Letters 2014

CAUTION- This page would be about 280 pages if printed!
Letters 1/6/2014

From Ann Marie Scott, Regent, Bland Ballard Chapter, DAR of Eminence KY:

Carolyn, Thanks so much for your help and interest for Bland Ballard’s  stolen memorial marker.  I have sent the information you and Amalie, Vince, Dianna and others have done on our behalf and (to) let member Phyllis and me know.  I have contacted Barbara Zink and several others that Bland Ballard will have a rededication for the marker at the Low Dutch Meeting House in April after the State Conference and on a date that suits the State Regent or her designee.  I would like for you and the others who were involved in this working and searching for us.  Vince Akers wrote a wonderful article for the Henry County Local.  If you did not see it, I could send you a copy.  

Ann Marie Scott, Bland Ballard regent

——-(my reply)

I would love to have a copy of the article, which I could share with our DUTCH COUSINS group. I am assuming you know the history of our national group as descendants of the Dutch who settled the Dutch Tract in KY. I am coordinator and manage the mailing list, so I could share that article with all these on the email list (about 600 or 700 now). I am also DAR, member of the Oklahoma Prairies Chapter, and one of my Dutch ancestors, the Rev. Cornelius Cozine, was a Patriot.

Can you scan the article in and email it to me?  Or if you need to mail the hard copy, my address is below.Thank you so much in advance.

Carolyn

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from Jack “Johannes” TAYLOR, to answer the question if anyone remember how their parents/grandparents celebrated christmas.

Good Question,

 

In my family I can only remember a couple of things that tied us to The Netherlands.   

1. Family tradition that they came from Holland.

2. A Blue and White boy dressed traditionally with wooden shoes and carrying a yoke that held a bucket at each end of the yoke.  I have often wondered if it was a Delft brand.  But, I don’t see anything in their catalog that exactly corresponds to my memories.

 

Genealogically speaking my mother’s father traces back through his male line to Hengelo, Gelderland, NL.  His paternal Grandfather was Jack LAMBERT.  But, his mother was a DeBAUN.  I have never been able to determine if LAMBERT was a spelling change from the New Netherlands Dutch spelling of LAMBERT. Bottom line, I have 23 ancestral names traced to al least through NL. 

 

Strangely Art RYNEIRSEN, one of two authors of our very excellent “A Genealogy of the REYNIERSEN Family” had no tradition of being Dutch in his family until after his retirement when he began working on his genealogy.  And, the great majority of his ancestors had never wandered far from the “Garden of the Dutch” around the Raritan River area of NJ!

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From Amalie Preston who drove in to Harrodsburg to itemize the items we are leaving in storage at the Library until the next Dutch Cousins Gathering in 2014. 

Carolyn:  Well, it got to 25 today, the roads thawed, and I made it to Harrodsburg.  The weatherman says the high temperature will be zero Monday!  Brrrrrrrr!

28 whiteDutch Cousins 2013 tee shirts (3 small, 1 medium, 4 large, 9 XL, 5 2XL, 4 3XL, and 

2 smudged shirts 2013, 1 medium and the other XL)

1 Orange tee shirt 2011, XL

4 Blue tee shirts  2009, size XL

80 Dutch cousins lapel pins and 8 pens in small box

1 flag (this would be the RYKER/RIKER family flag)

82 Blue and Cream book bags

28 Red tote bags

12 Old Mud Christmas Ornaments

1 box assorted heavy plastic table cloths (orange, brown, yellow, white, blue)

12 Chocolate Brown tablecloths

1 large Welcome banner

3 small banners (Harrodsburg 2009 and 2011, Madison 2013–didn’t see Shelbyville 2007)

Miscellaneous brochures, note cards, and construction paper

(Did not see lanyards)

Mock-ups of Revolutionary War markers for Simeon Moore, Samuel Britton, John Smock, and Jacob Sortore.  

Cozine and Comingore Family table top exhibits

archival quality storage boxes.

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MANY MANY Thanks, Amalie! Now I can get the 2013 Dutch Cousins business minutes and reports out.

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Carolyn:  I have been intending to reply to “Low Dutch Station History” in the June 13, 2013 Dutch Letters and am just now getting around to it.

On the 1784 Filson map, the Low Dutch are shown near Harrod, but this is Harrod’s Station located on his landgrant, not Fort Harrod which is designated as Harrods Towne further North on the map.

Some years ago Frances Keightley Moseley and I worked on establishing the location of Harrod’s Station.  We went to primary sources–a land dispute between John Braxdale and Henry Speed where the widow, Ann Harrod, was asked to mark the site of Harrod’s Station. The spot she marked on Harrod’s Run can be pinpointed on a present day Boyle County map using the surveyed contours of the creek in this old document.

Another primary source is a letter from Robert B. McAfee in the Draper Manuscripts (11CC87-89) which stated that “Harrod’s Station was on the west side of Harrods Run, and the Boiling Spring was on the same side.  The Cove Spring is a different spring about one and a half miles N East of Harrods Station and on the west side of the turnpike road leading from Harrodsburgh to Danville.”  You all know this place–the spring across the road (U.S. 127) from the DeMott House on the Mercer/Boyle County Line.  So conversely, Harrod’s Station was 1 1/2 miles South West from Cove Spring or DeMott’s.  From this description, Harrod’s Station and the Low Dutch Station cannot be at Burgin.  

From Stockading Up by Nancy O’Malley, she concludes that, “taking the archaeological and documentary evidence into account, a possible reconstruction of the boiling spring settlement is postulated as follows. . . the station and the cemetery is suggested to be located on the west side of Harrod’s Run (now Mock’s Branch) next to the permanent spring now feeding a stock pond.. . The lower terraces on the east side are tentatively identified either as once containing the cabins of the Low Dutch or outbuildings associated with the farm  . . .Only future research can settle the intriguing mysteries of Harrod’s Boiling Spring Settlement.”  Wouldn’t it be great to do an archaelogical dig there? 

Lastly, to the question of another Dutch Meetinghouse.  I think we all knew these devout people were worshiping somewhere–I had always supposed in homes until they built Old Mud. I wonder (this is pure speculation) if perhaps the Dutch were using Wilson’s Station for a meetinghouse.  It was a very large fortified cabin located within sight of Old Mud and had been used for public meetings such as Kentucky land court and George May’s surveying office as early as 1780. 

Hope all of this makes some sense.

Amalie

=================================================

From OLIVETREEGENEALOGY:

Hand Marks – Elaborate Symbols that Replace an Ancestor’s Signature

http://tinyurl.com/cstcu2

Ancestor Handmarks Revisited

http://tinyurl.com/cxr9xp

I’ve also added graphics of the handmarks of 26 early Dutch settlers

who used these handmarks in 1648 in New Netherland. They can be viewed

at

http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/nn/handmarks/ Over the years I’ve run across several 

sources of autographs of New Netherland people, sometimes called “HandMarks”. 

The biggest collection I’ve found is in

Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York

by David T. Valentine for 1863.  Usually referred to as

Valentine’s Manual, it was like an almanac with lots of

facts and figures.  Several editions in the mid 1800’s also had

a “Historical” section that had info of interest to genealogists.

It was different each year.  The 1863 edition is online here:

http://archive.org/details/manualofcorpora1863newy

The autographs are on 4 big (11” x 17”) foldout pages

following page 484.  The autographs are sorted by year.

There is an index of these autographs alphabetized by last name

and giving the year in the Year Book of the Holland Society of New York

for 1900 starting on p. 183.  That is available online at:

http://archive.org/details/yearbookofhollan1900holl

(The year book for 1900 also has other interesting items including

abstracts of Minutes of the Orphanmasters, and of notarial records

of Salomon La Chair and of Walewyn van der Veen.   You should

be able to find the Orphanmaster and Van der Veen full records online.

La Chair’s has been recently printed as part of the New York Historical 

Manuscripts:  Dutch so is still under copyright.)

There are also some autographs shown in the front matter to Abstracts of Wills

pub. by the NY Historical Society, vol 11 (Unrecorded Wills).

http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b3494941#view=1up;seq=11

(link from:  http://nycnuts.net/new_york_books/index.html )

There is an intro starting on p. xiii, autographs begin on p. xvii.

There are more in Revised History of Harlem … by James Riker on

pp. 165, 213, and 361.  Plus that of Jesse de Forest on p. 83.

Also, in O’Callaghan’s History of New Netherland, vol 1 on p. 494

there are two dozen signatures of some of the principal men of the colony.

Finally, here are two sources of marks.

Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York,

ed. by O’Callaghan, vol. 1, pp. 191-193 shows the marks of those

who “signed” that way.  Unfortunately, it doesn’t show the siganatures

of those who wrote out their names.

The Register of the Provincial Secretary, vol. 1 online here

http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/research/online-publications/register-of-the-provincial-secretary-volume-1/

also shows marks.

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Letters 1/8/2014

Dear Readers, as you know I am using a new mass mailer which makes sending out the “Dutch Letters” much easier.  However, this morning I received two notices that when readers clicked on the hotlink to go to my website, they got a message it might be a malicious link.  If you ever get a message like that please let me know.  I can’t fix it if I don’t know.

Hugs, carolyn

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Carolyn,

I also saw in your Dutch Letters today mention of the Low Dutch Meetinghouse near Harrods Station.  Attached is a pdf of a paper I wrote four years ago on another “snow day” (like today!) describing the Low Dutch Meetinghouses of the early 1780s–where they were and what went on with them.  Feel free to share it.

Vince Akers

1780s Meeting Houses Blog.pdf

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Jack TAYLOR: “Most interesting, Amalie, thanks for your in depth comments in the 6 Jan 2014 Dutch Letters.

 

“Below I have copy and pasted from your message. Which I will further your thoughts and locate another place of worship for the KY Dutch.”

 

(Amalie): “Lastly, to the question of another Dutch Meetinghouse.  I think we all knew these devout people were worshiping somewhere–I had always supposed in homes until they built Old Mud. I wonder (this is pure speculation) if perhaps the Dutch were using Wilson’s Station for a meetinghouse.  It was a very large fortified cabin located within sight of Old Mud and had been used for public meetings such as Kentucky land court and George May’s surveying office as early as 1780. 

Hope all of this makes some sense.

Amalie”

 

Jack TAYLOR: “I am commenting mostly from memory without giving primary source references, except for the map locating the historical location of “New Providence Presbyterian Church of Salvisa”.  So, take what I say as my present belief which can change in the light of better evidence.

 

“We often try to group several religious groups together as though they were in lock step with each other.  Dutch Reformed is one.  In truth they often split into smaller groups within the historical parent.  An example for our ancestors was The Psalter (Hymn Book with words used only directly out of the Bible) was a bone of contention.   And, to complicate things, over timethey/we change.

 

“We generally understand that French Reformed (aka Huguenot), Dutch Reformed, Presbyterian and Baptist are/were somewhat similar, even though they had their differences.  Now to the point of my usual long epistle.

 

“The New Providence Presbyterian Church at Salvisa presently just north of Harrodsburg at times historically had a KY Dutch Reformed congregation using their facilities.  Ann BANTA REYNERSON, d/o Hendrick & Ann DEMAREE BANTA, was a member of that congregation.

 

There is much on the Internet about “History of New Providence Presbyterian Church Salvisa, KY”. To whet your appetite try the link below to show the location on the KY River of thehistorical location of the church. 

 

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=37.9127200+-84.8238900+&hl=en&ll=37.912649,-84.823895&spn=0.048688,0.091667&sll=29.817178,-95.401291&sspn=0.856674,1.466675&t=h&z=14

 

 

If the link does not show the pointer at the location on the KY river use Google Map and copy and past the map coordinates into Google Map for the historical location of the church near the KY River!  UMmm . . .?

 

37.9127200 -84.8238900

 

Before this morning I had assumed the earliest location was next to the New Providence Presbyterian Cemetery near the Salt River.  ???

 

Source of the historical location coordinates below

http://geonames.usgs.gov/pls/gnispublic/f?p=gnispq:3:3653145424597027::NO::P3_FID:2566067

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from Amalie Preston, 1/6/2014

Carolyn:  I have been intending to reply to “Low Dutch Station History” in the June 13, 2013 Dutch Letters and am just now getting around to it.

On the 1784 Filson map, the Low Dutch are shown near Harrod, but this is Harrod’s Station located on his landgrant, not Fort Harrod which is designated as Harrods Towne further North on the map.

Some years ago Frances Keightley Moseley and I worked on establishing the location of Harrod’s Station.  We went to primary sources–a land dispute between John Braxdale and Henry Speed where the widow, Ann Harrod, was asked to mark the site of Harrod’s Station. The spot she marked on Harrod’s Run can be pinpointed on a present day Boyle County map using the surveyed contours of the creek in this old document.

Another primary source is a letter from Robert B. McAfee in the Draper Manuscripts (11CC87-89) which stated that “Harrod’s Station was on the west side of Harrods Run, and the Boiling Spring was on the same side.  The Cove Spring is a different spring about one and a half miles N East of Harrods Station and on the west side of the turnpike road leading from Harrodsburgh to Danville.”  You all know this place–the spring across the road (U.S. 127) from the DeMott House on the Mercer/Boyle County Line.  So conversely, Harrod’s Station was 1 1/2 miles South West from Cove Spring or DeMott’s.  From this description, Harrod’s Station and the Low Dutch Station cannot be at Burgin.  

From Stockading Up by Nancy O’Malley, she concludes that, “taking the archaeological and documentary evidence into account, a possible reconstruction of the boiling spring settlement is postulated as follows. . . the station and the cemetery is suggested to be located on the west side of Harrod’s Run (now Mock’s Branch) next to the permanent spring now feeding a stock pond.. . The lower terraces on the east side are tentatively identified either as once containing the cabins of the Low Dutch or outbuildings associated with the farm  . . .Only future research can settle the intriguing mysteries of Harrod’s Boiling Spring Settlement.”  Wouldn’t it be great to do an archaelogical dig there? 

Lastly, to the question of another Dutch Meetinghouse.  I think we all knew these devout people were worshiping somewhere–I had always supposed in homes until they built Old Mud. I wonder (this is pure speculation) if perhaps the Dutch were using Wilson’s Station for a meetinghouse.  It was a very large fortified cabin located within sight of Old Mud and had been used for public meetings such as Kentucky land court and George May’s surveying office as early as 1780. 

Hope all of this makes some sense.

Amalie

Letters 1/9/2014

If you get this message when you click on one of my links, the experts say it is nothing to worry about:

This link might be malicious. Please follow it with care. Learn more about keeping your account secure.

Carolyn, That is a typical response now to new websites or websites you visit infrequently. I get that response from a number of websites now.  It’s letting users know that there could be a virus if you do not know the sender.

Best Regards

Mike Vande Woude

Founder, SME WorkForce, LLC

Office (609)466-5444

Cell (908)230-7301

Toll Free (855)SME WORK (763-9675)

Fax (855)763-4260

image001.jpg

vandewoude@smeworkforce.com

http://www.smeworkforce.com/

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FROM ROBERT ADLET: Carolyn, I’ve been reading the stories on the location of the Dutch Station and Harrod’s with interest. I searched thru my Low Dutch items and found this map which shows all the places mentioned by Amalie if you would like to share it with everyone. I’m sorry but I don’t have the source documented.

Robert Adlet

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – I have seen that map before – might be from the book “stockading up”

Stations in Old Mercer Co., KY.jpg 

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Peggy Mendoza wrote:

My 5th great grandfather was Johannes Bernhardt Stagner (Barney)  was killed by Indians 6/22/1777 at Fort Harrod.  His great grandson’s name was John Speed Stagner.  Wonder if he was named after the Speed family mentioned above?  Always wondered where my great great grandfather got the name Speed.

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Ann Marie Scott, regent, Bland Ballard Chapter DAR, Eminence, KY:

Yes, Carolyn, I think I can forward Mr. Vince Akers information that he put in an email to me and to several DAR chapter regents in our area of Kentucky.  I will also mail you a copy of the Henry County Local that contains what happened and gives some history of the Low Dutch in Henry County.  I will send it tomorrow Jan. 7, 2014.

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from Vince Akers:  Carolyn, I saw in today’s Dutch Letters you are looking for the Henry County Local article about the DAR marker.  I realized the Local probably  has it available on-line and it indeed does.  The on-line version even has four photos versus three in print.  Hopefully the following address will take you right to it.  If not, justGoogle “henry county local” and click on their website where it’s in the lead stories.  I think non-subscribers are limited to three previews.

http://www.hclocal.com/content/history-saved-auction#.UstPFCx2O4Y.email

Hope your new year is going smoothly!

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from Kellie Wachter

Hello Carolyn,

    I have been receiving the newsletter for about a year now and I love being connected to my 

Dutch kin (I am a Banta among others ). In a few weeks I will be very near Gettysburg and would like to seek out the Banta cabin if it still stands.  Do you know specifically where it is?

 (NOTE FROM CAROLYN: Yes, I know! We visited there on our Dutch trip in 2011 and the owner even allowed us in to see the inside. Unforgettable. I have the directions somewhere, but could someone send me good directions to publish here in the Dutch letters — AND ALSO – you have to get permission from the owner first because he lives in the cabin, so I’ll include that with the directions)

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Making New Year Resolutions is a nice idea but most of us get too elaborate and the promises become overwhelming. Here’s an easy suggestion – just for today. http://bit.ly/1fcoSyW

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Happy New Year! Hope you are staying warm these frigid days of January.

The video attached is from the NY Historical Society Meeting in October 2013. It features Russell Shorto, author of “Island at the Center of the World .”

Recently he wrote” Amsterdam, A History of the World’s Most Liberal City. ” His talk is very interesting in outlining the impact of the early Dutch culture and history in shaping the aspects of modern USA as well as the Netherlands. it is almost an hour long video but worth the effort when you have the time.

Hugs, 

Mary Jo

Begin forwarded message:

http://www.c-span.org/History/Events/Dutch-Influence-on-New-York-City/10737442671/

Click “Video Playlist” on the right to watch

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From Vince Akers, about those HACKENSACK Church heartstones:

The Demaree Heart Stone goes back before my time… or, that is, before the time I study much!  I too seem to recall seeing an explanation, but can’t seem to find it.  I do see David and John Major in their 2007 book, A Huguenot on the Hackensack have two illustrations of the heart stone (pages 101 and 118) and it is on the dust cover of the book.  According to the caption on the page 118 photo, the heart stone was in the second (1696) HackensackReformed Church building.  The third and present building (built 1791) incorporated some elements of the 1696 building including the heart stone.

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Kathleen Van Nuys

So sorry to hear we have lost a wonderful cousin. Kathleen, author of THE HOPEWELL JOURNEY a wonderful book of history about our Dutch ancestors, passed away this week in Indiana. I am lucky enough to have a copy of the book, courtesy Vince Akers, and counted Kathleen a friend. She attended several of the Dutch Cousin Gatherings, as long as she was able.  She and her son planned to go on our Dutch Cousins journey to New York in 2011, but her health began to fail.

Kathleen Joan (O’Banion) Van Nuys, 92, died Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, in Franklin. She was a longtime Franklin resident. Born Sept. 28, 1921, in Columbus to Clayton and Mary (Newsom) O’Banion, Kathleen married Charles Branigin Van Nuys in June 1956. He preceded her in death on June 1, 1996. She is preceded in death by her parents, husband Charles, sister Jean Francis, and brother Joe O’Banion.

She is survived by son, the Rev. Dr. John C. Van Nuys of Crawfordsville, and grandson, Samuel Mark Van Nuys. Also surviving is one sister, Mary Jane O’Banion of Tipton.

A third-generation journalist, Kathleen’s six decade-long newspaper career began with her work for the Tipton Tribune in 1934 and continued, except for her college years, through 1955. She wrote the column So They Tell Me for the Indianapolis Times from 1956 to 1965 and the column Lightly Speaking for the Indianapolis News from 1966 to 1997.She was an active, longtime member of Hopewell Presbyterian Church where she belonged to the Fortnightly Club. She was also a member of Delta Gamma and Tri Kappa Sororities. She was a huge IU fan, holding season tickets for 50-plus years.The Revs. Brad Moger and Rev. Van Nuys will conduct a service at 11 a.m. Friday at Hopewell Presbyterian Church, 548 W. 100 North, Franklin. Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday at Flinn and Maguire Funeral Home, 2898 North Morton Street, (U.S. 31 North) in Franklin. Burial will be at Hopewell Cemetery.In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Hopewell Presbyterian Church or Franklin College. Online condolences may be received at www.flinnmaguire.net.

She was a graduate of Tipton High School (1939) and Indiana University (1943) where she majored in journalism and worked on the Daily Student and Arbutus.

Letters 01/15/2014

Terhune family plot at Danville 

My great grandfather John Terhune, born 1824, is buried in the Belevue Cemetary in Danville, KY.  He was married twice and fathered six children by his second wife.  One was my grandfather, Baker Ewing Terhune, also buried in Belevue Cemetary.  This cemetary is beautifully maintained by someone and is in the town of Danville.  It is a very large cemetary so to find the graves from the entrance, go to the second right after entering the cemetary and you will see a large TERHUNE marker with a dozen graves surrounding it on the left.  I probably am the only last survivor that knows about these Terhune folks that are buried in these dozen graves. 

 

Lucy is one of the children who lived to be elderly is buried there.  My mother and father Louise Terhune Townsend (Baker and Katherine’s daughter—my parents) and Ralph, Baker and Katherine’s oldest son is buried there. IMG_0312.jpg

 

Danville is a lovely small Kentucky town.  I go there to check on the cemetary at times and I am always delighted that the the folks who maintain it do such a beautiful job.  The last time that I was there the town and surrounding areas were “dressed up” for a party.  Even the fire hydrants were being repainted.  Bunting was everywhere!  Flags met you as you drove into the town from the surrounding farms from Louisville and Lexington.  Centre College is located there.  Many have not heard of this lovely small college.  Incidentally, my grandfather is a graduate.  If you haven’t guessed why is was decorated, you may remember that the Vice Presidential debates were held in Danville, KY last year at Centre College.

 

Mary Bates, 

granddaughter of Baker and Katherine Terhune and

daughter of Louise Terhune Townsend and Arlie Townsend

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NEW YEAR RESOLUTIONS – MY BLOG

Just for Today

New Year #resolutions are nice but  the promises can become overwhelming. Here’s an alternative-. http://bit.ly/1fcoSyW 

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from Barbara Terhune – Florida

I found this beautiful AND worth sharing…hope you do too….

‘Hand of God’ Spotted by NASA Space Telescope (Photo)

http://www.space.com/24225-hand-of-god-photo-nasa-telescope.html

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Bk Review- Law Practice of Alexander Hamilton: the duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr .. & so much more. Good history on early new york city — and even a lawsuit involving our COZINE ancestors!   http://bit.ly/1aGeA2v-PAXP-deijE.gif

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Carolyn, Thank you so much for this email [with info about Kathleen Van Nuys].  I just purchased the Hopewell Journey 🙂 I was also at the Historical Society to listen to Russell Shorto’s presentation, but now I have a copy of it and can pass it on…. Very Interesting. 

Best Regards

Mike Vande Woude

NOTE FROM CAROLYN:  The Hopewell church of Franklin Indiana is a daughter of Old Mud. When they were unsuccessful in securing a Dutch-speaking domine, many of our group in Mercer County Kentucky became Presbyterian, and those who migrated to Johnson County Indiana founded HOPEWELL church, and took the wineglass pulpit from Old Mud there with them in the 1820s and started the mission church. The church was organized on May 23, 1831 with 43 members.  At one time it included the Hopewell Academy which fostered scholarships for area students. Now a Presbyterian with membership of near 200, the “mission” remains active. Kathleen’s book tells the story and names the founders – those names will be familiar to those on this list. Jon and I visited Hopewell a few years ago and saw the plaque on the wall with the names of the founders. Here’s a hotlink to the Hopewell cemetery findagrave listings (lots of Bantas, etc): http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=1182425

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Please add me to the Dutch List.   My Dutch ancestors were:  Banta, Bantau, Terhune, Dedrick, and many others.

Thank you very much!

Patricia Cartwright-Canty

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If you get this message when you click on one of my links, the experts say it is nothing to worry about:

This link might be malicious. Please follow it with care. Learn more about keeping your account secure.

Carolyn, That is a typical response now to new websites or websites you visit infrequently. I get that response from a number of websites now.  It’s letting users know that there could be a virus if you do not know the sender. Mike Vande Woude

——————————-

Jack TAYLOR: “My opinion on such messages, which probably is flawed, follows. 

“First I agree with Mike, but add the following.  There are Internet services that check out programs, and other Internet Traffic (for lack of a better description) for all kinds of mischief, for a fee.  That’s in addition to virus protection programs* that almost all of us use.    Makes sense, however, the cost, time & bother for them to put their stamp of approval causes them to not be used often.  So, we get such warning messages.

 

“*I believe virus protection programs are very important, but there still will be viruses that get through and have to be removed.  When your computer slows down over time don’t give up on your computer.  Take it to a reputable technician and let them work it over.  I buy such a service that lasts for a year.  It’s worth the cost.  Don’t try to fix it yourself with on line services. You have enough to worry about just understanding all those programs you use.”

 

from carolyn – I am an Apple lover and use a Mac.  They are not completely immune to viruses, but very rare.  I have been using a Mac since 1984 — and so far no viruses.  However, I did have a hard drive crash in 2012 and that was a disaster!

===========================================

from Mike Vande Woude

Carolyn, I took the liberty and fowarded your string of messages to Dr. Charles Gehring and Dr. Charles Wendell of NNI.  Dr. Wendell is also the Chairman of the Holland Historical Society in Manhattan. You can follow the emails, but note the Charly Gehring mentions Frank Benta, who is a professor at Indiana University.  

Best Regards,

Mike

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from  Jerry Jones, The Jones Genealogist…:-)

Low Dutch can be identified on Filson’s map of 1784.  See it on my blog post of 12/13/12 at historicdanvilleky.blogspot.com.  You can enlarge the map by clicking on the post…it is located due north of Danville…and a scale in miles is given.  

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Dear Carolyn, 

This is to let you know that my husband, Marvin J. Westerfield, died on Sept. 14, 2014.  He was 90 and we had been married for 67 years.

Sincerely,  Marjorie Westerfield.

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from: Jack TAYLOR

The following that in reply to Jean Simon Re: THANKFULNESS. My reply is specifically about the copy and pasted part from her post at the bottom of this letter.

 

  For me her post is another example of how people move between different language groups often change the spelling of their name to accommodate the language where they were living. So, be careful to call someone who lived during the New Netherlands Period with a name that looks Dutch as being Dutch.  And, don’t confuse Dutch with Deutsch.

 

My impression follows, don’t take it as gospel,  it’s only my belief.  When the HATFIELD immigrant said he was “High Dutchman” from Dansig it tells a lot about him. That would exclude his being form the Low Countries where Dutch & Flemish was spoken such as The Netherlands (except for possibly the northwest area of Friesland, NL, which had their own language) and parts of neighboring Belgium down to northwest France along the coast.  High Dutchman would also exclude his being from the northeast part of today’s Germany which spoke Low Deutsch, aka Low German.

 

What is considered most properly spoken German is called High Deutsch  that would be spoken in North Central Germany including Brandenburg & Prussia. That would be consistant with his being from Danzig, East Prussia.

 

The following spellings might have been used:  HATFELD(T) = German, HATFIELD = English, HATVE(E)LT = Dutch.

 

There was a very influential HATFIELD Family in England.  http://www.archives.com/genealogy/family-history-hatfield.html

 

My youngest Canadian Dutch ancestor was my dad’s mother’s paternal grandmother,, Mary Van Norden, who married Jacob Lyon Hatfield. The latter was a descendant from the immigrant to USA, Matthias Hatfield (also spelled Heesvelt and other spellings) who lived in the 1600s in Connecticut and New Jersey. His will was proved 13 December 1687.  He was originally from the City State of Danzig, now called Gdansk.  He told the governor of a state, he also a physician, when Matthias was ill that he was a High Dutchman, from (the City State) of Danzig, now called Gdansk.  That floored us all, because we always thought the Hatfields were English! 

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I will be speaking at Mid Oklahoma Writers on Tuesday Feb 11th 7:00 p.m. at Rose State College in the Learning Resources Building (last building on the east side of the campus) in rooms 109 and 110.

Subject: THE TRUTH ABOUT WRITING: 10 steps to writing your story and 25 tips to make it publishable. Good Writing – is good writing in any genre. The talk I give and the tip sheet I hand out will apply to any kind of writing; fiction, non-fiction, magazine articles, short stories or family history. Learn how to narrow down your subject and tighten the content. 

For more info, contact Charles Vassel, 2014 MOW <laszls@cox.net>

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from John c. Westerfield (our DUTCH Cousin Prez)

Carolyn will you forward this to our Dutch Cousins.  Hopefully someone that lives in the area can attend and give us a report.

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2014) – As part of the Kentucky Governor’s Mansion Centennial Celebration, a new documentary about the architectural, social and political history of the residence is being released. The film, titled “Kentucky Governor’s Mansion:  A Century of Reflection” is narrated by Kentucky native and ABC World News anchor Diane Sawyer, and will premiere Jan. 15 at the Grand Theater in Frankfort and Jan. 16 at the Kentucky Theater in Lexington. 

 

The premieres kick-off a yearlong Centennial Celebration for the Governor’s Mansion, which turns 100 years old on Jan. 20. 

 

The documentary features historical reenactments along with interviews from former governors and their families, including former Miss America and Kentucky First Lady Phyllis George Brown, Gov. Martha Layne Collins and current Gov. Steve Beshear.  The film offers an unprecedented look at family and political life at the mansion— including milestones throughout both Kentucky’s and the nation’s history.

 

“The Kentucky Governor’s Mansion is a timeless treasure steeped in history, architectural symmetry and elegance,” said Michael Breeding, producer and director of “Kentucky Governor’s Mansion:  A Century of Reflection.”

 

“I have had the esteemed privilege of coming to know the architects, designers, builders, first families, staff and caretakers whose incomparable dedication and contributions have brought this mansion to life,” he continued. “It is my sincere hope that this documentary can provide a fitting introduction to the people of Kentucky and that they might see in this great landmark all that I’ve been privileged to see through the making of this film.”

 

For an exclusive preview clip of the film’s historical reenactment, visithttp://vimeo.com/83622761.

For the latest Centennial Celebration news and updates, go the official Centennial website athttp://governorsmansion.ky.gov/centennial/, visit the Governor’s Mansion Facebook page athttps://www.facebook.com/KentuckyGovernorsMansion or follow the Mansion on Twitter @GovMansion1914

 

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Carolyn this will be interesting to our Dutch Cousins if they belong to Ancestry.com

Cousin John

Subject: Coming to America: new New York records and immigration ideas

  Seven new New York Collections

This month we have 7 new New York collections and a free guide to help.

Letters 1/19/2014
I will be speaking at Mid Oklahoma Writers on Tuesday Feb 11th 7:00 p.m. at Rose State College in the Learning Resources Building (last building on the east side of the campus) in rooms 109 and 110.Subject: THE TRUTH ABOUT WRITING: 10 steps to writing your story and 25 tips to make it publishable. Good Writing – is good writing in any genre. The talk I give and the tip sheet I hand out will apply to any kind of writing; fiction, non-fiction, magazine articles, short stories or family history. Learn how to narrow down your subject and tighten the content.For more info, contact Charles Vassel, 2014 MOW <laszls@cox.net>

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Joan Gallo is one of our newer members on the Dutch list, and I had a bit of trouble getting it right.  First I had her name as Jean Gallow, but after a couple notices from Joan I got it fixed.  Loved what she replied – made my day.

Thank you, Carolyn!  I appreciate it.  I figured something like that happened.  I’m sure it’s corrected now.  I sort of laugh at my name anyway… I’m either associated with winemakers from the west coast, mobsters from the east coast, Cajuns from the Gulf coast (yes, I’ve even had an “eaux” added to my name) or the hangman… I guess I should really laugh, anyway.  I was born with the surname Schwerm, and my mother was chastised for naming me Joan and not naming me “Inch”.  Sigh…   ya gotta laugh.  Joan

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Hi!  Just fyi….I’m excited….in the first week of Feb I’m going to Rotterdam, Netherlands for some training for work.  I will have a day or two to travel after.  I don’t think I will get to the area of the Cozine’s but at least I will be going to the Netherlands!!

Thanks!

Johnnie Cozine Walker

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Hi Carolyn,

I hate to ask you to take a moment to change my Email address, but the old one is about to be closed down and I don’t want to miss any messages from you.  Whenever you have a moment….

Thanks,

Larry Cozine.

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Deone Pearcy of Kingfisher OK is a new subscriber to the Dutch Letters – so here is a big welcome to a fellow Oklahoman. Deone is a RYKER descendant.

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The New Netherland Institute will offer an annual $1000 prize for the best published article relating to the Dutch colonial experience in the Atlantic world, with a special sensitivity to New Netherland or its legacy

Entries must be based upon original research, Focus on New Netherland and its legacy, and be first published in 2013.  Only one submission per author will be accepted. Four copies must be submitted by 1 April 2014 to the Article Prize Committee, New Netherland Institute, P.O. Box 2536, Empire State Plaza Station, Albany, NY 12220-0536. The winner will be notified by August 1, 2014 and the prize will be presented at the annual New Netherland Seminar in late September or early October.

For more info, email mdouglas@mail.nysed.gov

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from Linda Hayes

Hi Carolyn,

Your newsletter arrived today and thanks for doing such a great job getting the news out to all the Dutch Cousins.

A Mary Bates had information on Terhunes buried in Danville, KY.  I would like to have her email address if you give them out.  I would like to ask her about a Barnett Terhune who may be buried in Danville and possibly in this same cemetery.  This Barnett Terhune was the husband of Elizabeth Catherine Vanarsdall Terhune.  Elizabeth is buried at Old Mud next to her parents, Cornelius C. Vanarsdall and Catherine Vandivier Vanarsdall, my 3Great Grandparents.  After her death Barnett married again and maybe buried in Danville.

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From Mary Bates, to answer Linda Hayes recent question:

I am Mary Townsend Bates and am the great granddaughter of Barnett Terhune and his second wife.  Yes, they are buried in Danville, KY and so are my grandparents and parents and other Terhune relatives.  It is a beautiful cemetery and very well maintained, probably by the town itself.

 

 

Hope that I can help you with the email that you sent me.  I will tell you what I know from having known some of our relatives and copy from the Van Nuys Genealogy book by Carrie Allen and many visits to the cemetery in Danville, KY where my parents, grandparents and great grandparents are buried.

 

Barnett Terhune born July 13, 1828 died Sept. 27, 1903 and is buried is the cemetary which is called Bellevue and is located in the small town of Danville near the historic square.  There is a big monument in the center of the plot with the word TERHUNE and graves around it.  I asked the caretakers if they could straighten some of the graves and the next time I went it was done.  Do not know who to thank.

 

Barnett is the “son of Garret and Rachel Rynearson Terhune, and grandson of Garret and Catherine Van Nuys Terhune.  He married first Elizabeth Catherine Van Arsdall, born Dec. 4, 1827, died July 14, 1862.  He married Mrs. Ellen Ewing Mitchell on Oct. 4, 1866.  She was born June 38, 1840 and died July 8, 1908.”  I have their wedding picture of them WITH their children (smile).  He had grown children and she had one. 

 

After they married, they had another family of children.  Some died in infancy.  I remember Thomas Barnett Terhune, born March 16, 1870,  He was a Presbyterian minister.  BAKER EWING TERHUNE, my grandfather, was born Aug. 24, 1873 and he and my grandmonther, Katherine B. Drye, are buried in the cemetery.  Lucy Ellen Terhune, born May 12, 1878, a daughter of Barnett and Ellen, is buried there in the family plot.  She had no children but was married for a time to George A. Farris.  There were other children, too, but Thomas was interesting.  I will copy more from the book mentioned above.

