machine to catch up on the piles of laundry.:)

Hugs,

Mary Jo

——————————————————————

from Larry Voreis:

The link didn’t work in your last e-mail. Could you send me the PDF’s for both of Vnce’s speeches.

 

Thanks and best wishes.

——————————————————————

from Judy Cassidy

I did receive the attachments.  Please change my husbands name from Tom to Jim. The Vanguards are all on line and can be accessed with a google search.

Thankyou

——————————————————————

Carolyn,  I could not open your attachments from Vince Akers.  Could you send them to me in a different manner?

Thanks,  Janice  Cozine  🙂

————————————-

from Pam Ellingson

The pdfs of Vince’s talks came through my e-mail okay. I have included them with the “letters” on the DC website.

———————–

From Bill VanOsdol

Carolyn, I sent my Dutch grandson’s photos to a friend in Margraten NL and he responded and added this note about Christmas. He keeps me informed of Dutch history and current events. There is a American cemetery in Margraten and each grave site(more than 8000)_ is adopted and attended by a Dutch family. I’ve been there 3 times. They were extremely upset when the Obama show down closed the cemetery and no one could enter.Did I already send this to you?  Bill

 

Subject: pictures

Man oh man wahat beautiful creations. Yes his roots lay down in the Netherlands the flower Garden of Europe.

Several of this creations are beautifull for christmas.

I’m happy I can raed my maiis and find something with Google on the PC. But when i see what our  Grandchild does on Ipad( what it is) with his 2 years I’m a verry old stupid Dummy. :-)).

Oke Bill I stay with the strongest and we survive.

Something funniest:

Perhaps you know we have in the Netherland at 6 dec, Santa Claus for the children. This Santa Claus a so called bishop from MIRA in Spain, over two hundred years and get  help from black servants. (White guys wo paint their face black)This Santa Claus is riding in the(what children believes) night from 5 to 6Dec. over the roofs  of the houses and his helping black people throw presents for the children through the chimneys. And in the morning of 6 dec. they find this presents in their shoes  in front of the  chimney in the living room. Everybody like this and it was a common case  hardly  over 250 Years.. A verry nice event for the children. Every year this Bishop is  coming several days before the 5th to several towns  standing on a ship  and the mayor of that speaks a word of welcome.  A beautifull tradition .!But now several real black  people in the Netherlands suddenly have problems with this while this servants are black..They yell that is slavery.

Nowadays the,believe me, the UN  had a requiry and the result is :that’s a total recial  discrimination and this is slavery.!!!!! They want we must stop with this children event .The president of the UN group  in the Netherlands is coming from….. Jamaica and she is black.

Oh happy day.

I’ll think this years i don’t find some presents in my shoe..jamaica girl stay with your Rum-Beans.

Met vriendelijke groeten

Charles Kesselaer

Letters 11/07/2013

from Carolyn Leonard (editor): We took a few days off and went home (to small town, rural Buffalo OK) from Friday to Tuesday this week – no internet, no tv, no phone service, not even a newspaper! It was wonderful!  I went to the public library on Monday to check email, but didn’t take time for replies. 

Really enjoyed this long weekend – Always have to come back to the farm every so often to get grounded and enjoy all the hugs. We went to Kiowa (Kansas), another small rural town, for a Dinner Theatre on Saturday night. Took son, granddaughter, and her boyfriend, and we had so much fun just being with my cousins there who are involved in the theatre — and the steaks were delicious. Another nice little celebration now that I am back on my feet again.

So now – back to work and the real world.  A dozen phone call messages to return, 125 emails, deadlines to meet, a tall stack of US Mail to take care of, and doctor’s appointments –Aware I have not sent out the Dutch Cousin 2013 reports and minutes  — so taking DEEP breaths and I will get there!  

—————————————————————-

From Judy K. McKee

I’m from Vevay and missed the reunion by a few days. I’ve just gotten my DAR membership last June and I’m trying to find pictures of some of my ancestors. I realize they would probably be pictures of portraits. I’m putting together a book for my grandchildren and need pictures of Isaac Vauter Banta and Hendrick Banta. I’d be happy to share what I have with others if wanted. My patriot was Henry Banta Sr. in PA. I’m a member of the Green Mountain Boys Chapter is San Antonio.I look forward to hearing from you.  (any cousins with info for Judy McKee, please hit reply and I will forward to her.)

 

—————————————————————-

From Jim Cozine to Vince Akers

cc Carolyn

Just got back from Hawaii 2 days ago and read your “Beyond Kentucky” paper..

WOW! – that was a fantastic read… Hope you will submit it to the Holland Society for publication in their magazine de Halve Maen.

Garret Cozine ( last son of the Rev Cornelius) went to Hendricks Co,. IN in late 1835 to join his grandson of the same name, who had purchased 120 acres on Oct 18th that year. Sorry I missed the gathering this year – but I’ve got Frankfort, KY on my schedule for 2015.

(Note from Carolyn – Garret Cozine is mutual ancestor for Jim Cozine and me – our 5th great grandfather)

—————————————————————-

from David Smock:

 

Supplementing Charles Kesselaer’s comments (copied below) in your Dutch Cousins message was an item in Dutch News, 22 Oct 13, reporting on an interview with the head of the U. N.’s human rights committee with television show EenVandaag that she would object to the character of Zwarte Piet (Black Pete) if she lived in the Netherlands. The woman, who is Jamaican (and presumably black) said in the interview that the U. N. working group cannot understand why people in the Netherlands do not see this is a throwback to slavery and that in the 21st century this practice should stop.

 Well, Zwarte Piet has been around for centuries, helping Sinterklaas as he makes his rounds on  the eve of the Saint’s holiday, or Dutch Christmas (6 December). He is part of Dutch tradition and culture, and doing away with him would be tantamount to animal rights fanatics “liberating” Santa’s reindeer from the task of pulling his sleigh! That U. N. troublemaker should focus on real human rights problems in the world, which are not lacking, and leave Zwarte Piet alone!

 Incidentally, who is Charles Kesselaer and how is he connected to Dutch Cousins.  I would like to write to him and would appreciate having his e-mail address.

 Met vriendelijke groeten

 David

————————————————————

Email shared by Dr. William (Bill) Van Osdol after sending Kesselaer unique photos that were created by Bill’s Dutch grandson:

Subject: pictures 

Man oh man wahat beautiful creations. Yes his roots lay down in the Netherlands the flower Garden of Europe.

Several of this creations are beautifull for christmas.

I’m happy I can raed my maiis and find something with Google on the PC. But when i see what our  Grandchild does on Ipad( what it is) with his 2 years I’m a verry old stupid Dummy. :-)).

Oke Bill I stay with the strongest and we survive.

Something funniest:

Perhaps you know we have in the Netherland at 6 dec, Santa Claus for the children. This Santa Claus a so called bishop from MIRA in Spain, over two hundred years and get  help from black servants. (White guys wo paint their face black)This Santa Claus is riding in the(what children believes) night from 5 to 6Dec. over the roofs  of the houses and his helping black people throw presents for the children through the chimneys. And in the morning of 6 dec. they find this presents in their shoes  in front of the  chimney in the living room. Everybody like this and it was a common case  hardly  over 250 Years.. A verry nice event for the children. Every year this Bishop is  coming several days before the 5th to several towns  standing on a ship  and the mayor of that speaks a word of welcome.  A beautifull tradition .!But now several real black  people in the Netherlands suddenly have problems with this while this servants are black..They yell that is slavery.

Nowadays the,believe me, the UN  had a requiry and the result is :that’s a total recial  discrimination and this is slavery.!!!!! They want we must stop with this children event .The president of the UN group  in the Netherlands is coming from….. Jamaica and she is black. 

Oh happy day.

I’ll think this years i don’t find some presents in my shoe..Jamaica girl stay with your Rum-Beans.

 Met vriendelijke groeten

Charles Kesselaer

————————————————————

From Dr Wm (Bill) Van Osdol:

Fridays’ Oklahoman printed my “Your Views” letter mentioning Charles and the Margraten cemetery.

That’s How we met –  at a grave site in the American Cemetery in Margraten Netherlands (NL). Since that year I’ve visited with him and his family at their home. 

Each grave site at the cemetery is adopted by a Dutch family. Charles Kesselaer adopted one grave from Oklahoma. The brother of Dwight Journey of OKC is buried there.  Charles has mailed books. CDs. DVDs , you name it, all relative to Holland and  WWII. Believe it or not the Kesselaers live on John F. Kennedy Street. 

By the way, I’m presenting a Vets day WWII program on 11 November in Evans Hall, south of Old North at University of Oklahoma in Norman, starting at 2 PM. The program chair has arranged WWII music and USO donuts, etc. Open to public, hope you come. 

I hope to sign a few books.  Bill

——————————————————————

From Alice Hostetter

Carolyn and Jan Schrouf—I can possibly give some information on John Smock and Elizabeth Bradshaw of Mercer Co., KY. Also, John King Finnell and Mary AnnSmock; also, other names mentioned–Frances Dove Finnell, Annie Laurie Ireland, etc. This is my line! Just contact me by email and I’ll help where I can. I was so happy to receive the speeches by Vince Akers. Thanks so much. I wish I had someone like him in many of my lines.

—————————————————————-

From Gene & Carol Heathcoat

Always interesting to read your email. 

Although we moved a few months ago down to Robson Ranch, just south of Denton, from Lake Kiowa, outside of Gainesville, we still return to LK for various reasons.  One is to attend the monthly genealogy club meeting.  Last week I gave a presentation on Family Reunions at the meeting and primarily focused on the recent (Low) Dutch Cousins’ Reunion and the organization behind it.  A new lady in the group was very interested in researching her family’s name- Duweese/Dueast?  She was curious if the family was involved in the low Dutch migration to America?

 Could you recommend a beginning point for her research relative to a connection to Low Dutch.  I don’t believe she has done any research…….\

By the way, I couldn’t open the Dropbox for Vince’s speech. Hope you are starting to get rested up from your trips. 

—————————————————————-

From Marilyn Douglas of the New Netherland Institute:

For those of you interested in New York history in all its aspects, check out the New York History blog. It will be well worth your time. Perhaps you might might want to contribute and/or sign up for the blog.

http://newyorkhistoryblog.org

—————————————————————-

from carolyn leonard

I stumbled onto this webpage about the Low Dutch Colony by Neal Underwood.  The page is well presented and interesting, but I did see some info posted that is in question so always seek a reliable source before putting informtion into your family history:

Check it out here: http://home.comcast.net/~neal4/shkylowd.htm

—————————————————————-

 from judy cassidy:  If you are researching in Kentucky, and wish to know more about your ancestor’s death, if you are lucky, Ancestry.com has an excellent site.  This is the original hand written record book of deaths reported from 1852-1953 titled Kentucky Death Records, 1852-1953. Searching by name can be an issue on ancestry because the transcribers got the names wrong more than right, however, I ended up doing a page by page search simply because it was easier.  The Mercer County pages are easier to read, excepting one or two which were faded, the Shelby and Henry were listed differently and not alphabetically.  Most pages are from 1 to 10 pages in length.If you click on  Birth, Deaths etc line on the Search page, then fill out the questionaire on the Deaths page, with just a surname, location this site should come up.  Click it on and you can do a county by county search, you can also click the year (s) you wish to search. These options are at the top of the “paper or page” in small letters.

Each page is two pages wide. Mercer is alphabetical by the surname of the Parent or Owner which is located in on the 2nd page. The name of the individual which is in the first column of the first page should be also, however, since some are slaves no surname given and some were reported by a surname which is not theirs. The surname  of the deceased and the surname of the person reporting the death may also be different when no a slave entry.   So you need to check both the Deceased Column and the Father/Owner column.  You will discover, the individual, race, sex, date of death, cause of death, location, and where buried.  

1855

Angeline, 9 days, Sept. 7, unknown, Samuel Demaree

Mary, 58, widow, July 15, Bowel Complaint – Samuel Demaree

These are just some of those named, there were other Dutch names as well, but for my purposes I only copied these.

Judy Cassidy

1856

Anna Vanarsdal reported by Daniel Vanarsdal, 101 years old, widow, d. April of  1856 of Old age bur. Harrodsburg.

Isaac Vanarsdale, 17, Cholera, again Daniel Vanarsdal, died. Sept. 1856, bur. Mud Church.

Alex Vanarsdall, 70, b. NJ, died Pneumonia, Nov. 14, bur. Harrodsburg.

1857

Hamilton Durlin, age 22 Farmer, d. 4 Nov. of Consumption, parents. John and Nancy Durlin.

Wm. Smock, 24, Farmer, d. Aug 21, Typhoid, John Smock parent, bur. Cane Run Church.

Daniel Stagg, 88,  b. NJ, d. Nov. 25, old Age, Daniel Stagg reported this, bur. Harrodsburg.

1858

Henry Banta, b. NJ, 67, married Farmer, d. Aug. 16, 1871, Reported by Peter and Margaret Banta.

—————————————————————-

 

Letters 11/10/2013

from Carolyn:  One of my favorite Dutch authors – and noted WWII pictorial historian, Dr Wm (Bill) Van Osdol, is presenting a Vets day program on 11 November (Monday) at UCO Edmond (Oklahoma) in Evans Hall, south of Old North Tower starting at 2 PM. He has several books out about WWII. The program chair has arranged WWII music and USO donuts, etc. Open to public, hope you come. Put it on your calendar now – I did. (Bill says we better come early – parking may be difficult.)

————————————

from  Rodney C. van Ausdall

Peter van Ausdall (born 1777) married Rachel Banta (born 2 Dec 1789 died 13 Mar 1843) . Rachel`s ancestors came from North Holland and settled in Flushing NY, in 1789.  Rachel had several children by Peter. They made their home in Lanier Township, Ohio,and homesteaded in Section 10, near Twin Creek ( I have visited the family farm there). The road near section 10 still bears the van Ausdall name. Members of the van Ausdall and Banta families are buried in the family graveyard near the farm. Peter  married Martha Kitson after Rachel`s death.

————————————

from Barbara Whiteside (about the Dutch Cousins facebook page)

You might want to put in the newsletter that I made the facebook site closed so anyone wanting to join has to apply to get on it…..not that hard.  I was getting quite a few rather enticing young ladies of Asian persuasion wanting to be added to the list in the past month or so.  I did a check their sites to see if there might be any info that leads me to believe there is a connection or interest..but in these cases….nothing.  I do know there is a Banta line in the Philippines but no idea how they connect…….but these were young ladies with more a come on sort of photo or two on their sites.  Rather err on the side of caution than allow someone on that might be harmful in one way or another.

————————————

From Lilly Martin in Syria:

I sent to the Low Dutch Repository in Harrodsburg Historical Society (KY) pdfs of my Brewer file (total of 73 pgs):

#1. A cover page outline.

#2. The Immigrant ancestor: Adam Brouwer, and his children: 18 pages.

#3. The eldest son, Pieter Brouwer and his children: 15 pages.

#4.  Abraham Brouwer, the son of Pieter, and his descendants, including those who went to Mercer Co, KY.: 38 pages.

#5. Daniel Brewers will.

 

Some of the material is from a website online, which I have cited and given full credit to through out, a premier website for all the Brouwer family,”Brouwer Genealogy Database”, is FREE online.<http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brouwergenealogydata/>

Hope it will be helpful to other Brouwer descendants. Also some info is from my own research, of following along with the Dutch Cousins newsletter group of Carolyn Leonard.

————————————

From Carolyn:  About the “Low Dutch Colony” website <http://xfin.tv/1begOY0> posted by Neal Underwood, who is a descendant of Andrew Shuck (ca1833-1803)…  The site has some good info, but details about Francis Montfort Jr may be wrong. And this is a reminder – Always be sure to double check your sources before posting internet info to your family tree. Remember the old GIGO rule (garbage in-garbage out) — and only reliable sources are accepted by lineage societies so be sure to make lots of good notes about your sources. Our “Dutch Cousins” does not require proof, we take your word for it — but DAR, SAR, all those others — require paper to prove who you are.

From barbara whiteside:

The “Low Dutch Colony” website <http://xfin.tv/1begOY0> mentioned in the previous “Letters” used to have the info wrong about the Montfort family. The same wrong info is published in the 1800s Banta book by Theodore M. Banta  and has been repeated in several more recent books on the family. I think we finally have it straight now.  I have more info about this family and will share my sources if requested.

FRANCIS MONTFORT JR: The true story is Francis Montfort Jr (born 1784)  was married to Polly/Marya Banta, daughter of John and Polly Riker Banta.  I have a copy of their marriage license from Shelby County, KY. The girls named in Neal’s “Low Dutch Colony” website as daughters to Francis, were actually his wife’s sisters, daughters of John and Polly Riker Banta, as listed in the will of John Banta. Francis Montfort Jr and Polly actually had two sons, John and David, and one daughter, Charity. They all became Shakers in 1806 and moved to the colony at Pleasant Hill, but all three children left the order as soon as they were old enough. Francis and Polly stayed, and are buried at Shakertown.

JACOB MONTFORT: Francis Junior’s brother JACOB Montfort (born 1787), was the one who married Margaret “Peggy” Banta, daughter of Cornelius.   I have their marriage record from Henry County KY. Margaret was called Peggy by the Shakers. Jacob and Peggy also had two sons, John and Henry, and one daughter, Leah, by the time he and his family joined the Shakers in 1809. Both boys later left the order. Their father Jacob Montfort, who had been an elder, left the Society and divorced Margaret/Peggy Banta Montfort in 1837 under Kentucky law which granted divorces if one party of the marriage was a Shaker and would not leave.   Peggy remained with the Shakers, and is buried in the old Shaker cemetery at Pleasant Hill. Within the same month of the divorce Jacob married 2nd to a much younger woman named Nancy Lineback, who was apparently pregnant (positively against Shaker rules) and they moved to Indiana.  The baby [a girl] that caused their dismissal from the Shakers lived long enough to be in the 1830 census as under 5 but no longer mentioned in the 1840 census.  By 1860, the are living in Frederickburg, Harrison County, IN…about 50 miles west of Madison, give or take a few miles.   Jacob is still living in 1864 when he signs for his son, Jacob Jr, to marry Martha Edmonson in Washington County, IN.  By the 1870 census, Nancy Lineback Montfort is listed as a widow living in Blue River Twp, Harrison County, IN   By 1900, no Montfort is listed in Harrison County, IN nor anywhere else that can be found.  They had six children but to date, no descendants have been found for any of them.  It is presumed both Jacob Sr and his wife, Nancy, are buried in Blue River Twp, Harrison County, IN.

Jacob had one son   [Henry]  by the first wife. who settled in Jefferson County, IN at Madison, by the name of Henry.  He married and had four children of which descendants have been found for one of the four children.  The other son, John, may have married and fathered a son, Stonewall Jackson Montfort in Kentucky.  Stonewall may have married but there is no indication he had children.

————————————

FamilySearch has a FREE Lookup service whereby they scan pages of books in the Family History Library for patrons who cannot get to the library. They now have a blog explaining how to use Google Books to find family in the Google snippets. https://familysearch.org/blog/en/google-books-free-copies-pages-family-history-library-books/

————————————

Back in July I wrote the Adams Co PA historical society, asking if they could put up a historical marker for the Low Dutch Conewago Colony church and cemetery/s.  I sent the third request to them this week, and here is their reply – just FYI– P.S.  I will not give up.

———

Dear Adams County Historical Society:

Mr. Weaner’s strongest wish was for the state of Pennsylvania to put up a historical marker to mark this important site. He sent us a map and a copy of his proposal  to have a State Historic landmark set at the site. He believed the location of the church on a present day plate map to be

at the junction of York and Coleman roads. (a spot 3 miles SW to G-Burg and 5 miles NW to New Oxford).

The text Mr. Weaner suggested for the marker was:

Holland Dutch families from New Jersey settled this area

in the late 18th century and removed in post Revolutionary

War years to Kentucky and New York. Latshell’s Tavern and

their church existed near this site. The walled burial ground

is at 900 Swift Run Road.

 

Our group strongly supports this plan.  What can we do to facilitate getting such a marker placed at that site?

————

Today (Nov 8) I received a reply from Benjamin Neely

Executive Director

Adams County Historical Society:

Dear Carolyn,

For a Pennsylvania historical marker you will need to work through the Pennsylvania Museum and Historical Commission.  Here is a link to their website and below is their address, phone number, and an e-mail address to direct any questions about the program:  http://www.pahistoricalmarkers.com/

Historical Marker Program

Bureau for Historic Preservation

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

Commonwealth Keystone Building, 2nd Floor

400 North Street

Harrisburg, PA 17120-0053

—————————————————————–

from Judy Cassidy

Just a follow up to the Mercer County Rootsweb Site.  Pam has moved the site to the following address which you will need to access the Original Willis using the Dedicated Search Engine. This will be the same Mercer County Rootsweb page that people are familiar with, simply no longer with Rootsweb.

http://kymercer.heliohost.org

—————————————————————–

from Kerin Smith to Judy McKee:

I am Kerin Smith of Wichita Kansas.  I also hold DAR membership in DAR on Henry Banta through daughter Rachel.  If any photo of Henry, second wife Ann Demarest, or daughter Rachel exist, I would love to see them!  I have never seen any photos of this family at all.  I only learned of my family’s Low Dutch connection a few years ago, and it has been very interesting research.  We’ve been to Old Mud 2 or 3 times while it was in the renovation process, and sure would like to see it now that it is finished, especially the pulpit.  hope you find your DAR affiliation satisfying.  I also hold membership on Koert VanVoorhees and Isaac Covert if that holds any interest for you.  Connecting these lines was a bit more challenging.  I have a couple of others that still have holes in the lines that I hope to do eventually.

—————————————————————–

From cousin Lilly Martin in Syria:

I have found this recent blog, by Chris Chester.  He mentions specifically the Daniel Brewer archives of Mercer Co KY.

 

He also says to download them all, as they may not be online forever.

 

Carolyn: I think a link to his blog should be included in the Cousin newsletter, and then those interested in Brouwer/Brewer can download these archives.

 

Also, the Low Dutch Repository should download these archives and have them available for researchers.

 

Finally, it would be interesting if anyone knew who did this research/gathering initially.  Apparently, it was sent to William Bogardus at some point.  It could even be someone connected to our ‘cousins’ group?  Best regards, Lilly Martin

 

Here is what his blog states:

http://brouwergenealogy.blogspot.com/

Friday, October 11, 2013

Brewer in Mercer County, Kentucky Court Records

Here is a large file of twenty-nine pages of abstracts and notes taken from various sources in Mercer County, Kentucky pertaining to persons named Brewer. It is from the William B. Bogardus Collection, but I do not know the name of the person who did the work, and gathered all of the leads found in this file.

Brewer – Mercer County, Kentucky

Mercer County was formed in 1786, out of what was then Lincoln County, Virginia. Kentucky did not become a separate state until 1792. Settlers from the east, including families with ancestral roots in New Netherland, began settlement in the region that would become Kentucky during the years of the Revolutionary War. Daniel Brouwer, born in 1719, a son of Abraham Brouwer and Lea Demarest of Bergen County, New Jersey, and a great-grandson of Adam Brouwer of Gowanus, Long Island, was among the early settlers in Kentucky. His sister, Rachel Brouwer, born in 1716, was the first wife of Hendrick Banta, a leader of the initial movement of settlers in 1780. (Rachel did not make the move to the Kentucky frontier having died some decades earlier, about 1750)

Low Dutch Station Historic Marker (Wikimedia Commons, 2008)

As was typical with BROUWER families that moved westward into the new United States, their surname was recorded, almost always, as BREWER. Records pertaining to Daniel Brouwer and his sons, who also settled in Kentucky, are found with the name recorded as BREWER in this file. Most, but not all, of the records mentioned in this large file pertain to descendants of Daniel Brouwer/Brewer. Also found among these records is Samuel Brewer, who died in Mercer County in 1835. He is a brother of Peter Brewer who, through Y-DNA testing of a direct male descendant, is known to be a descendant of Adam Brouwer, but who’s lineage from Adam Brouwer is still not known. A Vincent Brewer, and a couple of others who are not placed are also found in this file.