 

“The degree of D. D. was conferred by Hanover College in 1909.  For a number of years he has been the devoted and successful pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Huntington, Ind., a man of intellectual force and acknowledged pulpit ability.  He was Moderator in the Synod of Indiana the past year and has served his church on many important committees, as well as in the evangelistic field, and as a writer and lecturer.  He is an eloquent and popular platform speaker and has done acceptable work for Chautauqua and other bureaus, without losing sight of his mission.”

 

Keep in touch and do go by the cemetery if you are in that vicinity.  If you ever get to Williamsburg, VA look me up and come by for a visit.  If you wish me to look up any more of “our” folks from the Van Nuys Family History book, will be glad to do so.  It has a 1916 date on it and the Terhunes go back to Aucke Janse Van Nuys the first generation on this continent in 1651 when he and his children emigrated from Holland. 

—————————————GOOD TO KNOW!

 

Indian Censuses

Special Indian censuses were taken in 1880, 1900 and 1910.  Called Inquiries Relating to Indians, they give each person’s Indian name, the head of the household and tribal status.

Reservation censuses were taken every year from 1885 to 1940 by Indian agents.  In reality, this enumeration was more random than annual.

The Indian school censuses were taken from 1910 to 1939.  These recorded details about students from 6 to 18 years of age.  The information listed was the degree of Indian blood and the parents’ or guardians’ names.  It often included the mother’s maiden name.

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North Carolina destroyed stacks of 100-year old records.

A newly-appointed Clerk of Court in Franklin County, North Carolina, discovered stacks and stacks of books, boxes, loose papers, ledgers, and more in the basement of the county courthouse. The records were strewn everywhere. There was obvious mold in the back section and evidence of water damage. Some records had been ruined by the mold, but most were completely viable.

After extensive political wrangling, the county destroyed all the records on December 6, 2013. The records were from approximately 1840’s to the 1960’s. The records included Chattel Mortgages from the 1890’s, court dockets from post civil war to prohibition, delayed birth certificate applications with original supporting documents (letters from Grandma, bible records, birth certificates, etc), county receipts on original letterhead from businesses long extinct, poll record books, original school, road and bridge bonds denoting the building of the county, law books still in their original paper wrappings, and much, much more.

Read details here:  http://goo.gl/vnak1s.

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I love Dropbox (and I use it for free)!

This (or any other cloud-based space) has revolutionized some of what we do. It is now easier than ever to share large collections of video, audio or photos with our family, colleagues or others. No more e-mail server limits to contend with. Additionally, I have it set up so certain files I have created in dropbox automatically synch with my cellphone. For example, any photos I take on my cellphone start downloading to dropbox as I enter my house. By the time I’m working on my computer, I can start sorting/filing them to their respective projects.

By Gena Philibert-Ortega, Internet Genealogy and Family Chronicle author. — from  Internet Genealogy/Family Chronicle Newsletter Vol 2 #24

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London Poor Law Abstracts 1581-1899 online

Abstracts of over 22,400 London Poor Law records, covering over 300 years and 66 City of London parishes, now online at Origins.net.

Poor Law records are a major source for those interested in both local and family history and touched almost every aspect of the lives of those who had fallen on hard times or whose predicaments drew them to the attention of the parish officers. The parish officer / overseer of the poor was expected when necessary, to feed, clothe, house and find work for his poor inhabitants. He apprenticed pauper children and diligently pursued the fathers of illegitimate children born in the parish. But ultimately he protected his parish from the claims of paupers who were not his responsibility.Thus these records can allow you to prove relationships between both members of the same family and between families and places. A large number of families lived a hand to mouth existence, illness or death of the main wage earner or a bad harvest or other disaster could cause a family to become dependent upon poor relief. Poor Law records can provide the means to help you to follow these ‘pauper’ ancestors through their trials and tribulations.

These poor law abstracts (summaries) contain a complete summary of the details contained within each entry and includes all details including names and places plus incidental information such as relationships and occupations where found in the original documents.

Search London Poor Law Abstracts 1581-1899:

www.origins.net/BritishOrigins/Search/General/LondonPoorLaw/BOSearchLondonPoorLaw.aspx

Poor Law abstracts include: Apprenticeship indentures, Bastardy examinations, Indemnity bonds, Quarter sessions and appeals, Settlement examinations and removal orders, Vagrant removal orders, Workhouse admission and discharges.

Maggie Loughran

Genealogist, Origins.net

genealogy@origins.net

from Internet Genealogy/Family Chronicle Newsletter Vol 2 #24

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Letters 1/27/2014

NOTE from Carolyn: someone on this list invited me to come speak at a program in Enid OK.  The email mysteriously disappeared from my mailbox before I could answer. I can’t remember who it was. (Not the first time that has happened here lately – I swear there is a playful ghost hiding in my Apple.)  Please write again.

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DROPBOX.COM Are you looking for a secure way to send photos and large files to friends and family? I suggest an account with Dropbox, which is free and lets you store up to 2 gigabytes of data with more storage available for a fee. Once you download the program to your computer, (go to dropbox.com) create an online file folder for the data you want to store and share. Then create a link to that folder by right-clicking on it and choose “share dropbox link.” Create an email to thaat person and paste the link into it.  That is what I am doing here, because so many of you said you were unable to download or read the Christmas letter I sent earlier.  Here you go – just click on this hotlink. You don’t have to have the Dropbox program to open it. Let me know if this works for you. I use the program all the time.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/89092572/xmas%20ltr2.pdf

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TEN PROMINENT DUTCH AMERICAN FAMILIES: FROM 17TH CENTURY UNTIL TODAY”HAS JUST BEEN  PUBLISHED AND IS AVAILABLE FOR $ 2.99 in the  AMAZON KINDLE STORE

 

The families include the ROOSEVELTS with 13 members, the VANDERBILTS with 14 members, the VAN RENSSELAERS with 11 members, the VAN CORTLANDTS, THE SCHUYLERS, the FRELINGHUYSENS, the KOCHS, the FONDAS, the MEIJERS, and the STAALS.

 

This E-book is by  C. Carl Pegels author of the Dutch-Americans page on the NNI website.

 http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/history-and-heritage/dutch_americans/

 

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Loved your email. Such interesting stuff, Carolyn. I absolutely ached reading about North Carolina’s irresponsible destruction of records. Was there no genealogy society or library in all of North Carolina that would undertake the storage of such “elderly” records???? Oh my, oh my….and to think some of them had survived the Civil War, but could not survive the hand of a newly-elected court clerk. I’d think maintaining court records, regardless of age, would be part of his/her responsibility.

Sigh… Carolyn Steele

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 Special Indian censuses were taken in 1880, 1900 and 1910.  Called Inquiries Relating to Indians, they give each person’s Indian name, the head of the household and tribal status.

Reservation censuses were taken every year from 1885 to 1940 by Indian agents.  In reality, this enumeration was more random than annual.

The Indian school censuses were taken from 1910 to 1939.  These recorded details about students from 6 to 18 years of age.  The information listed was the degree of Indian blood and the parents’ or guardians’ names.  It often included the mother’s maiden name.

Prior to 1900 few Indians are included in the decennial Federal census. Indians are not identified in the 1790-1840 censuses. In 1860, Indians living in the general population are identified for the first time. Nearly all of the 1890 census schedules were destroyed as the result of the fire at the Department of Commerce in 1921.

Beginning with the 1900 census, Indians are enumerated on reservations as well as in the general population. For information on other Bureau of the Census Indian schedules, see American Indians in Bureau of the Census RecordsSelected Records Relating to Enumeration of Pueblo Indians, 1790-1939, and Selected Microfilm Pertaining to Eastern Cherokee Enumeration.

Indexes: Usually, it is necessary to consult a name index for a particular federal census to find an Indian ancestor. These indexes are available for nearly all states and territories, and the following should be kept in mind when consulting them:

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Got DUTCH buried in Green-Wood cemetery in New York?

An estimated 560,000 dead are buried in the cemetery in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. “Residents” in the cemetery include Leonard Bernstein, Boss Tweed, Charles Ebbets and Horace Greeley. The cemetery staff also has a massive paper trail that includes business records, annual logs, letters from family members and more. The staff is now offering a new genealogy-for-hire project, pulling family tree information from the cemetery’s in-house records for paying customers.

Green-Wood quiety debuted the new research program last year, offering document detective services for $28 per 30 minutes. The service has been so popular — requests average 25 a week — that the cemetery has hired five grad students as researchers and began publicizing it last week.

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This was posted on Dutch Colonies today.  Judy Cassidy

>Dear list,

>

>Today I received a confirmation that Frans Gouverneur has passed away.

>Frans was very sick for a long time and on 16 May 2013 he died at 

>the age of 70.

>We’ll remember him as an excellent researcher and a nice person, who

>was always willing to share his information.

>

>Cor Snabel

>The Netherlands

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findmypast.co.uk is about to launch a new web site, built on a new technology platform. The new site is promised to contain a new family tree builder to allow users to record all of the details found about each of your ancestor, including source material. It will also display a timeline of each ancestor’s life. Other improvements will include new search options, and a new “look and feel.” I joined as a subscriber last August but have NOT had time to try it yet!  Soon!

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Visit our webpage: http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/

We are continually adding new features and content to our website, and we are pleased to announce several new additions. See the links below for two historical-fiction stories for elementary school students by Lois Miner Huey and Janny Venema, an essay by Peter Douglas on the illustrations inspired by the “Manhattan Purchase,” and two essays from NNI’s Explorers, Fortunes and Love Letters collection by Peter G. Rose and Adriana E. Van Zwieten. 

d9f39b020948a5759f959b4360f47d5e.jpg Going Dutch: A Visit to New Netherland 

Where can a student’s imagination take them? Beverwijck? Fort Orange? New Amsterdam? How about all across New Netherland?! Follow one student’s imaginary trip through Dutch America in this story by Lois Miner Huey. 

THE IRVINGTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY INVITES YOU TO A PRESENTATION

ON

 UNDERSTANDING SLAVERY IN COLONIAL NEW YORK

BY Dr. Dennis Maika, Senior Scholar 2012, the New Netherland Institute

 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9TH AT 3PM, LIBRARY PROGRAM ROOM*

 

When most Americans imagine their country’s experience with slavery, their perceptions are typically influenced by an understanding of the 19th century American South in the decades before the Civil War.  Less well known is the long history of slavery in Colonial New York which began in the early days of seventeenth century New Netherland and ended officially in the decades after the Revolution.  For almost 175 years, the experience of enslaved people and their enslavers in colonial New York was uniquely different from the rest of the American colonies.  Dr. Maika will examine distinctive features of New York slavery, the changing experiences of enslaved Africans and their masters over time, and the opportunities and challenges posed by historical evidence.  He will include some history of the enslavement at Philipsburg Manor.

 

All Welcome                         Refreshments                 *Snow Date:  Sunday March 2, 3pm Library

 

Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President

New Netherland Institute

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Is there anything you can share with about the VanCleave’s? these would be the same ones spoken about in the Long Run massacre story.  I ask because I have fallen prey to genealogy and have found I am related to them.  Please anything will help.

My father Victor VanCleave Great x5 grandson to Capt Aaron Vancleave

OralVanCleave 1875 was son samuel vancleave. 

Chad Cossey

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Wellcome Images provides a huge archives of more than 100,000 high resolution photographs, ephemera, maps, paintings and drawings. The historical collections offer a rich body of historical images, including manuscripts, paintings, etchings, early photography, and advertisements. We have over 100,000 images ranging from ancient medical manuscripts to etchings by artists such as Vincent van Gogh and Francisco Goya, which are now freely available. Why not try it out now? Just search for your favourite images, click on ‘Download hi-res images’ and follow the instructions. The Wellcome Images are available at wellcomeimages.org.

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The following is an excerpt from the DNA Casting web site at http://www.dnacasting.com:

  • Do you have suspicions about your blood relation to a family member?
  • Have you ever thought that maybe you were switched at birth?
  • Did you ever think you look more like your father’s best friend than your own father?
  • Are you suspicious that you might not be related to any of your relatives?
  • Would you ever get a DNA test to prove your theory?

If you want to know who your parents are or who you are, then this is the perfect opportunity for you.

If you’re ready to make your last stand, and are at least 18 years old, then we want to hear your story! If selected, your search for answers may finally come to an end with a trip to New York or a visit by our genetic team where you will participate in a DNA test and be compensated for your time in doing so.

We’ll finally unlock the answers and put your suspicions to rest.

You can learn more at http://www.dnacasting.com and you can even fill out a questionnaire on the same site to be submitted to the show’s producers. You can also contact Jonathan Whipple at whipplecasting@gmail.com for more information.

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FamilySearch Launches New Indexing Website

This free genealogy website, Familysearch.com says this makes it easier for searchers to know how to get started and find the help they need. The great thing about indexing is that it doesn’t detract from family history research, it enhances it! Many people who index have heart-turning experiences that motivate them to want to learn about their own ancestors. And indexing accelerates the work of family history by making more names searchable for researchers.

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Major problems with new Dutch records on Ancestry.com

24 JANUARY 2014 BY YVETTE HOITINK

10 COMMENTS

Problems-300x198.jpg

Through its partnership with Familysearch.org, Ancestry.com added millions of records from the Netherlands to their website this week. Just search the Card Catalog for databases with ‘Netherlands’ in the title. The new record sets include:

Great news right? Well, maybe not so much. There are several problems with these record sets that severely limit their usefulness and will even cause major errors in family trees.

Read More here: http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/problems-new-dutch-records-on-ancestry/

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Letters 2/8/2014

Okay gang, I am again combining the Dutch Letters with Gen Tips  to save some time for me.  If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will!

Blessings, carolyn

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Information about the 2014 Swedish Genealogy workshops in Lindsborg, KS., “little Sweden USA”. March 29 & 30; Sept 27 & 28 in Lindsborg, Kansas.

For more info www.oldmillmuseum.org

785-227-3595

email oldmillmuseum@hotmail.org

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Hi Carolyn,

Thank you for your news.

Ronnie Riker

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From Amalie Preston:

inre: Low Dutch Meetinghouse/Providence Presbyterian, etc.

Again, I am replying belatedly to all the great input on the question of Low Dutch Station/Meetinghouse. First of all, Vince, what a wonderful article you wrote about Kentucky’s Low Dutch Stations on that snowy day.  I can’t wait to see what you are working on now given the number of snowy days we are all having!

Some observations for Jack (Taylor).  Yes, Dutch families soon moved to the McAfee area and were worshiping with the Presbyterians at Providence.  I well remember the Reynearson homeplace, accessed by a swinging bridge over Salt River.  It adjoined the Brewer farm, and other Dutch names in the area were Voorhies, VanArsdall and Terhune, to name a few.  On to the “historical location” of Providence Church.  I clicked on the link and there must be a mistake.  The view is from the Oregon Church of Christ in Oregon, Ky.  The building was constructed in 1910 of supplies brought in on my great grandfather’s steamboat. It just doesn’t seem logical that a McAfee congregation would travel miles away down the winding cliff road to the Kentucky River to worship.  I ran the deeds in Oregon some years ago, and lots were first sold in the 1840s. I did not find any that mentioned Providence Church.  So, yes–the earliest location of the Church was at the New Providence Cemetery near Salt River. Thanks, Jack, for finding that site and wonder how we can get it corrected?

To Peggy (Mendoza), a son of the Speed family who lived near Harrods/Low Dutch Station ultimately moved to Louisville.  His beautiful home, Farmington circa 1810, still stands.  Abraham Lincoln’s best friend in Springfield, Illinois was Joshua Speed from Farmington and Louisville’s Speed Museum was endowed by this family as well.

Lastly, the map showing station locations was an illustration used in Chinn’s book, The History of Harrodsburg and the Great Settlement Area.

Amalie Preston.

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from Jim Cozine:

Re the map of the Old Bloomingdale farms in NYC

I received my copy yesterday..

It is a very busy map and the notes are difficult to read but think I understand it now.

While we have known for years that the farm of Cornelius Cozyn

covered all the land from the Bloomingdale Road to the

Hudson River from 53rd to 56th Streets we never knew the shape..

This we can now see from this map,

but that is not the big surprise here..

We can now see from this map that the Cozyn farm also covered a lot of land

on the other side of the Bloomingdale Road (aka Broadway) all the way 

over to present day 6th Ave. down to 52nd St and up to 57th St..

Looks to me like Camegie Hall sits on old COZINE land.

more Later.

Jim   Cozine

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It wasn’t me, Carolyn. I haven’t been to Enid since 1971. I hope you locate the person.

Stay warm!

Gail Mattingly

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Hello and thank you for your time,

My Father Victor VanCleave born 2-27-1948  was the son of Orel G VanCleave Jr. Orel’s father was another Victor VanCleave, This leads me to believe that Orel was a Jr. due to his Grandfather.  Anyways my Grandmother divorced Orel and remarried a man with the last name of Cossey, this is why the Cossey last name, but we are VanCleaves.  I am told that my Grandmothers new husband made the statement, “I will not raise a child that has a different last name”  so my Grandmother signed everything Cossey.  I also have a copy of my Fathers birth certificate to prove any discrepancies.  Recently I submitted my DNA to Family Tree and to my surprise no VanCleaves showed up, not a one, (this could be due to lack of submission),  the only thing that showed up was Huff/ Hough/ Hoff  and all of these matches were from many years past, I believe out of 50, 3 were recent (meaning 3 people were still living).  I am baffled and even a little heart broken, from what I have learned about the VanCleave’s they were wonderful people.  Jan VanCleef  building homes in New Amsterdam, to Anne of Cleves including the VanCleef Jewelers.  So when I saw this Huff thing, you could imagine my surprise.  Anyways, I would love to do what it takes to become a member  (if you’ll have me), make new connections and hopefully complete a family tree.  Pleeeeeeease contact me and let know how to go about this the proper way.

Chad Cossey  (VanCleave)

Alta Loma, CA

You have been added to the email list Chad, and we will see if there is a Van Cleave/vancleve on this list who can help.

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Re

From Mary Hunter Linneman on the Dutch Cousins facebook page. Rea=ady for vacation? To some place different? Try this out: a “Virtual Vacation” in New Netherland! The very talented Lois M. Huey has imagined a trip to New Netherland from a student’s point of view. Here’s the link below.

P.S. I’ll send you all a postcard!

http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/education/for-students/fun-re/going-dutch-a-visit-to-new-netherland/

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I just heard on the news that Yahoo accounts have been hacked.  That may explain my continuing problems.

It said they are looking for address in the contacts folder, and for passwords.  So be careful which messages you open.

Also, they can use the computer for other reasons.

I told you I thought someone was controlling my computer!   I guess so.

Sandra Krug

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http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.vanarsdale/302/mb.ashx

Message Board Post:

I’m sharing this transcription of a New Jersey Supreme Court case:

New Jersey ss George the third by the grace of God of Great Britain, France((something covering words on my copy)) of Ireland king, defender of the faith to the Sheriff of Somerset ((Covered)) greeting.  We command you that you take Christoffel Van Arsdalen, otherwise called Christoffel Van Arsdalen of Summarsed County Youmans and province of East New Jersey, if he may be found within your baliwic, and him safely keep so that you may have his body before us at Burlington on the Second tuesday in May next, to answer unto Baltis Pickle Surviving executor of the last will & testament of Baltis Pickle deceased, of a plea of trespass; as also to a bill of the afsd Baltis against the afsd Christoffel for two hundred pounds current money of New Jersey at eight shillings the ounce of debt, according to the custom of our court before us to be exhibited:  And have you then & there this writ. Witness Frederick Smyth Esq. Chief Justice at Perth Amboy the seventh day of April in the elev!

enth year of our reign.

Stockton Atty.

Pettit

((Page 2))

New Jersey Supreme Court

Baltis Pickle

Surviv..g excr of

Baltis Pickle dec.

Vs

Christopher Van Arsdalen

CapX Debt

£200

Stockton Atty

XXX to May term 1771

CXXX XXX

Robt Stockton

New Jersey has several searchable databases, including one for Supreme Court Cases.  The databases can be found here:  http://www.nj.gov/state/archives/searchdatabases.html

It was easy to order and took about 2 weeks to receive.

Debbi

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The Probate Process

by Phyllis Young

At the January SWOGS meeting, Ellen John discussed the various steps of the probate process and some of the documents that are found in estate administration records.  She has done her homework – and more – as far as genealogical research is concerned.   The many hours she has spent in courthouses from Virginia and the Carolinas, through Kentucky and into Arkansas and Oklahoma sifting through dusty files and trying to read old and faded handwriting has led her to family members and stories that opened new trails to follow.

In her opening remarks, she explained that sometimes the richest and most revealing genealogy records are created after a person’s death.  The process of proving a will or being granted administration of the estate of a person who died intestate (without a will) often generated a series of probate records.   And it is those probate records that are some of the most valuable ones for the genealogist.  What can be found in them often answers questions that have been asked for several generations.

Here are some tips Ellen John offered for locating probate records.

References to the probate of a person’s estate will be listed in the will index book in the courthouse.  The entries in the index book refer you to pages in the will book.  The will that is recorded in the will book was copied from the original will by the court clerk who was supposed to record it accurately.  Remain alert as sometimes they did not.  The other documents pertaining to an estate that you find in the will book also have been copied from the original documents.

The original copies of estate probate papers were kept on file at the courthouse and might (repeat – might) still exist today, folded in packets or in file folders.  Some courthouse offices have disposed of original probate papers since the information was recorded in the will or probate books.  Sometimes they disposed of them because of lack of storage space.  Sometimes original probate papers have been turned over to the state or local archives.

If your ancestor did not make a will but owned property of enough value to probate, you should still look for his probate case.

Many of the large, official will and probate books at the courthouse have been microfilmed by the Mormon Church.  You can check the Family History Library Catalog at https://familysearch.org to find out if a will or probate index is available on microfilm for your particular county of interest.

Your ancestor’s will might also be listed in a will index or will abstract book in the Lawton Public Library’s Family History Room or the genealogy section of another public library.  You might also find that the will has been transcribed online or at least listed as part of some type of will index.  Do a Google search or check at http://usgenweb.org for the state and county of choice.  Some people have included will and probate documents in their family trees at Ancestry.com or on personal websites.

How did this probate package get created?

  •              The executor of the estate presented the will in court with proof that the deceased had signed the document.  The court approved the executor so that probate could begin.  (Existence of a will = testate estate)
  •              If there was no will, the principal heir petitioned the court for letters of  administration.  The court approved the administrator so that probate could begin. (No will = intestate estate)
  •              After approval of the executor in a testate estate or the administrator in an intestate estate, the probate process described below was the same.
  •              The executor / administrator posted bond equal to the estimated value of the estate.  At least two men who were sureties, or securities, and the executor / administrator signed the bond.
  •              The court appointed three to five disinterested people to inventory and appraise  all the property of the estate.  These were usually neighbors and often relatives          of the deceased who had no heirship.
  •              Sometimes an allowance was set aside for the widow and minor children from  a portion of the estate until the estate was settled or some cash was generated.
  •              A guardian was appointed by the court for a child or children not of legal age  who was referred to by the court as an “infant” or an “orphan.”  The “infant” did not live with the guardian.  The guardian’s role was to protect the child’s   legal rights and interests in the estate due him through his deceased parent.
  •              The report of sales of the estate usually listed each item sold and for how much. Many times this report listed the purchaser(s).  These names can be important  as they may be other family members.
  •              Various other reports directed by the court were submitted by the executor /  administrator and usually dealt with receipts and disbursements.
  •              Notices of publication were issued at various times, especially before the final settlement of the estate.
  •              After all debts were paid and money received from those who owed the estate, the balance was distributed to the heirs in accordance with the terms of the will or as determined by ­­­­­­­­­­­the administrator if the deceased died intestate.
  •              The original estate papers in a probate packet often contain signed receipts  from each heir, given when he received his portion of the estate.
  •              A final settlement report was presented to the court which ruled the estate as closed.

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From Genealogy Newsline #234:

FamilySearch is working with partners and the larger genealogical community to collect, digitize, and index millions of obituaries from the United States (with other nations to follow). This huge undertaking will ultimately make hundreds of millions of names of deceased individuals and information about their family relationships freely available for online research.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE, at: http://www.genealogyblog.com/?p=30586

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From Genealogy Newsline #234:  Beginning in 1987, the National Genealogical Society began publishing a series of state guides in the organization’s magazine, the Quarterly. These guides were later issued as special publications. The latest version of the series contains revised guides, plus additional states not included in the previous releases.Now, new for 2013, NGS has provided a slight twist to the “States Series” by adding a city and county based guide. Then again, considering the age and overall size of the city in question, it’s no wonder it got its own guide. Just released, and authored by Laura Murphy DeGrazia, is NGS Research in the States Series: New York City, Long Island, and Westchester County.

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The NEW ENGLAND GENEALOGICAL HISTORICAL SOCIETY has improved their website and online research help for people like me who will probably never get to visit their library. Membership ($75 a year) now is probably worth it.  See this:

http://www.americanancestors.org/

Record of Burials in the Dutch Church, New York, 1727-1803

Early Records of the Lutheran Church, New York, 1697-1771
Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (The Barbour Collection)

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NEHGS Database News

by Sam Sturgis, Digital Collections Administrator, and Christopher Carter, Digital Collections Coordinator

Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (The Barbour Collection)

Newly added to Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (The Barbour Collection): Hampton (1736-1851), Lisbon (1785-1850), Montville (1786-1850), and North Haven (1786-1854). Together, these towns add more than 9,000 records to this database. Compiled from an original Lucius Barnes Barbour typescript in the NEHGS special collections, this database currently contains records for 88 towns in Connecticut.

The complete Barbour Collection contains records of marriages, births, and deaths in 137 Connecticut towns from the 1640s to about 1850 (some towns include records up to 1870). These records were collected, transcribed, and abstracted by Lucius Barnes Barbour (Connecticut Examiner of Public Records, 1911-1934) and his team of researchers between 1918 and 1928. Mr. Barbour was an NEHGS member from 1907 until his death in 1934. This set of typescripts was donated to NEHGS by Mr. Barbour’s wife and children in 1938. Remaining towns will be added to the database over the next year.

Record of Burials in the Dutch Church, New York, 1727-1803

Early Records of the Lutheran Church, New York, 1697-1771

These databases were published originally as part of the Year Book of the Holland Society of New York, an organization founded in 1885 to record the history of New Netherland. “The Record of Burials in the Dutch Church, New York, 1727-1803,” was published in 1899. It contains more than 3,500 individual name records. “The Early Records of the Lutheran Church, New York, 1697-1771,” was published in 1903. It contains more than 3,000 individual name records relating to marriages and baptisms. Names of parents and spouses have been included for both record sets, when available.

Databases in Progress

The next update to the Barbour Collection of Connecticut vital records will include the towns of Bethlehem, Southbury, Warren, and Weston. In the near future, we will also be updating our New Hampshire vital records collection to include marriages that occurred between the years 1901 and 1937. Another database on the horizon is the Pioneer Irish of Onondaga, which contains genealogical information about Irish families who settled in Onondaga County, New York between 1776 and 1847.

NEHGS Database News

by Sam Sturgis, Digital Collections Administrator, and Christopher Carter, Digital Collections Coordinator

Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (The Barbour Collection)

Newly added to Connecticut Vital Records to 1870 (The Barbour Collection): Hampton (1736-1851), Lisbon (1785-1850), Montville (1786-1850), and North Haven (1786-1854). Together, these towns add more than 9,000 records to this database. Compiled from an original Lucius Barnes Barbour typescript in the NEHGS special collections, this database currently contains records for 88 towns in Connecticut.

The complete Barbour Collection contains records of marriages, births, and deaths in 137 Connecticut towns from the 1640s to about 1850 (some towns include records up to 1870). These records were collected, transcribed, and abstracted by Lucius Barnes Barbour (Connecticut Examiner of Public Records, 1911-1934) and his team of researchers between 1918 and 1928. Mr. Barbour was an NEHGS member from 1907 until his death in 1934. This set of typescripts was donated to NEHGS by Mr. Barbour’s wife and children in 1938. Remaining towns will be added to the database over the next year.

Record of Burials in the Dutch Church, New York, 1727-1803

Early Records of the Lutheran Church, New York, 1697-1771

These databases were published originally as part of the Year Book of the Holland Society of New York, an organization founded in 1885 to record the history of New Netherland. “The Record of Burials in the Dutch Church, New York, 1727-1803,” was published in 1899. It contains more than 3,500 individual name records. “The Early Records of the Lutheran Church, New York, 1697-1771,” was published in 1903. It contains more than 3,000 individual name records relating to marriages and baptisms. Names of parents and spouses have been included for both record sets, when available.

Databases in Progress

The next update to the Barbour Collection of Connecticut vital records will include the towns of Bethlehem, Southbury, Warren, and Weston. In the near future, we will also be updating our New Hampshire vital records collection to include marriages that occurred between the years 1901 and 1937. Another database on the horizon is the Pioneer Irish of Onondaga, which contains genealogical information about Irish families who settled in Onondaga County, New York between 1776 and 1847.

Letters 2/17/2014
Feel free to forward this free newsletter, as long as you state the origin. 

Mailouts: over 800 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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If you were unable to open the attachments for the minutes, reports and treasurer’s, here is a hotlink for Dropbox.

Treasurer: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/89092572/treasurer_2013.xlsx.pdf

 Minutes:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/89092572/2013%20Dutchminutes%3Areports/2013%20Minutes%20final.pdf

Final reports: 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/89092572/2013%20Dutchminutes%3Areports/2013%20reports.pdf

Please look it over and send in your comments.

carolyn

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woohoo!  Congrats to Dr. Schenck!

Carolyn

I see where Dr Bob Schenck 

( the speaker at the last gathering)

has been nominated to be the next President of the 

Holland Society of New York.

see below

Jim Cozine

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What has amazed me over the years is that Dutch ships’ names are often

translated into English. I can imagine that one wants to know what the

name means, but in several cases the name is simply changed. On

several websites and even in printed publications I found quotes that

the immigrant arrived on board of the “Spotted Cow” or on board of the

“Faith”, while the Dutch origin was not even mentioned (“Bontekoe” and

“Trouw”). I remember seeing a discussion whether the “Brindle Cow” and

the “Spotted Cow” were one and the same, or maybe two different ships.

I suggest we keep to the original Dutch names, it’s historically

correct and we can avoid any misunderstanding and confusion. And if

you somehow must translate the name of a ship, use the correct Dutch

name first, and put the “translated” name after it, in parentheses.

Regards,

Cor Snabel

The Netherlands

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From Judy Cassidy:  have a query I would like to put in the emails to the Cousins in the hopes that someone might recognize these people.  They don’t seem attached to those Vanarsdales we are familiar with and this certianly is not Captain Simon.  Perhaps they did not come with the rest of the Low Dutch from Conewago or Berkeley, but directly from New Jersey perhaps via Hampshire Virginia.  They knew the Kuykendall family of that state, so there may be a connection there.

In the 1800 census of Kentucky for Jefferson County was:

John and Simon VANNOISDAL.  The also spelled the name VANNORSDAL in Knox Co., Indiana and in Randolph County, Ill in the early 1800’s.  

If anyone recognizes these people I would appreciate hearing from you

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Jerry L Sampson‎,Harrodsburg Historical Society

On behalf of the Old Mud Meeting House Committee, we wish to thank, from the bottoms of our hearts, the estate and family of Kathleen O. Van Nuys. More details in the future. This is very good news.

(But he can tell us no more until the estate is settled)

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From Jim Cozine:  Check out this case at the NY Supreme Court on GOOGLE BOOKS

all about the land of another Cornelius Cozine b 1816 lived in Brooklyn without a will in 1902 – well worth looking at – we have all the genealogy right but 

this gives the address info and value of lands, etc. it goes on for some 96 plus pages of testimony, cross-examination and details – then the page nbrs start all over again with the ruling-  it’s like reading a family novel about the 1890s-1900 time frame. in the end it’s all about the money it seems. even shows the details of the entries in his bank account – these folks had a few bucks. estate valued at $9,500.

books.google.com/books?id=x8jBL0bkwpcC

1903

10. That on the 15th day of January 1900, Cor— nelius Cozine, the deceased, being then the owner thereof, with Elizabeth Cozine, his wife, conveyed by proper 

Sent 

 (From the New Netherland Institute)  

Friends of the Abraham Manee-Seguine Homestead

Petition by Save the Abraham Manee-Seguine Homestead

To be delivered to Bill De Blasio, Mayor of New York City

Dear Mayor De Blasio: 

The Abraham Manee House, also known as the Abraham Manee-Seguine Homestead, is a three-part Colonial Dutch dwelling that was designated a New York City landmark in 1984. Located on the South Shore of Staten Island on Purdy Avenue, and adjacent to Lemon Creek, the oldest section is a one-room structure built by Paulus Regrenier in the 1670s. An addition made of rubble-stone and Tabby, was added by Abraham Manee in the late 18th century. The Seguine family purchased the homestead in the 1780s and built an addition in the early part of the 19th century. 

It is purported to be one of the oldest Dutch structures on Staten Island and is threatened with demolition. 

Please allow the City of New York to purchase the Structure from the owner who is willing to sell it to the City, to preserve it for future generations of Staten Islanders. The present owner has purportedly said “Tell the City to buy it. I will give them a good price.”

There are currently 159 signatures. NEW goal – We need 200 signatures!

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Genealogy Program!

If you’re an Apple fan, don’t overlook the free iBooks Author software as an easy to use method of getting your family history published or shared. With this program you can drag and drop photos and other media files, add your own text and then publish your own family history quite easily! Try this link for more information: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ibooks-author/id490152466?mt=12.

By Tony Bandy, Internet Genealogy author

Don’t just live online. Many records and information you find online will lead you to a county courthouse, a battlefield, or a family cemetery. Take the time to walk where your ancestors walked and see their world with a new point of view.

By Lisa Elzey, Ancestry.com

 www.internet-genealogy.com.

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From Cor Snabel, The Netherlands

About Ship names

What has amazed me over the years is that Dutch ships’ names are often translated into English. I can imagine that one wants to know what the name means, but in several cases the name is simply changed. 

On several websites and even in printed publications I found quotes that the immigrant arrived on board of the “Spotted Cow” or on board of the “Faith”, while the Dutch origin was not even mentioned (“Bontekoe” and “Trouw”). I remember seeing a discussion whether the “Brindle Cow” and the “Spotted Cow” were one and the same, or maybe two different ships.

I suggest we keep to the original Dutch names, it’s historically

correct and we can avoid any misunderstanding and confusion. And if you somehow must translate the name of a ship, use the correct Dutch name first, and put the “translated” name after it, in parentheses.

Regards,

Cor Snabel

The Netherlands

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From Judy Cassidy:  Since many of the Dutch Cousins had ancestors who came to NN on the Bonte Koe, this might be of interest to them.  

William Ysbrandtszoom Bontekoe (June2 1587-1657,  was the skipper of a DUTCH EAST INDIA COMPANY [VOC] ship, the Bontekoe (probably named after him) who made only one voyage for the Company between 1618-1625, He became widely known because of the journal of adventures that was published in 1646 and later the first part of that Journal became a popular children’s book for boys called  The Cabin Boys of Bontekoe, This Bonte Koe was a VOC ship, [Note: OUR Bonte Koe belonged to the DUTCH WEST INDIA COMPANY, a very important difference.]