This could be a very useful file for anyone researching the Brewer families who settled in Mercer County, Kentucky. There are transcripts, abstracts and notes on marriages, deeds, wills, and other court documents. It is a large file and had to be placed online using Google Drive. Download the file as it may not be up online forever. Use it as a source for locating the complete records that are mentioned. When conducting your own research, you should always make  the effort to locate and examine original records yourself.

Posted by Chris Chester

—————–

from Carolyn:  Thanks so much for sending this hotlink, Lilly.  William B. Bogardus (born 1929) of Wilmington, Ohio, is still on our Dutch Cousins mailing list, so perhaps he will reply. I think he may have been the original source, becaue he is an expert on Anneke Jans. Jim Cozine spoke with Mr. Bogardus a few years ago, and learned he had written a book: Dear Cousin – A Charted Genealogy of the descendants of Anneke Jans Bogardus (1605-1663)’.  Jim ordered a copy an planned to donate it to the HHS. I would love to read it too.  Anneke Jans has remained one of my favorite New Netherland stories!

————————

Letters 11/20/2013

To Dutch Cousins

I have procrastinated in getting a letter out to you since we met in Madison, IN. After the service at Old Mud we visited family in Louisville and then headed to Florida stopping in Georgia to visit with my sister and then on to Florida to visit with our daughter, granddaughters and great-grandchildren.  On our way home we stopped in NC to visit with our son and family.  This was a very tiring but enjoyable trip.  After getting bac home we had to catch up on doctor visits and other miscellaneous obligations.

I want to thank everyone that attended and I hope you had as good a time as I did meeting new cousins and catching up with cousins we had not seen since our last meeting.  I thank you for the confidence you have placed in me by electing me as President.  I promise I will fulfil the position to the best of my ability.  If anyone has any suggestions or comments please direct them to me for consideration.

Hope you have a great Thanksgiving and may you have a very Merry Christmas.

John Westerfield

————————————

Greetings Dutch Cousins:

As we celebrate Thanksgiving, let us remember that the Pilgrims enjoyed eleven years of religious freedom in Leiden (in the old province of Holland) before setting sail for America and were well acquainted with the celebration of Dutch Thanksgiving on 3 October, to commemorate the heroic lifting of the siege of Leiden, on 3 October 1574, during the Eighty Years War of liberation from Spain. The traditional Dutch fare on that holiday is hutspot, a stew, made various ways today. Details of the traumatic siege of Leiden can be read at

http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=seige+of+leiden.

David Smock, Florida

————————————

From Jay Westerfield:

Carolyn, A very thoughtful take on “Thankfulness”. Sometimes, it seems, we get too busy in life to really pause and take a moment to appreciate the things we have in life.

My memories of Thanksgiving are very different. My Mom was (and still is thankfully) a terrible cook and is proud of it. We mainly spent holidays at relatives homes. So my memories are of being in Florida and swimming and water skiing during the holidays. Or visiting my Dads Dutch relatives in Kentucky where they still didn’t have indoor pluming.

Now with Deborah, who has to be one of the best cooks in the world, our holidays center around family. For that I am very thankful. The last few years have been tough with Jeremy in New Mexico and once again this year he won’t be home for the holidays but I am thankful that we got to spend two weeks with him and his wife Monica this summer.

I am sorry we didn’t get to spend anytime together in Madison. It seemed every time I came looking for you, you were surrounded by a flock of people. I know too well how busy the weekend can get when you are in charge. You looked well and am so glad to see that you are recovering from your health problems. As a survivor, I can have at least of first hand knowledge of the stress and  toll it can take on your mind, body and soul.

I am once again going through health problems, this time my kidneys. I was in the hospital for 3 day,s 10 days before the reunion and really didn’t feel well at the reunion. I am stable now but go to a specialist in Indianapolis in January to decide not whether or not to have surgery but to decide what type of surgery I’m going to have. So something to look forward to next year.

Even though I am not longer on the board or an officer, I still care greatly about the group. It is amazing how it has grown and I give a ton of the credit to your hard work and organization. Your email recaps alone greatly enhance the feeling of a vibrant and active group.

I do have one concern about the Dutch Cousins and I would be happy to help with a resolution if others agree. I was extremely impressed with the number of new attendees at the event and I understand in 2011 it was the same type of turn out. My concern is in what I perceive to be the low number of returnees. Before the 2015 meeting perhaps we could create a committee to personally contact these “lost” members and bring them back into the fold. Let me know what you think and as I said I would be glad to help with the endeavor.

Thanks for sharing your take on Thankfulness. I am thankful for having you and the entire Dutch Cousins family as friends.

Enjoy the coming holiday season,

Cousin Jay

—————–

Carolyn’s reply:  Those days at Madison went by so very fast – as the gathering days always do – and I was left with some regret thinking how much I had wanted to spend some private time with different ones, because we never know how many opportunities we will have to do that.  I had saved “down” time at the end in Harrodsburg – but most everyone including you had left by then.  Maybe next time?  Jay, Your idea is great for working on the returnees.  I saw that happening too but was juggling too many other things to do anything about it, so consider yourself the new chairperson in charge of contacting LOST cousins. Let me know who you pick for your committee and what I can do to help. After all, if it weren’t for you and the work you did holding the Westerfields together,  there wouldn’t be any Dutch Cousins.

————————————

Lilly Martin recommended this website:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brouwergenealogydata/

The William B. Bogardus Collection

The New Netherland colony of the 1600s included three families with the surname BROUWER who left descendants that continue today (Adam of Gowanus, Jan of Flatlands, and Willem of Beverwijck). Generally through the 1600s we see their names recorded as BROUWER. As the 1600s gave way to the 1700s and as settlers grew in numbers and found new communities we begin to notice the evolution of the name from BROUWER to BROWER or BREWER.

————————————

from William E. Davidson  ( former resident of NJ and native of Ohio) now of New York

(Riker/Ryker descendant.)

For over-the -road, family homestead site visit as Mr. van Ausdall mentioned (below); he did not mention the county.  Probably only one Lanier Twp. in Ohio, but Ohio is a big state. I did my gen. research 25 years ago, before nifty computer stuff, or at least before I began using a computer.

For Ohio and New Jersey, you need the name of the county as well as the township, because there  is multiple use of township names.  For example, there are at least two Camden Twps. in Ohio, and six Washington Twps. in New Jersey.

Since then military history original research in museums and archives; Annapolis to Fort Sill to Ottawa, Canada, and points in between; burned out three jeeps.  It began with clarifying the movement of  some of my Rev. War  ancestors (ten).  I wove ancestor Captain Abraham Riker into an extended endnote in an article in the Military Collector & Historian.  www.military-historian.org.

 

from  Rodney C. van Ausdall (Rod’s email is bouncing now, If you know him please ask him to send a new address so we can stay in touch with him)

Peter van Ausdall (born 1777) married Rachel Banta (born 2 Dec 1789 died 13 Mar 1843) . Rachel`s ancestors came from North Holland and settled in Flushing NY, in 1789.  Rachel had several children by Peter. They made their home in Lanier Township, Ohio,and homesteaded in Section 10, near Twin Creek ( I have visited the family farm there). The road near section 10 still bears the van Ausdall name. Members of the van Ausdall and Banta families are buried in the family graveyard near the farm. Peter  married Martha Kitson after Rachel`s death.

————————————

from Amalie Preston:

Hello all–Carolyn Worley and I will get together and print off this archive to include in the Brewer archive in the Low Dutch Repository at the Harrodsburg Historical Society.  Carolyn L., Lilly had previously sent her family files in a separate e-mail which will also be printed out and filed at the Historical Society.  The Brewer File just grew by leaps and bounds.

Everyone, have a blessed day.

Amalie

————————————

NOTE the Harrodsburg Historical Society library will close November 28th and remain closed through December, re-opening January 7 – weather permitting. Remember the library has an ALL-VOLUNTEER staff. Any time you are coming from out of the area, contact Jerry Sampson 859-734-7829 to be sure the library is open. 

Mercer County Courthouse records covering the years from 1780 to 1865 were removed when the old courthouse was torn down and the records were taken to Frankfort. They will not be coming back to Harrodsburg, but the records have been microfilmed and HHS is hoping to stock all 438 rolls. So far patrons have donated money to buy 240 rolls.  Only 198 rolls to go at $23 per roll, and the amont is tax deductible. Semd your donation to HHS, P.O. Box 315, Harrodsburg, KY 40330.

————————————

Harrodsburg has long been a tourism destination, due primarily to the discovery of three warm mineral springs.  These spas gave rise to several grand hotels and the community rapidly gained a reputation as the “Saratoga of the South.”  From 1806 to 1853, Harrodsburg’s famous spas, Greenville Springs, Graham Springs and Harrodsburg Springs, offered mineral water, gambling, horse racing and gala entertainment to throngs of summer visitors.

Dr. C. C. Graham purchased two of the watering places and converted them into Graham Springs. He contructed a brick four-story building with a “massy colonade, rich capitals and lofty entablature.”  In 1862 due to the raging Civil War, Graham sold , Graham Springs to the U.S. Government for $100,000.  The beautiful spa then became Western Military Asylum for aged invalid veterans. After main building burned, veterans were moved in 1859 to Washington, D.C. Ballroom and cottages were opened Oct. 8, 1862 to care for thousands of CSA and USA wounded from Battle of Perryville. Last of buildings had burned by 1885.

————————————

from Martha Banta Boltz:

Hi lady — thanks for sharing with me. SO many things you remembered resonate with similar things from my background, including the little red and white table, etc., which my aunt in Frankfort had in her kitchen — she also had oxalis plants on the windowsill there, and today the latest batch of my oxalis, both green and the red, sit in my window!  A sort of 70 years later homage to Aunt Josie.  And yes at home the homemade yeast rolls proofing on the back of the stove!!!    You did a great job of recalling all of those things, bless you for sharing.

Take care — I don’t think we are having turkey day– Don’s been in the hospital with pneumonia since a week ago today, and will be going to rehab soon, so heaven knows what we’ll have.  But I’ll get my turkey plates out to put on the table anyway — they are old Clarice Cliff brown on brown old ones, and a couple of newer iterations which are colored — check them out on ebay – very cool.  I may get a turkey on flat bread sandwich from Subway!

So good to hear from you — you are the best.

Martha — a cousin somewhere along the line!

————————————

from Jim Woodfill:

Sounds fine to me, Carolyn.   A lot of my own experiences are reflected in your blog.

Except for the pecan pie!  I never cared for that, and besides, the nuts play hell with my teeth (what’s left of them).  We always have pumpkin and apple, but I prefer mince.  Since I am the only one who eats it, I have to bring it if I want it.  Otherwise it’s “eat what’s prepared for you, or go hungry.”  (Now, where have I heard that expression before?)

Happy Thanksgiving!

————————————

from Alice Hostetter:

As I am writing my list of things to be thankful for I will include Carolyn Leonard and her leadership in the Dutch Cousins. You might be interested in the fact that Jan Whaley and I shared the pictures we took of the 2013 Dutch Cousins Reunion and the 2011 video to our Valley Clan Diggers group. They seemed to enjoy it very much.

Happy Thanksgiving,

 

————————————

NOTE FROM EDITOR & posted on facebook today: Would love to solve this mystery of the COZINE baby buried at Mount Pleasant Presbyterian Church yard, Harrodaburg, KY and name of the mother, Mrs —- (Whitenack) Cozine.  (any Whitenack family experts on this list?)

1884:  The Harrodsburg Democrat, Harrodsburg, KY Vol 1, No.21 Friday, June 6, 1884

Funeral Saturday, a funeral cortege left the depot, and wended its way to Mt. Pleasant Church about three miles west of town. The infant of Mr and Mrs Thomas Cozine, that had died at Lexington on Friday, was brought on the train to this place, where they were met by their uncles, Col. C P and Capt Andy Whitenack and other friends. The cherub was in Heaven when the kind friends laid the remains in the cold grave of God’s half acre. May the parents, as little children, ever be ready to meet their child in the great hereafter.                                                        

 Note: the Uncles as mentioned, CP and Andy Whitenack are buried int he cemetery but there is no COZINE child burial memorial record we have found. CP and Andrew Whitenack are the sons of Abraham D. Whitenack and “Annie” Comingo Whitenack (buried in a family cemetery near Mount Pleasant), and so far none of their daughters are known to be married to a COZINE.  It’s a mystery! would love to hear from anyone who could help solve it.

————————————

Carolyn, Thought I’d bring you up-to-date on a couple of things.  You remember the Dorlandt grave site here in NJ.  I’m getting together with the Boy Scouts on December 7thto clean it up.  Further, the Landmarks Committee bought a fence 5 years ago, but the neighbor didn’t want it installed.  They have since moved and we now have their permission.  It’s exciting, however, I cannot get the Boy Scouts to installed this fence.  I’m working on getting volunteers to help at a later date.

The real reason why I’m contacting you is to tell you about the progress with the New Netherlands Institute and the Reformed Church.  I am now connected with the COO of the Reformed Church and the head of Archiving.  They’ve also introduced me to the head of Colonial Research at Rutgers.  We’re going to arrange a call and we would love the Dutch Cousins to be involved.  The Dutch Cousins bring the Genealogy into the research.  The call will have Charles Gehring discuss what he is doing with the Dutch Records in Albany and his plans going forward.  I expect the Reformed Church to do the same.  Then, I would like you  to discuss the Dutch Cousins. What they’re all about, how many members, etc.  The goal is to bring the organizations together and see how we could share and discuss information from an historical perspective.  Perhaps start a simple little project to work together.  I’d much prefer discussing this with you over the phone.. Please let me know your availability.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Best Regards,

Mike Vande Woude

Letters 11/24/2013

From the DUTCH COLONIES mail list, and also from Society of Holland Dames & Firth Haring Fabend:

Here is very interesting article about the Historic Hendrick I. Lott house in Brooklyn posted at the BKLYNR website. Everyone gets one free article a month, so this link should work. The article is titled, “Keeping House, At the edge of the city, an old Dutch mansion awaits its day in the sun.”  I think several members of our group visited the Lott House in Brooklyn when we were there two years ago. 

I didn’t go. I went to the bus to rest – she said, hiding her face.

http://bklynr.com/keeping-house/

——————————————

from Ruby Baker Ingram:

A friend recently gave this recipe to me, and I made them-were delicious.  I cut the recipe in half, which was perfect for us.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Biscuit Recipe

Preheat oven to 425 degrees

Mix:

2 cups Bisquick

1/2 cup sour cream

1/2 cup 7-up soda drink

Melt 1/4 cup butter in baking pan/dish

Roll out biscuits on wax paper or biscuit board which has been

sprinkled with extra Bisquick, knead until stickiness is asorbed, cut,

then place biscuits in the melted butter in pan.

Bake 12-14 minutes until browned.

——————————————

Posted by Carolyn to findagrave: 

Hendrick “Henry” C. Comingo/Camega/Comingore, son of Rhyner Comingo/Kamminga and wife Annetje Aarjansen, was baptized 16 Sep 1749 at Schraalenburgh Reformed Dutch Church in Bergen, New Jersey. He married Rachel D. Brewer/Brouwer 2 Feb 1770, York County, PA, where he served as Deacon in the Conewago Dutch church from 1787 to 1791 and overseer of the poor in 1791 and 1792.  He served in the Revolutionary War with his brother John under Captain VanArsdale. He served at the battle of Yorktown.  Henry signed the 1783 petition of Low Dutch to Congress as an “Intend Friend” affirming his intent to move to Kentucky.

They removed to Mercer County Kentucky in 1795.  Henry was appointed by the Salt River Congregation to solicit funds to build a meeting house. He rode his horse from Mercer Co to Somerset Co NJ (and probably Conewago), a six week journey each way, where he collected money for the Salt River Gp.  He returned with the money in his saddlebags. After land was purchased, Henry and the other settlers made more donations, then set to work building The Mud Meeting House, the first Dutch Reformed Church west of The Allegheny Mountains.

Henry and Rachel Comingo had at least nine children, the youngest two born after their move to Mercer County.

——————————————

Re: THANKFULNESS

“reply to Jim Woodfill:

from Jean Simon

Sounds fine to me, Carolyn.   A lot of my own experiences are reflected in your blog.

Except for the pecan pie!  I never cared for that, and besides, the nuts play hell with my teeth (what’s left of them).  We always have pumpkin and apple, but I prefer mince.  Since I am the only one who eats it, I have to bring it if I want it.  Otherwise it’s “eat what’s prepared for you, or go hungry.”  (Now, where have I heard that expression before?)

Happy Thanksgiving”

 

I am interested to hear from a Jim Woodfill above that he is the only one at the holiday table for Thanksgiving (or also Xmas) who will eat mince pie.  It is the same for me in my family—I’m the only one who will eat mince pie.  (I’m also an only child.)  My mom and her mom always had it for the holidays, and I still enjoy mince pie. I have found a solution to prevent me from eating a whole mince pie (the almost whole left-over pie after the holidays), since I’d like to keep my relatively slim figure.  Here is my solution:I have found at our local military commissary in Huntsville AL Walker’s “6 Luxury Mincemeat Tarts, at 13.1 oz. a box for 6.  You might find it also in any of your big chain grocery stores, either in foreign foods, the cookie aisle, or with Xmas goodies.  It comes from Scotland.  Perhaps you have heard of Walker’s shortbread.  If your store carries Walker’s shortbread, they might also be stocking this Walker’s little mincemeat tarts.  Buying this box enables me to just eat a tiny mincemeat tart or two, instead of having to eat the remaining 5 slices of regular sized whole mincemeat pie.  It is probably more dough than mincemeat, but come Thanksgiving Day, I’ll give these little mincemeat tarts a try!

 

Another thing:  Since a high portion of the Mayflower ship crowd had been living in Leiden, Holland, and they surely celebrated the3 October Thanksgiving Dutch holiday while they were in Holland, I am beginning to wonder if the first Thanksgiving in USA was really influenced by and celebrated  by the Leiden crowd  in Plymouth MA in 1620 on 3 October 1620, or was it 1621, since they were familiar with it in Holland.  I am descended from several Mayflower passengers, but I believe that none of my particular Mayflower ancestors  had lived in Holland prior to coming to Plymouth, Mass.  If I remember correctly, we probably don’t know exactly which day in the fall of 1620, or was it 1621, that the Mayflower crowd first celebrated the first USA Thanksgiving holiday with the Indians.  I grew up in Massachusetts, but I never realized that there once was a tribe of Indians named the Massachusetts Mayflower passenger colonists.  Massasoit was one of their Indian chiefs, or sachems.  Maybe the suffix soit, from Massasoit, Indian sachem, could be the same as a suffix chusetts from Massachusetts.  I always knew that Massachusetts had to be an Indian name, but I didn’t realize that it was a whole tribe!  Perhaps the Massachusetts tribe was practically annihilated in one of those wars, either Indian tribe against Indian tribe, or perhaps the King Phillip War, waged by the English Massachusetts crowd in the 1600s against the Indians.  Anyway, I forget whether or not we have a paper trail with the actual date of the first Thanksgiving in Massachusetts.

 

Thank you to David Smock for the info about the Dutch celebration about the 3 October 1574 “lifting of the siege of Leiden, Holland, during the Eighty Years War of liberation from Spain.”

 

Thank you also to Jim Woodfil for his anecdote about mince pie.  My mom and grandmother may have bought mince pie from the grocery store, frozen (a possibility) though my grandmother and mom cooked ever so much more than I do now!  My grandmother’s oldest sister even made mince pie stuffing with real meat in it, to store in mason jars for the winter, a practice called canning, and storing it in the basement for winter use.

 

My Dutch ancestry does not come from my mom or her mom.  Rather, it comes from my dad’s mom’s side of the family.  My Dutch ancestors, after the American Revolution, went from New Jersey and New York, as Dutch Loyalists (loyal to the British side of the American Revolution) after the American Revolution, to Nova Scotia, Canada  In Nova Scotia they wouldn’t have much grief anymore for their Loyalist (Tory) politics.  I am guessing that there probably was also a king in the Netherlands in the 1600s and 1700s, when my Dutch ancestors came from Belgium and the Netherlands to New York City (New Amsterdam) in the early 1600s. 

My youngest Canadian Dutch ancestor was my dad’s mother’s paternal grandmother,, Mary Van Norden, who married Jacob Lyon Hatfield. The latter was a descendant from the immigrant to USA, Matthias Hatfield (also spelled Heesvelt and other spellings) who lived in the 1600s in Connecticut and New Jersey. His will was proved 13 December 1687.  He was originally from the City State of Danzig, now called Gdansk.  He told the governor of a state, he also a physician, when Matthias was ill that he was a High Dutchman, from (the City State) of Danzig, now called Gdansk.  That floored us all, because we always thought the Hatfields were English!  Matthias married on 25 August 1664 Marie Pardie (young widow of Marie’s first husband, Claes Allertszen Paradys who was killed by the Indians.  Marie was born Mariken Melyn whose father, Cornelis Melyn, owned all of the New York City borough of Staten Island except one farm  My great-great grandmother, Mary Van Norden was born 13 February 1772, daughter of Gabriel Van Norden and Jane WESTERVELT.  Mary Van Norden’s husband was  Jacob Lyon Hatfield (Hetfield), he born 9 December 1757 and baptized in St. John’s (Episcopal?) Church, Elizabethtown, New Jersey (now called Elizabeth, New Jersey). on 24 March 1758.  Jacob Lyon Hatfield “went to Nova Scotia where in 1786 he received 200 acres at Tusket River” in Tusket” (Yarmouth County) “Nova Scotia, where my dad;s mother, Bessie Hatfield (nee Elizabeth Maria Hatfield) was born in 1859 to Jacob Hatfield IV and Eleanor Jane MacKinnon (Gramma Jake).  Curiously, it was the immigrant ancestor to America (USA), Matthias Hatfield who donated the land across from St. John’s Church for the First Presbyterian Church in Elizabeth, NJ. 

My source for the Hatfield information and their wives is from “The Descendants of Matthias Hatfield” compiled by “Abraham Hatfield, compiler of “The Hatfields of Westchester and Captain John Hatfield, Loyalist”, 1954, Published by the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society. 

Carolyn, thank you so much for your emails.  I love reading them, even though it is mostly about the Pennsylvania and Kentucky Dutch ancestors of many of you.

Jean (MacGregor) Simon

Huntsville, Alabama

State Deputy Chieftain &

Council Member

American Clan Gregor Society 

 

————————————————-

Dr. Bob Schenck sent this wonderful photo from the gathering at Madison IN.  He asked me to convert it to pdf to make it easier to post.  Had never done that before, but with a little research I was able to do that online – and it is free!  Here is the hotlink in case you need to convert a jpg to pdf.  http://www.from-jpg-to-pdf.com/

What a wonderful memory – and with our Barbie doll in the picture too!  Just have to share the photo here.

DutchDrSchenck.pdf

Did I already include this in a “letters” issue?  Any Brinkerhoffs reading?

FROM Antoinette “Toni” Curtis Siegle and Cathleen Murray:

We visited Low Dutch cemetary today, searching for grave sites of our  ancestors – Brinckerhoff.  It was so exciting to locate this cemetery.  We just learned  this evening that there is both a north and a south Low Dutch cemeteries, which we will visit the Low soon.   In addition,  we located your very interesting blog tonight and read about your  many activities,  trips and research.   Please place us on any list that would  inform and educate us concerning the life of our ancestors.  Below is our Brinckerhoff family tree that has been researched.  We are sending this so you will know we are very serious researchers and any additional information would be greatly appreciated.   Please excuse any typing problems, I am having some eye sight problems that will hopefully be corrected. 