When WILLIAM BONTEKOE was 20 he took over the ship Bontekoe from his father, and in 1617 the ship was taken by the Barbary pirates and he ended up in a slave market, he was bought free but the ship was lost.  In 1618 he enlisted in the service of the VOC and on a voyage to Java he was shipwrecked along with part of his crew and continued in a life boat.  Eventually they reached Batavia on Java and he was given a new command and order to harass the Chinese Coast.  He kept the Journal later published.  The VOC operated in the Pacific Ocean area, the spice islands etc. If you want to read more, try Wikipedia, it is quite an adventure. The WIC operated in the Atlantic.

 The Dutch East India Company [VOC] and the Dutch West India Company [WIC].  But they were totally separate, run by different investors and Directors. The land they colonized, the ships they sailed, the freight they carried all belonged to their specific company.  Each had a total monopoly on their routes, their colonies, their ships etc.  Free enterprise by anyone else of Dutch extraction was not permitted with out the  permission of the Amsterdam Council or Directors of each company located in Amsterdam. 

 

 Curacao was the hub of their shipping in the Carribean with items such as bacon, food goods, settlers and other needed items being transported in to Curcaco and other colonies and Slaves, sugar, horses, citrus, conch etc being shipped back to the Netherlands and various colonies. This was the port where ships from other counties came to buy as well and Vice Director, Matthias Beck kept extremely detailed reports which can be read on line to day, they are very interesting and well written. Matthias Beck  the Vice Director in Curacao could have been a novelist in another life.  If  you enjoy the early history of NN and the Netherlands, this is a great read.  Dr. Charles L. Gehring translated it from the original documents so this is a typed copy.

Both the WIC and the VOC  populated their colonies who they brought over to settle the area.  The ship Bonte Koe, may well have been named for the Skipper mentioned above but this was not his ship, this ship belonged to the Dutch West india Company or the WIC. The date 16 April 1663 was when it departed from Amsterdam, not its arrival in NN which was between May and August in 1663.  The Bonte Koe did transport freight and settlers to Curacao and other ports, it simply didn’t travel between Amsterdam and NN.

The Bonte Koe made two trips to NN, the first in 1660 which carried both passengers and soldiers, the second The captain of the Bonte Koe in 1663 was Capt. Jan Bergen departing

 

http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/files/4013/5543/9329/CuracaoPapers.pdf

It is important when you are writing about the Ship Bonte Koe not to translate the name and if you do you should note that fact.  The Ship was never called the Spotted or Brindled Cow, EVER in the Netherland era, someone translated it thinking it was quaint.

Pietro of Dutch Colonies sent this information to me.

There’s even a move about the Bonte Koe, filmed in 2007:

“The Young Shiphands of the Bonte Koe”

http://www.maxon.net/en/customer-stories/movies/singleview/article/de-scheep

sjongens-of-bontekoe.html

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Letters 2/25/2014

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The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2013 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

Illinois General Assembly to Consider the “Access to Cemeteries Act”

Illinois State representative Charles E. Meier introduced a piece of legislation this week to require owners of private property on which a cemetery or graves are located to allow access by family members of the deceased. Specifically, it states:

“Provides that owners of private property on which a cemetery or graves are located have a duty to allow ingress and egress to the cemetery or graves by: (1) family members and descendants of deceased persons buried there; (2) any cemetery plot owner; and (3) any person engaging in genealogy research who has given reasonable notice to the owner of record or to the occupant of the property or both. Provides that a landowner may not erect a wall, fence, or other structure or device that prevents ingress and egress to the cemetery or grave unless the wall, fence, or other structure or device has a gate or other means by which ingress and egress can be accomplished.”

This is a PROPOSED bill and does have to go through the legislative process before it can become law. You can read the full text of the proposed act in the Illinois General Assembly web site at http://goo.gl/cxpiQ0.

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From Bill  Davidson of Potsdam, NY (RIKER DESCENDANT!)

Hello, Carolyn,

The remarks, 2/8/2014, on probate records were excellent and everyone should print and save them for future reference.  The potential for extraordinary detail in the Letters of Administration when a person has died without a will is tremendous.

An experience of mine which leads to another suggestion.

I searched for the will of a late 18th century Philadelphia, PA brassfounder and found it in the Probate records at City Hall, Center City.  But not the will of his brassfounder son.  Probate Office staff told me that intestate estates were administered by the Orphans Court and that those records were in the Philadelphia City Archives, two blocks from the 28th Street Station (AMTRAK and transit) on the west side of the Schuykill River.

The Orphans Court records for the brassfounder son revealed that he had been very successful in business; he owned a dozen rental properties and held a dozen mortgages.  His estate, in 1836, was valued by the Orphans Court at $114,211.78.  Professor John J. McCusker’s Composite Commodity Price Index enabled us to determine that the 2000 AD value of that estate would be $5,984,959.70.

I would recommend that everyone purchase Prof. McCusker ‘s book; How Much Is That In Real Money?; A Historical Commodity Price Index for Use as a Deflator of Money Values in the Economy of the United States; American Antiquarian Society, second edition revised and enlarged, 2001, pb, 142 pp., ISBN 1-929545-01-0. You will learn also, what several historians did not know when they published, that most of the American colonies had their own currencies, in pounds/ shillings/pence, before, during and after the American Revolution until the mid 19th century.  You may have encountered, L/s/d transactions during and after the Am. Rev. and puzzled over the apparent continued use of the British pound sterling; twarn’t so!  Even the U.S. government, in Philadelphia, was making purchases in ‘L/s/d, Pennsylvania Currency’ in 1792. All of those currencies and the Continental dollar, the U.S. dollar, the British pound sterling and the western European countries were

based on the Spanish milled dollar.

Interested readers may e-mail me and I will explain why the Continental dollar was expressed in ninetieths and thirds and the easy way to convert those currencies.

A fascinating subject, to me, but I will stop now.

I hope this will be helpful.

I would mention that the will of my ancestor, Captain Abraham Riker, who died at Valley Forge in 1778, is in the New York State Archives, Albany, NY.

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From Barb Terhune, DeBary FL

a Twenty-first Century – New Amsterdam, New York, USA ?????

My opinion – It will never happen.   But I DO love the proposed name !!!!!

If interested, read more here:

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/feb/17/secession-movement-in-new-york-pushes-for-big-appl/

“…A movement is afoot to split New York into two regions — upstate and downstate — to acknowledge the gaping philosophical differences and improve representation….

The upstate region tentatively would be named New Amsterdam — after the 17th-century Dutch settlement on Manhattan Island that eventually became New York City — and would comprise the state’s remaining 53 counties, including the state capital of Albany….”

AND 

http://www.newamsterdamny.org/

HERE’S the proposed Map: the “must see” Proposed Map at:

http://www.newamsterdamny.org/about.html

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From Tamara Fulkerson

Love this story: 200-yr-old Bible reveals family history bit.ly/1co7Cnb 

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WDRB) — The recent discovery of a 200-year-old Bible brought a Kentucky woman to tears. Inside, it holds living proof of a family history that had been lost for generations. 

From the Netherlands, to a flea market in Virginia Beach, and back to Lexington: a piece of history makes its journey home.

Clark said the Dutch Bible belonged to her great-great-grandfather, Hendriks Albert Sprik. Born in 1808, Sprik carried the world with him on a steamship as he immigrated from the Netherlands to Grand Rapids, Mich., with his wife, Trientje Sprik, in 1874.

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http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/research/research-resources/guide-to-dutch-manuscripts-relating-to-new-netherland-in-u-s-repositories/

The guide to searching the Guide to Dutch Manuscripts in its electronic form is now on our website.

The Guide to Dutch Manuscripts Relating to New Netherland is an online catalog of primary source material located in repositories throughout the United States. The purposes of the Guide are to 1) describe relevant documents and collections and 2) provide researchers with their location.

The dates of the material extend from the earliest years of Dutch West India Company activity in New Netherland to the final handover to the English in 1674.[1] The language of the material is Dutch with the exception of English language notations and endorsements added at a later date to certain documents. 

Originally compiled in 1977 and 1978 by Dr. Charles Gehring, the Guide was updated in 2010–2012 under a project of the New Netherland Research Center and the New York State Archives with support from the New Netherland Institute and the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The project included digitization of the Guide to meet current archival standards. 

The resulting catalog records describe approximately 850 manuscripts in thirty repositories. Each record includes a variety of metadata, including Title, Author, Subject, and Geographic Terms. It identifies where the manuscript may be accessed in its original or in alternative physical and/or digital formats. It also identifies the physical and digital availability of transcriptions and translations.

Researchers may access the Guide online through the New York State Library/Archives/Museum Catalog. Please see our Searching the Guide to Dutch Manuscripts for an overview of how to focus your search on material in the Guide. Also see our List of Repositories for instructions on how to search or browse by repository. 

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From Jim Cozine, Barbara Cozine, Carolyn Leonard:  

Barbara

cc Carolyn

I have a copy of this work – it is of little use for family history.

This is the John Cozine that made the trip & wrote it..

     1799 John C Cozine 1847    (line 480 on the hard copy tree)

The Dutch Cousins visited the house he grew up in there

in Harrodsburg one year

Jim

1828 -John C. Cozine, son of Johannis “John” Cozine of Mercer Co KY and nephew of Garrit Cozine, was author of a travel diary that he wrote on a trip to New York City. He wrote the diary on horseback. Purpose of the trip was to check on some money believed owed to the Cozine family.138-ctx-.tiff The day-book account of John C. Cozine : a journey from Harrodsburg, Kentucky, to New York, and return, September 10th through November 27th, 1828.

I reviewed the book at the University library in Lexington a few years ago.  Not much help on Cozine history, but In the diary, John C. Cozine, grandson of Rev. Cornelius, goes to Owasco, NY and near Auburn NY.  He mentions some familiar names.

He speaks of his cousin HANNAH BODINE (page 19). His cousin Abraham BODINE and wife Nelly, the dau of Jacques Fontine (FONTAINE). cousin Peter BODINE (pg 24) (these would probably be descendants of Rev. Cornelius Cozine’s daughter Lumentje “Lune” who married John Bodine.)

He spoke of an aunt who looks like her sister Ellen. He mentioned his cousin Peter and wife Susan. (His father’s sisters: Probably the sister would be Ellen Cozine Vanarsdale, AND the aunt who looks like Ellen could be Lune Bodine who moved to NY.)

He mentioned “old Mother PARCEL,” his mother’s Aunt Moria PARCEL, the widow VANHAELEN, Mrs. Amerman. (page 22); also Richard PARCELS (pg 24), Aunt Maria PARCEL, her daughter and his old uncle. (pg 25) The uncle went to New Jersey in 1822 with their son David who died there at the age of 47. (pg 26) (John C. Cozine’s mother was Hannah SMOCK, daughter of John and Sara “Sally” FONTAINE.)

John Brokour (BROKAW) and his afflicted family: 3 daughters, one is nearly helpless, one’s mind is disordered and the third is entirely crazy. (pg 24) (REV. Cornelius’ youngest daughter Maria Cozine married Abraham BROKAW and they apparently remained in PA.)

Page 23 – Mr. John DEMAREE. MR. Jacob BRINKERHOFFs & James VANARSDALL (pg 25). Mr. Johnson & Vandervoort family (pg 28); Peter Wiecoff (WYCKOFF), Uncle Peter COZINE and wife Willy.(pg 28). (John C’s uncle Peter Cozine married Willempie “Willie” Wyckoff, but Peter died in 1779 – 48 years before! The widow “Willie” married second to Abraham VOORHEES (Voris))

Since you brought this to mind, I will post this to the next “Letters” in hopes it might help someone else tho it didn’t help us.

Hugs, Carolyn

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Pieter Wolfersen van Couwenhoven was first nominated for the position of

orphan master at New Amsterdam on 19 October 1655.

From: E Johnson

Sent: 23/02/2014 16:38

To: Dutch Colonies

Subject: Re: [DUTCH-COLONIES] Maria du Trieux

I don’t know what book this comes from, but maybe someone else here can

supply the reference. It’s probably mentioned in D-Col archives.

What happened is, two married people had an affair, resulting in a child.

Maria du Trieux (married at the time for 3 years with Cornelis Volkertsen

Viele) and Pieter Wolphertsen van Couwenhoven (married Dec 1640 to Hester

Simons) had a daughter Annetje.

Acknowledgement of paternity of Maria Truax’s child by a man other than her

husband (1642, New Amsterdam):

I, the undersigned Pieter Wolphersen, hereby acknowledge for myself, my

heirs and successors that this day, date underwritten, I have adopted, as I

do hereby adopt, Aeltjem Pieters van Couwenhoven, my own daughter, whom I

have begotten and procreated by Maria de Truy, promising therefore that

from this date I shall do by the above-named, my daughter, as a god fearing

father is bound and ought to do by his own legitimate daughter; therefore,

I hereby discharge and release Cornelis Volckersen, husband and guardian of

the aforesaid Maria de Truy, from all charges and responsibilities

incidental to the bringing up of a child till she becomes of age; I, Pieter

Wolphersen, promising to look after the child, to let her learn to read and

to bring her up according to my means. Furthermore, if I do not beget any

children by my present wife, the above named child shall be my rightful

heiress and inheritrix, as if she were duly begotten in lawful wedlock, and

if it happen that children be begotten by me and my wife, the above named

Aeltjen Pieters shall receive, like the legitimate children on my side, a

just child’s portion of all such goods, means and effects as it shall

please the Lord God Almighty to bestow on me. Requesting that this may have

effect before all courts, I have signed this without fraud in the presence

of the subscribing witnesses hereto invited. Done, the 7th day of January

1642.

This is x the mark of

Pieter Wolphersen

Jacob Couwenhoven

Philippe du Trieux

Acknowledged before me,

Cornelis van Tienhoven, Secretary

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The source for your first entry (Pieter Wolphersen’s acknowledgement of

paternity) is:

Van Laer, Arnold J.F.. Register of the Provincial Secretary, 1642-1647. New

York Historical Manuscripts, Vol. 2. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing

Co., Inc., 1974, pages 6-7

The baptisms of Maria du Trieux’s first two children by Cornelis

Volkertszen Viele are in the New Amsterdam RDC are are recorded as:

27 May 1640 – Aernoudt; parent: Marie du Trieux; witnesses: Isaac de

Foreest, Teunniis Cray, Schippr; & Jan Cant

5 Feb 1643 – Cornelis; parent: Cornelis Volckertszen; witnesses: Philip du

Trieux, Anneken Bogardus, Gerrit Molenaer

These can be found in The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record,

volume 5 (1874), pages 28 and 32.

The overwhelming majority of baptism records from this early time only

recorded the name of one parent, and almost always the father, so the fact

that Aernoudt’s record only names his mother is unusual, and perhaps he was

illegitimate as well. He is said to have had the name Aernoudt Cornelisz

Viele throughout his adulthood (but I have not researched this, nor can I

confirm this myself). There is no marriage record for Maria and Cornelis

Volkertszen. It is conceivable that they were unmarried when Aernoudt was

born, but then married when Cornelis was born, OR, it may be that Cornelis

Volkertszen was not the father of Aernoudt, and that Aernoudt simply took,

or was known by, his step-father’s name.

The illegitimate daughter Aeltje (or Alida) Pieterse was born between her

two half-brothers, as Pieter Wolphersen’s acknowledgement is dated 7 Jan

1642. The acknowledgement refers to her as Aeltje/Aeltjen Pieters (not

Annetje).

According to Howard S.F. Randolph (ed. from a manuscript by T. de T.

Truax). “The House of Truax,” New York Genealogical and Biographical Record

Vol.57, 58 (1926, 1927) at 58:78, the illegitimate daughter was named

Aeltje (Alida), and she first married Ludovicus Cobus, and married second

Dirk Ofmulder. Randolph cites Jonathan Pearson’s First Settlers of

Schenectady, pp. 45-46, for this. Both of these works have errors, but I

have not seen Maria du Trieux’s daughter, Aeltje (Alida) referred to as

Annetje. Perhaps, if your source for this name and placement is correct,

she (Annetje) is an otherwise unknown daughter of Pieter Wolphersen van

Couwenhoven.

Lincoln C. Cocheu, “The Van Kouwenhoven-Conover Family,” New York

Genealogical and Biographical Record Vol.70-71,81-83 (1939-40, 1950-52), at

70:356. gives Pieter a daughter, Hester, by his first wife Hester Symons.

But this may not be correct, as the only record of Hester is the appearance

of a Hester Van Couwenhoven as a witness at the baptism of Johannis, child

of Frans Jansen and Marritie Gerrits (New Amsterdam RDC, 5 Jan 1663). This

witness may actually be Pieter’s wife Hester Symons, and not a daughter.

Cocheu also repeats the claim that Pieter’s daughter Aeltje was married

first to Ludovicus Cobus and second to Dirk Ofmuller. (He cites “Miss Tam

Denyse Conover, Sect., Van Kouwenhoven-Conover Family Association,

Englishtown, N.J.).

On 22 Nov 1665 (after the above baptism date in which Hester is a witness),

Pieter married his second wife, Aeltje Sibrants. Both are described as

widowers in the marriage record (NY RDC).

The only other confirmed child of Pieter Wolphersen van Couwenhoven, was

his son Pieter, baptized 27 Feb 1669, New York; parents: Pieter Van

Couwenhoven, Aeltie Sibrants;  sponsors: Jacob Van Couwenhoven, Cornelis

Pluvier, Magdalena Van Couwenhoven. He lived in Gloucester Co., NJ and left

a will dated 10 Nov 1700 and proved 21 Mar 1704/05. Some of his children

are seen with the name as Conover and Covenhoven and they married spouses

named Adams and Risley whose origins were in Hartford, Connecticut.

More research would have to be done, but for now, I would have doubts about

the notion that Aeltje Pieterse was the Annetje Pieters van Couwenhoven of

Delaware. I would tend to think that Annetje would more likely be a

previously unknown daughter of Pieter Wolphersen van Couwenhoven.

And finally, regarding Maria du Trieux, she was baptized at the Walloon

Church in Leiden on 5 April 1617, so I do not see the possibility that her

mother was Native American.

Although it does not solve anything, I hope the above can be of some help.

Chris Chester

—————————————-

Chris and List

I don’t think the birth of Aeltje occurred as a result of an affair between

two married persons. I think her birthdate was likely much early, possibly

1634/35 when Marritje was just a teenager, possibly 17-18 and Pieter a few

years older. Because the registers of the New Amsterdam Reformed Dutch

Church baptisms don’t begin until 1639, I have nothing to confirm this but

Aeltje likely married first to Ludovicus Cobes and had a daughter Maritje

who would likely have been born about 1655 since she married Johanes Cleyn

and had children born in the late 1670’s. Why Pieter would have waited so

long to acknowledge a daughter is uncertain but I believe she was born much

earlier than 1641.

As for the marriage of Marytje de Trieux to Cornelis Volckertsen, they may

have married as early as 1636. There is a record in the archives of the

West India Company where Cornelis was in Amsterdam appearing before the

Amsterdam Chamber of the WIC on 18 February 1636, having a power of

attorney from Phillipe de Trieux to collect his wages from the Company. It

does not call Phillipe his father-in-law and the power of attorney is

before the earliest surviving records of New Netherland. Evidently Cornelis

was a merchant\soldier and he may stayed in Amsterdam in 1636 as he is

mentioned in November 1636 before the WIC having come to the fatherland as

a sailor on *den Endracht* but  who couldn’t be paid as his name wasn’t

found on the Ships Book. So Cornelis and Marytje could have married prior

to 1636 and there may have been additional children than those baptised in

the Dutch Chuch. I’ve theorized that Wyntje Cornelis who married Paulus

Jansen and lived at Albany and Schenectady might have been a child of this

couple. They had a son and daughter Cornelis and Marytje as well as a son

Arnout. That name is particular to the Viele family and very uncommon but I

haven’t found anything definite to prove this.

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Check out the latest Federation of Genealogical Societies newsletter:  (free)

http://us5.campaign-archive2.com/?u=abebe65784f20abe33d765f2e&id=025709db14&e=0495f97525

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Letters 3/10/2014

Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so I use a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net

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From Joyce Gendill:  Interesting info.  Thanks for sharing!

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From Jeannine Long: Here I was, enjoying reading all about the Dutch, New Amsterdam, etc., by clicking the link in your email, and up popped the name of my 8th great grandfather Philippe du Trieux.

 

From my files:  “…Phillipe Du Trieux was a Walloon who lived in Amsterdam and who came to New Amsterdam in 1624 and built a house either on a lane that is now Beaver Street or on a lane that is now Pearl Street — the historians aren’t sure which.”

 

When I was in New York in 2004, I got off a bus to go to the ferry for Ellis Island, looked up and saw a street sign that said “Pearl Street.”  Naturally I took a photo of it and everyone thought I was nuts, taking pictures of street signs!

 

Phillipe had a daughter Maria, and since he signed the legal document about “Maria,” who had a child out of wedlock, I’m guessing that was his daughter.

 

Thought all the info that was available via your email was just fascinating.  I’ll have to go back and read it all more thoroughly.  Good work!

 

Jeannine (a Mayflower descendant cousin also!)

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UPDATE ON OLD MUD MEETING HOUSE (from the Harrodsburg Historical Society newsletter March/April 2014)

Things are progrressing smoothly in the continual restoration of Old Mud. Indirect lighting has been installed over the ceiling beams and accessible with a wall switch. Kentucky Heritage Council has allowed a new metal roof for the schoolhouse adjacent to the meetinghouse and work will commence soon.

A sincere thank you to the descendants of these early Dutch settlers and the estate of Kathleen O. Van Nuys, for remembering Old Mud in her will.

also, additional rolls of microfilm are still needed.  Please consider making a tax-deductible donation of this invaluable research source. These records were removed from Mercer County to Frankfort when they tore down the courthouse to build a new one. The records cover the years from 1780 to 1865 and cost $23 per roll. We have only 257 of the 438 total. Additional purchases will be acknowledged in future Ledgers.

——————————————————————-

Hi Carolyn, I am having trouble finding someone who may or may not be living.  My great grandfather, Alford VanArsdall, had a half brother, Henry Forrest Vanarsdell.  He went by Forrest.  Forrest lived in Indianapolis, Indiana until his death on Aug 1, 1973.  His wife, Grace Marie Kershaw Vanarsdell passed away in Jan 1984.  They had no children and she left everything to one of her niece’s.  I have been unable to find out who this niece is.  Do you or anybody else have any suggestions on how to find out what her name is?  Thank you, Mark VanArsdall

———————————————

From Della Ford Nash:

Vol 39, no 1, Autumn 2003, page 36 Kentucky Ancestors

Near South Louisville, Lillie Van Arsdale, 16 years old, was struck by a train and killed while on her way to school.

 

Just in case you don’t have this.

Copied from Dutch-Colonies List

Subject: [DUTCH-COLONIES] Reformed Dutch Church vs Dutch Reformed Church Date: March 6, 2014 8:04:43 PM CST

This has been on my mind all day – it seems to me entirely reasonable to say Dutch Reformed Church – as someone pointed out if you said “Reformed Dutch Church” it sounds as though it was the Dutch Church specifically that

had been reformed!

But there was a French Reformed Church in N.A., and when the Demarest family moved to Bergen, they donated land for a French Reformed Church. This was known as the “French Church at Kinderkamack”, tho it only lasted from 1682 until 1696,  The little French cemetery remains.  After that the Demarests, Duries, and others joined a Dutch Reformed Church known as the “Church on the Green” in Hackensack.  The English Reformed Church in Amsterdam was the Pilgrims’ church.

Also – there was reference to Martin Luther in connection with the church – not so.  John Calvin was the theologian connected to the Reformed church, and his theology as regards predestination and the sovereignty of God in

connection with salvation differs a lot from Lutheranism.  The Presbyterians represented the similar view for the English speaking Reformed believers.

Most interesting discussion!

Regina Haring

Nanuet, NY

http://www.dutchdoorgenealogy.comid

—————————————————

My understanding is that the Dutch Reformed Church and the French Reformed Church were essentially the same, both based on Calvinism.

==David Smock

——————————–

juliasgenes <juliasgenes@yahoo.com> wrote:

This is from the website of the DRC/RC/RDC of Shawangunk, Ulster, New York. The official name given (Reformed Church Congregations in America) seems to be rather stretchy, able to include a mix of those name variants:

“The Reformed Church of Shawangunk founded in 1753 is the oldest church still in use in the Reformed Church Congregations in America, the oldest denomination in the United States. . .”

http://www.shawangunkreformed.org/index.htm

There were also a few German Reformed/Reformed German Churches scattered about the North American Palatine enclaves. An example is the “Brick Church” in Montgomery, Orange, New York. It’s my understanding (correct me

if I’m wrong) that the teachings were very similar to exactly the same, only preached in the German language. I think so  because I remember reading where Dominies rode circuits between the DRC/RDC and the GRC.

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FROM JUDY CASSIDY:  Please share with the list group.

Today I was going over footnotes for the project I am working on, The History of Low Dutch Slaves, and I realized that some of the citations, such as in possession of Arthur Weaner, for say unrecorded deeds, are no longer applicable.  I called the Adams Co. His. Soc., and spoke to the Director, Ben Neely, to see if they had finished cataloging Arthurs material. They have not.  The ACHS took the boxes from the Milk House, but left the metal filing cabinets as the family wanted to keep them as they had his notes from a book he apparently wrote on the Cashman family.  But the question in my mind, were the unrecorded deeds kept there also.  I asked Ben if he also received the notes and other information Arthur used in his Taxables Book, and he thought so, perhaps they might also be included there and he thought perhaps they had but was uncertain. A lot of material is still in the boxes.

The most important unrecorded deed of course is the Low Dutch Congregation Unrecorded Deed, Wilamis Hocdail to Petter Canine, 4 acres 154 perches, Straban Townhip, 2 August 1791, and this would be for the SECOND church located near Latshells Tavern on todays route 30. I don’t know if anyone ever had an opportunity to receive a xeroxed a copy of that document, and or the other unrecorded deeds in Arthur’s possession, but if so, please consider making a copy or copies and sending one copy to Harrodsburg and the other to the Adams County Historical Society, 368 Springs Ave. Gettysburg, PA 17325 and mark it to the attention of Ben Neely.

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This is SO AMAZING I just HAVE TO SHARE IT.

A virtual tour of the Smithsonian Museum room by room.

click here:

http://www.mnh.si.edu/vtp/1-desktop/

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FromGenealogy Newsline Vol 1 #27, Monday, September 26, 2011; a publication of Family Roots Publishing Co. LLC.

Find Your Kentucky Roots at KHS’s New Online Genealogy Magazine

The following news release is from the Kentucky Historical Society website:

Kentucky-Ancestors-Online.jpg

Monday, February 24, 2014: Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) today announced the launch of its new online family history magazine, Kentucky Ancestors Online (KAO). This free electronic magazine, or e-zine, represents the latest evolution in KHS publications and continues the long-respected legacy of the former print journal, Kentucky Ancestors.

The transition of the 40-year-old print publication to an online publication took shape last fall, with the goal of reaching a wider audience and of presenting new genealogy stories and information on an ongoing, rather than a quarterly basis. KAO incorporates high-quality feature articles and a continuing spirit of learning and engagement, with such additional elements as history mysteries, case studies, book notes, collections corner, trending topics, how-to articles and commentary.

READ THE FULL Article: http://www.genealogyblog.com/?p=30896

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(copied from Dutch-Colonies info)

There is a family myth amongst tens of thousands of American families: “The name was changed at Ellis Island.” The stories claim the immigrant arrived at Ellis Island and was unable to communicate with the officials. A record was then created by some official who assigned the immigrant a new name.

That is a great story but is always false. This fairy tale refuses to die.The people at Ellis Island did not generally create any documents whatsoever unless someone was held over for days for further examination. Even then, many interpreters, themselves frequently immigrants, speaking multiple languages, worked every day at Ellis Island with more on call for the more obscure languages. Nobody was railroaded because they didn’t speak English. If he was detained and a record was somehow erroneously created, your friend was under no obligation whatsoever to continue using that version unless he wanted to. Ask him to show you the document that changed his name.

Passenger lists were never created at Ellis Island. They were created abroad, beginning close to the immigrant’s home, when the immigrant purchased his ticket for the ship.

The passenger manifests were created by the steamship line’s clerks, prior to sailing. After arrival, the immigration agents merely checked off the names on the manifests to ensure that the person actually arrived and matched the ship’s record. That’s why manifests have all those check-marks on them. Your friend has a good yarn, go ahead and enjoy it, but facts don’t support his claim. However, the true story told below is  VERY interesting!

* “Why Your Family Name Was Not Changed at Ellis Island (and One That Was)”http://www.nypl.org/blog/2013/07/02/name-changes-ellis-island

Folks assume their ancestors came through Ellis Island. Actually that was the inspection station for immigrants only from 1892 to 1954. Before that, it was Castle Island from 1855 to 1890. Earlier, you just came. You weren’t inspected.

———————————————

from  Mary Townsend Bates

FYI, here is the grave marker for my great grandfather who is buried in Danville, KY.  He married two times and is buried with his second wife.  The Bellevue Cemetery has a plot and one of his son’s is buried there also with his wife.  They are Baker Ewing Terhune and Katherine Drye Terhune and my mother and father Louise Fiddler Terhune Townsend and Arlie Louis Townsend.

Was your Dutch ancestor at Valley Forge? Many of them were. The Valley Forge Muster Roll, a project of the

nonprofit Friends of Valley Forge Park, can help you find out. By using kiosks at the park visitor center or a

searchable database online, you can determine what regiments were present during the Valley Forge encampment.

(Regiments were present from Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampshire,

New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia.) You can also search for particular soldiers by last

name or partial last name. The information in the Valley Forge Muster Roll has been compiled from original muster

rolls, payroll records, pensions, letters, orders, and other contemporary primary documents.

Valley Forge National Historical Park, located twenty miles northwest of Philadelphia, is famous for serving

as the encampment site of the Continental Army from December 1777 through June 1778. The approximately 12,000 troops under the command of General George Washington built a city of 2,000+ log huts. In addition to foraging and seeing to their own needs, the men patrolled and drilled. The National Park Service brochure speculates that “Perhaps the most important outcome of the encampment was the army’s maturation into a more professional force.” Former Prussian officer Baron Friedrich von Steuben arrived in February 1778 and led a training program “that gave the troops a new sense of purpose and helped sustain them through many trials as they stuck to the task of securing independence.” The eighteen-minute orientation film, “Valley Forge: A Winter Encampment,” shown at the park’s theater, can be viewed online; shorter YouTube videos on specific topics related to Valley Forge can be seen here.

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More than 1 million FamilySearch genealogical records are now discoverable in WorldCat, the world’s largest

database of records representing resources in libraries worldwide. Links to WorldCat are now available on
FamilySearch.org.

Many FamilySearch records added to WorldCat represent large collections of vital information, such as birth and death
records from localities all over the world. If digitized, these records link back to FamilySearch.org where they can be
viewed online. If on film, these records can be requested from FamilySearch to a satellite or affiliate FamilySearch Family
History Center. FamilySearch records with a corresponding WorldCat record will indicate a library or libraries that hold
the item.

———————————————

 

Carolyn,

Sure wish I could be there for Dr. Van’s presentation.  Would mean a lot to me.

If you remember, my husband Joe was a WWII veteran.  He was on Omaha

Beach on D-Day, and then was injured at the Battle of Saint Lo about a

month later and was airlifted out to a hospital in England where he

was a patient for 5 1/2 months. He fought in 4 major campaigns.

Ruby Bishop Ingram, Kentucky

———————————————-

Halvor Moorshead passed away on Friday, March 7, 2014. Halvor is best known within the genealogical community

for foundingFamily Chronicle, and later Internet Genealogy. However, he also founded History Magazine, as well as
a number of other magazines.

———————————————-
Letters 3/18/2014

Feel free to forward this newsletter, as long as you state the origin.

Mailouts: over 800 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

 

Blessings, carolyn

———————————————–

Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so the mass mailer program switches to a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net

————————————————————————————

Dear Carolyn,

I like getting the newsletters and maintaining contact. Bob and I have moved to Tulsa and we miss our friends in OKC. Linda O’Hern

————————————

Received from Administrator of zoominternet.

Your message was rejected for the following reason:

5.7.1 Message blocked due to spam content in the message

The following recipients did not receive this message:  <benttree@zoominternet.net>

I have had no problem receiving any of the messages, so I am not going to get another email address!  It has to be something with the way you are sending it, that makes them think it is spam.  I have had this same email address from the very beginning and well before the start of your mailing list, and have no desire to add another email address to contend with.  This one is the one I use for all genealogy.  If you remove my email address, so be it.  I deal in 100’s of genealogy emails daily, with no other problems getting messages.

Nancy Bender

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From Barbie Hamman, Event coordinator for Dutch Cousins 2015:

I’ve been so busy, but thank you for making me stop and answer you.

I’m so proud to have been chosen by my cousins to be the Event Coordinator, and I really am working on that.  I’ve been in contact with Crystal King from Capital Plaza Hotel and have an appointment with her next week to meet her and work on some details.  They can accommodate us on the weekend we’ve asked (September 24-Sept. 27, 2015) and I can ask for another one if we need to change the date.   I really want this weekend to be a Bang-Up one if we get to re-dedicate Old Mud.  Please feel free to contact me with any questions you or anyone else has.  I’m also going to be checking on other hotels in the area for prices, dates, etc. but haven’t gotten that far yet.  Again, thank you for this opportunity and since crawling out of some of the snow, maybe I can get more stuff together.

Hugs to you and all my cousins!

Barbie

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FOR MORE INFO:  CONTACT JIM COZINE

I have the honor and pleasure to invite all Holland Society Members, Friends and Fellows to the Paas Heritage Ball sponsored by the Saint Nicholas Society of the City of New York and the Society of Daughters of Holland Dames.  This wonderful evening, which I was pleased to attend last year, is an absolutely delightful affair and will be held on Friday, April 4, 2014, starting with a wonderful cocktail reception at the Racquet and Tennis Club, 370 Park Avenue in New York City.  A formal invitation is attached for your convenience, and I can assure you that many of our Dutch colleagues will be in attendance.  Many of you have met Mrs. Elbrun Kimmelman and her husband, Peter, at our annual banquets in recent years.  The Dames are a   wonderful organization, and I strongly endorse joining the Holland Dames for this very important evening.

Wishing you all the best,

Charles Zabriskie, Jr.

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Sent: Sunday, March 09, 2014 4:39 PM

To: dutch-colonies@rootsweb.com

Subject: Re: [DUTCH-COLONIES] The Church

So, to summarize, did we all decide to call it the “Dutch Reformed Church

(DRC)” or something else? It’s going to be hard for me to switch from “RDC”.

 

Go with whatever you are comfortable with. After all, we’re citing in

English a church organization that had a Dutch name, so in either case it

isn’t the “original” name. The word Dutch really only indicates the language

of the service and the country they called their ministers from; the only

difference from the German Reformed and French Reformed churches was the

language. They were all Calvinist. The same is true of the Congregationalist

Church, whose worshippers on Long Island in the 17th century were served by

both Congregationalist and Presbyterian (Scotch Calvinist) ministers.

Actually there were two groups in England, those that wanted to reform the

Church of England and were called here Puritans, and those who wanted

nothing to do with the Church of England —  Plymoth Rock’s Pilgrims.

As to what was the oldest church in the present 50 states, I would suspect

there were Roman Catholic churches in the southwest and west in the 1500s.

Someone might want to take that on for a homework assignment and tell us all

about it in class tomorrow.