Abraham Brinckerhoff and Femmitie Bloom

 Dirch Brinckerhoff and Mrs. Dirck

   JorisDircksen and Susannah Dubbels

    HendrickJorisen Brinckerhoff and Claasie (Bloomgaert) Bogart
JacobusHendrickse Brinckerhoff and Agnitie Banta

      Joris“George” Jacobus Brinckerhoff and Martyntje “Martina” Bogart

       Jan “John” L. Brinckerhoff andSarah Van Arsdel

        George Joris Brinckerhoffand Ida Cassatt

         Henry James Brinckerhoffand Katherine Steiger

          David C. Brinckerhoffand Clara Elizabeth Mayer

            David Lawrence Brinckerhoffand Sarah Anastasia Punch

             Sarah L. Brinckerhoffand George Curtis / Bernadette Brinkerhoff and Frank Marino

             Antoinette BrinckerhoffCurtis and Barry Siegle / Cathlen Brinckerhoff Marino and John Murray

Antoinette Curtis Siegle or Toni (410) 461-8944

Cathleen Murray

————————————————-

CAN YOU HELP SOLVE THIS MYSTERY

From Carolyn Leonard and Jim Cozine, researching Thomas H.B. Cozine, youngest son of Harvey Cozine and Mary Ann Snider Cozine, born 14 Jan 1845 Mercer Co, Kentucky.  Tom disappears from the records after 1860, except for this mysterious newspaper entry:

1884:  The Harrodsburg Democrat, Harrodsburg, KY Vol 1, No.21 Friday, June 6, 1884

Funeral Saturday, a funeral cortege left the depot, and wended its way to Mt. Pleasant Church about three miles west of town. The infant of Mr and Mrs Thomas Cozine, that had died at Lexington on Friday, was brought on the train to this place, where they were met by their uncles, Col. C P and Capt Andy Whitenack and other friends. The cherub was in Heaven when the kind friends laid the remains in the cold grave of God’s half acre. May the parents, as little children, ever be ready to meet their child in the great hereafter.

Note: the Uncles as mentioned, CP and Andy Whitenack are buried int he cemetery but there is no COZINE child burial memorial record we have found. CP and Andrew Whitenack are the sons of Abraham D. Whitenack and “Annie” Comingo Whitenack (buried in a family cemetery near Mount Pleasant), and so far none of their daughters are known to be married to a COZINE. It’s a mystery! would love to hear from anyone who could help solve it.

1850:   Mercer Co KY #274 (Harvey’s 3rd wife Elizabeth is listed below children.)

Harvey COZINE age 48 (1802) Brickmason KY (all in HH born in KY, exc. Barney – Ireland)

Samuel, 15,  b. 1835

Peter, 14, b. 1836

John, 7,  b. 1843

Thomas 5, b. 1845

Meredith 2, b. 1848

Elizabeth, 24, b. 1826

Mary Crilley age 27, b. 1823 (she is still with Harvey & family 30 years later)

Mary Ann 3, 1847 (This would be “Molly Crilley” who married the blacksmith William Lyons by 1870)

Barney Crilley, age 35, Ireland, stonemason

Source Citation: Year: 1850; Census Place: District 1, Mercer, Kentucky; Roll: M432_213; Page: 274; Image: 210.

Son william Cozine age 18 is living at Bourbon KY probably as an apprentice in the family of James D. Knox Tailor, wife Clarissa age 31, Amanda W age 15, Mary Ellen age 13, Thomas C age 11, Carrosso (male) age 10; and William Cozine age 18 is listed as a tailor also.

The Cozines seem to have always lived near Salvisa in Mercer Co, and Mary Crilley with her daughter Mary Ann lived with the Harvey Cozine family from 1850 through 1880 census. – Mary’s husband Barney Crilley, stonemason born Ireland, lived with them in 1850 age 35 – but he disappears after that.

1860 Census, Harrodsburg, Mercer Co., Kentucky, page 13) – Thomas H. B. Cozine, age 14, printer, born in Kentucky. living in household of Harvey COZINE brickmason, age 50

and his 3rd wife, Elizabeth Ann Tumey (Toms stepmother), brothers: Peter 22, John P. age 17, Thomas H.B. 14, (and Tom’s half brothers:  Meredith R. 12, James S. 5, David B. 2), and (no relationship known) Mary V. Crilley age 36 seamstress. 

1862???bio of Thomas’ brother John P Cozine says all his brothers were soldiers. I have been able to find military records for all but one of Harvey’s sons — that of Thomas.

Kentucky: A History of the State, Battle, Perrin, & Kniffin, 6th ed., 1887, Shelby Co.

“JOHN P. COZINE, editor of the Shelby News, was born in Mercer County, Ky., May 3, 1843, and is a son of Harvey and Mary (Snider) Cozine, natives, respectively, of Shelby and Mercer Counties. His paternal grandfather was born in Virginia* (wrong – Peter VH Cozine, the grandfather was born at Conewago in Pennsylvania), but settled in the southern part of Shelby County, Ky. (Peter got 80 acres bounty land at Mt Eden on the Spencer & Shelby county line for his service in war of 1812.), whence Harvey Cozine, when quite young, moved to Mercer County, where he followed bricklaying. During the recent civil war, Harvey, with eight of his sons, joined the Union forces….”

1870 census, there is a T. H. Cozine born ca 1842 (age 28) in Columbia, Boone Co, Missouri. Says he was born Missouri. Living in the Columbia Hotel, occ. PRINTER.

1884 – the infant of Mr and Mrs Thomas Cozine, that had died at Lexington on Friday, was brought on the train to this place, where they were met by their uncles, Col. C P and Capt Andy Whitenack and other friends. (buried apparently at Mt. Pleasant church)

1885: letter from David “Dock” Cozine in Kentucky to brother George Cozine in Kansas: “…All the boys are married but myself…and all have families but Bro Pete; he has no children<78-ctx-.tiff>”  “Bro.Thomas Was In MO Last We heard…

? 1886 -Marriage date 1 Sep 1886 Thomas J. Cashion married Mary M. Satterfield in Corse Island, Dunklin co, Missouri.

? 1890 census veterans; Thomas Cason, Corporal, Co C, 65th MO Inf; date of enlistment 3 Feb 1864, discharge 1867; 3 years.

Jerry Sampson thought he knew someone who could shed some light on the baby’s burial and the Whitenack connection. He didn’t tell me who, but said he was forwarding it to them.  I’ll take anything!  I have corresponded with the whitenack family scribe – Put all the whitenacks in my Reunion database but could never find anything to connect.

————————————————-

OKC is experiencing the first winter storm for this year with very slippery icy snow lightly covered roads. We have stayed inside and rested – a good thing to do on a cold Sunday.  Yesterday we made Dutch Chicken Soup.  My daughter Judi was an international exchange student at the University of Utrecht, in the Netherlands in 1995 for a year. She brought home some good recipes.  It is easy and delicious, with chopped chicken breast, mushrooms, carrots and corn with angel hair noodles.  Problem is I went to inspect the remodeling job going on in our guest room, and Jon dumped the whole box of noodles in.  You know how those noodles plump up and grow in liquid like rice?  Well we now have enough condensed Dutch Chicken Soup to last us for several days!  all we have to do is cut out a chunk, put it in a bowl, add some chicken broth and stick it in the microwave.  Here’s the recipe…Enjoy

Dutch Chicken Soup

from Judi Leonard Mills 

1 pkg mushrooms, sliced

1 bunch green onions, chopped, tops & all

1/2 stick butter or margarine

1/2 jar (3 3/4 oz.) Wyler’s chicken bouillon granules

1-2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breast, chopped

3 or 4 carrots, scraped and chopped

1 (8-oz.) pkg thin egg noodles, crumbled

1 pkg frozen corn

2 (14-oz.) cans chicken broth & 2 cans water, or more

Saute in big pot, mushrooms and onions in oleo mixed with

bouillon. While that is sauteing, cut up chicken and add those

pieces to the pot. Let it all simmer about 5 to 10 minutes until

chicken is cooked. Add carrots and steam until they are slightly

cooked. Add chicken broth and water. When that is all heated add

the package of noodles, and then the frozen corn. Simmer until

cooked, turn off fire, cover and let set a few minutes before serving.

Makes enough for about 10 people; total cooking time about

20 minutes. Serve with fresh French bread and butter. Delicious!

————————————————-

Letters 12/3/2013

From Dr. Bob Schenck — We’re in the Holland Society Newsletter!

Please go to this link to see news of the MidWest Branch of the Holland Society.

Our November 17 reception for the Dutch Consul is the new lead article, but the article

about my visit with you and the Dutch Cousins is next! Enjoy. It was a pleasure to

with your fine group.   Bob Schenck

http://www.hollandsociety.org/br_midwest.html

(This link may work by clicking on it, but if not, please copy and paste into

your browser bar.)

——————————————-

GELUKKIG SINTERKLAASDAG TO ALL DUTCH COUSINS

This tongue twister wishes all Dutch Cousins a HAPPY SAINT NICHOLAS DAY.  Sint Nikolaas, or Sinterklaas as he is commonly know, and  Zwarte Piet (Black Pete), his  black helper, make their rounds on the eve of 5 December, leaving gifts in klompen (wooden shoes) left out by Dutch children, with a carrot inside the shoe for the good saint’s white horse. Our own Santa Claus is a direct descendant of Sinterklaas, thanks to our Low Dutch ancestors. The Christmas tree is a German tradition and actually of pagan origin, as is the winter celebration that evolved into Christmas.  To work up enthusiasm for the centuries-old holiday,  Sinterklaas and Zwarte Piet now arrive well in advance of the appointed date by modern conveyances, including a helicopter, and a carnival-like atmosphere reigns in the land, with many people in blackface dressed up like Zwarte Piet. Unfortunately, this practice has given rise to some criticism as being racist, but almost all Dutch people consider this  good, clean fun having nothing to do with slavery, which, unlike in the United States, did not exist in the Netherlands.  Details about Saint Nicholas Day and the origin of the Christmas tree can be read at the following web sites:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinterklaas

http://www.simpletoremember.com/vials/Christmas_TheRealStory.htm

David Smock, Florida

——————————————-

I would like to make a suggestion.  Would it be possible when compiling the newsletter to separate the genealogical emails from the receipe emails.  they are both of value, and in this way, for those who print and save them, they would be able to do so with out messages being mixed together.

Thanks

Judy Cassidy

NOTE FROM CAROLYN — Sorry Judy.  Everyone else seems to enjoy the “folksy” news and recipes from cousins.

——————————————-

from Jeff Villines:

Thank you so much for the Comingore information in the newsletter!  I have some of that info but not all of it.  So excited to have a more complete picture of my great grandmother’s family!  Jo Ellen Villines

P.S.  I make a mince pie every Thanksgiving for those who don’t care for pumpkin (me).

——————————————-

Holland Society newsletter, courtesy of Jim Cozine

——————————————-

Some people asked about the history of the Dutch Cousins, so Here’s what Jay Westerfield and I came up with.

WESTERFIELD REUNION

Sept. 1998 in Louisville, about 25 attended

Sept. 2000 in Harrodsburg, about 50 attended

Oct  2002 in Owensboro, about 75 attended

July 2003 in St. Louis, about 12 attended

DUTCH COUSINS

Sept 2005 in Harrodsburg, about 110 attended

Sept 2007 in Shelbyville, about 150 attended

Sept 2009 in Harrodsburg, about 150?(115 reg. by Sept 1)

Sept 2011 in Harrodsburg … about 80 attended

Sept 2013 in Madison Indiana (100 attended)

2015 – in Frankfort Kentucky!  (2,000 expected)joke

——————————————

Lots of great info in this online booklet; The year book of the Holland Society of New York, 1900;

Here are some excerpts:

https://archive.org/stream/yearbookofhollan1900holl#page/n275/mode/2up

(read to page 183 – Autographs)

The year book of the Holland Society of New York, 1900

page 121, bottom

1661 (29 Dec) Vroutje Gerrits, wife of Cousy, the wheelwright, owes to an estate 37 guilders 16 stivers. (my note: Cousy is COZINE/COSINE)

(begins on page 110, DUTCH RECORDS IN THE CITY CLERK’S OFFICE, NEW YORK

Book labelled “Original records of burgomasters and orphan masters” “surrogates”

Names of persons who divided estates, or gave security therefor, after death of husband or wife.

page 118, From a stray leaf of court records. “Adolf Pieterzen is asked about the best means for supporting the wall between the City Hall and the Bridge.

VOL II OF MINUTES OF ORPHANS COURT.

Page 129 – end of the orphans court minutes.

REGISTER OF SALOMON LA CHAIR, notary public at New Amsterdam

page 131:  !661. Feb 17. Isaak De Foreest, burgher at New Amsterdam, sold half of mill at Goanis to Adam Brouwer, miller at Goanis. Witnesses, Henderick Obe, Jan Joris Rappalje.

(next entry) Translation from Dutch into English of demand by Heer Fiscal against Joris Wilson, Quaker, for having lodged and allowed to preach in his house a Quaker preacher. The translation was made for Michael Spicer of Gravesend.

page 140: 1662. May 2. Joannes Theodosius Polhemis, preacher at Midwout, Long Island, appoints as his attorney Hendrick Van Vleuten, apothecary at Amstrdam in Holland, to receive for him what is due to him from the estate of Servaes Carpentier, Dec’d.

page 141: 1662. May 10. Jan Schryver, inn keeper, at New Amsterdam grants to Paulus Van der Beeke at New Amsterdam a lot at (N.A.) on the Beavers graft between Hendrik van Bommel’s and Pieter Pra’s, extending from Beaver’s graft to end of the Marketsteegh. Witnesses Eghbert Meynderts and Pieter Harmensen.

page 151: 1662. Sep 22: Geertie Jans, widow of Reynier Stoffelsen dec’d makes a will; names as heir or heirs, child or children of her daughter Tryntie Reyniers, wife of Meyndert Barents Kuyper. Said Tryntie to have usufruct? until said child or children shall be of age. In case of demise without heirs the estate to go to the deaconry of New Amsterdam. Witnesses: Everdt Duyckinck and Hendrick Obe.

  1. Oct 4. Volckertie jans, wife of Jan Jansen Van Hoesem, living at Fort Orange, declares that Geertie Broeders said that 140 guilders worth of her white seewan was missing. Some time after when the former was in the act of selling her black seewan to Pieter Van Hael which Barentie (no name) had removed from a string of black seewan, she (does not specify clearly who she isk) took up the black string and said it belonged to her. Witnesses: Nicholaes Bootand Hendrick Obe.

page 152: Walewyn Van der Veen’s record

taken from a translation by Dr. E. B. O’Callaghan.

iinfo about Wolfert Webber and wife and children inheritance.

page 158:  Schepen Register (from the original dutch)

——————————————

9-year-old HOLLAND’s got talent (amazing voice)

this is amazing. Can’t believe that voice is coming from this little girl.

 

http://www.flixxy.com/9-year-old-girl-sings-opera-on-hollands-got-talent.htm

——————————————

————

sent by John C. Westerfield (president, Dutch Cousins)

Valuations

by anonymous

To realize

The value of ten years:

Ask a newly

Divorced couple.

 

To realize

The value of four years:

Ask a graduate.

 

To realize

The value of one year:

Ask a student who

Has failed a final exam.

 

To realize

The value of nine months:

Ask a mother who gave birth to a stillborn.

 

To realize

The value of one month:

Ask a mother

Who has given birth to

A premature baby.

 

To realize

The value of one week:

Ask an editor of a weekly newspaper.

 

To realize

The value of one minute:

Ask a person

Who has missed the train, bus or plane.

 

To realize

The value of one second:

Ask a person

Who has survived an accident.

 

Time waits for no one.

 

Treasure every moment you have.

 

You will treasure it even more when

You can share it with someone special.

 

To realize the value of a friend or family member:

LOSE ONE.
——————————–

Don’t you just love Christmas decorations? Here’s a fun way to decorate even your computer screen this Christmas! You can download this free Starry Night themed wallpaper by clicking this link: http://bit.ly/1cwDrHT

Letters 12/15/2013

from the Harrodsburg Historical Library:September after the Dutch Cousins gathering in Madison IN, many of us went to Harrodsburg KY to worship at the Mud Meetinghouse and research at the Historical Library. We made the news.

postcard EGS 2014.pdf

——————————————-

from Barbara Cozine in New Jersey:

The Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial in the village of Margraten, about six miles from Maastricht. There lie buried 8,301 American soldiers killed in the battles to liberate Holland in the fall and winter of 1944-5. Sgt. Bill Dukeman, 101st Airborne Division, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, Second Battalion, Company C is buried there. He was killed in the battle of “The Crossroads” in northern Holland.

The Dutch hold an annual memorial concert every September at the above cemetery to remember and honor the Americans who died to free them in Operation Market Garden and subsequent efforts to eject the German army from Holland. Sgt. Dukeman, like many other fallen GIs, was “adopted” by a Dutch family. Dukeman’s family in the States was contacted and hosted in Holland, and his grave site decorated each year by his Dutch “family.” They keep his portrait in their home, displayed in a place of honor. Fathers pass this obligation down to their sons in Holland. This version of the original “taps” music is played by a 13 year old Dutch girl named Melissa Venema. The conductor of the orchestra is recently deceased Andre Rieu from Holland . 

Many of you may never have heard taps played in its entirety . The original version of Taps was called Last Post, and was written by Daniel Butterfield in 1801. It was rather lengthy and formal, as you will hear in this clip, so in 1862 it was shortened to 24 notes and re-named Taps. Melissa Venema is playing it on a trumpet whereby the original was played on a bugle. 

Watch at this site, and go full screen. 

http://www.flixxy.com/trumpet-solo-melissa-venema.htm

——————————————-

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS – nothing to do with Dutch but too cute and timely not to share with my cousins!

http://videos.komando.com/watch/4588/kims-christmas-music-dogs-with-hands-play-little-drummer-boy

From Mr. Lynn Rogers,

On page 43 of Franklin A. Ryker’s book, there is a pic of a chair which belonged to Abraham Ryker in the 1600s.  Both a good jpg photo and a pdf description may be downloaded.  Ryker descendants might be interested.  See forwarded email from mcny.

Thank you for your interest in the Museum of the City of New York.  I have included a link to download the catalog record of the chair in question, object 40.296.  The record includes a thumbnail image and I have included a slightly larger reference image, for which there is no charge. If you would like to request a high resolution image, you can direct that inquiry to rights@mcny.org, who will provide you with an estimate.

ryker chair.jpg

————————————————————–

Our cousin Vince has given the cousins another Christmas present!

 Amalie Preston sent an emergency message that  a plaque mentioning the Low Dutch Tract was to be auctioned off Friday Dec 13. 

——————————————-

Hello all!  A friend, Kent Riley, has come upon this plaque which will be auctioned this Friday at Mike’s Auction, 755 New Lebanon Rd., Campbellsville, Ky.  It appears to be a DAR marker for the Low Dutch Tract in Shelby County.  Diana, can you find out which chapter this is?  Looks like Ballard is in the name.  We need to contact them and see if this has been stolen.  I’ll try to contact the historical society down there tomorrow and see if they are aware of this.  If worse comes to worse, we really need to go down and bid this in.

Vince or Carolyn–are you aware of this sign?  It has four corner holes and I assume was bolted to the side of a building?  It appears to be a DAR marker of the site of the Low Dutch Tract purchased from Squire Boone.  Hopefully the picture is attached.

Amalie

A little research showed the plaque belonged on the mill stones near the six mile Meetinghouse we visited in September.

Amalie – I was not aware of this plaque but it definitely should not be auctioned! Looks like it says “Placed by the (something) Ballard Chapter DAR.”  There is a Bland Ballard chapter DAR at Eminence and I am copying the contact person Ann Marie Scott to see if she can help us.  Could you contact the auctioneer and ask him not to sell, or to name a price and we will try to come up with the amount.

I pulled it into iPhoto and worked to read it.  Here’s what I got. “This site marks the religious and civic center of the LOW DUTCH COMPANY which purchased from squire boone in 1786? (not sure of date) to become the home of 34 families. Erected by Bland Ballard chapter Daughters of American Revolution.”

quick!  We don’t want to lose this. Obviously stolen. Thanks so much for sharing the info and giving us a chance to get it back.

Carolyn

—————-

On Wednesday, December 11, 2013 11:09 PM, Vince Akers wrote:

Hi Amalie!

This is the old DAR marker for the Low Dutch Tract.  The DAR style mill stone (with the metal X marking the spot where the marker was stolen) is still located along Highway 421 just NW of the KY highway marker for the Low Dutch Tract.  This is right up the road from the relocated Six Mile Meetinghouse.  It is on the other side of the road where the meetinghouse was orginally located.  I have attached a July 2007 photo I took of the DAR stone from which the marker was taken.  You can see the KY highway historical marker in the background.  I seem to recall that this marker had a history of being periodically stolen, then it would turn up, be re-installed and stolen again.  The original installation of the DAR marker is described in Maude Johnston Drane’s 1948 History of Henry County, pages 158-9, including a quotation of the inscription which matches exactly the photo you sent.  Original installation was in 1939 and the first theft in 1943.

Clearly this is a stolen marker which should be returned at no cost.  However, if some bidding is necessary to retrieve it, I am willing to reimburse anyone who can get it so we can return it to Henry County.  Please let me know what I can do to help in any way.  I can be reached on my cell phone at 317-695-4514.

I have copied Earl “Hammer” Smith at the Henry County Historical Society.  I’m sure he’ll be interested!

Thanks Amalie for sending out the SOS for this!

Vince

—————–

Carolyn:  I will go down to the auction house today.  Vince is on his way down from Indiana.  We will try to coordinate getting this item today, and not let it go to auction.  I am waiting to hear from our state DAR regent.

Amalie

—————–

Mike Vander Woude arranged for a local boy scout troop to clear and clean up the Lammert Dorland family cemetery located on Sunset Road, Montgomery Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, on Sat. Dec. 7th.  They did a wonderful job including outlining the area for a fence. Once again the field stones markers are visible.  Decendants of the Dorland family owe Mike a big vote of thanks for volunteering to take on this much needed job.  The Dorland cemetery is one of the few early cemeteries still remaining in this area of New Jersey and while many of the stones remain under the surface of the cemetery, a few are still visible as is the brick and brass topped monument erected in place of the Memorial Stone for Lammert Janse Dorland. Those remaining field stone markers are very similar to the ones erected in the Northern Cemetery at Conewago. Inscriptions are still not visible.

Judy Cassidy

To all the interested parties,

Amalie Preston and I met Thursday afternoon at Mike’s Auction between Lebanon and Campbellsville to try and head off the auction Friday of the Low Dutch Company bronze marker which has been missing for many years from its millstone base along Highway 421 southeast of Pleasureville in the center of the Low Dutch Tract.  According to the 1948 History of Henry County, the marker was originally installed by the DAR in 1939, was stolen in 1943, a new one was cast and reinstalled and shortly after the missing marker was located.  We have no idea if this is the original 1939 marker or the reinstalled marker that was again stolen years ago, maybe decades ago.

Mike Pruyear, owner of Mike’s Auction, showed us the marker and listened to our concerns about getting it back to Henry County.  Mike said he had a responsibility the the estate whose 40-year collection of antiques and memorabilia he was commissioned to auction off on Friday.  He felt he was not a liberty to pull the marker out of the auction without proof it was stolen and since he had advertised it for sale at the auction on the internet.  He was concerned disappointed bidders would turn him in to the Auction Board if they made the trip for the marker and it was not offered for sale.  We thanked Mike for advertising the marker since that is how we were alerted to it coming up for sale.  I asked if he thought bidders would be interested in the metal value and, if so, how much that was.  He thought it was maybe $200.  I offered him $200 to take it right then for Henry County saying that way the estate was “whole” and anyone coming to bid on it for historical purposes should be satisfied to know it was going back to Henry County.  Mike said he could not sell it Thursday, he was bound to auction it fairly on Friday, but he would give us his word that he would get the last bid and buy if for us.  If the bidding stopped at $200 or less, he would sell it to us at that price.  If the bidding went over $200, he would still sell it to us for $200 and “eat” the difference himself.  He and I shook hands on the deal.  Mike arranged with Amalie for her to pick up the marker at his home on Saturday.  I think Mike Pruyear came to a practical, reasonable and honorable solution that was fair to the estate, the auction bidders and all of us who want to see this bronze marker returned to Henry County.   