Peter

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FROM MARK VANARSDALL:

Hi Carolyn, I am having trouble finding someone who may or may not be living. My great grandfather, Alford VanArsdall, had a half brother, Henry Forrest Vanarsdell. He went by Forrest. Forrest lived in Indianapolis, Indiana until his death on Aug 1, 1973. His wife, Grace Marie Kershaw Vanarsdell passed away in Jan 1984. They had no children and she left everything to one of her niece’s. I have been unable to find out who this niece is. Do you or anybody else have any suggestions on how to find out what her name is? Thank you, Mark VanArsdall

SOME GREAT SUGGESTIONS FROM LILLY MARTIN

Dear Carolyn,I have a few suggestions: first Mark can look for a newspaper obituary, which may list the name of the niece.  Or, he could look at the PROBATE file for the deceased woman at the courthouse.  Probate is a public record and you can look.  If this is too far away, you can write a letter to the specific courthouse location, addressed to ‘the clerk of the court’ outlining the request, with name, dates, etc.  The clerk will look for it and probably will ask for a fee to cover it.

 

To find people who are living: www.ancestry.com and www.familysearch.com both have databses which are called “Public Records”.  Many times recently I have been looking for old classmates of mine and have found their name, birthdate, and current location comes up, even on the familysearch website, which is free.

 

Then, go to http:veromi.net and you can find spouses, children and current places they live.  That is free.

 

Then go to www.whitepages.com and lok for a current address and telephone number.

 

Also, just a www.google.com search on their name and city may bring up needed information, especially real estate listing, if they have bought or sold recently, or if they have paid property taxes, and are listed by name and city.

 

Hope this helps in finding living people.  In looking for the dead, www.findagrave.comis excellent.

 

Best regards,

Lilly Martin

********************************************************************

Letters 3/24/2014

Subject:  Fwd: What is the oldest Catholic church in Maryland?

Regarding Peter’s question: Right church, but established on the east coast before the time of the Spanish missions in the southwest, according to this site.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_oldest_Catholic_church_in_America

David Smock, Florida

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Hey there distant cousin Carolyn….

There are records of an ancient Celtic landings on the west coast of North America for the purpose of fur trade activity with western American Indian tribes… the reason I mention this is because those records show that those ships carried what we might revere to as a CPA or Accountant…. There purpose was to keep track of the expenses/costs of a given trade/auction and the total of such expenses for a given trip. Those doing such financial tracking for a trip were revered to, as close as translation of the ancient record can identify, were referred to as Netherlanders…. in other words…. Hmmm…. even way back then those folks were driving the Dutch control of financial activity around the world…. Just thought it interesting that back when the Celts had the largest fleet of sailing ships…. centuries before Columbus (and its defeat of the Celtic ships in the Mediterranean by the Roman’s) the Celts were carrying ancient Dutch accountants controlling the financial aspects of the trading. This information is not even mentioned in schools or collages in the U. S. today but I have a couple of book references I can dig back out of my stuff if anyone is interested….. Gary

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Just FYI – FROM CAROLYN – Oh my!  This is from a long time friend and co-worker so I know it is true.  And how do we protect ourselves from this one?

Wow, a new sleazy scam – people are able to call forward your phone to theirs. Then they call and add themselves to your credit cards and the “verification” call goes back to your phone which they receive.

 

This has happened on all three of my credit cards (all different companies) during the last week. To make it worse, when I called my home number from a cell, a woman answered!  She did not speak enough English to understand her; however, her “husband” called me back later on both my cell and home phones and said there had been an “issue” with the phones but he had called the phone company and resolved it.  I called the phone company who said call forwarding had just been added to my account last week (by the scammers obviously).

 

Bottom line: They had access to my phone number and pin number, added call forwarding and forwarded my calls to them.  They had to have access information to my three credit cards, including my verbal passwords, added themselves to my accounts, and had used one of them substantially. They are in Tennessee – not even in my state.

 

I am sending this to share a “word to the wise” that it is happening.  Beverly

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From DAVID SMOCK – OUR DUTCH RESIDENT EXPERT:’Regarding the question of the proper name of the church commonly called in English the Dutch Reformed Church, my understanding, based on all available information, is as follows:

The historic name of the church in the Netherlands was “Nederduitsch Gereformeerde Kerk,” which was renamed in 1816    “Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk.” (Nederduits is a modernized spelling of Nederduitsch.)  Although “Gereformeerde” and “Hervormde” can mean different things, the standard translation of both is “Reformed.” I would translate “Nederduitsch” as “Low Dutch,” and “Nederlandse” means Dutch. The standard translation of both Dutch names is “Dutch Reformed Church.” The word “Duitsch” at one time referred to people not only in the Netherlands but also across the border in present-day Germany, where the church was founded in East Friesland, in 1571, and then in the Dutch Republic, in 1579.)

[De Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk (ook wel: Nederduitsch Gereformeerde Kerk of vaak in die tijd ook Gereformeerde Kerk ) is de gereformeerde kerk die ontstaan is in de stad Emden (Oost-Friesland, thans binnen de Bondsrepubliek Duitsland) in 1571. In1579 werd zij de publieke kerk van de Republiek der Zeven Verenigde Nederlanden. In 1795 onder de Franse overheersing hield zij op met de officiële publieke kerk te zijn, en zij kreeg in 1816 van koning Willem I een nieuw reglement en de naam Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk.]

The name in English was the Dutch Reformed Church, until it was incorporated in 1819 as The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, which name was changed in 1867 to The Reformed Church in America. [The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a mainline Reformed Protestant denomination in Canada and the United States. It has about 240,000 members, with the total declining in recent decades. From its beginning in 1628 until 1819, it was the North American branch of the Dutch Reformed Church. In 1819 it was incorporated as the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church. The current name was chosen in 1867.]

The church was more informally known as the “Reformed Church” (Hervormde Kerk), or simply “the church” (de kerk), or by the local name of the church itself, such as the Six Mile Run church. Today, as often as not, historians and others refer to the church as the “Dutch Reformed Church, as a matter of convenience, I suppose, in order to avoid explaining the name changes through the years.

As a footnote,  the church still exists in South Africa, with an Afrikaans name: “Die Gereformeerde Kerke in Suid-Afrika (GKSA). It is also known as the Reformed Churches in South Africa (RCSA). It has 415 Congregations ministering to people in all 11 official languages of South Africa. [6]There are congregations in Zimbabwe, Namibia and Lesotho.”

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The following article is EXCERPTED from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

………………..

Changing an email address abruptly can be very frustrating. Just ask anyone in Maine, New Hampshire, or Vermont who went through that a few years ago when Verizon sold the company’s DSL and phone networks in those states to Fairpoint Communications in a deal worth $2.72 billion. Once the sale was completed, the problems began for the former Verizon customers.

The first problem was that all the Verizon customers were given notice that their e-mail addresses were being converted to addresses ending in “@myfairpoint.net.” Unfortunately, these customers were not given much time to notify their email correspondents. Most only had a few days in which to notify friends and relatives and to change their e-mail addresses on e-mail lists and thousands of web sites. Some received even shorter notices or were not even notified until AFTER the change had been made. One of my friends who runs an active eBay business suddenly found that the hundreds of listings he had on eBay now pointed to a non-existent e-mail address. He attempted to changed the listings on eBay to his newmyfairpoint.net address, only to find out that it didn’t work.

……………………….

The solution is simple: never, ever use an e-mail address provided by your employer, school, or Internet provider for personal use. Get a separate, independent address that can be used from any Internet provider.

For most people, that means obtaining a FREE Gmail (Google Mail), Yahoo Mail, Outlook.com(formerly Hotmail), or similar service. Most of these services work better than the mail servers of most Internet service providers, plus they have the advantage of working from anywhere. If your Internet provider suddenly gets acquired, or if you move to a new area, or if you are simply on vacation for a few days in some sunny climate, you can always use the same e-mail address.

My favorite is Gmail, provided by Google.

……………………………

To be sure, there is never any guarantee that Gmail, Yahoo Mail, Outlook.com, and the others will remain in business under the same banners, the same corporate names, and the same e-mail addresses. There is always a risk that even these staunch services will force their customers to change someday. However, the experience of the past five or ten years shows that most of the turmoil has been in the arena of Internet service providers. So far, Gmail and Yahoo Mail customers have seen no forced changes. The odds are that they will remain stable while the Internet service providers will remain in turmoil. 

……………

If you have an e-mail address ending in twc.com (Time Warner Cable’s email service),roadrunner.com (another email service used by some Time Warner Cable locations), att.com,comcast.netcharter.comcox.comverizon.comearthlink.comAOL.com, or any other Internet provider’s “captive” e-mail addresses, the time to start planning is NOW.

In fact, you can sign up at all three: GmailYahoo Mail, and Outlook.com

…………….

I’d suggest that everyone should have at least two e-mail addresses. After all, most of these services are free.

————————–

 

Carolyn, Marvin died on 9/14/2014.  So please remove me from your mailing list.

Best wishes.

Marjorie Westerfield

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From Jim Woodfill – California

Carolyn, here is a recipe for Dutch split-pea-with-ham soup that I stumbled on in a Viking cruise e-mail. I am not a particular fan of split pea soup–I generally pass it up when I stop at a Pea Soup Andersen’s–but this sounded good, and I thought maybe we could try it as an appetizer at the next DC gathering.  What do you think?Just don’t call it “snert.”  That does not sound appetizing to me, in the least.  These silly Dutch names!Cheers!   Jim

Packed with flavor, the Dutch version of split pea soup (known as snert), is one of the signature dishes of the Netherlands. During the cold winters, small food and drink stalls called “koek en zopie” spring up along frozen canals serving snert to ice skaters. It’s a real treat and easy to make!

Dutch Split Pea Soup (from cousin Jim Woodfill)

Ingredients:

1 pound dried split peas 

8 cups low sodium chicken broth, or more as needed 

1 medium onion, diced 

1 ham hock 

1 bay leaf  

2 teaspoons salt 

1 1/2 teaspoons black pepper 

8 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled

Directions:

1. Place peas in a colander and rinse, picking through and discarding any shriveled beans or other debris. 

2. Transfer peas to a large saucepan. Add chicken broth and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. 

3. Add onion, ham hock, bay leaf, salt and pepper, stirring to combine. Cook, stirring often to prevent burning, until peas are very soft and creamy, about 40 minutes. Add additional broth or water if soup begins to thicken too much and stick to the bottom of the saucepan during cooking. 

4. Remove from heat. Remove ham hock, and pull off meat. Chop meat and return to soup. Ladle soup into bowls and garnish with bacon. 

5. Serve hot. 

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THIS story was in the Sunday Oklahoman, 3/23/2014 – page 14a. Sharing since it mentions Dutch cousins:

http://m.newsok.com/oklahoma-volunteer-says-the-return-is-greater-than-the-service-given/article/3946320

Oklahoma volunteer says the return is greater than the service given

By Bryan Painter

dutch:j&me:sml.jpg

Carolyn Leonard vividly remembers the first time she volunteered.

It was at church in Leonard’s hometown of Buffalo in northwestern Oklahoma.

Leonard, 5 years old at the time, and her brothers planned to sing a special song. The pastor asked the name of the song.

“I wanted us to sing, ‘Pistol Packin’ Mama,’ but the preacher asked us to choose ‘Jesus Loves Me’ instead,” said Leonard, 75, of Oklahoma City.

That certainly has not detoured her from volunteering throughout life.

“I volunteer because my parents taught me whenever we receive, it is our duty to give back, when we learn something we should teach it to others,” Leonard said.

She’s served with the Oklahoma Writers’ Federation Inc. holding several………………. 

http://m.newsok.com/oklahoma-volunteer-says-the-return-is-greater-than-the-service-given/article/3946320

TWO PAGES

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Dutch Cousins Executive Committee 2013-2015:

            President: John C. Westerfield of Pennsylvania 

            Vice President: Tommy Green of Oklahoma

            Secretary: Carolyn Leonard of Oklahoma 

            Treasurer: Diana Davis of Virginia 

            Webmaster: Pam Ellingson, Lakewood, WI 

Finance Chairman:  Vince Akers of Indiana 

Board of Directors:

            Barbie Abbott Hamman of Kentucky 

    Jim Cozine of Nevada 

Barbara Whiteside of Indiana 

President Emeritus Claude Westerfield of Iowa 

Letters 4/7/2014

from Firth Fabend, noted author of Dutch historicals

When the Reformed Church received its corporate charter from the English King in 1696 it was formally called the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in the City of New York. The charter is in the possession of the Collegiate Church to this day (not specifically the Marble Collegiate Church, but all four remaining Collegiate Churches whose headquarters are at 551 Fifth Avenue, the 17th floor). Firth Fabend

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I owe an apology to Judy McKee of San Antonio TX, a BANTA descendant.

Many moons ago, she sent me a booklet titled OUR HERITAGE published by the San Antonio Gen Soc., and I am just now reading it. Very good easy to read pub, and it is even indexed.  Thank you Judy.  We are hoping to be in San Antonio in August for the Federation of Gen Socs conference so maybe we will see you there?

Judy McKee says:  “Since I’ve started getting your Dutch letters, I have connected with Kerin Smith, who comes down through my Daniel’s sister Rachel.  I am really excited aout finding new relatives.” She said that her grandmother was Mary Lela Banta Williams. hr line comes from Henry Banta in PA, Daniel, Henry D, Isaac V and James S Banta.

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 re: Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead (this may have been posted previously)

from Mary Woodfill Park

Mary:

We’ve had a very hard winter here at the Homestead. Come Spring lots of

repairs will need to be attended to as well as our continuing efforts to

recover from Hurricane Sandy which devastated the property. The remains of

the 4 ton tree are still on the grounds as well as several of the cast iron

ornaments that were crushed beyond repair. Several more trees are in

jeopardy, and work is slow due to my lack of funds.

I would welcome any monetary donations on behalf of the Rikers. I have

maintained the Riker Cemetery for more than 30 years now with no financial

assistance. I have also kept alive the history of the Homestead thru tours,

interviews and on-going restoration and enhancement to the property.

I wish to stay here until my death. My ideal situation is for someone to buy

the Homestead during my lifetime, but to give me lifetime tenancy so I have

an income to continue my work and lifestyle.

Thank you for your interest.

Marion Duckworth Smith

“Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead” <info@rikerhome.com>

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from Rodney Dempsey

We are having a CHAMPAGNE party for Mary Lu , 4:30 to 5:30 Saturday night at the Forum in the Library/Activity Room. I realize this is in the heart of the tax season, and the UK/U of L  game is this week. But, I sure hope you could join us and John could bring his horn. We all enjoyed his playing so much. Beth, maybe you could lead us in some songs.

I am inviting you to join our Low Dutch Cousins Genealogy group. Cousin Carolyn Leonard does a tremendous job compiling, composing and  editing, and publishing our email newsletter. ALL FOR FREE!

I know you will enjoy what she has compiled, especially about the new email scam,  the story about the very early Dutch Accountants, and the origin of the name of the Dutch Reformed Church. (That is as far as I have read this morning). Knowing your Father was a Dutch Reformed Missionary Minister in rural Appalachian Kentucky, I’d bet you will find this interesting.

Love,

Rodney

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New York Public Library Puts 20,000 Hi-Res Maps Online & Makes Them Free to Download and Use

The New York Public Library announced the release of “more than 20,000 cartographic works as high resolution downloads.” The maps can be accessed through the library’s Digital Collections page.

Dear people,

Just want to share with you the fact that just now the New York Public Library has put Hi-Res Maps online and they even allow you to download and use them.

Wanted my friends to know this!  I was at the NYPL Map Room two weeks ago, and left a note requesting that they obtain the work,

“Grote Atlas van de West Indische Compagnie, Deel I”

A book which include all the maps of the West India Company from 1621-1674.

I have been looking to access this work for a couple of years, but using “worldcat” it seems that the book is only possessed by Libraries in the Netherlands…. Does anyone have suggestions on how to access?

If anyone is interested there is a full description of all the maps in this work in a PDF format on the Internet…  I couldn’t locate the web address, but anyone who wants this PDF document can contact me and I will be happy to email them the file.

New York Public Library Hi-Res Maps  <http://www.openculture.com/2014/03/new-york-public-library-puts-20000-hi-res-maps-online.html>

Kind regards, or -like they say here in Brazil- abraços,

Willem

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from Cousin Jim Cozine in Las Vegas (he had quite a time translating this poem and scanning it into OCR to make it copy for the Dutch Letters.  Good Job Jim!

from the Holland Society Year Book 1914

10th Annual Dinner at the Astor Hotel NY, NY Nov 25th

The Holland Society

“The Hollanders made it; it exists because the

Hollanders preserve it: it will vanish only when the

Hollanders abandon it.”

“New York’s pride shall ever be In her Holland ancestry.”

Ye lusty sons of Holland, who rally at the cry,

Oranje, Oranje Boven! have ye ever questioned why?

Your Society was founded, and leads the van to-day

Of others much more ancient, that had the right of way?

Well, once there were some Dutchmen, with names gone down to fame,

Their fathers were Dutchmen, their grandfathers were the same.

Famed for their genial nature, of philanthropic mind,

They thought how social it would be, if they could only bind

Their countrymen together, that thus they might recall

Events that shaped New Amsterdam- the Dutchman above all.

So once a year, ’bout “twelfth night,” they all did meet and sing

Oranje, Oranje Boven! with a true Holland ring.

The feast they spread before them would make their fathers stare,

For early settlers in our land had very simple fare,

Though as the years sped onward and they had richer grown,

They had such toothsome dainties as made them feel at home.

When all were fully satisfied and warmed by arrack punch,

They’d light the long Dutch pipes of peace, and, gather in a bunch,

They’d quaff and smoke, and smoke an quaff-though far be it from me

To say that any Dutchman was ever ” half at sea.”

The inner man thus fortified, the old-time tales were told,

When governments were honest, and could not be bought for gold;

When half-doors swung wide open, and all the city’s light

Was furnished by a lantern from each tenth house, hung in sight;

When streets were cleaned by private hands, and quaint old Bouweries stood,

Their gables toward the street, and built of Holland brick, or wood,

When christenings were such great events, and famed for liberal cheer,

And Apostles’ spoons were given to mark the natal year.

They recalled a real Dutch wedding, with guest from near and far,

Who came in sleights from Beverwyck, not in a palace-car.

They saw the piles of linen, all spun by fair Katrine,

Who introduced young Volckert of honest, manly mien.

And when the wedding feast was o’er, the bridegroom took the men

Back to his father’s Bouwerie, where they made merry, then

They pledged his health in rare “rack punch, ” made by a skillful hand,

And renewed their true allegiance to the dear old Vaderlandt.

Dutch funerals–shall I speak of them, or shall I draw a veil

On the scenes in which they ended, when spiced wine, mead and ale

had drowned the deepest sorrow, and when the “monkey spoon”

Was a most appropriate present for each one in the room.

When ladies ate the door-cakes, and drank to hot-mulled wine,

Served them in silver tankards, of quaintly graved design.

The Domine- the dear old man, where shall we fined one such

To preach the simple Word of Life in pure old Holland Dutch?

In baffy white, and long black gown, he spoke to them of God,

Regardless of the hour-glass or drowsy trader’s nod.

And when the Sackie-Koek was passed, the tinkling bell would wake

The tired ones, who sometimes gave stray buttons by mistake.

The punch was good, the pipes were long, too fast the hours sped,

And when they parted ’twas the hour to rise, not go to bed.

Now can you wonder longer why men from near and far

Are hunting up their records to find a Dutch grandpa?

The honest old Dutch customs, so dear to hearts like mine,

No more shall all be scattered like the hoar-frost, by old Time,

Ans sons and grandsons, yet to be, shall know and understand

The habits of their fathers in the famed New Netherland.

Another mug of punch, Mynheers–enough of old-time tales;

When we pledge Oranje Boven! the Dutchman never fails.

Now toast our sturdy ancestors, to whom we owe our birth

In a land they settled along ago, the fairest upon earth.

Three cheers now for New Amsterdam, then joined hand in hand,

A silent toast to those we miss, and to the Vaderlandt.

Mary L. D. Ferris

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Bulletin:  Carolyn Leonard will be speaking to the Oklahoma Prairies DAR Tuesday on

“Planning a Genealogy Trip Vacation”

at OK Station BBQ at 50th & Meridian, meeting starts at 6:30 pm. If you love genealogy, travel and solving mysteries, you will love planning a genealogy vacation.

Here’s the REST OF THE STORY!  Our cousins are the greatest!

Mary Jo Gohman, of Indiana, put together this wonderful video of our trip from Kentuky to New York. I had all my audio equipment with me (I thought), and the video on a DVD. At the Dutch Cousins meeting in September, I was ready to play and discovered my traveling computer the Air book, doesn’t have a DVD drive. Luckily Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin had a flash (USB) drive with Mary Jo’s video and I was able to use to present the Trip Video.  It worked great.  Afterward I gave the flash drive back to Pam.  Bad choice.

 

I had forgotten that when I agreed to present the video for the DAR Tuesday evening.  Decided to practice Sunday night and on my big desktop discovered I could not copy the DVD to the flash USB or to Dropbox.  It would only copy the icon (alias)  I struggled with it and researching online for a solution for 7 hours before giving up. Should have been simple.

So I emailed Pam and Mary Jo and my daughter the techhie for help. None of us could figure it out, but  Pam discovered she had the video already on her Dropbox and sent me the link. I downloaded it to the airbook and it works!  Pam can’t remember how she did it but my problem is solved thanks to a Dutch Cousin in Wisconsin and one in Indiana.  I am now set for tomorrow night!

Hugs, carolyn

Buffalo Industries

Carolyn Leonard

Letters 4/14/14

FROM JERRY SAMPSON, HARRODSBURG KY –

Just found out that Old Salem / MESDA (Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts) is coming to tour Old Mud Meeting House this July. Its a groups of about 25 scholars that will be touring Kentucky. MESDA is holding its annual summer lecture series in Frankfort, Kentucky this year. Its an honor that they’re coming to Frankfort, and for the Society, its quite a coup. For those of you who don’t know, MESDA is a big deal in the world of Southern antiques, architecture and decorative arts. Yahoo!  Carolyn can you get this to the other Low Dutch sites? I’m so excited over this.

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On Apr 7, 2014, at 7:25 PM, John Van Nuys wrote:

Dear Carolyn,

                I hope this finds you well.

                I wanted to pass along to the Dutch cousins the sad news that my mother Kathleen Van Nuys died on January 2.  She was 92 and had good health until the final month and a sharp mind until the end.  Since Dad’s death in 1996, she lived independently at the farm near Franklin, Indiana in the Hopewell community that was established from the Dutch and Huguenot families migrating north from Harrodsburg in the 1830s.  Our farm has been in the Van Nuys family since the settlement of the area.

                After a six-decade long career in the newspaper business, Mom in her retirement focused her reporting and writing skills on researching and preparing a history of the Hopewell community on the occasion of the 175th anniversary of the founding of Hopewell Presbyterian Church, which was and is the anchoring institution and emotional center of the community.  Mom’s efforts took 5 years and resulted in a 660 page book The Hopewell Journey: 350 Years from Immigrant Religion to Hoosier Faith.  The book traces the history of the Low Dutch company from New Amsterdam to N.J. to Conewego, PA to Harrodsburg, KY to Hopewell, IN.  The book, which is richly-illustrated with multiple, multiple photos, is available via Amazon.  The link follows.  My purpose in mentioning this is not to hawk books, but rather to make sure that Mom’s labor of love is known to the Dutch cousins who might find it of interest.

                With thanks for passing this along — and in the hope of the Resurrection,             Rev. John C. Van Nuys; Crawfordsville, IN

 

http://www.amazon.com/Hopewell-Journey-Immigrant-Presbyterian-1831-2006/dp/1425928951/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394848028&sr=1-1&keywords=Hopewell+Journey

 

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On Apr 7, 2014, at 6:37 PM, JRill wrote:

Hi Carolyn, 

I would appreciate your asking the cousins in the next “Dutch Letters” whether they have any knowledge of the following lawsuit found in Book 1 of the Mercer County Court Orders.  All I’ve seen is an abstract which reads:  Benjamin Lock v. James Westerfield on petition, defendant did not appear; Judgment to plaintiff for 2 pounds, 10 shillings and costs.  Lock to pay Peter Lock 25# of tobacco for attending on day as a witness for him.  March 25, 1789.

 

If anyone can shed light on what this lawsuit was about, I’d appreciate it.  Judi Rill

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The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

Living Today but in the 1930s

Jo Hedwig Teeuwisse still lives as if it is 1938. In her apartment on the second floor of a building in AMSTERDAM, the Netherlands, constructed in 1918, Teeuwisse lives with all the “modern” amenities of a 1930s woman. She describes her space as “a typical working-class house with a front room, back room, bedroom, ‘wet room’ (bathroom) and kitchen.”

The cozy apartment is filled with DUTCH furniture from the 1920s and 30s, with a fireplace and radio and no television. “Making sure that everything is at least pre-1945 gives the home automatically the right atmosphere, and of course I’ve done a lot of research to see how I can recreate some of the details correctly,” Teeuwisse said. She runs a 1920s vacuum cleaner over the rugs, and washes the floors with vinegar, scrubbing on her hands and knees. She does all her laundry by hand using a washboard, a block of soap, bleach and a brush – “the smell is lovely,” she said.

“The only modern thing I have in my house is my computer; I need it for my work,” she said. “I also have a modern fridge, but only because I haven’t found a nice 1930s one yet and they no longer deliver ice for ice boxes.”

You can read the full story in an article by Ilyce R. Glink at http://goo.gl/iYvWoB.

How many of us would give up today’s conveniences? Not me!

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FROM ANITA BARETT

Hello Cuz–I feel I can say that with assurance now. I did DNA through Ancestry know about my DUTCH. I have had several matches. Finally found Cozine matches, so the familly is confident that Stephen Otis Cozine was my mother’s real father. Thanks to you and Jim Cozine for making me feel so welcome. Now, since my mother was adopted, maybe someday I will be able to trace my mother’s real mother.

Blessings!

Anita

{by Carolyn: Anita’s mother Pauline Helen Cozine born 1920 MO, was adopted by her father Stephen O. Cozine and his wife Edna D. Barnhart.  Anyone on here familiar with adoption records in Missouri?) 

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More on the thoughts of Judy McKEE of San Antonio, a BANTA descendant. 

From: Jack, aka Johannes, TAYLOR 

 

If in Waco, TX, be sure to visit the TX Ranger Hall of Fame & Museum that is located off  the northeast corner of Baylor U. next to Interstate 35.

 

 https://maps.google.com/?ll=31.555097,-97.116759&spn=0.012617,0.02281&t=h&z=16

 

William Banta was a Captain in the TX Rangers in the 1800s.  He wrote a short book about his experiences.  Be begins by saying something like: “Some won’t like what I have to say, but this the way it was.”  The museum library has a copy of the book which has been out of print for years.

 

This is one of many Internet Sites that discuss William BANTA, TX Ranger.

 

BANTA, WILLIAM (1827–1897). William Banta, Indian fighter, Civil War soldier, and autobiographer, was born in Warrick County, Indiana, on June 23, 1827, the son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Barker) Banta. . . .

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Greetings from Michelle and James Nevius,

 

Great news! Our new book, Footprints in New York: Tracing the Lives of Four Centuries of New Yorkersis finally out! We have a number of fun, free events in the works, including book talks and walking tours, so read on.

 

(You’re receiving this email either because you’ve taken a New York City walking tour with us in the past — or, perhaps, you contacted us at www.walknyc.com about a tour only to discover we weren’t unavailable because we were busy working on the new book.)

In Footprints in New York (Lyons Press)the follow-up to our critically acclaimed history of the city, Inside the Apple: A Streetwise History of New York City, we explore the stories of notable citizens of the Big Apple—including Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant, religious dissenter Anne Hutchinson, writers Edgar Allan Poe and Edith Wharton, urban advocate Jane Jacobs, and musical legend Bob Dylan—and use them to guide the reader through four centuries of the city’s history. One part history and one part personal narrative, the book creates a different way of looking at the city’s past. We are really proud of the finished product and we hope that—just like on our walking tours—you’ll discover things about the city in these pages that you never knew. Some of you, our walking tour clients, even make cameo appearances!

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FROM JIM COZINE of Las Vegas:

We are pleased to announce that the Holland Society’s collection of transcribed church record books is now available through Ancestry.com in a database called U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records from Selected States, 1660-1926. As part of this partnership Ancestry.com digitized and indexed more than 100 record books, many that were previously not indexed or published anywhere else. Now anyone with a subscription to Ancestry.com can search and view the records so carefully collected more than 125 years ago. Access to the database is also available at the Society Library and the Librarian will be pleased to assist HSNY Members in getting copies of records they may want for their own research.

At a meeting of the Holland Society Trustees in March of 1887 Theodore Banta reported that the record books of ‘Ancient’ Dutch churches in the Americas were in declining condition and that ‘prompt action’ must be taken to copy the records. Mr. Banta and his committee proceeded to do exactly that. Over the next few years record books were located and transcribed and some even published so that the information they contained might be available to genealogists and family historians for years to come.

While we cannot guess what Theodore Banta and his Committee on the Publication of Ancient Church Records might think of the Internet and digital copies of record books, it does seem safe to say that they would be delighted to know that by their efforts researchers all over the world, in numbers they surely would not believe, can access the records of the churches in the area that was once New Netherland.

With very best regards,

Mary Collins, Librarian, for

The Library Committee, Holland Society

Charles W. Wendell, Ph.D., Chairman

To search the records go to http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=6961

NOTE FROM CAROLYN:  I think we met Mary Collins, Librarian, when we visited the Holland Soc Library Oct 2011.

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CDs do not last forever!

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

When you do make copies, use the SLOWEST writing speed available in your disc copying software. Writing at slower speeds reduces errors and allows the laser to write slower and make bigger “holes” in the reflective layer. Of course, this also significantly increases the time required to make each copy; however, the extra caution should be well worth the extra time.

How Can You Increase the Lifetime of Your Discs?

First, copy each disc to a new, blank CD as described above. Make sure you copy them only to high quality blank discs. The discs with a gold reflective layer are considered to be the longest-lasting, but they are also the most expensive. It’s your data. How important is the information to you?

Treat your CDs and DVDs with care. Always hold them by the outer edges or by the hole in the center. Don’t touch the surface, avoid scratches, avoid fingerprints, and keep dirt from the discs.

Store the discs in plastic jewel cases, not in paper sleeves. Always store the discs vertically, not lying down.

Never, ever place a gummed, stick-on label on a CD or DVD disc. First, labels are never perfectly balanced; the discs will wobble in the drive and will eventually induce damage. Next, the adhesive on many gummed labels contains solvents that will eat into the plastic surface of the discs. If you must label the discs, use a non solvent-based, felt-tip permanent marker that is designed for writing on CD or DVD discs. Never write on the plastic disc with a general purpose “Sharpie” or other felt tip marker that is not designed for use on CD or DVD discs.

Summary

As with any other sort of backups, always make multiple backups of your CD, DVD, and Blu-ray discs on different forms of media, store them in different places, and then test all the backups periodically to make sure they are still good. Finally, make periodic copies of your older backups. These rules apply to any backups, whether they are made on CDs, DVDs, Blu-ray, floppy discs, magnetic tape, paper, or clay tablets! You’ll be glad you did.

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Family History (Genealogy) has become big business

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

Trent Toone has published an article in the Deseret News that describes the genealogy business. The article caught my eye because (1.) It describes how  genealogy has become big business and (2.) because it describes the rapid growth of MyHeritage, the exclusive sponsor of this newsletter. Toone writes:

“Gilad Japhet launched MyHeritage.com out of his garage in 2005. He mortgaged his home, poured all his money into the business, and was not afraid to take a few risks.

“Almost a decade later, the startup MyHeritage has revenues in the tens of millions of dollars, continues to see significant growth and has more than 160 employees. Its 75 million users have built 1.5 billion profiles and millions of family trees in 40 different languages.”

Trent Toone interviewed Gilad Japhet, CEO of MyHeritage, as well as Tim Sullivan, CEO ofAncestry.com, and Annelies van den Belt, CEO of FindMyPast.com. You can read the full article at http://goo.gl/BZxLVk.

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IN OKC we had 90 degrees Saturday. Snow Sunday night and this morning, and hard freeze predicted tonight. Crazy weather. I have beautiful Holland Tulips in Bloom.  Will they die in the freeze?

tulips.jpg

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

Letters 4/29/2014

from Amalie Preston, our Old Mud representative in Harrodsburg KY: (with 3 MAGNIFICENT photos!)

Carolyn:  This is my belated update on Old Mud.  Things are progressing nicely.  The wiring is complete with indirect lighting installed on the large beams and the light switch beside the double doors activated.  The door with transom for the west side of the church is being made and should be in place by mid-May.  The paneling on the interior west gable end has been installed with insulation behind it.  This entailed crafting poplar boards with a bead to match the paneling on the opposite end and to harmonize the color with existing boards.  Missing ceiling boards have all been replaced.  All new interior woodwork and the large double doors will be painted and repairs made where necessary at the same time the new door is installed.  This leaves the big task–repairing and replacing the mud panels.  We are talking with local craftsmen/plasterers and hope to find someone who will take on that project. When we get the mud completed, the reclaimed flooring will be laid, and the project, except for future heating and cooling will be complete!  Hoorah!  If the Dutch Cousins wish to contribute toward the mud repair, that would be great!  I understand your reservations about diverting any funds toward the schoolhouse. 

The Historical Society had adequate funds to have a new metal roof installed on the little schoolhouse located beside Old Mud, and that is now complete.!  Again, this is wonderful.  Since the electrical system that powers Old Mud is located in the schoolhouse, it was imperative that we make it weatherproof!   It was great watching the rain fall last night and knowing that it wasn’t running down the walls of the schoolhouse. 

Now that the horrible winter is over, activities are picking up at Old Mud.  We have had several private showings, and in early April the Asbury College Photography Class came to visit and take pictures.  Last week the Mercer County 9th grade made their annual history field trip and Old Mud was one of their stops.  Lastly, in mid June we have a wedding scheduled.  If buildings could smile, I think Old Mud is smiling!

Cousin Amalie       

009.JPG  034.JPG  083.JPG

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From Judy McKee

Thanks to Jack Taylor for the information on William Banta, Texas Ranger.  I look forward to visiting the Museum soon. I appreciate any and all info on my ancestors and relatives.

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Attn:  Demaree family members & other Huguenot

French Migrations to America Before 1800
The French Cultural Center of Boston is hosting a presentation on early migrations from France and Québec to America. Dr. Bertrand Van Ruymbeke of the Université de Paris 8 will offer an overview of these migrations and of the French presence in America before 1800. The event will be held at 53 Marlborough Street, Boston, May 1, 2014, 6:30-8:30 PM. $5, RSVP Required. For more information visit frenchculturalcenter.org.

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http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/kings-day-giveaway-dutch-roots/

26 April, we will celebrate the first ever “King’s Day” in honor of the birthday of King Willem-Alexander. Until last year, the national holiday to celebrate the monarch’s birthday was “Queen’s Day,” a tradition started in 1891.

King Willem-Alexander succeeded his mother, Queen Beatrix, on 30 April last year. This year, he will be visiting the towns of De Rijp and Amstelveen to celebrate his birthday. His actual birthday is 27 April, but the holiday is not celebrated on a Sunday so that is why it is celebrated on the 26th this year.

To join in the merriment, I will be giving away a hard copy of the book Dutch Roots by Rob van Drie to one lucky subscriber of the Dutch Genealogy newsletter. I reviewed this book last month.

The winner will be randomly selected from the list of all subscribers on 26 April. I will contact the winner via email to ask for their shipping information.

All you have to do to enter the giveaway competition is sign up for the Dutch Genealogy Newsletter before 26 April.

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FROM JUDY CASSIDY:

Hello Carolyn,  Below is a query, as well as an address for a site that will be of interest to the Low Dutch Community, as it also included Switzerland County as well as Clarence Edwin Carters,  28 Volumes of the Territorial Papers of the United States. The address below gives the site [digitalized copy on line at HarthTrust].  The Territorial Papers cover IL, IN, OH, AL, MO, FL, MS, ARK, Wisc and other areas where the Low Dutch moved after leaving Kentucky.  Included are militia, Petitions with signatures and other documents.  Each volume is indexed which makes searching pretty easy. I believe people will find this of great interest. 

http://www.indianasgore.com/2013/04/  or April | 2013 | Indiana’s Gore – Genealogy Resources

My Query is as follows:

Does anyone know or recall Jim Hendricksen of Houston, TX.  He placed a query in the VANGUARD 3, no. 1, July 2000, pg. 36  which reads as follows:  

Seeking information on Simon Van Orsdale born late 1700s??. He was a frontier trader and never came back from a trip about 1828.  His wife was Catherine Claypool 1784-1821.  Her parents seem to have come from Kentucky or ennessee but she may have been born in Indiana.  Simon’s children include Eva Mari, Amos and Valencourt (born 25 August 1817 in French Village, IL.  After Simon’s death, Eva Marie and her husband took Amos and Valencourt to Keokuk, Iowa to live with them. 

This was followed by a query from Loren Kester, of Independence, MO., now deceased.  Valencourt Vanausdol born about 1818 in Illinois, lived in Keokuk, Lee, Co., IL.

Simon was not deceased by 1828 he had simply married the year after Valencourt was born, in 1818 and was living in a different area of St. Clair Co., IL. He abandoned his family, if Catherine Claypool lived until 1821 marrying Catherine Swiggart. His third wife was Sophia Savage. Simon lived in St. Louis, MO, Kaskaskia, Randolph Co., IL, St. Clair Co., IL and  Knox Co., Indiana.  Eva Maria or Anna Marie, his daughter, married a carpenter from St. Louis, Moses Stillwell and they were just about the first settlers in Lee Co., Iowa.  

I would like to contact Jim Hendrickson as he may be descended from this family and you have my permission to given him or anyone who may have helpful information my email address.  

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FROM Dutch Genealogy news for 25 April 2014

Since the introduction of the civil registration (in 1811 in most part of the Netherlands), everybody was supposed to have a fixed name. Everybody who did not have a surname, was required to take a name and have that recorded. The reality was not always so neat. Especially in regions where many people did not have surnames before 1811, like FrieslandGroningenOverijssel and Gelderland, the same person may appear in civil registration records under different names. Willem Lucas de Jonge and Willem Lucas Hateboer illustrate this situation.

Is Willem Lucas de Jonge the same person as Willem Lucas Hateboer?

On Twitter, Eric De Young asked:

Do you think Willem Lucas de Jonge and Willem Lucas Hateboer are the same person? [Wiewaswie] [WieWasWie]

This is a very clear research question.

The first link that Eric gave us is the birth record of Nies de Jonge, son of Willem Lucas de Jonge and Epke Meinderts, born in Scheemda, Groningen, on 16 March 1827. Willem Lucas de Jonge was the informant for the birth record, which was created on 19 March 1827.Lucas would be his patronymic, a name derived from his father (Willem son of Lucas).

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Letters 5/5/2014

From Bryce Stevens – A COMPLETE transcription of the Pleasant Church records (During the 2013 Dutch Cousins Gathering at Madison IN, on the tour led by Lynn Rogers, we visited the site of the church and the existing cemetery with MANY of our Dutch people.)

Now Bryce is sharing the transcription he did of the Pleasant Township hurch records (attached to this email in pdf.)

On May 3, 2014, at 7:59 PM, BStevens wrote (edited for brevity):

Deaar Carolyn

I still have the full transcript, and realize that it does have errors due to the poor quality of the manuscript in places, but I still feel that is needs to be shared as widely and freely as possible, and apparently this did not happen as I was assured it would be by the man who first drafted me into this project.

 

Since this is, essentially, my transcription, and I suppose I have “proprietary rights”, errors and all, can you suggest a way to share this as widely as possible?  Just kidding about proprietary rights, of course … I just want to own up to my own errors in the transcription.  I know there are mistakes due to the poor quality of the film of the manuscript, but they will never be corrected if we do not manage to share the records.

Bryce Stevens

Pleasant Church records

This transcript is very interesting and you will probably all want to save it to your hard drives. Bryce said he would welcome any corrections.  He could double check them against the film and make corrections to the transcription. I noticed familiar names ofIsaac Vannice (Van Nuys), Henry Banta, Daniel Demaree, and Cornelius Voris in the original petition, and later several Vanosdol (Vanarsdale or however spelled!)

Here is one of the first paragraphs:

Pleasant Township Church 

Sept 29th 1829 

We the undersigned, being members of the Jefferson Church, & feeling the importance of having our congregation divided, pray Presbytery to divide us into two churches. The south Wilson’s Fork of Indian Kentucky to be the division line. We likewise with the Ryker settlement to retain the original name of the church, & we wish the Dutch Settlement to be called by the name of Pleasant Township Congregation. 

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FROM KERIN SMITH:

Thanks for the photos {of Old Mud}.  I especially am happy to see the picture of the pulpit put together and standing upright.  When we were there the last time, it was still lying in a dirty heap on the floor.

But then, the church was still wrapped in plastic then as well.  And pigeons roosting in the school.  Seems there has been lots of progress.

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FROM DELLA NASH:  If only you care.The pictures were worth a million words.  Thanks, Della

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from judy cassidy

Thanks very much for including the Simon Vannorsdal query in the newsletter.  Hopefully it will generate some helpful information.

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from Jean Simon

Dear Carolyn!  Just rec’d today, 29 Apr, your complete, helpful email!  Am just delighted!  A techie cleaned our computer well!  Thanks!

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from New Netherland Institute

TWO DUTCH-AMERICAN HISTORY RELATED E-BOOKS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR $ 0.99 EACH ON MAY 1, 2 AND 3 AND FOR $1.99 ON MAY 4, 5 AND 6

Author: C. Carl Pegels, Professor Emeritus, University at Buffalo, SUNY

The two books are available from Amazon for $ 2.99 each at any time, but are discounted to from May 1 to May 6 in honor of the first Dutch King’s Birthday on April 26, 2014. This was the first Dutch King’s Birthday celebration in 122 years.

 The two books are:

  1. Dutch American Achievers: Arts, Sciences and Sports
  2. Prominent Dutch American Achievers: Government, Military, History and Philosophy

 The two Dutch American Achievers books each cover about 100 prominent Dutch Americans and consist of about 20 chapters focused on a professional field of the individuals.

Some of the prominent performing artists are Humphrey Bogart, Henry and Jane Fonda, Audrey Hepburn and the Van Halen brothers. Among the graphic artists are DeKooning, Hopper and Mondrian. In the sciences there are the five Nobel Laureates, the astronomers and the five Dutch American astronauts.

Leading the government volume are the three presidents, Van Buren and the two Roosevelts.  The longest political family dynasty consists of six Dutch Americans, four U.S. Senators and two U.S. Representatives.

The two E-books are available from Amazon.  Google: “Amazon Kindle Store, Pegels”   

Buy both books for the price of cup of coffee. They also make excellent gifts.

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From Martha Banta Boltz

Hi Carolyn — I almost feel like an outsider since I’m stuck here in Vienna, VA and have not been able to get anywhere near Old Mud thus far. I am assuming this is the meetinghouse in  Harrodsburg — Don’t know anything about it, which Banta(s) were connected to it, who built it, what it was used for other than “church”, etc.   if you can direct me to something findable on the web, I’ll try to get informed.  I am hoping to move back to KY as soon as I can get Don’s estate settled, clear out the house and get it on the market, and find something in Louisville. Maybe then I won’t  have to be so dumb!!  Thanks for any info, and best always.

Note from Carolyn

Want to know more about the Old Mud Meetinghouse built by our Dutch ancestors more than 200 years ago? Old Mud? What’s that?  Where is it?  Read all about it here:   http://bit.ly/QXFsIq

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From Preston Forsythe

Thank you Carolyn and Cousin Amalie. Our Westerfield relatives came to Ohio Co., KY via Old Mud.

We will have to visit Old Mud one day.

Preston Forsythe in Muhlenberg Co. KY

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To commemorate the 1614 establishment of Fort Nassau in Albany, the New Netherland Institute is raffling a beautiful quilt designed by Len Tantillo and quilted by Bonnie Urso, NNI’s Office Manager and Corliss Tantillo, Len’s wife. The quilt features a 17th century ship in the center which represents Dutch commercial activity in the Hudson Valley.  The quilt will be on display at the Albany Heritage Visitors Center and the New York State Museum.  Raffle tickets are 3 for $25.00 and are available for purchase online atwww.newnetherlandinstitute.org or by mail at NNI, P.O. Box 2536, Albany, NY 12220-0536

 

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September 20, 2014. NNI also announces its 37th New Netherland Seminar, which will take place in the Huxley Theater of the Cultural Education Center in Albany, NY.  The program will also commemorate the 400th anniversary of the construction of Fort Nassau on Castle Island in the port of Albany. “1614” will feature five speakers, including Jeremy Bangs, Director of the Leiden American Pilgrim Museum Foundation, Leiden NL, Leslie Choquette, Professor of History Assumption College, Worcester, MA,Willem Frijhoff, consultant on research in history, chair Cultural Dynamics (NWO), visiting professor at Erasmus University Rotterdam, NL, William A. Starna, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the State University of New York College at Oneonta, Len Tantillo, Historical and Marine Artist, Nassau, NY.  These speakers will place the Dutch trading post in its historical context as well as offer arguments for its probable location on the island.  The complete program will appear soon on our website and in the next issue of the Marcurius.

The drawing for the quilt will be held on September 20th at New Netherland Institute’s 37th Seminar. Winner need not be present.

 

Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President

New Netherland Institute

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From Ruby Bishop Ingram (Vanarsdale descendant)

This is an amazing video, special to us because of our New York heritage, but also because we are humans and feel compassion for those involved in the 9/11 disaster.

 

Friends and Relatives,

This piece rips the heart out because it shows these boaters pulling

together to get the people out of Manhattan that sad day.  Heroes!  My

own daughter-in-law’s aunt, uncle, and cousins were working there that

day and rode these boats away from the Island.

Ruby

Subject: Fwd: : An untold story of 9/11

Many thanks to my niece, for sending this to me to share with my email friends.  Mary

We certainly were busy watching the news right after 9/11, but we never saw this…BOATLIFT OF 9/11.

Dozens of boats removed people from Long Island.

The fact is, it was all done in 9 hours…500,000 people!  This is a video well worth watching.  The guy

at the end (same guy who is at the beginning) has some great words to live by for all of us.

Watch till the end.  You won’t regret it.

Click here: BOATLIFT, An Untold Tale of 9/11 Resilience  –

YouTube  <http://www.youtube.com/embed/MDOrzF7B2Kg?rel=0>

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from judy cassidy

Diane Barth Swartz has recently put information on her mother, Barbara A. Barth’s, book the Dorland Enigma Solved on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/Dorlandenigma

Since she is a descendant of several of the the Low Dutch families, I felt it was appropriate to send it to you for inclusion in the newsletter. Just so you know, I do not receive any money from the sale of this book. The cost covers the cost of publishing and mailing which was done by Diane.

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Jon and I plan to attend the FGS 2014 in Austin TX in August.

The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) was founded in 1976 and represents the members of hundreds of genealogical societies. FGS links the genealogical community by helping genealogical societies strengthen and grow through resources available online, FGS Forum magazine (filled with articles pertaining to society management and genealogical news), and Society Strategy Series papers, covering topics about effectively operating a genealogical society. FGS also links the genealogical community through its annual conference — four days of excellent lectures, including one full day devoted to society management topics. To learn more visithttp://www.fgs.org.

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from Judy Cassidy

Diane Barth Swartz has recently put information on her mother, Barbara A. Barth’s, book the Dorland Enigma Solved on Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/Dorlandenigma

Since she is a descendant of several of the the Low Dutch families, I felt it was appropriate to send it to you for inclusion in the newsletter. Just so you know, I do not receive any money from the sale of this book. The cost covers the cost of publishing and mailing which was done by Diane.

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Letters 5/6/2014

from Diana Davis, treasurer, Dutch Cousins

It  {Dutch Cousins donation to Old Mud Restoration} has been sent. $4000.00. sorry cannot remember the day I sent it. last Thursday, Friday, orSaturday, just don’t remember which day.

 

Diana

note from carolyn:  I am not sure, but I believe Diana said earlier that donation still leaves us with $500 in savings and $772.28 in the checking account for startup expense on the 2015 gathering. 

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Thanks, Carolyn. 

 

My line (Isaac Covert Vanice) left KY in 1840 for Arrow Rock, MO and stayed in western MO until my father moved to northeastern IN in 1946.  Any semi-close relatives I have in southern IN would be descended from James Van Nuys, Isaac’s father.

 

Larry Vanice

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If your provider stripped the Pleasant Church transcription attachment from your *Letters,* here is a hotlink to it on Dropbox. 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3g8ph33lbz6a37y/Pleasant%20Church%20Minutes%20copy.pdf

The minutes are NOT boring – those churchmen kept a tight rein on their members, but it was mostly the women they blamed for all the adultery, etc!

The migration of our Dutch ancestors from New Amsterdam to New Jersey to Conewago Colony PA, to Mercer County KY, to Henry County KY (the Dutch Tract) to Madison, Jeffereson Co, IN and later to Franklin Co is the story of American Westward migration. 

For more info, check out the info below my name, and on the official Dutch Cousins website. The letter from Larry Vanice (Van Nuys, Vannice) is lengthy so I am sending it out now.

Hugs, carolyn

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

See the 2013 Newsletter http://goo.gl/MLnha

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson

We also have a facebook page, Dutch Cousins of Kentucky

Carolyn, thanks for all your hard work for the Cousins.

 

The file attachment Pleasant Church Minutes.pdf did not arrive with your email.  My great great grandfather, Isaac Covert Vanice (Van Nuys, Vannice) and his wife, Eleanor Smith Vanice were members of the Six Mile Presbyterian Church, which I think is now the yarn shop near Pleasureville, KY. 

 

Where is Pleasant Church?  Is it another name for Six Mile Church?

 

I don’t know if the story is well known to the Cousins, but my Low Dutch ancestors finally gave up finding a (preferably Dutch-speaking) Reformed pastor for their settlement and joined the Presbyterians.  That would be how my Isaac met his Eleanor, whose father was born in Scotland.  Previous generations of the Van Nuys family had married women with Dutch names.

 

Here is Isaac’s history, up to leaving KY in 1840, that I have compiled.

Isaac Covert Vanice and descendants, a timeline:

 

1810

1916 Book, p. 263 (first edition): Isaac Covert Vanice Born 24Aug1810 Henry County, KY to James and Tinie Bice Van Nuys.  This date is also given in the 1899 obituary notice.  But see 1811.  Our Van Nuys family had lived in the Low Dutch colony, a communal area of 8000-12000 acres around Six Mile, later Bantatown (now Pleasureville), KY since 1791.

http://home.comcast.net/~neal4/shkylowd.htm

 

1811

Family Search, no source cited: Isaac Covert Vanice Born 24Aug1811 in KY to James and Tinie Bice Van Nuys.  This date agrees better with the age of Isaac given in the various census records, but conflicts with the genealogy book and obituary.

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp

1818

1916 Book, p. 161: Eleanor Smith Born 12Oct1818, father Scotch Robin [Robert] Smith.

[The 1880 Census says her father born in Scotland and mother in VA.]

 

1835

Ref. 15, P. 136: Isaac C. Vannice admitted to the Six Mile Presbyterian Church by profession of faith on 21Jun1835.  The 1824 post and beam church building has been moved and reconstructed and is now a fiber art establishment near its original site outside Pleasureville, KY.

http://www.sweet-home-spun.com/dutch.htm

1837

1916 Book, p. 161: Isaac married Eleanor Smith 28Sep1837 near Eminence, Henry County, KY

1899 Miami (MO) News obituary for Isaac Vanice confirms the date.  Eminence is a larger town a few miles west of Six Mile (Pleasureville).

 

1838

1916 Book, p. 161: William Dodd Vanice born 18Jul1838 near Pleasureville, KY to Isaac and Eleanor.

 

1839

Ref. 15, P. 136: Ellen Vannice admitted to the Six Mile Presbyterian Church by transfer from Drennon Creek Church on 12Apr1839.  Drennon Creek runs into the KY River a few miles north of Six Mile, but I could find no information on the church, which was likely Presbyterian.

 

1840

1840 US Census: Western Div. Henry County, KY

               Isaac C Vannice [sic] head of family

               Free Whites:

Males under 5: 1 [William Dodd Vanice, age 1, born 18Jul1838]

               Males 15 & under 20: 1 [A relative of Isaac or Eleanor?]

               Males 20 & under 30: 1 [Isaac Covert Vanice age 29, born 24Aug1810]

               Females 20 & under 30: 1 [Eleanor Smith Vanice age 21, born 12Oct1818]

               Slaves: Females under 10: 1

               No. of persons engaged in manufacture & trade: 1 [Presumably Isaac, a wagon maker]

 

1916 Book, p. 161: Isaac and his wife and son lived near Pleasureville [Henry County], KY until 1840

[after the census], when they removed to Miami [more likely Arrow Rock], MO.

 

 

1. “1916 Book” A record of the Family of Isaac Van Nuys (or Vannice) of Harrodsburg, Kentucky, Son of Isaac Van Nuys of Millstone, New Jersey by Carrie E Allen 1916 (Page numbers from the version retyped in 1972 on 8.5×11 pages, and easier to read than the reprint of the original edition)

 

15. Kentucky Ancestors, Spring 2005: Article entitled, First Methodist Presbyterian Church, Eminence (KY), 1877-1925, includes information transcribed from “A Record of Session Book of the Presbyterian Church of Sixmile”  (church name changed to Pleasureville in 1857).

http://history.ky.gov/pdf/Publications/ancestors_v40_n3.pdf

Larry 

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From Jim Cozine 

Maybe this is what we have at Dutch Cousin Gatherings! 

.. JImNo. 2: Gezellig Gezelligheid

Posted on Sep 2011 by Stuff Dutch People Like

“No translation possible. Please try again.”

How could we possibly expect to make a list of stuff Dutch people like and not include this perplexing little guttural-sounding word at the top of the list!

You will quickly learn that Dutch people like love this word. They are fiercely proud of this word and all it represents. I would go as far to say that gezelligheid is the modern day religion of the Dutch. They love it, they need it and they respect it.

In fact, Dutch folk are going to ask you over and over again if you know what gezellig means. Once you do know it’s meaning, they are then going to ask you over and over again if you know how to pronounce it. Learn to love it too, because you won’t escape it (or its pronunciation), and you will soon seen that gezelligheid truly is all around you.

For those of you not yet knowing what gezellig means, let’s get one thing straight: this word has NO accurate English translations. Yes, it’s a sad fact my friends, but it’s true. People will try and try again to tell you that it means cozy… or quaint… or familiar…or friendly… or a nice atmosphere… or a fun time, but you get where this is going; no one word can really sum it upGezellig and gezelligheid are less about a word and more about a feeling. Yes, this is starting to sound all chakras-and-healing-crystals to you, but truthfully, gezellig(heid) can only really be felt.

het-was-gezellig.jpg

You can say that again!

Things do get even trickier to comprehend, because Dutch people tend to evaluate everything on its particular level of gezelligheid. A place can be gezellig, a room can be gezellig, a person can be gezellig, an evening can be gezellig. Christ, even childbirth can be rated by its gezellig-ness (my doctor once told me she preferred home births, simply because they were, “well… just more gezellig”)!

But as we all know, there are two sides to every coin. True to its form, meet ongezelliggezellig‘s nasty twin brother. Again, ongezellig is a precise astute word like no other. “Let’s get out of this place, its just so ongezellig” can sum it up like nobody else can.

I’ll never forget taking an impromptu boat ride with a friend of mine and her family. After an hour spin and a stop by a canal-side restaurants for a nibble, we  docked the boat as her 3 year old Dutch son turned to me, clasped his hands together and sighed while saying “ge-zel-lig”! Truth be told, it was the only word that accurately summed up our day. And even a 3 year-old knew it.

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Letters 5/9/2014

from Mocavo.com genealogy 

Mother’s Day is right around the corner and what better way to celebrate your mom than to help discover and share her story. From now until Monday at midnight, we are opening up our universal search to all members of the Mocavo community. Usually you need to be a Mocavo Gold member to search all of our databases at once, but for this weekend only, all Mocavo members have the ability to search more than 340,000 databases to their heart’s content. In honor of Mother’s Day, spend some time discovering the stories of the important women in your life.

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From Robert Adlet:

Carolyn, I forwarded a couple of emails from ancestry.com from the book “A record of the family of Isaac Van Nuys (or Vannice) of Harrodsburg, Kentucky: son of Isaac Van Nuys of Milestone, New Jersey”

 

the first was a copy of the deed for “Old Mud” from pg 33, the second the genealogy of Isaac Covert Vanice from pg 263.

 

Just confirming the info in the latest Dutch Cousins newsletter with the Vanice info by Larry Vanice.

 

I didn’t know how else to send them to you as my printer is not working, so I don’t even know if you will get them in proper form.

 

Robert Adlet

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from Larry Vanice

That Ancestry.com excerpt is page 32 from the 1916 Vanice family history book.  It is on Ancestry.com, you can buy a CD of it on eBay, and the Allen County (Fort Wayne, IN) Library has two printed versions.  The book should be of interest to all the Cousins because the Van Nuys’s married a lot of fellow Dutch neighbors over several generations.  Miss Allen was a Van Nuys descendant and did a fantastic job of assembling the information in the book back when people had to write letters on paper and wait for a horse to carry it. 

 

About any Dutch name you can think of is mentioned in the book.  Isaac Covert Vanice was born in 1810 or 1811.  The Isaac Vanice that was a founder of the Old Mud was his grandfather.  A page or two before the Old Mud deed, there is a 1795 letter from the Salt River congregation back to the NJ Reformed Church classis (fathers?) asking for a pastor who could preach in both Dutch and English to baptize more than forty children and otherwise help to bond the many Dutch residents together so that they would not separate.  There is also good information about the raising of funds to build the church.  The author points out that Aucke Janse Van Nuys, the first to come to America, was a carpenter and was in charge of building the first church on Long Island.  Then his grandson Isaac helped establish the Reformed church at Millstone, NJ and that Isaac’s son, another Isaac, helped establish the Old Mud church.  I suppose the next generation helped found the Sixmile church.

 

Larry 

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From Dutch Cousins President John Westerfield:

Hi Carolyn,  Diana sent the $4,000 donation for Old Mud on May 2.  We now have a balance of $772.28 in the checking account plus $500.46 in our saving account.  She has a grandson due on May 14 and will be in Virginia until middle of June.  She will get the filing fee paid before she goes to Virginia.

 

As a reminder when you send out letter to the members please remind them to be thinking about items for the silent auction at our next reunion in 2015.

 

Your Cousin

John

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From Larry Vanice

Carolyn, I just found that there is a very high quality photographic copy of  A Record of the Family of Isaac Van Nuys (or Vannice) of Harrodsburg, Kentucky, Son of Isaac Van Nuys of Millstone, New Jersey by Carrie E. Allen, 1916 on archive.org.  It is searchable, a very good thing because the book has only a useless two page index.

 

I am sure you and many of the Cousins are aware of the book, but may not have found this recent scan.  I read an original book in the Fort Wayne library around 1968, but the shelves now only have a facsimile copy by University Microfilms that lacks one page and has poor photos.  They also have a copy of the book, carefully typed out on a typewriter on letter size paper, including that page missing from the microfilm version.  My CD copy is of the microfilm version, only worse.  The microfilm version can also be found online, as can an OCR text with lots of typos.  And I see Amazon sells very low quality paper copies of the microfilm version.  So having access to the new online (downloadable) photo copy is very valuable.

 

Now anyone with a computer can quickly find all the mentions of whatever name they wish to search.  And there are mentions of many Dutch names because the families were large and the marriages were mostly within the Dutch community for about 175 years after Aucke Janse Van Nuys (or Van Nuis) came to New Amsterdam in 1651.

 

Some may wonder why the author’s name is Allen.  It is a good story, told on pages 176 –177 of the book.  Carrie’s father, Tandy Allen and uncle, Samuel Van Nice, each had a sister and the four young people married after moving from Indiana to new farm claims in Iowa in 1856.  As of 1916, her parents had been married 60 years.  Carrie was an unmarried school teacher, born in 1856, and must have been a demon letter writer and a real bulldog when it came to doing research, tracking down distant relatives and wringing out old documents and memories.  There is very good information in the book beyond a bare list of names and dates.  The building of Old Mud Church is a prime example.

 

https://archive.org/details/recordoffamilyof00byualle

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May I brag just a little?  The 2014 Oklahoma Writers’ Federation, Inc. Conference last week was a blast and an educational one as well as quite successful in promoting our craft. I believe 225 entrants submitted 920 manuscripts in 34 categories of the contest.

Here’s what Judge Brenda Black said on my Western Article about Carry A. Nation, The Hatchet Lady:

Congratulations on winning 1st Honorable Mention, especially when it was the only award for the category!

Judge’s comments:

EXCELLENT ARTICLE

EXCELLENT RESEARCH

EXCELLENT VOICE

As stated, I got a bit picky because it is so good. Remember to go back and edit, edit, edit. There are several run-on sentences in the first page or so that need to be broken up. As the article wore on, you found your pace and those were mostly eliminated. Watch for too many prepositional phrases. In my opinion, the second paragraph should be the first and the first one could be purged or worked in elsewhere.

It’s a shame the category didn’t make. This would have been the First Place Winner. Excellent writing.

fat lady, bad hair, squinty eyes!.jpg 10294378_10152437874679309_1216341704506582961_n.jpg

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From Judy Cassidy:  

Announcing great series of programs put on by the Genealogical Society of New Jersey and the Archives.  So I thought perhaps  you might  wish to include it in an email. Perhaps there are people who would like to attend.

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FamilySearch is FREE; the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

———————————————–

Judith Smith Cassidy was awarded the Max Bradbury Award for most

>  “outstanding article,” published in the North Louisiana History for the

> calendar year 2014. “The Murder of William D. Vanarsdell was published in

> the North Louisiana History, Vol. XLIV, No.’s 1-2, Winter Spring Issue,

> 2013, a publication of the North Louisiana Historical Association,

> Shreveport, LA,  The Award winner is chosen by a committee of at least 3

> members of the Board of Directors.The award is named for the late Max

> Bradbury who was the first editor of the North Louisiana Historical

> Association Newsletter.

————————

Letters 5/23/2014

from rett? ….

Carolyn, You might be interested in this item I ran across on Etsy.  I am not the seller, just noticed the name & thought that someone who researched the family might want it.

It says “Peterson Van Arsdale Mother Lowe’s Brother” on the back.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/94506576/antique-tintype-photograph-small-size-in?ref=listing-shop-header-4

Interesting tintype of a 1860s Civil War gentleman who bears a resemblance to Abraham Lincoln. His hollow cheeks are tinted pink. The actual tintype is trimmed in an octagonal shape and mounted in an ornately embossed presentation card. The gentleman’s name is written in pencil on the back, “Peterson Van Arsdale Mother Lowe’s Brother”. Interestingly, the paper that was used to close the back appears to be the to let classified section of a New York newspaper. One ad is for a rental on 55th Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenues, the rate: $7.50. Wonder what it rents for today, lol.

———————————————–

from Mary Bates

Thanks for all the updates.  My husband and I are driving to my Atherton High School reunion in Louisville, KY in June.  Coming back we are spending the night of June 29 at the Beaumont Inn and have dinner reservations at Shaker Village.  In the afternoon we are going to the old Mudd Meeting House and seeing the grounds.  My Terhune relatives are buried in the Bellevue Cemetary in Danville, KY so we will go there, too.  This is a beautifully maintained cemetary.

 

Any specific directions on how to get to Mudd from the Beaumont Inn?  Will GPS work?  Is it possible to enter Mudd or is it kept locked?

 

I have a copy of the VAN NUYS GENEOLOGY written by Carrie E. Allen in 1916.  It has over 300 pages of begats.  Women did not live as long as men in those days.  So many died in childbirth.  It starts in 1651 with the first immigrants.  Love seeing the pictures in the book.  Also, I have a framed picture of my great grandfather and his wife on their wedding day with their children.  He was a widower and she was a widow and they had six kids after they married.  One was my grandfather Baker Ewing Terhune who graduated from Centre College in Danville.  He did not preach, but his brother, Thomas Terhune who was also a graduate of Centre, was a Presbyterian pastor.

NOTE from Carolyn

Yes Old Mud is kept locked up and has a new security system that will set off alarms if the perimeter is entered without permission. There has been vandalism so it is being closely watched. (You don’t want to get arrested!) Contact the Harrodsburg Historical Society (owner) for permission to go there and they will give you directions (it is about three miles from Harrodsburg.) The HHS number is (859) 734-5985. President Jerry Sampson (859) 734-7829 or (859) 734-9888, or our Dutch Cousins rep Amalie Preston (859) 265-7278 might be able to arrange the visit or even go with you.

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from Dutch Genealogy news

23 May 2014

Miller. Credits: Molenaar by Jan Luyken. Geneaknowhow

molenaar was a miller. There were different types of mills. Besides the classic Dutch wind-powered mill, there were also horse-drawn mills and water mills. Mills could be used for different purposes, the most common being grind grain or to drain water from low-lying fields. People could not just build a mill, that right was reserved for the landlord. Before the 19th century, most millers did not own the mills that they worked, but worked for the landlord. The French occupation put an end to those manorial rights, giving rise to more owner-operated mills.

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from Larry Woodward

Carolyn,

I have very much enjoyed receiving the newsletter which I learned about when I visited Harrodsburg 18 months ago.  When there I was able to visit my ancestor Cornelius Vanarsdall’s veteran marker for his Revolutionary War service at Old Mud.

My great grandmother was Emma Vanarsdall from Mercer County.  She married Thomas Bosly and moved to Indianapolis.  Their daughter Sarah, my paternal grandmother married Alvin Woodward around 1904 in Hendricks County, Indiana.

My Vanarsdall line moving back in time as I know it starting with Sarah’s mother is:

Emma Vanarsdall

George Vanarsdall

Cornelius B. Vanarsdall

Cornelius O. Vanarsdall

Geret Vanarsdall.  Last name spelling unsure

I also have relatives with names I see on your list including Banta, Smock, Adams, and Sharp.

I know my great grandmother Emma had lots of siblings.  Curious to know if some relatives of hers are still in the local area.

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Gezelligheid Looks like a Dutch translation of a Deutsch word,

Gemütlichkeit. from Jack “Johannes” TAYLOR

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from judy cassidy

Congratulations to you Carolyn.  I am sure that you would agree with me that two of the most important things any writer should do while you are in the process of writing anything is first to footnote and cite your sources right away while writing your rough draft and second constantly edit.  Editing your own material can be tough simply because after you have read the document a gazillion times, you really don’t necessarily have a clear view. So it helps if you have a friend willing to help you out.  Double spacing while writing helps some what, but I would encourage all of you who have told me so many times, that you have great intentions of compiling all your family papers into a readable document to go for it.  I am sure that there is such a wealth of information among all the Dutch cousins but none of us are getting any younger, many of our children and grandchildren do not have the same interest, so it is up to us to not lose what we spent to many years collection.  Computers are great, you can cut and paste, move your text around, use all the editing tools, we live in such a great age of technology. So I would encourage everyone to just jump in and take a chance, you might really enjoy it.  If you love puzzles, this is like assembling a giant puzzle and just as much fun.

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from Kerin Smith

Hi Carolyn and all our Low Dutch cousins:  I have been looking at the Van Nuys book included in your last newsletter, and find very interesting information and some familiar names.  As many of us who try to piece together our family histories, I still have some gaps in information I haven’t been able to tie up.  One of those concerns a possible tie to the Van Nuys genealogy.

One of my Revolutionary War ancestors is Issaac Covert who died in Kentucky – b 1755,

d 1822.  His wife was Ann Van Arsdale, who outlived her husband and died in or near Franklin, Indiana.  b 1756 d 1828.  I have not been able to positively identify Ann’s parents, but have hints that they were Cornelius VanArsdale and Lemmetje Van Nuys  – b 1729 in Flatlands NY d 1761.  I find that they were married 1 Jan 1745.

I do not locate any person matching this information in the Van Nuys book.  I am wondering if anyone out there in your contacts might have any information that could help me tie this up.  I can trace back to Albert Albertse through the Terhune and Banta lines.

Any information that can shed any light on this particular mystery would be much appreciated.

Kerin Smith

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from Connie Anoonshan

Dear Carolyn–I have enjoyed reading all your emails–thank you so much. This Armenian Bridge email might be of interest to you? My Dutch connection is G-GF Aaron Melville Dudrey m. Stella Elmira Cleveland (ancestors in NY, NH, Ohio, MN). And of course, you see my husband,

Armen receives info about the Armenians.

Connie

THE ARMENIAN BRIDGE

An ancient Amsterdam bridge, which was a frequent passageway for Armenian merchants in the 17th century, has been named Passageway Named “The Armenian  Bridge ” “ Armenian Bridge ”,

thanks to the efforts of one man, 60 year old Nikolai Romashuk, Jerusalem born Romashuk, whose

mother is Armenian, emigrated to Holland in 1976

Since then he has been an active member of the Dutch-Armenian community.

and settled in the northern city of Assen .

He said that he spent years researching the history of the JULFA, Armenian

merchants at the Dutch National Archives at the

University of Amsterdam .

And after that several more years to convince the

Amsterdam municipality that naming the old

bridge after the Armenian merchants was a worthwhile idea.

To help get the green light from city hall, Romashuk also pointed out that he

had discovered the graves of a number of Armenian priests and merchants in the

Old Church

in the heart of Amsterdam .

One such grave bears the number 444. To further buttress his case of the long-time and Armenian-Dutch relations, he added that Soviet Armenian soldiers, veterans of the Second World War, are buried in the Dutch city of Leusden .This is not the first time Romashuk has raised the Armenian profile in his

adopted country. Some years ago, Romashuk – founder and chairman of the

Armenian Social and Cultural Foundation – helped bring to Assen a huge khachkar

(Stone Cross) from Armenia .

Now every year, on April 24, Assen Armenians commemorate, in front of the

khachkar, the genocide of the Armenians by

Turkey in 1915.

There are 300 to 400 Armenians in the city, mostly fromArmenia , Iraq ,Turkey .

Iran .

Romashuk has also helped establish an Armenian cemetery in his town – the only

one in Holland .

It is named after Hrant Dink. Time and funds permitting, he also publishes “Parev

Tsez” (Hello to you), the only Armenian journal in Holland.

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from the New Netherland Institute

Dutch History in the Capital Region 1650 – 1664 – Lecture

 

On Thursday, May 29th at 6:30PM, Janny Venema,PhD, Associate Director of the New Netherland Institute will be at the Troy Public Library to discuss The Dutch History in the Capital Region from 1650 -1664.