Amalie Preston went to Mike’s home on Saturday morning and, true to his word, Mike had the marker waiting for her.  The bidding had stopped at $185 and for that amount Mike sold the marker to Amalie for the DAR and its return to Henry County.  It will be up to the DAR where the bronze marker will once again be displayed.  The old millstone sitting along 421 may not be a safe location.  One option may be to loan it to Sam and JoAnn Adams for display at the Low Dutch Meetinghouse moved and rebuilt just down the highway from the millstone which was placed near the original site of the meetinghouse.  Wherever it is displayed, it is now safe and secure! 

Attached is the chain of e-mails beginning Wednesday evening which triggered this mission.  I’ve also attached a pdf of the pages from Maude Johnston  Drane’s 1948 History of Henry County reporting the 1943 re-installation of the marker.  Also attached are three photos:

1) Vince Akers, Mike Pruyear (holding the marker) and Amalie Preston taken Thursday at Mike’s Auction

2) A close-up of the marker taken Thursday

3) The millstone on which the marker was originally installed along 421 taken in July 2007

THANKS!

Vince Akers

   

On Thursday, December 12, 2013 8:20 AM, Vince Akers <vinceakers@yahoo.com> wrote:

I looked up Mike’s Auction’s website and see that their store is open 10AM-6PM today.  I’ve decided to just get in the car and drive down and get this marker.  I’ll donate it to the DAR and/or HHS or whoever will see it returned and displayed in Henry County.  It’s 4 hour drive, so I’m leaving now.  If anyone has a better idea or any other information, please call me on my cell phone at 317-695-4514.  Vince

On Thursday, December 12, 2013 7:45 AM, Vince Akers <vinceakers@yahoo.com> wrote:

I’ve attached a PDF of the page in the History of Henry County that quotes the marker’s text.
Low Dutch Marker
Vince

On Wednesday, December 11, 2013 11:09 PM, Vince Akers <vinceakers@yahoo.com> wrote:

Hi Amalie!

This is the old DAR marker for the Low Dutch Tract.  The DAR style mill stone (with the metal X marking the spot where the marker was stolen) is still located along Highway 421 just NW of the KY highway marker for the Low Dutch Tract.  This is right up the road from the relocated Six Mile Meetinghouse.  It is on the other side of the road where the meetinghouse was orginally located.  I have attached a July 2007 photo I took of the DAR stone from which the marker was taken.  You can see the KY highway historical marker in the background.  I seem to recall that this marker had a history of being periodically stolen, then it would turn up, be re-installed and stolen again.  The original installation of the DAR marker is described in Maude Johnston Drane’s 1948 History of Henry County, pages 158-9, including a quotation of the inscription which matches exactly the photo you sent.  Original installation was in 1939 and the first theft in 1943.

Clearly this is a stolen marker which should be returned at no cost.  However, if some bidding is necessary to retrieve it, I am willing to reimburse anyone who can get it so we can return it to Henry County.  Please let me know what I can do to help in any way.  I can be reached on my cell phone at 317-695-4514.

I have copied Earl “Hammer” Smith at the Henry County Historical Society.  I’m sure he’ll be interested!

Thanks Amalie for sending out the SOS for this!

Vince

On Wednesday, December 11, 2013 10:11 PM, Amalie Preston <amaliepreston@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello all!  A friend, Kent Riley, has come upon this plaque which will be auctioned this Friday at Mike’s Auction, 755 New Lebanon Rd., Campbellsville, Ky.  It appears to be a DAR marker for the Low Dutch Tract in Shelby County.  Diana, can you find out which chapter this is?  Looks like Ballard is in the name.  We need to contact them and see if this has been stolen.  I’ll try to contact the historical society down there tomorrow and see if they are aware of this.  If worse comes to worse, we really need to go down and bid this in.

Vince or Carolyn–are you aware of this sign?  It has four corner holes and I assume was bolted to the side of a building?  It appears to be a DAR marker of the site of the Low Dutch Tract purchased from Squire Boone.  Hopefully the picture is attached.

Amalie

———- Forwarded message ———-

Vince Akers shared these files from Dropbox:

Letters 12/18/2013

On Dec 16, 2013, at 8:00 AM, Firth Fabend wrote:

Dear Carolyn,

Thank you so much  for posting Barbara Cozine’s information about the American Cemetery near Maastricht. My second cousin, John Scott (a Haring descendant), age 19, was killed at this time and is buried here. I will forward this to his brother’s widow, Glory Schott. It is very moving. Merry Christmas to you and yours.

Firth Fabend

————————————

On Dec 16, 2013, at 8:31 AM, David L Smock wrote:

Hello Carolyn,Regarding the first item, André Rieu, the conductor of Johann Strauss Orchestra, is alive and well.  In fact, he is scheduled to give a concern near Weston (where I live) next April, I think it is.  It was André Rieu, Sr., also a prominent conductor, who died , but that was in 1992, as noted in the following biographical summary..

André Rieu sr.

Afbeelding gewenst

Algemene informatie

Land  Nederland

Portaal     Muziek

André Rieu sr.—-Hij werd in 1949 dirigent van het Maastrichts Stedelijk Orkest. Onder zijn leiding werd dit in 1955 omgevormd naar een provinciaal symfonieorkest, het Limburgs Symphonie Orkest (LSO), dat hij leidde tot 1980. Het LSO is het oudste symfonie-orkest van Nederland.Andries Antonie Rieu (André Rieu senior) (Haarlem, 12 mei 1917-1992) was een Nederlands dirigent. Zijn zoon is de violist en orkestleider André Rieu (junior).

Visiting the  military cemetery at Margraten (very near Rieu’s home town of  Maastricht), in 1947, was a most moving experience. Knowing the character of the Dutch people, it is not surprising that they still commemorate the American role in liberating the Netherlands during World War II.  At the banquet held in Washington, D. C., on the 50th anniversary of the liberation, hosted by the Netherlands Embassy, the Netherlands Ambassador said, among other things, that “our gratitude will be everlasting.” Earlier that day, the Ambassador presented the 50th bell for the carillon, a gift of the Netherlands government, which carillon is located very close to the Iwo Jima Memorial, next to the Arlington National Cemetery.  The audience was then treated to a carillon concert.

David Smock, Florida

————————————

[repeat below from previous “letters” in case you missed it – referred to above – and worth playing again even if you did before. It is quite an amazing performance by a 13 year old girl, to have been performed anywhere — but especially at the American cemetery in the Netherlands.]

from Barbara Cozine in New Jersey:

The Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial in the village of Margraten, about six miles from Maastricht. There lie buried 8,301 American soldiers killed in the battles to liberate Holland in the fall and winter of 1944-5. Sgt. Bill Dukeman, 101st Airborne Division, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, Second Battalion, Company C is buried there. He was killed in the battle of “The Crossroads” in northern Holland.

The Dutch hold an annual memorial concert every September at the above cemetery to remember and honor the Americans who died to free them in Operation Market Garden and subsequent efforts to eject the German army from Holland. Sgt. Dukeman, like many other fallen GIs, was “adopted” by a Dutch family. Dukeman’s family in the States was contacted and hosted in Holland, and his grave site decorated each year by his Dutch “family.” They keep his portrait in their home, displayed in a place of honor. Fathers pass this obligation down to their sons in Holland. This version of the original “taps” music is played by a 13 year old Dutch girl named Melissa Venema. The conductor of the orchestra is recently deceased Andre Rieu from Holland .

Many of you may never have heard taps played in its entirety . The original version of Taps was called Last Post, and was written by Daniel Butterfield in 1801. It was rather lengthy and formal, as you will hear in this clip, so in 1862 it was shortened to 24 notes and re-named Taps. Melissa Venema is playing it on a trumpet whereby the original was played on a bugle.

Watch at this site, and go full screen.

http://www.flixxy.com/trumpet-solo-melissa-venema.htm

————————————

On Dec 18, 2013, at 7:38 AM, Jack Taylor wrote:

To: REYNERSON Family & Carolyn LEONARD

From: Jack TAYLOR

 

Just today I got an Email entitled “Dutch letters 12/15/2013”.  This is sent out from a distant cousin who lives in OK.  I amforwarding it to you because there are several things in it that are connected to our family.  Specifically, the section at the top of the Email “from Barbara Cozine in New Jersey”.  The account of the military operation and the cemetery is very similar to my Uncle’s Herbert REYNERSON’s military service.

I have added below Carolyn Leonard’s name if you want to be added to her Email list you can contact her.  Then below that information is what I am sending to “Dutch Letters” about my Uncle Herbert REYNERSON.

 

From: Jack TAYLOR

Re: Barbara COZINE in NJ

 

Are you sure Andre RIEU died?  I am a fan of his and recently saw his music on our Public TV Station in Houston.  His death was not mentioned. Wikipedia does not yet report his death.  Andre RIEU’s home is Maastricht next to the Margraten Cemetery.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andr%C3%A9_Rieu

 

My uncle Herbert REYNERSON is in the that Margraten US Military Cemetery. Our family has a picture taken shortly after WW 2 that shows a Dutch lady who was one of the many who adopted graves. We received a picture of her next to Herbert’s grave and  a message to our family. 

 

Since that picture the cemetery has been landscaped and is a beautiful cemetery & memorial.  I visited the cemetery in 1959.  Most recently Herbert’s son, Craig, has visited the cemetery with his daughter and her husband.  They uncovered more facts connected to Herbert’s action at the farm where Herbert was KIA.

 

I have traced my uncle’s service.  He was living in OK City at the time he joined a National Guard early in WW2.  Early he was a part of a group that guarded the locks at Sault Ste. Marie on the Great Lakes because Hitler had said in “Mein Kamp” that in case of war the locks on the Great Lakes would be bombed.  Later he went to Europe arriving immediately after “The Battle of the Bulge”.  He was a part of Operation Market Garden   that fought up the Netherlands/German Border and turned toward the Rhine River bridge at Wesel.  He was killed as he threw  a smoke grenade into a German Machine gun nest which resulted in their immediate surrender.  He was killed less than 30 miles from the REYNERSON Ancestral Home in Hengelo, Gelderland, NL.

————————————

On Dec 16, 2013, at 5:12 AM, Martha Boltz wrote:

Carolyn —  Don had such a good time with the Banta group. We met some of you in and around Gettysburg last year when we saw the old Banta cabin, a real treat. Just a note to tell you that I lost my husband, Don, this past Sunday morning from a combination of CHF, pneumonia, Kidney disease, etc.

Martha Banta Boltz

————————————

On Dec 16, 2013, at 1:30 PM, Mary Sue Chatfield wrote:

Carolyn,

This is a very interesting story!  Thanks to all those responsible for accomplishing the return of the marker and to you for sharing it.

Take care,

Mary Sue

————————————

On Dec 16, 2013, at 6:43 PM, Preston Forsythe wrote:

Thanks Carolyn for the newsletters and info on my Dutch Cousins.

We are packing right now for 5 weeks in Florida with warm wx.

I do want to learn more about my Westerfield relatives.

Preston in Muhlenberg Co., KY

——————————————

On Dec 16, 2013, at 9:55 PM, Della Ford Nash wrote:

This was surely interesting. Thanks for sharing.

——————————————

On Dec 16, 2013, at 8:29 PM, Peggie Mendoza wrote:

That is a totally awesome and heartwarming thing to do.

——————————

On Dec 16, 2013, at 11:45 PM, Robert Schenck (Dr. Bob) copied us on his missive to Holland Society:

Greetings Fellow Holland Society members:

As we celebrate Thanksgiving, let us remember that the Pilgrims enjoyed eleven years of religious freedom in Leiden (in the old province of Holland) before setting sail for America and were well acquainted with the celebration of Dutch Thanksgiving on 3 October, to commemorate the heroic lifting of the siege of Leiden, on 3 October 1574, during the Eighty Years War of liberation from Spain. The traditional Dutch fare on that holiday is hutspot, a stew, made various ways today.

Details of the traumatic siege of Leiden can be read at

http://www.google.com/search?aq=f&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=seige+of+leiden.