In 1652, Petrus Stuyvesant, director general of New Netherland, established a court at Fort Orange, on the west side of New York State’s upper Hudson River. The area within three thousand feet of the fort became the village of Beverwijck. From the time of its establishment until 1664, when the English conquered New Netherland and changed the name of the settlement to Albany, Beverwijck underwent rapid development as newly wealthy traders, craftsmen, and other workers built houses, roads, bridges, and a school, as well as a number of inns. A well-organized system of poor relief also helped less wealthy settlers survive in the harsh colonial conditions. Although Beverwijck resembled villages in the Dutch Republic in many ways, it quickly took on features of the new, “American” society that was already coming into being.

Dr. Venema will also speak about Kiliaen van Rensselaer and the patroonship of Rensselaerswijck.

            This program is free and open to the public. Registration is necessary.  For more information and to register call the library at 274-7071 or online at www.thetroylibrary.org.  The Troy Public Library is located at 100 2nd Street, Troy, NY.

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from Rod Dempsey

This is interesting, Carolyn.  I volunteered  in KY prisons, putting on ecumenical religious programs for 20 years. I can understand how difficult  it would be to obtain much information . I would hope that this information would not be obtained by cruel people with a hateful agenda against someone who had a relative in prison, who would then gossip about a family who had a  black sheep in their genealogy.

Hopefully,there are not any people out there that would stick their noses into other family’s history with the intent to do them harm.

Soldiers who fought for a cause, like the Revolutionary or Civil  war is an entirely different matter.

I believe the public has a First Amendment right to examine any public record. Too many things are being kept confidential today. In KY, we have a problem accessing records  of children who have bee neglected or abuses,  especially where a child has died. Child Protection records are not being released. I think that is wrong. Bad publicity for the perpetrators is due to be publicly exposed.

Rod

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From Carolyn:  In the book “The Battle of Perryville” it says that nearly every church in Harrodsburg was filled with wounded soldiers from the battle.  It named several churches, and told incidents that happened there.  My question is — what about Old Mud’s role in the Civil War Battle aftermath?  Anyone have an answer?

—–

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

List of Perryville Battlefield Casualties Now Available Online

With the help of a class from Centre College, the Perryville Battlefield State Historic Site now has a digital database of more than 5,800 soldiers who died, were wounded or went missing during the largest Civil War battle in Kentucky. The database includes where the soldier was buried, if that is known.

Perryville is the scene of the most destructive Civil War battle in the state. The park museum tells of the battle that was the South’s last serious attempt to gain possession of Kentucky. The battlefield is one of the most unaltered Civil War sites in the nation; vistas today remain virtually those soldiers saw on that fateful day in 1862.

“This is a great resource for anyone doing family or military research,” said Parks Commissioner Elaine Walker. “Our thanks go out to Centre College and the students who worked on this project.”

The database can be viewed at: http://www.perryvillebattlefield.org.

More details about the creation of the database may be found athttp://migration.kentucky.gov/newsroom/parks/PBdatabase051214.htm.

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from Dutch Genealogy news

A tale of two calendars

23 May 2014 | Yvette Hoitink

Almost everywhere in the world today, we use the Gregorian calendar. It has 365 days a year, with the occasional leap year that is determined as follows:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.1

This calculation of the leap years make sure that the average length of the year matches the time it takes the earth to revolve around the sun.

Before the Gregorian calendar, most countries including the Netherlands, used the Julian calendar. This was just a little less accurate, so over time the changing of the seasons misaligned with the calendar date, leading to a shift of 11 days by 1582 and 12 days by 1700. When the Gregorian calendar was introduced, those days were skipped to correct this shift.

Most countries adopted the Gregorian calendar between 1582 and 1701. One of the last countries to adopt the Gregorian calendar was Russia, after the October-revolution of 1917, which actually took place in November on the Gregorian calendar.

Introduction of the Gregorian calendar in the Netherlands

Map of the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands. Image credits: Joostik, Wikimedia Commons

Interestingly, the Gregorian calendar wasn’t introduced in the Netherlands all at once. In 1582, protestant people under the leadership of William of Orange tried to free themselves from the Spanish (Roman Catholic) rule.

In general, the provinces under the control of the Spanish (Roman Catholic) King introduced the Gregorian calendar in 1582 while the provinces under the Orange (Protestant) rule introduced the Gregorian calendar in 1700/1701, but even then they did not all do it on the same date.

The following table shows the exact dates when each province introduced the Gregorian calendar:2

Province End date Julian calendar Start date Gregorian calendar
Brabant, Zeeland  14 December 1582 25 December 1582
Limburg  20 or 21 December 1582 31 December 1582 or 1 January 1583
Holland  1 January 1583 12 January 1583
Groningen  10 February 1583 21 February 1583.

Returned to Julian calendar in the summer of 1594.

Gelderland 30 June 1700 12 July 1700
Utrecht, Overijssel 30 November 1700 12 December 1700
Groningen 31 December 1700 12 January 1701 (second time).
Friesland 31 December 1700 12 January 1701
Drenthe 30 April 1701 12 May 1701

Implications for research

When you encounter a date in original records that is between 1582 and 1701, it could be in either the Julian or the Gregorian calendar, depending on the location. Some records use double dates (i.e. 10/21 July 1583) but those are rare. You will need to find out where the record was created to determine whether the date was in the Julian or in the Gregorian calendar.

Most genealogists just enter the date as they find it in the record, regardless of the calendar. If you encounter a Julian date and calculate the accompanying Gregorian date and use the calculated Gregorian date in your publication or database, be sure to make a note about that.

Usually, you don’t get in trouble when using the Julian date without converting it to the Gregorian date, but it can be significant if you want to find out what day of the week a certain event took place. For example, you might get suspicious if a church baptizes children on a Thursday only. Chances are, those dates are in the Julian calendar and the corresponding Gregorian date is 11 days later, on a Sunday. When in doubt, refer back to the table above and check which calendar was in use at the time.

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Letters 6/1/2014
From Jean Simon: 
Thanks very, very  much, Carolyn, for the fascinating info on when Netherlands accepted the Gregorian Calendar, explanation of Leap Year, which I’d nevertheless heard before, and for naming the 11 Netherland provinces.   I wish we had the same info pertinent to the British Isles’ acceptance of the Gregorian calendar, and all its ancient provinces named, including the shortening of the names of the shires.  Does anyone have that info, all concise as in below?  I suppose USA and Canada followed Great Britain’s acceptance of the Gregorian calendar.
Jean Simon, descendant of the Van Nordens, Melyns, New Jersey Hatfields, Westervelts, etc.
Huntsville, Alabama
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from Martha Roach
i played bridge with a lady some years ago, diana ramsdook.  i think that was the way she spelled her last name, and she lived at epworth villa the last i knew.  her son was an accomplished chef and worked at numerous hotels and private golf clubs in the OKC metro area.  i saw a similar spelling in this newsletter and thought i would throw this in.
also, when i first started selling real estate in the mid 1970’s, a mr. bill venema was with the prudential financial office in OKC and helped me set up  a retirement account there.
always enjoy reading the newsletter.m.roach, edmond, OK
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NOTICE: dues to Harrodsburg historical Society are payable each may; $20 per person. That puts you on the mailing list for their newsletters and other info of special interest to our Dutch. Pleae include correct mailing address and phone number. Mail to:
Membership Committee
Harrodsburg Historical Society
Box 316
Harrodsburg, KY 40330-0316
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Dr. Robert “Bob” Schenck, The new president of the Holland Society of New York is well-known to those of us who attended the 2013 Gathering of Dutch Cousins in Madison, Indiana.  His letter to members begins with these words: “I have a vision …”  Read the newsletter (forwarded by Jim Cozine) here:
HSNY President's Letter May 2014.pdf
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Dutch History in the Capital Region 1650 – 1664 – Lecture
 On Thursday, May 29th at 6:30PM, Janny Venema,PhD, Associate Director of the New Netherland Research Center will be at the Troy Public Library to discuss The Dutch History in the Capital Region from 1650 -1664.
                           In 1652, Petrus Stuyvesant, director general of New Netherland, established a court at Fort Orange, on the west side of New York State’s upper Hudson River. The area within three thousand feet of the fort became the village of Beverwijck. From the time of its establishment until 1664, when the English conquered New Netherland and changed the name of the settlement to Albany, Beverwijck underwent rapid development as newly wealthy traders, craftsmen, and other workers built houses, roads, bridges, and a school, as well as a number of inns. A well-organized system of poor relief also helped less wealthy settlers survive in the harsh colonial conditions. Although Beverwijck resembled villages in the Dutch Republic in many ways, it quickly took on features of the new, “American” society that was already coming into being.
            Dr. Venema will also speak about Kiliaen van Rensselaer and the patroonship of Rensselaerswijck.
            This program is free and open to the public. Registration is necessary.  For more information and to register call the library at 274-7071 or online at www.thetroylibrary.org.  The Troy Public Library is located at 100 2nd Street, Troy, NY.
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From Amsterdam to Albany:  An Address by Russell Shorto
Russell Shorto, the 2013 New Netherland Research Center Senior Scholar and author of The Island at the Center of the World and Amsterdam: A History of the World’s Most Liberal City, as well as other acclaimed works, will talk about Dutch cultural heritage from Amsterdam and its influence on Albany, New York.
The talk will be followed by a signing of his most recent book Amsterdam: A History of the World’s Most Liberal City, named one of Publisher’s Weekly Best Books of 2013 and described as “an expertly told history of a city of new, shocking freedoms and the tough-minded people that developed them.” Copies of the book will be available for sale.
Russell Shorto’s research with the New Netherland Research center has focused on following several families from New Netherland though early American history and exploring their paths during the American Revolution. He is a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and former Director of the John Adams Institute in Amsterdam. Mr. Shorto’s books have won several literary prizes including the New York City Book Award, the Washington Irving Prize, and the New York Public Library Award. In 2009 he received a knighthood from the Dutch government for advancing Dutch-American Relations.
When: Thursday, June 19, 2014 @ 6:00 p.m.
Where: Huxley Theater, 1st floor Cultural Education Center, Empire State Plaza, Albany
Sponsored by the Friends of the New York State Library
Co-sponsor: New York State Library
Free and open to the public
Registration is recommended by calling 518-474-2274 or registering online athttp://www.nysl.nysed.gov/programs/index.html.
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Use D/2 Biological Solution to Clean Gravestones
The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.
D-2 Bilogical Solution-gallon.jpg
Genealogists and anyone else interested in preserving cemetery tombstones and other objects exposed to the weather should become familiar with D/2 Biological Solution. It is useful for cleaning tombstones without causing any damage to the stone. The solution is safe for use and does not harm the tombstone. Even the highly-respected Association for Gravestone Studies recommends the product in the organization’s FAQs (Frequently-Asked Questions) athttps://www.gravestonestudies.org/knowledge-center/faq-s#faqnoanchor:
“Treat a wet gravestone with D/2 Biological Solution, scrub into a lather using a plastic bristle brush, and smooth the lather into the inscription to make the letters more readable. Afterward, rinse the stone thoroughly.”
graveyard-primer.jpg
Further details may be obtained from A Graveyard Preservation Primer, 1st Edition, by Lynette Strangstad and published by the Association for Gravestone Studies at http://goo.gl/xM4Qx4
D/2 Biological Solution is even used to clean the outside of the White House and also recently won a Veterans Administration contract to supply cleaner for over 3.5 million headstones and another contract to clean Civil War monuments at the Chickamauga battlefield. (Details may be found at http://d2bio.com/news.) 
D/2 Biological Solution is a biodegradable, easy-to-use liquid that removes stains due to mold, algae, mildew, lichens and air pollutants. It is effective not only on tombstones, but also on marble, granite, limestone, brownstone, travertine, masonry, terra cotta, concrete, stucco, wood, and other architectural surfaces, including monuments and sculptures. 
D/2 Biological Solution is easy to use. Apply it to the surface to be cleaned, preferably by using a soft-bristle brush. Wait 10 to 15 minutes, and then scrub the surface to be cleaned, again by using a soft nylon or natural bristle brush to loosen most biological and air pollutant staining. Never use a stiff brush or anything abrasive on a tombstone or other stone surface! Be sure to bring a watering can or other water source along so that you can rinse the solution off the cleaned surface when you’re done. 
D/2 Biological Solution:
  • is biodegradable
  • will not harm plants, stone, animals or people
  • contains no acids, salts, or chlorine
  • is pH neutral
  • will not etch metals or glass
  • is not a hazardous material and requires no special handling or protection
  • is used full strength with no in-field mixing required
  • contains no carcinogenic compounds as defined by NTP, IARC, or OSHA
  • is considered essentially non-toxic by swallowing
  • requires no special ventilation during use
  • has a shelf life of 5 years
D/2 Biological Solution is available in 1-gallon and 5-gallon containers and 55-gallon drums. 
All in all, I’d suggest this is a good product used to clean many surfaces, including tombstones. You can learn more about D/2 Biological Solution at http://d2bio.com. It can be ordered from a number of distributors with a list available at http://d2bio.com/buy-d2. I also found it available in 1-gallon containers from Amazon at http://goo.gl/LfebAH.
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The Death of Microfilm
microfilm-viewers.jpg
Genealogists love microfilm. Visit any genealogy library anywhere, and you will see genealogists in darkened rooms, hunched over microfilm viewers, trying to solve the puzzles of their family trees. I have taken several pictures of genealogists sitting at rows of microfilm readers. However, I suspect that within ten years those pictures will become collectors’ items, recalling an era that exists only as distant memories in the minds of “the old-timers.” You see, microfilm and microfiche are about to disappear.
Many of the manufacturers of microfilm and microfiche equipment have already disappeared or else have switched their production lines to other products.
The problem is economics: microfilm is expensive. Those who wish to preserve data find it faster, easier, and cheaper to scan documents on computer scanners and then make the information available as disk images than it is to do the same thing on microfilm. Hospitals, insurance companies, government agencies, and others have already made the switch from microfilm to digital imaging. Genealogists are among the very few still using microfilm and even that number is dropping rapidly.
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Email Your Documents Directly to Evernote
The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.
evernote_logo_center_4c-lrg.png
Evernote is a great—and free—tool for genealogists and almost everyone else. Installed on Windows, Macintosh, Android, or Apple iOS systems, it is primarily a system for recording, storing, and retrieving notes about any topic. It shares your notes amongst all your systems—desktop, laptop, and handheld alike. I say it is PRIMARILY a system for storing notes, but it has many other uses as well. A smartphone user can even take pictures or videos with the phone and then store them directly in Evernote. Even Google Glass can store pictures and videos into Evernote. In fact, Evernote will store text notes, email messages, pictures, videos, audio, web pages, and more. I suspect every user of Evernote has different needs and methods of organizing things. I consider this to be the beauty of the program; you can configure it to work the way that YOU want.
While I use Evernote for many different purposes, I use it for genealogy primarily to record my research notes and especially for my “to-do list” of FUTURE research tasks that need to be conducted. For instance, before entering the Penobscot County Courthouse, I search for the words “penobscot county” in Evernote, and it immediately shows every note I have that refers to this county. If I want to find tasks I have previously assigned to myself as “to-do tasks,” I enter a search of
to-do penobscot county
That quickly narrows the list down to only those tasks I added to my to-do list. I can narrow it even further by a search for:
to-do penobscot county courthouse
Entering new notes into Evernote can be either tedious or very easy to do, depending upon the method used. For quick notes, I enter them directly via the keyboard. However, if someone sends me an email message that requires follow-up at a later date, I simply forward the message to Evernote, and it is automatically stored.
I am often surprised how many Evernote users are not aware of the “forward to Evernote by email” feature. Yet it is available to all Evernote users.
When you sign up for an Evernote account, you are given a unique email address that works with the program. You can find this address at any time in the desktop version of Evernote: click on TOOLS, then ACCOUNT INFO. Your email address will look similar to this:dickeastman.12345@evernote.com. You can forward any email message to Evernote by sending it (or click on FORWARD) to this email address. The message should appear within Evernote within a few minutes.
To find the email address in the Apple iOS version (iPhone and iPad), open Evernote, touch the SETTINGS icon (which looks like a gear), then touch GENERAL, then scroll down and touch EVERNOTE EMAIL ADDRESS. The Android version is a bit different: open Evernote, touch your name near the top of the screen, touch ACCOUNT INFO, and you will see the email address displayed about two-thirds of the way down the screen.
Of course, the assigned email address is a bit cryptic and difficult to remember. One way to find the address in the future is to store it as a note in Evernote! When you want to forward an email to this address, you can search for the note as described earlier. Even better, storing this address in your address book will save mouse-clicks when you are in the middle of an email message.
To store this address with your other contacts, from Evernote’s SETTINGS menu, choose ADD TO CONTACTS below the email address. After that, any time you want to store an email message in Evernote, simply open the message and click FORWARD as usual; then follow the prompts to search for and insert your Evernoteemail address. The exact instructions will vary from one email program to another, but searching for and inserting email addresses from the address book is usually a simple operation in all email programs.
Note: The above steps work for most email programs. For a few others, you may need to copy your Evernote email address and then paste or enter it into the email program’s address book.
When you’re ready to forward a message to Evernote, you will find it helpful to give the subject line a word or phrase that will help you find it quickly in Evernote. To do so, once you click on FORWARD, change the subject line of the email message to whatever you want it to be when it is stored in Evernote. You can also place the forwarded message directly in an existing Evernote notebook by specifying that notebook in the same subject line; just add an @ symbol followed by the name of your destination notebook. Another neat tip is to add a # sign followed by the name of one of your existing Evernote tags. If you want to use multiple tags, proceed each one with the # sign.
For instance, to send the email message about Maxime Theriault to my Evernote program’s genealogy notebook about the Theriault family, I could use a subject line of:
Maxime Theriault christening record @genealogy #theriault #to-do #acadia #aroostook
Note that you can insert multiple tags, if desired. Both the notebook name and the tags must already exist within Evernote. Also, this feature will not work for notebook or tag names that contain an “@” or a “#” in their name.
(My French-Canadians all lived in Aroostook County, Maine, for the past 150 years or more. I use a tag of “Aroostook” for records believed to be in that county.)
Try it! If you use it a few times, I suspect you will soon become accustomed to adding email messages to Evernote. Those notes will also include the name and email address of the person who sent the information to you as well as the date and timestamp of the email message. That’s all handy information to preserve.
For instance, just below this article you will see a number of links. The left-most link is labeled EMAIL. Click on that link and enter your Evernote email address. The article will appear in your Evernote database of notes within a few minutes. In the future, if you ever forget how to send email to Evernote, simply open Evernote and search for:
send email to evernote
I bet this article will be displayed within a very few seconds, giving you full instructions.
I find the email-to-Evernote function to be one of the easiest methods of preserving notes and to-do action items.
Letters 6/11/2014

from Rod Dempsey

Great accumulation of worthwhile and varied articles  Carolyn. You provide a very valuable service to us Dutch Cousins. I don’t think the organization would survive without  you. You keep the Dutch family growing as more Cousins discover your neat publications. 

Rod

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from Jack Taylor

Y-DNA & Autosomal DNA tests for Tree Climbers.

by Jack, aka Johannes, TAYLOR 

  

 To be 99%+ certain of kinship 2 things are needed 1. A paper trail &  2. DNA evidence.  

I am no expert on DNA testing for genealogy purposes.  That being admitted here is what I believe today.

 Since 1963 I have been working on my paper trail. In recent years I sent a cheek swab sample of my DNA to myFTDNA for a Y-DNA test.

 ttps://my.familytreedna.com/ 

 

Y-DNA

The Y-DNA test tests only direct paternal linage, but to a very distant prehistory past. My main purpose was to find cousins that would help me find the parents of my elusive TAYLOR brick wall.

The Y-DNA test has generated some very interesting general information and placed me in contact with many people in a TAYLOR specific group. But, I have yet to get past that brick wall. And, I have never been able to contact a cousin and complete a paper trail of our kinship. The closest name so far has 58.99% probability of a common male ancestor in the 4th generation back.

What I just said about Y-DNA is too pessimistic.  Data bases are growing fast as people are being tested and there will be some great results in the future!

 

Autosomal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogical_DNA_test

Then I had them use the same submitted DNA to test a newer type of DNA test,   autosomal (aka Family Finder).  This test tests all lines, but only for 6-7 generations. Lo and behold, I am now contacting others who have had the same test that are as close as third cousin! This is allowing us to confirm paper trail cousins and find new completely unknown cousins. One is a rather famous active IN athlete that has the same New Netherlands ancestors as I.    

 

In summary

if you have had a similar experiences with Y-DNA or mtDNA don’t give up. Autosomal will get you a lot of new cousins and allow you to confirm paper trails that you already have. And, data bases are growing fast as people are being tested

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PLEASE NOTE- ANNOUNCEMENT FROM ANCESTRY.COM

MyFamily, MyCanvas, Mundia and the Y-DNA and mtDNA tests will be shut down. In addition, the Genealogy.com web site will undergo major changes but will remain as an available product. Here’s an excerpt from the announcement from Ancestry: …the AncestryDNA (autosomal) test will continue to be available for purchase. Only the y-DNA and mtDNA tests will be retired.Starting September 5, 2014, these services will no longer be available to access.Genealogy.com is the exception to the rule, and will continue in a slightly different form. If you are an active member or subscriber to one of these services, you will be contacted directly with details of how to transition the information you’ve created using these services.

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from Shirley Thompson

Carolyn,

 

I am really happy to learn about this tombstone cleaning product (IN THE PREVIOUS DUTCH LETTERS).  I will get some and make my way to Willowbar Cemetery (Keyes, OK) and clean stones.  My Grandparents Gray and my Mother and Daddy’s stones are of white marble and have stained somewhat.  I hope it will help them.  They were both bought in 1951.  Thanks for the info.

Til later,  Shirley

 

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from Sharon Cole

King and I sold our house in Austin and started our boating adventure, the Great Loop on May 15th.  I am writing a blog if you would like to take a look, it is CatchOurLines.blogspot.com

You can check out the route at www.greatloop.org  go to ‘about the loop’ and ‘seasonal map”.  We left Elizabeth City, N C on May 15th and are anchored out tonight across from Atlantic City NJ.  We are looking forward to stopping in Tarrytown and seeing the old Dutch church and cemetery.

We enjoy getting the email from you about the Dutch Cousins.  We look forward to seeing you all again at the meeting in Frankfort.  

King and Sharon Cole

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from carolyn

I spotted several incorrect info items in this sketch of the history of the Old Mud Meeting House.  Can you find them?

OLDMUD MEETING HOUSE

(Found this in the Harrodsburg Historical Society files, author and date not revealed)

Dutch Reformed church members originally had been Protestant refugees from France and Flanders who settled in New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Those from the Conewago Colony in Southern Pennsylvania, pressed by strife of the War for Independence plus crop failure, migrated to New York and Kentucky. (my note_ there were also Indian attacks on the Conewago Colony.)

They arrived at Harrod’s Station in 1798.

In  1796, a missionary, the Reverend Peter Labagh, established a church in the area. In 1800, shortly after Henry Comingore’s trip east to solicit funds, land was purchased and construction begun on the meeting house.

In 1816, the Dutch Reformed Church, after the loss of their Dominie, engaged a Presbyterian preacher and the congregation “was amalgamated with others …”

From 1826 when the Cumberland Presbyterian Church was formed, extensive changes and remodeling obscured the original design of the building.

Having been deeded the House and Cemetery in 1929, the Harrodsburg Historical Society seriously undertook restoration in 1873.

Removal of exterior weatherboarding and interior plaster revealed the wattle and daub walls, original windows, and the great arched door. Designs for the reproduction and arrangement of the ‘hourglass’ pulpit, sounding board and pews were based on evidence found in the building as well as through research.

Future plans include landscaping, hopefully by the University of Kentucky College of Landscape Architecture, and installation of caretakers nearby who can guide visitors as well as oversee the House and grounds.

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Hooray!  WDYTYA IS COMING BACK SOON!  The new season of Who Do You Think You Are? premieres July 23 on TLC. Past stars included Sarah Jessica Parker, Brooke Shields, Tim McGraw and Vanessa Williams. Upcoming episodes will feature Valerie Bertinelli (One Day at a Time), Jesse Tyler Ferguson (Modern Family), Lauren Graham (Gilmore Girls), Kelsey Grammer (Cheers, Fraiser) and Rachel’s sister Kayleen McAdams. 

 

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New Netherland Institute

Student Scholar Research Grant,in New York

Deadline extended to July 1

The grant offers a $5,000. stipend for up to three months work at the NNRC and provides a rare opportunity to work with the collections and staff at the New York State Library, New York State Archives, and the NNRC. 

 If you know of a worthy candidate, please encourage her/him to apply. The criteria and application are available at the NNI website under Research Grants http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/programs/research-grants/nnrc-student-scholars/

Contact Dr. Elisabeth Paling Funk, Chair of the Grants Committee at epf@hlfunk.com

Marilyn E. Douglas Vice President 

New Netherland Institute

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Dear Carolyn–thank you so much for Lilly Martin’s email–we are impressed with your wide-range of readers! Yes, Armen will answer Lilly & thank her also. Armen does have lost ancestors in Syria & his mother was a survivor of the 1915 genocide.

Thanks again,

Connie (Dahl Anooshian)

Forwarded to our cousin Lilly in Syria

Hello Lilly,

Thank you for the update information about the events in Kessab.

Yes I have a continuing interest in the developments in that part of the world.

My mother is a survivor of the Turkish Genocide of the Christian Armenians from 1915 to 1923.

My mother ended up in Aleppo and eventually came to  the USA via France.

I was born in the USA and have never been to that part of the world but have heard stories.

In fact out family believes that it is possible that my uncle’s family if they survived the Genocide perpetrated by the Ottoman Turks may have arrived in Aleppo or nearby.So I am always interested in events in that area as there may be a clue as to part of the family.

It turns out that there is a Dutch-Armenian connection that dates back to the years 1300 to 1400 as a result of trade between the two areas and that there was a significant number of Armenians in Holland and also an Armenian Orthodox Church there.

The bridge in Amsterdam was named the Armenian Bridge to commemorate these historic events.

Anyway the above is the story of how we connected and I was surprised to learn of your story..

I did not know the specifics as you described  in Kessab and again was most interested to learn of what is going on there.

I certainly hope there can be a quick solution to the problems associated with the conflict in Syria so that the Armenians can go to their homes and live in peace. I recently read an article about Kessab and will send it to for your info.

Regards,

Armen Anooshian

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from judy cassidy

I just received the attachment from the Van Harlingen Society which is the missing document which ties the trip that Henry Commigore made to the Reformed Dutch in Harlingen to raise money to build the Old Mud.  I had last seen it in 1970 or so, and when they were going through the safe last summer they could not locate it. So the lost has been found and I thought you would like a copy for your records.  This important scrap of paper ties together both congregations for that date. This paper and the text on page 20-21 of the booklet by H. A Scomp, “Historic Sketch of The Old Mud Meeting House Near Harrodsburg, August 25, 1900,” go together.

Judy

From Carolyn: I think it says: 22 Oct 1904, Received by the hands of Mr. Henry Polhemus from the consistory of Harlingen the sum of ten dollars being collected on mails? for the congregation of Salt River Kentucky. Witness my hand, Henry Commingore

Letters 6/26/2014

Sent by Carla Gerding

Dear Carolyn,

The Bland Ballard Chapter, NSDAR, would like to cordially invite any Low Dutch descendants to the rededication of the Low Dutch Tract marker in Henry/Shelby Counties.   The ceremony will be held on October 25,2014 at the Low Dutch Meeting House just outside of Pleasureville on US 421 at 10:00 am.   Refreshments will follow the ceremony.  I am hoping that many of our Low Dutch cousins will be able to attend!  Please RSVP to Carla Gerding –cbg326@aol.com— so we can recognize you as special guests at the rededication.

Carla

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Sent by

Tamara Fulkerson

Two Plays In June and July at Old Fort Harrod

 

HARRODSBURG, Ky. – Old Fort Harrod State Park will host two theatrical productions in June and July.

 

The Ragged Edge Community Theater will produce “The Sound of Music” beginning June 12 at 8 p.m. at the James Harrod Amphitheater. The show runs June 12-15 and June 19-22.

 

The other production by Ragged Edge Community Theater is “James Harrod: The Battle for Kentucky.” This historical drama is based on the founding of Harrodsburg and Kentucky.  Join James Harrod as he tries to keep his group of settlers together, trying to survive in the wilderness. With fights, gunfire, a wedding, dancing, music and drama, this play has it all. Performed at 8:30 p.m. July 3-5, 10-12, 17-19 and 24-26.

 

Tickets are $10 for adults, $9 for seniors and $8 for children for each show. To purchase tickets, call the theater at 859-734-2389.

 

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The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

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The big news this week has been the outage of web servers at Ancestry.com and several other web sites that are subsidiaries of the same company. The outages were caused by a DDOS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack. In short, a criminal managed to overload the servers, rendering them inoperative, then demanded a ransom to stop the attack.

A sadder story has become public this morning. Code Spaces (a web hosting service) has been under DDOS attacks since the beginning of the week. The attack apparently started at about the same time Ancestry.com was attacked. The outcome was radically different, however. The attacker managed to delete all Code Spaces’ hosted customer data and most of the backups. The managers of Code Spaces have now announced that they are shutting down business.

You can read the sad story at http://www.codespaces.com/.

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Sent by Jim Cozine

I just received the attachment from the Van Harlingen Society which is the missing document which ties the trip that Henry Commigore made to the Reformed Dutch in Harlingen to raise money to build the Old Mud.  I had last seen it in 1970 or so, and when they were going through the safe last summer they could not locate it. So the lost has been found and I thought you would like a copy for your records.  This important scrap of paper ties together both congregations for that date. This paper and the text on page 20-21 of the booklet by H. A Scomp, “Historic Sketch of The Old Mud Meeting House Near Harrodsburg, August 25, 1900,” go together.

From Carolyn: I think it says: 22 Oct 1804, Received by the hands of Mr. Henry Polhemus from the consistory of Harlingen the sum of ten dollars being collected on mails? for the congregation of Salt River Kentucky. Witness my hand, Henry Commingore

re ” being collected on mails? for”  try ” BEING COLLECTED OR MADE FOR”

A nice work by Judy…Thanks for sharing

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Sent by Judy cassidy

Regarding the paper from the Harlingen Safe: While it might appear to be a 9, it is actually an 8, in the Commmigore receipt.  The content of the receipt speaks for its self.

note from carolyn: here is what she is talking about – the pic of the note was in the previous Dutch Letters.

I just received the attachment from the Van Harlingen Society which is the missing document which ties the trip that Henry Commigore made to the Reformed Dutch in Harlingen to raise money to build the Old Mud.  I had last seen it in 1970 or so, and when they were going through the safe last summer they could not locate it. So the lost has been found and I thought you would like a copy for your records.  This important scrap of paper ties together both congregations for that date. This paper and the text on page 20-21 of the booklet by H. A Scomp, “Historic Sketch of The Old Mud Meeting House Near Harrodsburg, August 25, 1900,” go together.

From Carolyn: so with the corrections from Jim Cozine and Judy Cassidy, I think the document says: 22 Oct 1804, Received by the hands of Mr. Henry Polhemus from the consistory of Harlingen the sum of ten dollars being collected or made for the congregation of Salt River Kentucky. Witness my hand, Henry Commingore

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Also Sent by Judy Cassidy

Arthur never believed that members of the Conewago Congregation were attacked by Indians, although a few may have remained in the area, the majority had been pushed west about 10 years before, which is why the land office opened and was selling land in York to perspective settlers.   They were extremely active in the northern and western counties of the state especially in the 1780’s.  My grandfather who was a child in Washington County and his sister and other children who were boiling maple sap for sugar along the Raccoon River were kidnapped in the 1780’s by the Delawares.  But in York, things had settled down and the land was now available for purchase being some originally by the state to settlers.

Here is what she is talking about:

I spotted several incorrect info items in this sketch of the history of the Old Mud Meeting House.  Can you find them?

OLDMUD MEETING HOUSE  (Found this in the Harrodsburg Historical Society files, author and date not revealed) Dutch Reformed church members originally had been Protestant refugees from France and Flanders who settled in New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Those from the Conewago Colony in Southern Pennsylvania, pressed by strife of the War for Independence plus crop failure, migrated to New York and Kentucky. (my note_ there were also Indian attacks on the Conewago Colony.  They arrived at Harrod’s Station in 1798.  In  1796, a missionary, the Reverend Peter Labagh, established a church in the area. In 1800, shortly after Henry Comingore’s trip east to solicit funds, land was purchased and construction begun on the meeting house.  In 1816, the Dutch Reformed Church, after the loss of their Dominie, engaged a Presbyterian preacher and the congregation “was amalgamated with others …”  From 1826 when the Cumberland Presbyterian Church was formed, extensive changes and remodeling obscured the original design of the building. Having been deeded the House and Cemetery in 1929, the Harrodsburg Historical Society seriously undertook restoration in 1873.  Removal of exterior weatherboarding and interior plaster revealed the wattle and daub walls, original windows, and the great arched door. Designs for the reproduction and arrangement of the ‘hourglass’ pulpit, sounding board and pews were based on evidence found in the building as well as through research.  Future plans include landscaping, hopefully by the University of Kentucky College of Landscape Architecture, and installation of caretakers nearby who can guide visitors as well as oversee the House and grounds.

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Who Do You Think You Are?’s Fifth Season on U.S. television Premieres on July 23

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Sent by Della Nash (in re: the tombstone cleaning product)

Carolyn, Let Shirley Thompson know that she should take before photo of the stones. (before she cleans) Daughters of the Indian Wars had a application that included pictures of one of the ancestor tombstones that was deemed suspicious because it looked so brand new.

Someone had given it a good cleaning!  After months of debating it was finally accepted because  a “before” photo was submitted by another relative.

Although there were some other sources, the photo was good evidence, had the names of all children.

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Sent by Judy McKee

Frank G. Banta,95, BA 1939 of Bloomington, Indiana,: professor emeritus  of Germanic studies, College of Arts and Sciences, retired assistant director, Student Advocates Office, IU, Bloomington, January. 3rd.

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Sent by judy cassidy

Was John Houtz, Hauts German or Dutch?

The marriage records of the Reformed Dutch Church in New Amsterdam give the marriage of John Houts and Sophia Rideton, 1753, April 19, Getrouwt. (Olive Tree).

The baptismal Records below begin about 9 months later in the RDCh of New Amsterdam (Olive Tree) so I assume that Sophia Jongh/Jong and Sophia Rideton are one and the same.  The sponsors are perhaps related but I am not sure.  In addition, I don’t see the surname in New Netherlands records and this would be the time frame that many Germans were coming into Philadelphia and New York. So perhaps they were a German Couple who joined the RDCh.

1754 Feb 27; Johannes Hautz, Sophia Jongh; Christina; Johannes Wetzel & wife Maria Christina Ernst

1755 Nov 06; Johannes Houts, Sophia Jong; Christoffel; Johannes Kool & wife Catharina Schuyer —

1757 Apr 10; Johannes Houts, Sophia Jong; Caharina; Michiel Hoffman & wife Catharina Ernst

1760 Sep 28; Johannis Houts, Sophia Jong; Catharina; Johannis Cool & wife Catharina Scheyer

1762 Mar 10; Johannes Houts, Sophia Jongh; Jakob; Johannes Cool & wife Catharina Scheyer

I don’t know whether or not the family came directly from New York to Conewago or settled elsewhere first.  There was a Daniel Hont (Hunt) at Harlingen but he was the only person by that surname. The Conewago Deacons records show a John Houtz/Houts a Deacon and whose wife in 1778 was Ida Vannarsdale, the daughter of Simon, the Elder who he married around this time period. He wrote his will in 1780 and was deceased by the Summer of 1781 leaving a will indicating he was a very wealthy man.  Lancaster County, PA has many Houts, Houtz families who are German, so Houtz, Houts seems to be German name.

John moved to Conewago  by 1769 as he warranted land in Mt. Pleasant Twp. in 1767, so he was one of the early members of the Low Dutch Community. John Honts and ida Vanarsdale baptised Johannes 8 Nov 1778 and then Lammetie, 25 Feb. 1781, however by that summer he was deceased. His will mentions daughters Margaret, Elizabeth, Christina and Catherine and an unnamed daughter w/o Andrew Radat.  Sons were Christophel, Jacob and John.His son Christopher later moved to Mercer County, Kentucky.

Your Thoughts would be appreciated.

Judy

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Sent by Jack (Johannes) Taylor

noting that Family Tree DNA and Ancestry.com DNA are different entities

The juxtaposition of “PLEASE NOTE- ANNOUNCEMENT FROM ANCESTRY.COM” that says Ancestry.com has closed shop on their DNA with my experiences with DNA testing for genealogical purposes can be confusing.

 

The testing site I use, Family Tree DNA, aka FTDNA has not closed shop.   I often get information about matches from them. Their Link is https://www.familytreedna.com/login.aspx

 

Jack TAYLOR

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Carolyn, I have been trying to track down the family or papers Loren Kester who is no deceased, from Independence, Missouri and it is as if he simply never existed.  Yet he was an avid Low Dutch researcher who I believe was a friend of B. Vanosdol Schneiders, also deceased.  Lucille from Iowa, is also deceased.  My point is that when these people die apparently so does all their research unless it is donated or unless their family is willing to keep in touch with the group.  Look what happened to Arthur, his family was totally not interested and his papers were stored in the milk house on his farm until the Adams County His. Soc. was called in most likely because so many people were calling the family.  Arthur was angry with the Adams Co. His. for various reasons.

My point here, is that perhaps some kind of register of deceased members and where and if their papers were donated, to whom etc. should be kept by the group.  This has happened to so many well known researchers, we need to save what we can in some for or another in addition to the Low Dutch repository at the Mercer Co. His. Soc.  When a family member dies, it takes the family a long time to be ready to make these kinds of decisions and sometimes at that point they figure who cares, or they simply can’t bring themselve to go through papers that they have no interest in.

Carolyn, I did receive a copy of the obituary of Loren Kester.  Would it be possible to put this in the newsletter. I believe that most of his family is deceased but you just never know.  He was a good friend of B. Vanorsdal Schneider I believe and a Vanarsdale desendant.   Judy

Would  you consider writing something about this for inclusion in the newsletter?

Obituary for Loren Eli Kester

Loren Eli Kester, 71, of Independence, MO, passed away, Thursday, April 29, 2004 at Independence Regional Health Center. Services will be held at 2:00 p.m., Tuesday May 4, 2004 at the Speaks Suburban Chapel. Burial with full military honors will be in the Mound Grove Cemetery. The family will greet friends from 12:30until service time Tuesday at the chapel. Loren was born April 23, 1931 in Independence, MO to Eli William and Alice Jane (Baker) Kester. He has been a lifelong resident of Independence graduating from Williams Chrisman High School in 1951. He then went into the U.S. Army where he served time in Germany. He later attended college and graduated with a degree in electrical engineering and was employed for Burns & McDonald for over 28 years. He was later employed by Systec. At the time of his death, he was a consultant for the Insite Group. Loren was preceded in death by his parents and sister, Doris Pearson. Survivors include; a sister Maxine Smith and her husband Lyndell, 35 nieces and nephews and friend Russell Timmons.

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Sent by Pam Ellingson

I recently had my DNA tested through Ancestry. I now have 181 “matches”  to sort through. To help sort through this I would like to know which other Dutch Cousins have had their DNA processed at Ancestry.   If you have done this please send your username to ellingson.pam@gmail.com

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Letters 7/8/2014

Hope you all had a FANTASTIC FOURTH of July and are enjoying a wonderful summer.

Feel free to forward this newsletter, as long as you state the origin, Dutch LettersCarolynLeonard@me.com

Mailouts: over 800 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so the mass mailer program switches to a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net 

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Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg where they established the Conewago Colony, and made history when they later settled the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse these ancestors built near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.

————————

Executive Committee:

            President: John C. Westerfield of Pennsylvania <jcw44@juno.com301-535-8633

            Vice President: Tommy Green of Oklahoma <tagreen@swbell.net580-716-0936

            Secretary: Carolyn Leonard of Oklahoma <Buffalo234@cox.net405-720-2324

            Treasurer: Diana Davis of Virginia <dianadavis8@aol.com757-536-1905

            Webmaster: Pam Ellingson, Lakewood, WI <ellingson.pam@gmail.com715-276-7129

Finance Chairman:  Vince Akers of Indiana <VinceAkers@yahoo.com317-695-4514

            Board of Directors:

            Barbie Abbott Hamman of Kentucky <barbie@thekidzclub.com> 502-291-3093

    Jim Cozine of Nevada <coz999@embarqmail.com702-871-5304

Barbara Whiteside of Indiana <ktdink@gmail.com812-945-9067

President Emeritus Claude Westerfield of Iowa <dcwesterfield@yahoo.com712-435-9150

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Sent by Phyllis Miller – Welcome aboard – New Member! – VanDyke

It is thought that my William Van Dyke was in the Conewago Colony before moving to Westmoreland County, PA. He was born in New Jersey around 1755. We believe he moved to Westmoreland County around 1772. He married Anna Barbara Meyer/Moyer and had a large family of children. He later moved to Armstrong County, PA where he died in 1806.  My DNA suggests I am related to many of the old Dutch families but our family cannot find the ancestry of our William Van Dyke. It is thought his father was John Van Dyke. I am particularly interested in the Conewago Colony and what you may know about its occupants. 

Perhaps I could tell you a little about my family.   My fourth great-grandfather, William (Wilhelm) Van Dyke, appeared in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania in the early 1770’s seemingly without other family members.  He seemed to be well-off financially, purchased land there, and married Anna Barbara Meyer/Moyer.  They had a large family of children, and most of the sons had the name “John” in their names, perhaps indicating that his father’s name was John.  Around 1800 he moved over to Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, purchased a large amount of land there, and died in 1806.  We believe he is probably descended from the large Van Dyke family of New York and New Jersey, but cannot find his parents or siblings.  I thought he might have been part of the Conewago Settlement near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania but did not find his name there, although there was a John Van Dyke at that location. Is your group part of the Conewago group also, or just generally people who have Dutch ancestry?  Either way, I would be most interested in anything I can find out about my Dutch ancestry!

Thank you!!

—————–

Reply from Carolyn herself: Welcome to the Dutch List cousin. Yes we are very much centered on the Conewago Colony.  I am trying to get the two dutch burial grounds there sorted out on Findagrave. Have you checked there?  There is a south cemetery and a north cemetery. Someone entered many memorials in the wrong one and sometimes they are listed both places. 

Here are hotlinks to the two cemeteries:

northern: http://bit.ly/1mvRGUt

southern: http://bit.ly/1oEM6PN

And here is a hotlink to my webpage of Low Dutch Heritage. Maybe you will find something helpful there:

http://bit.ly/lowdutch

I promise to keep my eye out for VAN DYKEs.

Blessings,

carolyn

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

See the 2013 Newsletter http://goo.gl/MLnha

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson

We also have a facebook page, Dutch Cousins of Kentucky

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Sent by Jack Taylor

Cyber Attacks and my Pocket Book

 

I am no expert on the following and sure that my thoughts below are flawed.  But since my concerns are about “my pocket book” I am sending it out for you to think about.

 

Historically we have gone through bartering, rare metals, money backed by rare metals, paper money, etc.

 

In the early purchases of stock & bonds we got bearer certificates which showed ownership of an investment.  In recent years these have not been sent out, but reportedly held by the companies that we do investing.  But, do those companies exchange the certificates when we buy and sell?  What happens when they are attacked?  I doubt if my statements would hold up in court to prove ownership?

 

There has been concern of cyber attacks for several years.  It is now happening, so what should be do?  Sell all investments and buy prescious metals, take delivery and bury in fruit jars?

 

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Sent by Amalie Preston, Harrodsburg Historical Society Library

This is a brief update on the “LDR” [the low Dutch Repository].   The lateral filing cabinets housing the Low Dutch materials is now the first stop for anyone arriving at the Harrodsburg Historical Society researching their Dutch ancestry.  Both family and topical files are represented in the repository.  This continues to be a work in progress with new information being added regularly.  The growth of the repository is primarily due to your (Dutch Cousins) continued donations of genealogical and historical materials.  We are honored to learn that housing this repository gives Harrodsburg another first, the first and only Low Dutch Repository in the USA!  Thanks! 

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Sent by 

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Sent by James Leonard

That’s a neat story, the History of the Low Dutch of Kentucky.  

I am disappointed that the dedication of Old Mud is

late September 2015, because I really DO want to attend one of these with

y’all, and this one would be pretty cool, methinks; but my class session

with Creation Truth will be late September or early October 2015.

It is interesting that in the late 1700’s, our ancestors built a Church out of mud

without all the regulations, laws, and requirements of how to build a

structure….and as you mention here it is over 200 years later even after

having been somewhat abandoned for some time ….. and it still stands.

Also note:  These Low Dutch settlers that Washington Irving called

Knickerbockers are also the story behind the name of the New York

professional basketball team–New York Knicks (Knickerbockers).

  Thanks for the history on the history!

Love, James

 

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Sent by 

Dutch Genealogy newsletter

Quick tip: check Dutch Reformed records for Catholics
02 July 2014 | Yvette Hoitink

After the Eighty Year War (1568-1648), only marriages performed in the Dutch Reformed Church or before the Eldermen’s court were considered legal. This means that even marriages between two Catholic people can often be found in Dutch Reformed church records. This does not mean they converted or pretended to be Dutch Reformed, they just went there to get married. Catholics considered the Dutch Reformed marriage as their civil union.

For more information and examples, see always check all versions of a marriage record.

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Sent by Mary Townsend Bates

Hi Carolyn,

My husband and I visited Old Mud Meeting House on June 29, 2014 and I have some pictures that I hope to share with you and any of the Dutch Cousins that have an interest. I called the Harrodsburg Historical Association and they gave me Amalie Preston?s telephone number.   The entrance is locked, so you need someone to open it up for you, which she graciously did for us.  Anna Lee Demaree Nunan, a Dutch cousin and her husband Richard met us there.  Also, my cousin Robert Foxworthy joined us.  

I have pictures of Old Mud and the other structure which may have been a school and the cemetery and the stone fence.  My great great grandfather Garret Terhune, born 1787, married Rachel Rynearson, born 1790, in Mercer County Kentucky on Jan. 16, 1814.  I wonder if they married in Old Mud, but we do not have that record.  They are buried in the cemetery at Old Mud.  I have a picture of her tombstone.    Garret was a wagon maker and he taught his three sons the same trade, according to the Van Nuys Geneology book written by Carrie E. Allen and published in 1916. I have a copy of this book and my mother annotated the updates for me. Garret was 6th generation on this continent. 

The trip was so meaningful to me and I am very grateful to Amalie for making it possible to leisurely view the inside of the church and the grounds.  I hope that other Dutch Cousins also make the pilgrimage.   Preserving this structure and the grounds is something that we should all be proud about and it does need donations to the Harrodsburg Historical Society annotating Old Mud Donation for those that feel it is an important part of our heritage to preserve.     

Mary Townsend Bates

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Sent by Pam Ellingson

My closest DNA match is a 3rd cousin- Westerfield (Janice Samsa) who happens to have a vacation home about 30 miles away from me. I have found a few more Westerfield cousins and am promoting the Dutch Cousins.

Pam

 I did Ancestry Family Finder. It is now on sale for $79 (20% off) through July 6. Maybe you could post that in the DC news.

Pam

On Fri, Jun 27, 2014 at 10:34 PM, Leonard Carolyn <Buffalo234@cox.net> wrote:

What kind of DNA did you do?  Sounds like you did the family finder.

We did FamilyTree DNA, the Y search. We went to 37 markers.  At first we did just 12 and thought we matched to everyone in the world. So we paid more and upgraded to 37 markers.  Now we finally have four good matches…however – one we know personally, a cousin. The other three will not reply so we still don’t know.

Good luck in your search!

hugs,

carolyn

On Jun 27, 2014, at 8:02 PM, Pam Ellingson wrote:

I recently had my DNA tested through Ancestry. I now have 181 “matches”  to sort through. To help sort through this I would like to know which other Dutch Cousins have had their DNA processed at Ancestry. I believe that my username is ellingson_pam.  If you have done this please send your username to ellingson.pam@gmail.com

Thanks for your help,

Pam

 

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Sent by Jerry Sampson

New Pics of Old Mud July 2014

let me know if you can open them okay.

10401370_10204347144024956_7258014942782111760_n.jpg10404512_10204347144144959_5276560972035903822_n.jpg

Letters 7/18/2014

STAY TUNED FOR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT SOON!  Barbie Abbott Hamman and Dr. Steve Henry and working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky the last weekend of September. (Can’t Wait to see everyone again!)

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Sent by Jack “Johannes” Taylor 

 

I realize that cost of restoring history such as the Old Mud Meeting House is a major consideration.  I am no expert on architecture, so I may not be using the correct term to say it was half timber style when I first saw the Old Mud Meeting House many years ago. But, I whatever it was I do miss that old world look. Maybe when I saw it last the outside was not completed.

Johannes

Note – from Carolyn herself – I agree with missing the “old world” look … but that was done in the interest of preserving the building using the hardiplanks that can withstand the outside weather, and not “melt” like the mud and wattle (which is still there on the inside._

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Sent by Amalie Preston, our Rep from the HHS

inre: the receipt from Dutch in New Jersey for building Old Mud

Oct 22, 1804: Received by the hand of Mr. Henry Polhemus from the Consistory of Harlingen the sum of ten dollars, being a collection made for the congregation of Salt River Kentucky. Witness my hand, Henry Commingore

A copy of the original document is now in the Low Dutch Archives at Harrodsburg.

I made copies of this document and will file one with the Scomp booklet, another in the Commingore file, and a third in the Old Mud File.  You can’t be too careful.   It is scary how these precious little pieces of paper can get away, but after reading the bit on hacking for ransom, I continue to trust paper more than electronics

Amalie 

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Sent by Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President

New Netherland Institute

“ORANJE BOVEN” !!!!!!!!!!

TO CELEBRATE THE DUTCH WINNING THE BRONZE MEDAL IN THE WORLD CUP, ONE OF THE DUTCH AMERICAN BOOKS WILL BE ON SALE FOR $0.99 FROM 7/16 TO 7/23/14. NORMAL PRICE IS $2.99.

THE SALE BOOK IS “TEN PROMINENT DUTCH AMERICAN FAMILIES: FROM THE 17TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT”.

PLEASE GOOGLE: “AMAZON KINDLE PEGELS”, CLICK ON THE BOOK AND ORDER IT.

 

For those of you unfamiliar with the Dutch-Americans page on our web site, go to

http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/history-and-heritage/dutch_americans/

 

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Sent by Phyllis Young of Twigs & Stems

 

“Who Do You Think You Are?” is back for a fifth year and the first episode will air on Wednesday July 23, at 8:00 pm(central time) on TLC (The Learning Channel).

As announced by TLC, this is the upcoming schedule:

July 23 – Cynthia Nixon (actress) learns about an unconventional great, great, great grandmother who did not take her husband’s name and was incarcerated

July 30 – Jesse Tyler Ferguson (actor)

August 6 – Rachel McAdams (Canadian actress) and sister Kayleen McAdams (actress)

August 13 – Kelsey Grammer (actor)

August 20 – Valerie Bertinelli (actress)

August 27 – Lauren Graham (actress / author)

If you miss these episodes, go to http://www.ancestry.com/cs/who-do-you-think-you-are to watch them.  None will be available online until each one airs on TV.

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Sent by Inez Phillips

 

The Writers Reminder by Carolyn B. Leonard is free. It contains updated news, tips, contests, and conferences for writers. Check it out at 

http://bit.ly/H6krq9

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Sent by Meg Hacker

Archives Director, National Archives at Fort Worth

Preserving Your Family Papers! Our Friday Freebies are starting again! Mark your calendars for August 1, highnoon, at our Montgomery Plaza location (2600 W. 7th Street, Suite 162). Archivist Ketina Taylor will go over some basic preservation tips for your genealogical needs. Space is limited so reserve your spot today by emailing your contact information toftworth.education@nara.gov or calling 817-831-5620.

1400 John Burgess Drive

Fort Worth, TX 76140

Phone Number: 817-551-2033

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From Dutch Genealogy news for 18 July 2014

Quick tip: The first of same-named siblings probably died young

16 July 2014 | Yvette Hoitink

If you see multiple siblings with the same name, the first one probably died before the next one was born. Dutch parents typically named their children after relatives. By giving the new child the name of the deceased sibling, both the deceased sibling and the relative that that sibling had been named after were commemorated.

There is one exception: If both grandfathers or grandmothers had the same name, in rare cases they are both named after, leading to two children of the same parents with the same name. Often, they will get different call names, or one will get a suffix like ‘the younger.’

Example: family of Martinus Trouw and Petronella Oomen

A good example of same-named siblings is the family of Martinus Trouw and Petronella Oomen, who lived in Etten-Leur, Noord-Brabant in the 1860s. Their daughter Catharina, born in 1862, died in February 1865. The next daugher, born in July 1865, was also called Catharina. Likewise, they had a son Adriaan, born in 1863 who died in March 1865. A new son Adriaan was born to them in 1867. The younger Catharina and Adriaan lived to adulthood, married and had children.

Dutch term – Vondeling

14 July 2014 | Yvette Hoitink

vondeling is a foundling, an abandoned child whose parents are unknown. It was rare for children to be abandoned. Most cases where children were abandoned took place in the city, not in the countryside. Most abandoned children were raised in orphanages or were placed in a home while the city poor relief paid for their upbringing.

Example: Johanna Frederiks

Johanna Frederiks was the second wife of my ancestor Johan Jacob Tanto. When they got married in Enkhuizen on 23 March 1817, the record told about her:1

[…] shortly after her birth abandoned by her parents and placed by the regents of the almshouse in the poor orphanage, where she was raised by them.

Marriage record of Johan Jacob Tanto and Johanna Frederiks, Enkhuizen, 23 March 1817

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Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg where they established the Conewago Colony, and made history when they later settled the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse these ancestors built near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.

Executive Committee:

            President: John C. Westerfield of Pennsylvania <jcw44@juno.com301-535-8633

            Vice President: Tommy Green of Oklahoma <tagreen@swbell.net580-716-0936

            Secretary: Carolyn Leonard of Oklahoma <Buffalo234@cox.net405-720-2324

            Treasurer: Diana Davis of Virginia <dianadavis8@aol.com757-536-1905

            Webmaster: Pam Ellingson, Lakewood, WI <ellingson.pam@gmail.com715-276-7129

Finance Chairman:  Vince Akers of Indiana <VinceAkers@yahoo.com317-695-4514

            Board of Directors:

            Barbie Abbott Hamman of Kentucky <barbie@thekidzclub.com>502-291-3093

    Jim Cozine of Nevada <coz999@embarqmail.com702-871-5304

Barbara Whiteside of Indiana <ktdink@gmail.com812-945-9067

President Emeritus Claude Westerfield of Iowa <dcwesterfield@yahoo.com712-435-9150

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Letters 8/1/2014

Sorry late in sending this out.  Lots going on here! And LOTs of interesting into included.

STAY TUNED FOR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT SOON!  Barbie Abbott Hamman, Dr. Steve Henry, and Janice Cozine are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky the last weekend of September or early October 2015. (We can’t Wait to see everyone again!)

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Feel free to forward this newsletter, as long as you state the origin, Dutch Letters CarolynLeonard@me.com.

Mailouts: over 800 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so the mass mailer program switches to a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net

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Sent by Theodore “Mike” Banta

Author of “Conquest of a Continent”.

Hi Carolyn,

It’s been a long time since I’ve had a chance to visit.  Though I’m now 90, I try to keep up with the youngsters.  My latest project is to put some of my research video on Youtube.  The first is Yvonne and my visit to Friesland to find the progenitor of the Banta family,  Epke Jacobse’s, home in Minertsga.  The visit to Friesland was in 1998, three years before I published my book, “Conquest of a continent.  Nine Generations on the American frontier.”

We not only found his house, but also found Epke’s mill that had been disassembled and reassembled a few miles away.

 

Although published in 2001, the book continues to sell though it can be completely read for free at “Google Books.”

Simply type in “Conquest of a Continent, Nine.” to separate it from other “Conquest of a Continent” book as this seems to be a popular title.

 

To watch “Finding Epke’s home in Friesland” on Youtube, click here:

http://youtu.be/xqhXeetNVZw 

 

This might be an interesting 15 minute video at the coming Cousins Convention.

Your Kentucky Cousin, Theodore M. “Mike” Banta

(Carolyn herself: This video is certainly worth taking the time to watch It is about 20 minutes and very well done even if you are not a Banta descendant. Visiting Friesland vicariously!)

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Sent by Internet Genealogy

Take the time to dig into the basics behind personalities to better understand and interact with your family, and to perhaps better understand why your ancestors did what they did.

Struggling to understand my family’s dynamics some years back, I came upon the book and the concept of The Color Code. Without going into the ideas too deeply here, I will just summarize what I learned.

There are four major, main, basic personality types: (1) REDS – always right, takes charge, strong willed, often abrasive, can be good strong leaders; (2) BLUE – caring, thoughtful, kind, loving, wants everybody to be okay and happy; (3) YELLOW – somewhat unorganized, carefree, fun loving, avoids conflict, very social; (4) WHITE – reclusive, stubborn, narrow focus to life, not bubbly.

Keeping those four concepts in mind, I applied it to my pedigree chart. My two RED parents had a BLUE, a YELLOW and a RED child. I’m the blue. I married a RED and we had a daughter who is BLUE/RED who married a man who is RED/WHITE and they have four sons, two YELLOWS, one RED and one WHITE. I’m sure you get the idea.

Why bother with this? If you can honestly recognize people’s personalities for what they really are, you increase your ability to understand them and interact with them much more successfully. For example, how does a RED grandfather interact with a YELLOW or a WHITE grandson?? With patience and long-suffering!

By Donna Potter Phillips, Internet Genealogy and Family Chronicle author

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Sent by new member- Debbi

Please include me on your mailing list!

I just found your site as I was searching online for any new information on my Vanarsdall family history.  What wonderful information to share!  Here’s my info:

Families:

Aaron LaGRANGE – b. abt. 1770 in NJ, probably Somerset County.  I have records of him in Mercer County, KY; Nelson County, KY; and Gibson County, IN.  His probable father is Arie Molenaer LaGrange, but I’m still not entirely convinced.

Christopher VANARSDALL – b. abt. 1740 in NJ, probably Somerset County.  I have records of him in all the same places as Aaron LaGRANGE, which isn’t entirely a coincidence since he was Aaron’s father in law.  Christopher’s daughter, Anne, is the only documented family member I have found, so I’m definitely working on chipping away at this brick wall.

Charles H. GORDON – b est. 1770 in NJ.  He lived in Somerset County, and I have records of him in Mercer County, KY.  His son, Christopher GORDON, b 1790 in Somerset County, NJ,  had a daughter that married into the LaGRANGE family.  Christopher (and perhaps Charles) lived in the same locations as Aaron LaGRANGE.

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Sent by Vanarsdale mail list

contributed by Judy Cassidy

Recently I discovered a record that revealed a hereto unknown slave family  of whom two members were  owned by Lucas Vanarsdal. E. W. Harvey of Cayuaga,  Clairborne  County,  MS owner the rest of the family, William Robinson  purchased them and then freed them in Gallatin County, Illinois.  This was  one of those accidental findings while looking for some one else of the same  surname.  The Territories of Louisiana, Illinois, Indiana and Missouri in order to  appease slave owners moving into the territory in the late 1700’s through  statehood devised a system where the owner had 60 days to INDENTURE their  slaves, register them in the county they would be living in, or free them.  We are speaking for the most part of about 1800-1830’s or so.  Indenturing  consisted of the fact that slaves were forced, so to speak, to agree to the  arrangement where by they would work for the slave owner for a period of  years, sometimes as little as 5 or as long as 50, sign a document, and  ocassionally be promised money at the end of their term. Indentures could be  sold but the individual had to agree to the sale of their indenture.  Many  slaves ran or were permitted to sue for their freedom and it was often  granted.  However, the owners families would often hire a bounty Hunter to  capture them, so they could be taken out of the Territory and sold.  There  was a strong group of abolitionists on the side of the slaves who would  represent them in court, and slaves went to court frequently and sued for  their freedom.  These records can be found by the slaves first name in  the Illinois Regional Archives Data bases on line under

Illinois Servitude and Emancipation Records 1720-1865.  They can also be  found in the court Records in Indiana, especially Knox County, Indiana.  Remember to check this source out, if your slave owner dissappears in the  early 1800’s as he just might have moved to one of these Territories.  The  records give the slaves age, their relationships if they exist, who owned  them sometimes where they were from, that kind of thing.

Not in a million years would I have thought to look in Illinois for slaves  of Lucas Vanarsdale because he was living in Mississippi where he remained.   And while he never left, these two slaves did, as did the man who bought  them and this information was included in the record.  The way I found Rose  and her daughter was simply to enter William Robinson into the search area  and this is when I found the information on their original owner E. W.  Harrison.

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VERY INTERESTING STORY – 1700s Dutch Ship found under World Trade Center

By Kari Paul

Researchers have discovered the origins of the ship that mysteriously emerged from the ruins of the World Trade Center in 2010. Four years ago this month, construction at the Ground Zero construction site was halted when workers uncovered a massive wooden ship 22 feet below the street’s surface. Work was put on hold for weeks while the boat was excavated and taken to the Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory, and later Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory for further analysis.

See also: 10 Amazing Google Earth and Maps Discoveries

After analyzing samples from the ship, tree ring scientists at Columbia University concluded that the wood on the vessel originated from a forest of White Oak trees near Philadelphia, which was chopped down around 1773.

“We could see that at that time in Philadelphia, there were still a lot of old-growth forests, and [they were] being logged for shipbuilding and building Independence Hall,” Dario Martin-Benito of Columbia’s Tree Ring Lab told Live Science. “Philadelphia was one of the most — if not the most —important shipbuilding cities in the U.S. at the time. And they had plenty of wood so it made lots of sense that the wood could come from there.”

Researchers have tentatively identified the ship as a Hudson River Sloop, a Dutch ship designed to navigate shallow, rocky water.

Researchers have tentatively identified the ship as a Hudson River Sloop, a Dutch ship designed to navigate shallow, rocky water. Archaeologists believe that the ship was in service for 20 to 30 years before it was docked one block west from Greenwich Street in Manhattan.

The ship was ultimately buried by trash and other landfill in the late 1700s. Historians do not know whether the ship was accidentally submerged or if it was sunk by the city to expand the shore of Manhattan further into the Hudson River. The ship was likely completely covered by 1818 and did not reemerge until after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in 2001. The clay-rich soil sealed the ship in an oxygen-free environment that likely prevented decay and kept the ship well-preserved, according to Archaeology Magazine.

Archaeologists have also found hundreds of other artifacts from the 18th century during the excavation of Ground Zero, including ceramic dishes, bottles and shoes, but uncovering the ship paved the way to find out the date of those artifacts.

See photo:  mashable.com/2014/07/30/world-trade-center-shipwreck/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link

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Here’s another version in Archaelology  magazine

http://archive.archaeology.org/1011/etc/wtc.html

(click to see pics)

The Hidden History of New York’s Harbor

Volume 63 Number 6, November/December 2010

By Jarrett A. Lobell

Two surprising finds help scholars understand the source of the city’s wealth

For more than 200 years, numerous efforts have been made to extend and regularize Manhattan’s shoreline, allowing more and larger ships to enter the harbor. This 1807 map shows the island’s original shore, bounded by the yellow line. Battery Park City, created out of the material excavated during construction of the World Financial Center in the 1960s, lies beyond the line. (Library of Congress)

The ship lay buried in mud for two centuries as New York City grew up around it. The last time it sailed along the East Coast and pulled into the harbor on the west side of the island, Manhattan’s population was probably less than 20,000. Just five blocks from the ship’s final resting place, George Washington had recently been inaugurated at Federal Hall on Wall Street as president of the newly formed United States, of which New York was the first capital………………………………

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Sent by Tamara Fulkerson

www.theblaze.com/stories/2014/07/30/four-years-ago-a-ship-was

(click hotlink to see pics)

Jul 30, 2014 · Four Years Ago, a Ship Was Discovered Buried 20 Feet Below the World Trade Center Site — Now Scientists Have an Explanation

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Sent by

Ruby Bishop Ingram

Carolyn,

My granddaughter, Jaclyn, who is the daughter of my daughter, JaniceHagman and John Hagman, married Michael Bryant on July 12, 2014 at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Bowling Green, Kentucky, which isMichael’s family’s church.  I’ve attached some of the wedding pictures with this message.  Two were made before her vows and two afterwards,with one showing me with them.  Her husband’s family, and mine has the Lutheran connection, as my 3rd great-grandfather, Valentine Baustdonated land in 1769 for the first church built in Maryland.  The building served two congregations, Lutheran and Reformed Church ofChrist and is near Westminister.  My daughter, Janice, John, Jaclyn and her brother, Nick, and I visited this church on a Sunday inOctober of 2005.  This was the last Sunday for the Lutheran Congregation, as they were down to 13 members and gave their interestin the property to the Reformed Church of Christ congreagation that very day.   I could almost feel the breath of my ggggrandfather,Valentine Baust, as we worshipped there-me, my daughter, Janice, and my grandson Nick, and my granddaughter, Jaclyn-3 generations.Valentine’s daughter, Margaret Baust married Vachel Bishop (who is my paternal gggrandfather) and they moved to Mercer County, Kentucky, andthey had 10 sons and 2 daughters.   One son, Isaac is my great-grandfather, with his son, George Logan Bishop, Sr. mygrandfather, whose son is my father, George Logan Bishop, Jr.  Vachel and Margaret Baust Bishop were members of Providence PresbyterianChurch in north Mercer County, and he died in 1840.  The present church building is up the road from the church buidling in which theyworshipped, with this new building completed at the end of the Civil War.

Ruby Bishop IngramGlendale, KY

———- Forwarded message ———-From: Ruby Bishop Ingram <raingram.ingram@gmail.com>

Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2014 16:33:55 -0400

Subject:

To: “raingram.ingram” <raingram.ingram@gmail.com>

Oh, Carolyn, I forgot to tell you that I made Jaclyn’s wedding gown in1988 for her mother Janice to wear when she married John and thenaltered the bodice to fit Jaclyn for her own wedding.  I spent 150hours making it for Janice and around 25 hours altering it for Jaclyn.It has a 4 foot train-with Venetian lace all around the bottom and alarge display of this lace laid in the front-had 55 pieces total,which I sewed by hand.  I altered it for Jaclyn by hand and left allthe material in the dress, tucking and hiding it.  If perchance sheand Michael has a daughter, and she wants to wear it at her ownwedding some day and may be a bit larger than Jaclyn, the dress can belet out enough to maybe fit her-an heirloom gown.

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Sent by Judy K. Park McKee

I’ve gotten my Ancestry DNA results and It’s been very interesting. I’m 72% British and Irish. My countries of Ancestry are United Kingdom, Ireland, Germany, Cuba, Netherlands and a bit in eastern Africa about 50,000 years ago. I’m ready to start connecting with cousins all over the country and England. I’m really enjoying learning more about my family.

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Sent by judy cassidy

Carolyn, this information was sent to me by the St. Clair County, Illinois Genealogy Society and so I thought I would pass it on to others.

They yse as a guide, Elizabeth Mills’ “Quick Sheets on Citing Ancestry.com Databases and Imagines. “Citing online Historical Resources” and for the stout at heart, “Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace” to allow people to get back to the original source viewed on line.

I know that Amazon.com carries the Quick Sheets which I think run about $8.00, but not sure about the other two.

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Sent by Vanarsdale@rootsweb.com

Contributed by Judy Cassidy

These are very early slave records which I simply stumbled across in Illinois    Regional    Archives   web   site   which   is   on   line at http://www.ilsos.gov/isa/servEmanSearch.do.  Emancipation and Servitude  Records 1722-1863. Only type the word Van into the search box for other person and this should come up.  Then redo and type in the surname for either Robinson or Harvey for additional information.

 

Lucas Vanarsdell, in this case named L. Vanansdell was listed with the following two slaves. William Robinson purchased them and then moved to Gallatin County, Illinois where he emancipated them.

Henrietta age 14, the daughter of Rose, filed in Hinds Co., MS. Vanarsdel sold  Henrietta to William Robinson for $400.00,  Robinson emancipated Henrietta on 24 March 1834.  [Vol 1:163].

 

Thomas, no age given, Bill of Sale, no dollar amount, 2 September 1838, Filed in Hinds Co. MS, again sold to William Robinson for $600.00, [Vol,1:163]

 

William Robinson also purchased Mary age 4 whose mother was Rose evidently in Mississippi and emancipated her in Gallatin County, 24 March 1834 [Vol.1:163]. Rose age 32, mother of Mary, originally filed in Cayuga, Claiborne Co. MS.. E. W. Harvey was her original owner and sold Rose to Robinson for $100.00 on June 3, 1834.  Robinson after the purchase took her to Gallatin and emancipated her on 24 March 1834.  She is also the mother of Henrietta. [Vol. 1:163].

 

I was delighted to find these early records.  Illinois Territory as well as Indiana  Terr.  required slave owners moving into their Territories to indenture their slaves for a number of years.  Apparently in this case William  Robinson  was an abolitionist and he emancipated Rose and her Children.  I don’t know the relationship between Thomas and Rose.

(Note:  I inserted paragraphing to make it a little easier to read and follow.  Very interesting research)

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Sent by Jim Woodfill

Carolyn, the story below about siblings of the same name reminds me of one I heard about (President) Franklin D. Roosevelt and his family.

Franklin and Eleanor had five children:  Their daughter Anna (the oldest) and their four sons: James, Elliott, Franklin Jr., and John.  However, I read where they had anotherearlier, John, who died in infancy; I forget where he fit into the order.  But the Roosevelts were about as Dutch as you can get, so that supports the theory about Dutch families renaming another child after one who had died young.

As you probably know, Eleanor Roosevelt never had to change her name, as she was Teddy Roosevelt’s niece.  Jimmy Roosevelt was named after his paternal grandfather, James Roosevelt.  Elliott was named after his maternal grandfather, Elliott Roosevelt.  Then, when the third boy came along, he was named after his father, and the last boy was named after his late brother.  Normally, the oldest son bears his father’s name, followed by Jr., but that is not always the case.  Even in my own family: my older son is named Stephen (not after anyone in particular, but the only name my wife and I could agree on), and my younger son is James C. Jr. (although we call him Chuck.)  We never could agree on a name for him, so I named him after myself just to get him out of the hospital.

All the Roosevelt boys served in World War II, and all had exemplary military records.  (They had to–the President could not shield his own sons and still send everyone else’s sons into combat–it wouldn’t look good.)  Jimmy served as a congressman from California for many years after the war.  Elliott’s claim to fame was that he piloted the photographic plane in 1944 that followed Joe Kennedy Jr.’s explosive-laden bomber out over the English Channel, where Joe and his co-pilot were supposed to bail out once the plane was on radio control, but saw it explode in mid-air, killing both men.  FDR Jr. was elected mayor of Miami Beach around 1966, I think–I remember the news reported interviewing some people who thought it was President Roosevelt, not realizing he had been dead for over 20 years!  I don’t know what became of Anna or John.