For the information above, I am indebted to David Smock, Florida from a group named “Dutch Cousins” that are descendants of early Dutch migrations to Kentucky, and ultimately to Indiana and all points west, for sending the above to me. I had spoken to them at their biennial meeting two months ago at Madison, Indiana, on the banks of the Ohio River.

The above link will take you to a variety of listings about just where our Thanksgiving celebration derived from…from celebrating the lifting of the siege of Leiden in Holland. That was where the Pilgrims spent 11 years before sailing to “Plymouth Rock.”

One more thing we can be proud of with our Dutch traditions!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Robert Schenck, MD

Membership Chairman

The Holland Society of New York

——————————

A repeat from David Smock of Florida for making Hutspot:

As for “hutspot,” I understand that it is made a variety of ways. Historically, it was what the starving inhabitants of Leiden found, upon their liberation, in the abandoned stewpots of the Spaniards, who fled from the rising waters so hastily that they did not have time to take their dinner with them!  What the exact ingredients in the pots were is not clear to me.

According to a contemporary Dutch recipe, hutspot was made of finely chopped mutton or beef, green vegetables, parsnips or prunes, sprinkled with lemon or orange juice, moistened with strong vinegar, well mixed and boiled for a long time with fat and ginger.  Other variations existed, for example with onions.  A more spicy dish of Spanish origin, “ollapodrida” (called “olipotrigo” by the Dutch),sometimes replaced the hutspot on feast days.

(Paul, Zumthor, “Daily Life in Rembrandt’s Holland,” p. 69.)

The recipe in my Dutch regional cookbook is as follows (intranslation):

300 gms. “runderstoofvlees” (brisket of beef) salt and pepper 50 gms.

butter or margarine

1 onion

1 bay leaf

piece of mace

500 gms. white beans

1 1/2 kg. carrots

500 gms. parsnips

500 gms.onions

Cut the beef in cubes, salt and pepper, and sauter in butter or margarine. Add a diced onion. Boil the beans. Add bay leaf and pieceof mace. Simmer the meat for 1 1/2 hours.  Then add the beans.After 30 minutes add the cut up carrots, parsnips, and onions. Cook for about 45 minutes.

The recipe from The Holland Society of New York (which I will send to You later) is slightly different.

Best regards, David

——————————

Barbara Whiteside maintains a facebook page for Dutch Cousins. There are now several thousand genealogy groups on Facebook. Some are for commercial enterprises and some are for researching in a specific locale or for a specific topic or surname. They are all community forums in which we can participate and help one another with our research. Social networking on Facebook is a great way to meet others, to teach others, and to help others. In order to make it a productive and helpful tool for our research, there are several things we should all put into regular practice. (from “Cyndi’s List” blog.)

Common Rules to Follow in a Thread:

  • Read the initial post carefully to be sure you understand the comment or the question.
  • Before replying, be sure to read the entire thread first so that you don’t repeat something that has already been said by someone else. Unless, of course, it is something that bears repeating.
  • Be thorough in your reply if you are offering advice or answering a research question.
  • If you are stating a personal opinion, offer some reasoning to back up your statements.
  • Do not assume that the reader has the same knowledge-base that you do about the topic or about genealogy in general.
  • Remember that the reader of the thread isn’t just the person who wrote the original post. Everyone who belongs to the group can read what your replies contain. This is always an opportunity to keep in mind that you may be sharing information with new genealogists and you might be helping them to learn new ways to do their research. You might also teach the veterans a thing or two.
  • If your reply includes a reference to something found online, be sure to include the URL (web address) for the reference. Copy & paste it from your web browser directly into your reply to be sure it is accurate and will work properly.
  • If your reply includes a reference to a specific work, online or offline, be sure to include the complete title so that it will be easy for others to track down.
  • Stay on topic. If the topic strays from the original post, it might be time to start a new thread.
  • If the thread becomes more of a personal conversation between you and another person, it might be time to move it to a private message conversation instead of using the public forum.
  • Respect the opinions and advice given by others. Have a thoughtful conversation with others, encouraging a good-natured exchange of ideas and research methodology tips.
  • Mind your manners. A public forum isn’t the time or the place for anyone to do or say something that they wouldn’t do or say in person, face to face. It’s sad that I have to include this bit, but I’ve seen tempers flare far too often. Treat others with the same courtesy you wish for yourself.
  • ———————————

On Dec 17, 2013, at 6:00 PM, Mike Vande Woude wrote:

Enclosed are some wonderful historical documents from the Holland Society of New York.  These discussions and research papers are about the “Low Dutch” that migrated from Central Jersey to Kentucky and Pennsylvania.  As early as the late 1600’s you can read about the Terhunes, Dorland and many other names we are familiar with just by being associated with  this area.  I hope you enjoy the reading as much as I did.

NOTE from Carolyn: I AM ATTACHING the first installment of Vince Akers HISTORY OF THE LOW DUTCH, which Mike sent. Most of our cousins have a copy of the booklet by Vince with his articles on Low Dutch, but thank you for sending, and because we have several new cousins on the list all the time who may not have these, I will include them. But because of size limitations on email, they will come one at a time. Have you checked ont he FREE application Dropbox where you could download things like this and photos from the cloud – no size limitations?  Here’s a hotlink to check that out if you don’t already have it.  I have used Dropbox for more than a year and think it is GREAT!

ttps://db.tt/934BbPP6

——————————————

On Dec 18, 2013, at 12:39 PM, Meg Hacker wrote:

Hi Carolyn,

Start 2014 off right by attending our Friday Freebie program on the Highlights of the National Archives at Fort Worth: January 10th at High Noon at our Montgomery Plaza location (2600 West 7th Street). Join us as our Education Specialist, Jenny Sweeney, takes you a virtual discovery tour of our records–especially the fun finds! Space is limited, so please RSVP today: ftworth.education@nara.gov or calling 817-831-5620.

Happy Holidays!

Meg

Meg Hacker

Director, Regional Archives

National Archives at Fort Worth

1400 John Burgess Drive

Fort Worth, TX 76140

Phone Number: 817-551-2033

Letters 12/26/2013

PRETTIGE KERSDAGEN

 

MERRY CHRISTMAS

 

GELUKKIG NIEUW JAAR

 

HAPPY NEW YEAR

David Smock, Florida

On Dec 19, 2013, at 11:16 AM, jacassidy22@verizon.net wrote:

It would be interesting to learn whether or not, any of the Cousins can recall of their grandparents or even great grandparents celebrated Christmas using any of the Low Dutch family traditions.  I don’t recall reading or hearing about if and when the Kentucky Low Dutch stopped these traditions or what their traditions were.  I know in my family, perhaps because the women they married after the 1800’s were Scotch Irish or German any Low Dutch customs were not celebrated until just about everything they did was American.  I am not sure they even knew they were Dutch by 1900 or so.

Since several members are fortunate to still retain their family letters or papers and written or verbal histories, perhaps clues might be found there.

Judy Cassidy

On Dec 18, 2013, at 7:10 PM, Simon wrote:

Carolyn, Thank you so much for the below-listed website with the 13 year old girl playing the 1801 long version of Taps.  We are a military family ourselves.  Fun to learn the history of Taps, composed in the long version in 1801!  Last January we buried a 2nd cousin in Arlington National Cemetery, a lady Major in the U. S. Army.  Of course, they played Taps!  The cemetery was quite beautiful and very formal.  Fortunately, it was a warm day in January 2013.

 

http://www.flixxy.com/trumpet-solo-melissa-venema.htm

 

Merry Xmas and Happy New Year to all,

 

Jean (MacGregor) Simon

Huntsville, Alabama

——————————————————-

On Dec 18, 2013, at 10:16 AM, Charlie Westerfield wrote:

Carolyn,

This is an article from “American History” magazine, which I have subscribed to for many years. Thought the cousins would enjoy.

Thanks for all the hard work. PS sorry for the quality of the scan, my scanner is on its last leg.

Charlie Westerfield
Gotham Gift Giver.jpg

——————————————-

  1. June 20. Epke Jacobs, inn keeper of Vlissingh on Long Island, acknowledges to owe Nicholaes DeMeyer of New Amsterdam, 104 guilders and 14 schepels of peas, for merchandise received to his satisfaction. Witnesses, Claes Machael and Meyndert Barents Van Keyserryck. (Holland Society of New York)page 143 https://archive.org/stream/yearbookofhollan1900holl#page/n319/mode/2up

—————————————————

On Dec 26, 2013, at 9:04 AM, Amalie Preston wrote:

Vince and Carolyn:  I finally contacted Phyliss Koch of the Bland Ballard Chapter DAR in Henry County.  They are amazed at the recovery of the plaque after so many years!  They agree that it is probably not safe to place it on the roadside again and . will make a decision at a later chapter meeting.  Ms. Koch agreed that either the Seven Mile Building or the Historical Society would be logical places.  In the meantime, I will take the plaque to the Henry County Historical Society for safekeeping.  They will keep us “in the loop” as to their final decision.

A belated Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you both.

Amalie Preston

—————————————————

On Dec 23, 2013, at 11:05 AM, jacassidy22@verizon.net wrote:

Vince Akers and I are working on a project which involves a Simon Vanarsdale, who was living in Vincennes, Knox Co., Indiana from about 1802-1810.  He was a slave catcher and was hired by the Heirs of John and Elizabeth Brown Kuykendall who originated in Hampshire Co., VA, now WVA.  The parents died between 1794 and 1800 with their children inheriting the slaves.  The Heirs took their slaves with them when they moved from Virginia to Kentucky and then to Knox Co., IN. in the early 1800’s. Indiana has a form of slavery until about 1810. Slaves not indentured by their owners when they moved into the State, were considered free. Discovering this, the Kuykendall Heirs planned to take their slaves back to Hampshire Co, VA and sell them there, when the slaves discovered this they ran.  The slave family included a mother Phyllis and her 5 teenage children, Bob, Kate, Hanah, George and Peggy.  Simon arrested three of them, i.e. Hanah, George and Peggy, but a writ of Habeas Corpus was filed by Peggy and others and the cases went to Court. Simon lost, the case was retried, he lost again.  George was bound over to Territorial Governor, William Henry Harrison, Hanah was bound over to Benjamin Beckes and Peggy went free.  Simon next appears and we believe him to be the same man, in St. Louis Missouri and Ste. Genevieve, MO. He was in all kinds of trouble in St. Louis, and then applied and was granted a license to Trade with the Indians along the Mississippi.  He probably originated in Kentucky, and was on the Vincennes voting list in 1807, so was over 21 probably in 1802.  He is not Capt. Simon, husband of Rachel Banta.  If anyone has information on the identity of this Simon, we would certianly like to hear from you.

—————————————————

I have to admit I am now hooked on DOWNTON ABBEY (Masterpiece Theatre on Public Broadcasting station – OK it is channel 14 OETA, season 4 starts Jan 4).  Found this place where you can watch the back shows since I never got started until the end of season 3.  WOW.  I have now seen the first six episodes of season one and the first of season Two.  Incredible writing, acting and producing. Oh the plots and subplots – the intrigue and drama – the glory of the Lords and Ladies and the interaction with their house maid and servants. It puts history in perspective through those living it.

Downton Abbey is a British period drama television series created by Julian Fellowes and co-produced by Carnival Filmsand Masterpiece.[1] It first aired on ITV in the United Kingdom on 26 September 2010 and on PBS in the United States on 9 January 2011 as part of the Masterpiece Classic anthology.

The series, set in the fictional Yorkshire country estate of Downton Abbey, depicts the lives of the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants in the post-Edwardian era — with the great events in history having an effect on their lives and on the British social hierarchy. Such events depicted throughout the series include news of the sinking of the RMS Titanic in the first series; the outbreak of World War I, the Spanish influenza pandemic, and the Marconi scandal in the second series; and the Interwar period and the formation of the Irish Free State in the third series.

Check it out here:

http://www.simplyjune.org/p/downton-abbey.html

—————————————————

To see our Christmas 2013 in photos, I will put a dropbox link invite in the NEXT dutch letters, which will include our AFTER-Christmas letter.