I wonder if the Roosevelts could be our Dutch cousins, too.  They were all from New York, but we found some when we were back there in 2011, remember?

Hugs,

Jim

STAY TUNED FOR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT SOON!  Barbie Abbott Hamman, Dr. Steve Henry, and Janice Cozine are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort, Kentucky. the last weekend of September or first of October 2015. (We just can’t Wait to see everyone again!)

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Sent by Family Tree DNA

This is a question I get often

How can DNA help if I am adopted?

 

FTDNA has set up a project just for adoptees.  Once you are tested, here are some things you can do to make the most of your search:

  1. Set your “personal page” so that your test results are compared to the entire database.  This option is shown on the “user preferences” page.  This will allow you to compare to everyone who has opted into the FTDNA database.
  2. Upload your results to Ysearch, which is the database which allows anyone to upload his DNA results, no matter which testing company was used.  This will allow you to compare to a larger group.  To upload to Ysearch, go to your “personal page” at FTDNA and click on “Y-DNA Matches”.  The blue-boxed information will provide you with a link to Ysearch.
  3. Consider an upgrade.  37 markers is considered a minimum for matching across surnames, and some say you should test at 67 markers to confirm matches across surnames.
  4. Once you have a very close match across surnames, contact the men you are matching and ask them to share paper trails with you.

Adoptees can also use the Family Finder test to match to male and female cousins from any of your family lines.  You may be able to discover Parents, Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles, Siblings and Cousins.  If your parent or grandparent was adopted, the Family Finder test may help you find their birth families.

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Sent by Judy cassidy

This ties in with the post I just sent which had to do with the Minister, deacons and Congregation who donated money and land for this building.  John Houts, a Tanner, who latter married Ida Vanarsdale, the daughter of Simon Vanarsdale living in York Co., PA at Conewago was one of those men.:Jonathan Greenleaf, History of the Churches of All Demoninations in the City of New York from Its First Settlement to the Year 1846 (New York: E. French, 1846 (24-27.

Before 1758 German Emigrants to New York who were in sentiment Calvanists and who could also understand the Low Dutch language attached themselves to the Reformed Dutch Church while those who could speak German only were constrained to attend the Lutheran Church where the service was in German.

The Original Congregation for the true German Reformed Church stood at Nassau Street between John Street and Maiden Lane.  The first minister Rev. Mr. Rozencrantz for about a year or two.  A request to Germany bby the church resulted in Rev. J. M. Kern [of the previous article] being sent in 1763.  They adopted the name German Reformed Congregation in New York attaching themselves to the Classes of Amsterdam and Synod of Holland which brought them at once into connection with the Collegiate of the Reformed Dutch Church of the City; and when a regular call of the German Church was made out for Mr. Kern to take the pastoral office, the Rev. Mr. De Ronde of the Collegiate Church presided at the meeting and Mr. Kern was installed by the Ministers of the Collegiate 27 January 1764. In the year 1804 The Rev. Mr. Labaugh was called with the approval of the Classis and continued as Pastor until 1822 when he resigned.  At the time the Congregation decided to dispose of their house of worship on Nassau Street and erect a new Church on Forsyth Street.  In later years this building which had been built in 1765 was sold but was still standing on Nasseau Street near Maiden Lane and was converted to an eating house known as “Goslling’s Dining Saloon,” and bore the street numbers 64-66..

Full text of “A history of the churches, of all denominations, in The web site is :https://archive.org/…/historyofchurche00gree/historyofc

John Houts sent me the following link, as he found his ancestor John Houts, Tanner of New York had given land, as did others, to build a German Church on and the deed was in the pages.But when i started reading it I realized it is so much more than that.  The books covers all kinds of Dutch Reformed Records, Decisions which were made by various churches, names, locations of buildings, houses, businesses, it is truly a wealth of information for New York City and other regional areas in 1765 or so.

  1. http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/Ecclesiastical_Records_State_of_New_York_v6_1000691488/261

John Houts later married Ida Vanarsdale, daughter of Simon at Conewago.

from Jonathan Greeleaf’s the History of the Churches of all Denominations in the City of New York from its first settlement  to the year 1846. (New York: E. French, 1846), 24-27.

The original congregation of the True German Reformed Church stood at Nassau
Street between John Street and Maiden Lane, the first minister was Mr.
Rozencrantz- for about a year or two.  A request to Germany by the Church
resulted in Rev. J. M. Kern being sent in 1763.  They adopted the name
German REformed Congregation in New York attaching themselves to the Classis
of Amsterdam and Synod of Holland which brought them at once into connection
with the Collegiate of the Reformed Dutch Church in the City; and when a
regular call of the German Church was made out for Mr. Kern to take the
pastorial office, The Reverend Mr De Ronde of the Collegiate Church presided
at the meeting and Mr. Kern was installed by the minister of the Collegate
Church 27 January 1764.

In the year 1804 Rev. Mr. Lebaugh [who also was assigned a short time at the Salt River Congregation in Mercer County,
Kentucky] was called with the appropriation of the Classis and continued as pastor until 1822 when he resigned.

At the time the Congregation decided to
dispose of their house of worship on Nassau Street and erect a church on
Forsyth Street. In later years this building which had been built in 1765
was sold, but was still standing on Nassau Street near Maiden Lane and was
converted to an eating house known as “Gosling’s Dining Saloon,” and bore
the street numbers 64 and 66.
Several  Low Dutch families such as John Houts were affiliated in some
fashion with this Church.  Although living in Somerset County, New Jersey in
1764 and baptizing his children in Dutch Reformed Church’s, John apparently
still owned land in NYC and was one of the the men of the who sold his land
to the members of German Reformed Congregation Church on which this church
was built.  The others were Cordwainer John Will, Pewterer John Sebastian
Stephany, Apothecary John Wetzel, an unnamed man who was a Baker and John
Houts, Tanner. The entire entry can be found http://www.forgottenbooks.com/readbook_text/Ecclesiastical_Records_State_of_New_York_v6_1000691488/261Thi

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Sent by

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

See the 2013 Newsletter http://goo.gl/MLnha

 

Letters 8/20/2014

STAY TUNED FOR IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT SOON!  Barbie Abbott Hamman, Dr. Steve Henry, and Janice Cozine are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky the last weekend of September or early October 2015. (We can’t Wait to see everyone again!)

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Feel free to forward this newsletter, as long as you state the origin, Dutch Letters CarolynLeonard@me.com.

Mailouts: over 800 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by Berny Calhoun

Hello again, Carolyn —

 

FYI:  My direct descendent is 8th gr/gf Immigrant Epke Jacobse Banta>gr/gm Sarah Emeline Banta Bowman 1849IL-1931MO).  We corresponded in 2012 re Dutch Cousins, etc.

 

After a year or so – and getting back on my feet (a double knee replacement last year) –  I’m re-affirming my interest in The Dutch Cousins.  My son and I are also planning a 2 week Dutch journey to Kentucky in early September, which will include my father’s Bantas, et al,  my mother’s Mt. Sterling Allisons, and my son’s McIntire antecedent Cressons, LaRues (LaRue County), and Gerritsen [aka Garrison}, Nantz, plus (of their respective counties.)

 

Many thanks – I’ll be looking forward to your response as convenient.

Bernadene McCaul Calhoun (nm ‘Berny’)

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Sent by Karen Prather

I am again stumped trying to document another patriot. The DAR Genealogist in Washington has sent me the following email:

Dear Mrs. Prather,

 

Thank you so much for forwarding the additional documentation for your supplemental application through ancestor Jolley Parish.  We are almost there, but we are still missing a link between generations 5 & 6.

 

As I mentioned in my previous letter, we will need documentation to prove that Andrew Parish is the son of Carter and Pamila Parish.  While the 1810, 1820, & 1830 Census records give us a place of residence for Carter Parish and the number of people in his household, they do not list the names of the family members.  You may wish to search for a will or probate records, Bible records, church records, or court records in order to establish the relationship between Andrew Parrish and his parents, Carter and Pamila Parish.

I am asking you to please put out a request to our cousins to see if anyone can help. My third cousin Myrgle Huffman from the historical society in Harrodsburg has searched to no avail. There is nothing on Ancestry so I am hoping maybe someone else can help.

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Sent by Jean Simon

Carolyn and those responsible, thank you so much for the article and photos about Friesland!  Priceless.  The Dutch music too!

 

Jean Simon

Huntsville, Alabama

Descendant of Low Dutch Ancestors

Who were Dutch Loyalists after the

  1. S. Revolution and escaped to Nova Scotia!

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Sent by Mary Townsend Bates

Thanks for the e-mail.  My husband and I would like very much to attend the dedication of Old Mud.  Please let me know of any updates on the event so that we may put it on our calendar.

Thanks,

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Sent by Missy.OBrien

Hi…I saw your newsletter on line re: the meeting of the Dutch Cousins in 2013.  How interesting.

 

I am descended from Samuel VanHook through his daughter Mary VanHook Lee.  He was born around 1733 in New Jersey, lived in southwestern Virginia and in northern North Carolina before moving to central Kentucky in 1780.  He was captured in June of 1780 and held in Detroit as a prisoner of war until sometime in 1784 when he returned to Kentucky.  His family started out in New Amsterdam around 1648 and eventually lived in the Freehold,. Monmouth Co NJ area.

 

While I can’t find any evidence that he was ever involved with the Low Dutch settlement in Henry County, KY, I feel almost certain he would have been familiar with these people (at the very least).

 

Two things…

  1. Have you ever heard the VanHook name associated with this group.
  2. Is your organization only for those who are descendants of the original group of Low Dutch settlers in Henry Co?

 

Thanks for any information you can offer.  J

 

Missy L. O’Brien, CRM

 

Of all our national assets, Archives are the most precious; they are

the gift of one generation to another and the extent of our care of them

marks the extent of our civilization.

~Arthur G. Doughty, Dominion Archivist, 1904-1935

 

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Remember in 2013 when we had to find a provider and pay to have a memorial stone placed at the Old Mud Graveyard for our Revolutionary Veteran ancestors?  We did so for eight veterans when the VA refused to supply them.

Until 2012 the VA provided headstones for unmarked veterans’ graves based on documentation of that vet’s identity and service provided by these groups or individuals.

That policy was then changed, limiting headstone requests to a veteran’s next-of-kin or authorized family representative – a difficult requirement when dealing with graves dating back 100 years or more, and unknown family descendants.

Last year the VA said the policy is intended to discourage someone from marking a veteran’s grave in a way that the descendants may not want or even know about. A spokesperson added that the VA was reviewing that policy.

a bipartisan bill by U.S. Senators Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and Jon Tester (D-Montana) was recently introduced to provide headstones for historic unmarked veterans graves. That is welcome news to state and local historians.

The “Honor Those Who Served Act of 2014” would enable veterans service agencies, military researchers, historians or genealogists to request a free headstone or marker from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for a veteran’s grave.

Our Dutch Cousins group has placed markers and held memorial services for some 35 veterans of the Revolution and one 1812 veteran in the past. Perhaps if this bill passes, we will be able to place more Memorial markers there. There are many unmarked graves at Old Mud, and nearly every Dutchman of age served in that war for Independence. Here is a hotlink to the complete article in THE PLAIN DEALER.http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2014/08/legislation_would_provide_head.html

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Sent by Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President

New Netherland Institute

For those of you who missed Russell Shorto’s talk ‘From Amsterdam to Albany presented by the Friends of the New York State Library on June 19, 2014, here’s your chance to view it online by going to

http://vimeo.com/99862384

 

Enjoy!

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Want to recommend subscribing to the free DUTCH GENEALOGY NEWS

Dutch Genealogy <news@dutchgenealogy.nl>

Here’s an example of the most recent issue:

Fighting in church

15 August 2014 | Yvette Hoitink

It is rare to find sources that show us the how our ancestors behaved in their every-day lives. Church council minutes can sometimes give us a glimpse. The church council minutes of Aalten are a good example.

Č

đ

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Sent by NEW COUSIN

Patty Hoenigman

Hi Carolyn,

 

This has been a great day! First Mary Park called me, responding to an email I’d sent to her. Then she sent me your newsletter. I’m thrilled to be connecting with my Dutch cousins.

.

I would like to be added to your mailing list. I am in the process of proving my line back 7 generations to one of my Dutch ancestors, John Van Arsdale, who fought in the Revolutionary War. The registrar from one of the local DAR chapters is coming over this Sunday to help me fill out my application and hopefully be able to mail it in quickly. I believe I have all the documentation necessary, but maybe too much…lol   so she’ll tell me which are the best documents to use.

 

John Van Arsdale is the subject of a book by James Riker called Evacuation Day, Its Many Stirring Events. It tell the story of him being the one to successfully climb a greased flagpole where a British flag had been hung in a spiteful act by the Brits as they left the harbor at the end of the war. Van Arsdale was the one who figured a way to climb the pole and replace the Union Jack with the Stars and Stripes. It’s a fascinating story. James Riker, the father of the author and historian by the same name, married VanArsdale’s daughter, Elizabeth. I am a direct descendant of James Riker Jr.’s brother, Col. John Lafayette Riker, who was my great great grandfather. He died in the Civil War.

 

Please feel free to share my contact information if you know of other Dutch relatives in Austin who’d like to connect. I look forward to hearing from you and seeing the newsletter. You’re a good soul for doing all that!

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Sent by Jim Cozine

Screen shot 2014-08-20 at 12.01.24 PM.png

 

Screen shot 2014-08-20 at 11.55.33 AM.png
Letters 8/22/2014

HERE’S THE IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT!  Barbie Abbott Hamman, Dr. Steve Henry, and Janice Cozine are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky. THEY HAVE IS SET FOR:

September 18 & 19, 2015 at the Frankfort Convention center.  PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.

Here we go!  Janice Cozine is all over this!  Love that gal and so grateful for what she is doing.  Here is the notice:

The dates are set for Sept 18 & 19, 2015 (Fri & Sat) for the

“2015 DC Gathering” at the “Frankfort Convention Center”.

They will send me the contract to review next week and sign. Depending on how the contract is sent, (through email or slow mail)  I will send out a copy of the contract to Barbie, Carolyn & Diana to look over to see if there are any questions/concerns.  We can decide how the deposit will be handled, as well.

The arena is 10,000 sq. ft. with seating capacity of 5,000.  More than enough room for any amount of people we have. This facility has a full kitchen for our caterer, complete sound system, stage, all the tables & chairs will be set up for food, eating, auction, family display set ups, registration in the main lobby,  etc., all included for one price.

This location is in the heart of our capitol of Kentucky near most of the attractions that our group is interested in. The Frankfort Historical Society is in walking distance (1 block) from the Convention Center and main hotel.

Barbie and I will get the info needed for surrounding hotels, to give our cousins a variety of price ranges for them to make their RSVP’s. We can decide later what tours the cousins are interested in.

I will send out an email to Dr. Steve Henry to let him know of these dates, and see if he will be able to set up a tour to see the Lt. Governors Mansion as he spoke of earlier.

If there are any questions/concerns you may have,  please don’t hesitate to ask.

Blessings to all,  Janice  Cozine  🙂

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Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as Janice and crew gets the Gathering schedule together. Feel free to forward this newsletter, as long as you state the origin, Dutch Letters CarolynLeonard@me.com.

Mailouts: over 800 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so the mass mailer program switches to a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net

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Sent by Catharine MacMillan

Carolyn,

While I’ve not been able to attend any Dutch Cousin Gatherings, I always read your correspondence, and often follow links suggested by you or others.

I’ve moved even further away, (from upstate  NY to Port Townsend, WA) and also changed my email. Won’t make reunions any easier, but I’ll be nearer the next generation of Dutch cousins.

However I don’t want to miss any news! Please change my email to cgmacmillan@gmail.com.

My closest Dutch cousin connection is William Holman DeMotte; son of Daniel DeMotte and Mary Brewer; son of John DeMotte and Anna Cozine and daughter of Johannes Brewer and Janette Vanarsdalen.

Thank you very much.

Kate MacMillan

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Sent by William Davidson

Hello, Carolyn,

Jean Simon, Huntsville, Alabama,  inquired about the Dutch Loyalists who went to Nova Scotia  after the Am. Rev.

I would call your attention to the newsletter, Loyalist Trails, of the United

Empire Loyalists Assn. of Canada.

Editor,, Doug Grant, Toronto, ON, Canada; <loyalist.trails@uelac.org>.

The regular feature writer/researcher on those migrating from the states is Stephen Davidson (no relation), Halifax, Nova Scotia; <stephendavidson@gmail.com>.

Good Luck ,and  Happy Birthday.

Bill Davidson,

Potsdam, NY.

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Sent by Bill Van Osdol

Very close, Beverly’s birthday is today, 20th, she still isn’t as old as I am.  My 3rd novel of Zack’s WW II trilogy will be out on 2 Sept.  I’ll have copies.Looking forward. think it’s a good one.  “From the Sky – ODESSA” Will keep you posted.  Bill

Dr. Willian R. Van Osdol

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Sent by Judy McKee

Trying to forget will do you no good.  Enjoy anyway.       Cabell

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Sent by Mary Jo Gohmann

Happy Birthday Carolyn! Have a great day and a happy healthy year!

Hugs, Mary Jo

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Sent by Rogene Smith

Happy Birthday!  I  hope you are receiving many birthday greet ings on this hot, hot day in August.  Stay cool and enjoy!  Rogene Smith from Missouri

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Sent by Dutch Genealogy News

In the Netherlands, there has never been a tradition of writing biographical obituaries like you see in countries like the United States. Instead, “familieberichten” [family announcements] simply announce the death of a person.

In the 19th century, only more affluent people had a familiebericht placed in the paper. It was usually very short and only signed by the closest relative, typically the spouse or eldest son. In the 20th century, the announcements became a bit more informative and usually included all the children. But the information about the deceased is usually limited to the name and date of death, sometimes a date of birth as well.

Where to find family announcements

There are two major places to search for familieberichten: online newspaper website Delpher and the Central Bureau for Genealogy.

Delpher

The Delpher website provides access to kranten (newspapers). Search for the last name of the person combined with the name of the town where he died, or search for the last names of two spouses.

Central Bureau for Genealogy

The Central Bureau for Genealogy (CBG) collects newspaper clippings. The collection is available via their catalog. Search for the last name and then click ‘Familieberichten.’ Viewing the pages costs credits, that can be purchased from the CBG.

The clippings come without source citations so it is unknown which newspaper the announcement appeared in. I always search Delpher after I find a clipping to see if I can find it in its original context.

The CBG is indexing all of these clippings. The index is available on WieWasWie. If you click the thumbnail of the page, you will be taken to the CBG website where you need credits.

Example: Hendrik Jan Kastein

The Central Bureau for Genealogy collection includes two family announcements for Hendrik Jan Kastein (1848-1930).

Marriage announcement

Marriage announcement of H.J. Kastein and E.J.E. de Monye

His marriage announcement shows that Hendrik Jan Kastein married E.J.E. de Monjé on 20 May 1885. He worked as a ‘religious teacher’ (preacher). The announcement also shows that he lived in Haarlem and she lived in The Hague prior to their marriage.

(example) Death announcement

Hendrik Jan Kastein death announcement

The death announcement of Hendrik Jan Kastein shows that he died in Velp on 7 February 1930. The announcement also gives us biographical information: he was a ‘religious teacher’ in the Dutch Reformed Church and the Arnhem prisons. He was a Knight in the Order of Oranje Nassau. The introduction calls him a husband, father, father-in-law and grandfather, which tells us about his family composition. The funeral will take place on the following Tuesday at the “Heiderust” cemetery in Worth-Rheden.

We can search WieWasWie for his death record

We can visit the Worth-Rheden cemetery to see if his grave still exists

This announcement gives several opportunities for further research:

  • We can find the Royal Decree whereby he was knighted
  • We can search newspapers to find out when and where he was appointed as preacher of the Dutch Reformed Church and the Arnhem prison
  • We can consult the Arnhem prison archives to see if they have any personnel files
  • We can look for the church records, including the council minutes, to see what his parish was like.
  • ———————————————-
Letters 9/3/2014

HERE’S THE IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT!  Janice Cozine, Barbie Abbott Hamman, & Dr. Steve Henry are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky. THEY HAVE IS SET FOR:

September 18 & 19, 2015 at the Frankfort Convention center.  PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.

Here we go!  Janice Cozine is all over this!  Love that gal and so grateful for what she is doing.  Here is the notice:

The dates are set for Sept 18 & 19, 2015 (Fri & Sat) for the

“2015 DC Gathering” at the “Frankfort Convention Center”.

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as Janice and crew gets the Gathering schedule together. Feel free to forward this newsletter, as long as you state the origin, Dutch Letters CarolynLeonard@me.com.

Mailouts: over 800 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

———————————————–

Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so the mass mailer program switches to a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net

———————————————–

Sent by

Small Town Sunday: Pleasureville, Kentucky | Local News – WLKY Home

CLICK HERE:  https://editor.ib-prod.com/htv/servlet/page/view/htv-lou/news/small-town-sunday-pleasureville-kentucky/27705940?showAds=0

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Sent by Helen McKinney   

The Long Run Massacre & Floyd’s Defeat

                            A Living History Event in its 16th year!

                                          September 13, 14, 2014

 

When looking for a permanent spot for a settlement along the Kentucky frontier, pioneer adventurer and explorer Squire Boone selected what he thought was one of the prettiest locations in the world, Shelby County.  More specifically, he intended to build a fort along the banks of Clear Creek.  He did so in 1779/1780.  What he didn’t count on were the increasing hostile actions of Native Americans and the effects of the Revolutionary War on this small, isolated wilderness in America.

 

It is Boone’s story, along with that of his fort inhabitants, that is told through an annual living history event each September in Shelby County, Ky.  Boone, younger brother of famed frontiersman Daniel Boone, knew he wanted to settle in Shelby County and bring others with him.  Because of ensuing incidents with Woodland Indians in the area the inhabitants of his fort, Painted Stone Station, decided to leave and move to Lynn’s Station in September 1781.  On their way to the station (site is in present-day Eastwood, Ky), the fleeing settlers were attacked by the Native Americans.  The settlers who survived this massacre related their stories and have kept alive a very precious part of the early history of Kentucky.

 

The Painted Stone Settlers, Inc., a group of living history re-enactors, strive to keep this story alive by their dramatic re-enactment of these events each September.  The Long Run Massacre & Floyd’s Defeat retells the story of Painted Stone Station and the real people who lived there.  Included in the weekend event are various demonstrations of heritage skills such as spinning, weaving, fire starting, laundry, customs of the 18th century and blacksmithing.  Militia life and a Native American campsite are also depicted.  Visitors can experience the sounds and smell of an 18th century cannon, visit with Kentucky authors from 10-4 on Saturday, Sept. 7, and engage in lively conversation with costumed interpreters.  The main re-enactment (battle between settlers and Natives) will be at 2 p.m. on Saturday and at 1 p.m. on Sunday.  The SAR (Sons of the American Revolution) will provide a special American flag ceremony prior to the battle re-enactment.  A special re-enactment will be held at dusk on Saturday night.  A modern food vendor will be on site both days.

 

A special School Day is held on Friday, September 12 for all area school children.  This hands-on event is a day full of special demonstrations great for teaching the lifestyle of the 18th century.  School Day is held rain or shine.  Spots are still available.  For more information contact Helen McKinney at (502) 738-9435 orhlnmck@aol.com.

 

A special thank you to this year’s sponsors:  the City of Shelbyville and Shelby County Fiscal Court.

 

EVENT:  The Long Run Massacre & Floyd’s Defeat

PLACE:  Red Orchard Park, Shelbyville, KY (directions attached)

DATE:  Saturday, September 13, and Sunday, September 14, 2014

TIME:  Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m./Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

ADMISSION:  $6 for ages 12 to adult/ $3 for ages 3 to 11; ages 3 and under are free.  A

$10, 2-day pass is also available.

****SCHOOL DAY PROGRAM is held in the same location on Friday, September 12 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.  Cost is $4 per student.  Bagged lunches are permitted or teachers may pre-register lunches with us.  Registrations are required for School Day and lunches from our on-site food vendor.

 

For more information please visit www.paintedstonesettlers.org or contact:

 

Helen McKinney                                           Kathy Cummings

School Day Coordinator                                President

Painted Stone Settlers, Inc.                           Painted Stone Settlers, Inc.

-A non-profit organization                          -A non-profit organization  

(502) 738-9435                                               (502) 228-3746

(502) 487-0379                                               (502) 500-4475

hlnmck@aol.com                                             kathy.cummings@graphicenterprises.net

 

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Sent by Cozine mail list

Message Board URL:

http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.cozine/26.30.33.34.36/mb.ashx

Message Board Post:

Hello,

I know much time has passed, but I just located this interesting letter dated 1/6/1882 from a Thomas MOORE to his daughter, Jennie MOORE  posted in “Heart of Texas” Vol. 12 Spring:

(This letter was written by Thomas MOORE to his daughter, Jennie MOORE, at Hamilton College, Lexington, Kentucky. It was found with some old books and reprinted here with the permission or Ruth’s Book: Mart, Waco, Texas. )

When Danl. BOON and his little Colony made the first settlement of white people in Kentucky, my great grand father, Simeon MOORE, and his three sons, Thomas, John and Samuel were of that little band of adventurers.   The settlement was made at Ray Spring, the head of Shawneerun Creek, Mercer County, about 25 miles S. W. from Lexington and about four miles from Harrodsburg!

The history of Kentucky will give you some knowledge olr the dangers, hardships and privations of this little band of bold and intrepid pioneers!   Surrounded as they were by the heavy forests, dense canebreaks and hosts of hostile Indians; they had indeed a hard time to “hold the fort”

and m aintained a truly perilous life !   But by their indomitable energy, their self denial and bold daring they subdued the forest, conquered the Indians and gallantly held their position, and forn-led the nucleus around which other bold pioneers rallied and before the year 1800, they had conquered, subdued, occupied and cultivated one of the very loveliest and best countries ori the globe.  But the struggle was long and hard!

Some of these gallant men fell by the hand of the savage Indian;  amongst them, was Samuel MOORE,  a gallant young rnan, the brother of my grand father Thomas MOORE.   He was slain near Perryville, where a fort was formed in a large cave!   That is about 40 miles S, W, of Lexington. It was at this cave (Perryville) fort that my grand father, Thomas MOORE, formed the acquaintance of a lovely young woman, Miss Elizabeth HARBISON , whom he wooed and won; and they were married on the very night that the terrible “BLUE LICK” defeat occurred, by which the brave colonists were almost destroyed! as there was not one of the company, who were defeated and slain there, left to rell the sad tale of their destruction, My grand father, who belonged to the company that was slain in the “Blue Lick” defeat, had obtained his Captain’s permission to remain in the fort at Perryville (the cave) to get married. So he was married the very night the balance of his gallant comrades in arms were slain!

Simeon Moore, rny great grand father, arid his two surviving sons, Thomas and John, located their head rights of land on Shawneerun in Mercer County. Simeon died about the year 18 10, Thomas and John inherited his rich, broad acres of land and upon this, they both lived and raised large families of sons and daughters.

Thomas MOORE was born in 1755 and died in 1834. His wife, my grandmother, died in 1836. My grand father Thomas, left three sons surviving him, to-wit, John, my father, Thomas and Samuel, to whom he bequeathed all his lands. Samuel sold his interest in 1835 to Thomas and moved to Clark Co. Indiana, where he raised a large family–and died.

John, your grand father, sold his interest also to Thomas, and moved to Missouri in 1834, and back to Ky. in 1835–from Ky. he removed to Alabama, where he died in 1864, in the 75th year of his age.  My father had four sons and one daughter. I was his oldest, and are the only one living of his children. Bro. Hamilton died in the Army in 1863–leaving six children, two of whom live in Texas, two in Alabama and two in Smith County,

Tennessee.  His son, James, and daughter Phebe, live in Hill Co., Texas.   His son Hamilton and daughter Bettie, live in Lawrence Co., Ala.  His oldest son John and his oldest daughter, Ann Eliza, live in Smith Co., Tennessee.

My only sister,  your Aunt Ann Eliza, rnarried Jesse SANDERS in Barren Co. , Ky.  My sister died in Glasgow, Ky. , in 1843–leaving two sons, John and Barton.  They live in Graves Co., Ky., and Barton is a Christian preacher.   Their father died some 10 years ago.

My brother Simeon died in Lawrence Co. , Ala. , in 1861, leaving no children. My other brother Lucas died in his infancy in 1832.

Your grand father, John MOORE, was a soldier in the Army under General Harrison in 1813.   In Feb. 1814 he was married to Phebe W. WESTERFIELD  in Mercer County, Ky. , where they were both born and raised.  There is a large number of MOORES and WESTERFIELDS  living in Mercer and Boyle Counties, Ky., who are your relatives.

In Mercer County I was born, Aug. 6th, 1815. In my childhood 1 went to school on Old Shawneerun Creek. My school mates were the THOMPSONS

HARRISES, DAVIESES,  DODDS, HAYNESSES, DOWNINGS,   HOVINES, GRIMESES, McRAYES, BURTONS, etc., etc.

How I would like to meet and talk about our early days with them ! But “I feel like one, solitary and alone, treading some banquet hall deserted. ” and this privilege I cannot have here.

My grand father  James WESTERFIELD, was an early settler in the County of Mercer. His wife was a COZINE.  They raised quite a large family of both sons and daughters, Their sons were John, Cornefins, James, David and Isaac. Their daughters were Mary, who married Van DRIPE, Ann married CARTER, Phebe your grandmother MOORE, Betsy who married SCOTT.   Some of their descendants are in Ky. , Ohio, Ind. , Mo., Tenn., ‘Texas, Ala. , Iowa, Ill. , etc. , etc. Yea, and some in New York, and the Lord only knows where else!

I should have stated before that my grandfather MOORE raised several daughters – -towit- -Polly who married John HARROD, and settled in Viena, Indiana, where she raised a large family and died.   Ann, who married George WORLEY, and moved to Scott Co. , Ind. , raised three sons, John, William and Simeon and died; Nancy married NEWLAND, moved to Ind., raised one son and one daughter and died. Isabella married BINGHAM  by whom  she had two daughters and one son.   BINGHAM died and she moved to Illinois and died there. Betsy married ,Josiah BASS , by him she had several children. Bass died in Ky. and she married Van ARSDALE and moved to Pana, Ill., where she was still living, a widow a short time since–being the ONLY one of my ancestors living! She had a daughter, Mary Elizabeth, who rnarried one RAYLRILL  and they have a large family living at or near Pana, Ill. I have a colxsin, the daughter of my Aunt Isabella BiINGHAM  by the name of RANKIN, who lives near Quincy, Ill. She is a very intelligent and estimable lady and has a large family of children.

Having given you a brief sketch of your PATERNAL relatives, it is but proper that I should say something in reference to your maternal. Your Ma was

the daughter of James DODD, a farmer in Barren County, Ky., where she was born in 1818. Her father was the son of one of the first settlers in Barren County, Ky. Your grandfather DODD had several brothers, who raised large families, and he also had several sisters; one married DAVIDSON who had a large family–another married Settles, another CLAYTON, two others married CARTERS and they all had large families, and nearly all live in  Barren and Warren Counties. Your Ma had three brothers, William rnarried a EUBANK and lives in Arkansas, Thomas is a bachelor and lives in Glasgow, Robert married a BARLOW–she died leaving several children, who are now with their aunt at Smith Grove, Ky. , and he is now living

near Waco, Texas.She (your Ma) had five sisters; Sarah married DAVIDSON, who died, leaving 3 sons & 5 girls–all of whom live with their mother in Waco, Texas, except one son who is in Ky. Mary married EUBANK; they both died in Burnet Co. , Texas, leaving two sons who now live in Western Texas,  After your Aunt Mary died EUBANK married Mrs. WATSON, a widow lady, by whom he had three children; his widow and her children live in Burnet, ‘Texas. Your Aunt Hellen married GORIN who died, leaving five children; she now lives in Waco, Texas. Your Aunt Bettie married James SCRIVNER and they have several children; they live on a fine farm near Smiths Grove, in Warren County, Ky.

Your Aunt Mattie married ARRINGTON; they also have children and live on a good farm near Lebanon, Ky. Your grand mother DODD was a Miss BELL, she was raised in Barren Co., Ky., and the BELLS were an old and very respectable family among the early settlers in Southern Ky. Most of your ancestors, both paternal and maternal, were members of the Christian Church! some of them becoming members as early as 1805.

I have now given you a brief statement of your “kin folks. ” There are many incidents that I would like to give, but must stop for the present, One little incident I must relate: Shawneerun, Ky., is fed by numerous bold running springs of pure water and it has a deep channel passing through rocky falls and boulders and empties into Kentucky! River about one mile above MUNDAYS old ferry, on the Lexington and Harrodsburg road.  Before entering the river, the creek strikes the foot of a cliff of solid rock some 2 or 3 hundred feet high. The creek then turns northward and runs about a

helf mile rather up the river before it enters the river. ‘The cliff is equally high on the river side, making a long narrow cliff with the creek on one side and the River on the other. Just below the mouth of the creek–for several hundred yards, this cliff, with perpendicular sides some 2 or 3 hundred feet high, is about 75 to 100 yards wide, terminating in a narrow point about 200 feet high! When my grand father MOORE was a young man, he went out deer and elk hunting, and when upon this high point he discovered a large Indian hastily approaching him, with bow and arrow and tomahawk in hand-this awful precipice was before him, and the Indian behind him. The Indian yelled and let fly his arrows at him; MOORE being excited, fired his rifle at the Indian! but missed his mark! MOORE then retreated to the very verge of the terrible precipice ! fortunately the Indian’s deadly arrows also missed their mark. When MOORE could retreat no farther he clubbed his rifle to defend himself from the Indian’s deadly tomahawk!  The Indian seized MOORE’S gun with his left hand while he held the tomahawk in his right hand, ready to cleave MOORE’S  head! MOORE seized the tomahawk with his left hand–and thus it became a hand to hand, life and death struggle between these two powerful young men!  They grappled each other and both struggled for dear life !  At length they fell to the ground, on the verge of the cliff! The Indian fell on MOORE, but the latter still held his strong grip upon the Indians tomahawk–MOORE  fortnately, had a large butcher knife in its scabbard, which was I hung to his hunting belt. Whilst the lndian was yet upon him, MOORE succeeded in drawing his knife from its scabbard arld plunged it into the left side of the Indian, who gave a quick yell, and rolled off of MOORE arid instantly expired! MOORE irnmediately regained his feet, and quickly rolled the Indian over the precipice, who went crashing through the OH cedar tops, to the abyss below! ! How vividly I recall the night when at my grand father’s house, when the glowing log fire warmed us, when rrly old grand mother, comfortably seated in the chimney corner, knitting away, grand father lifted me upon his knee and detailed to me the foregoing incident!  And NOW I am an OLD MAN! penning this down, to send to only youngest child– a thousand miles away, at a college, erected in that same “dark and bloody ground” where my forefathers toiled SO HARD, and suffered SO MUCH! Well! they did not labor in vain ! ! My dear child, may you and I fill our destiny as faithfully and as well as they did. God bless you.

YOUS Pa

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Sent by Jim Cozine

 New York’s 350th Birthday Party? WE ARE PROUD OF NIEW AMSTERDAM AND OUR HISTORY

Ralph DeGroff, a long-time Trustee and officer of the Holland Society of New York kindly sent this news release on to me. I forward it to you, our members and leaders of this great Society.

We are proud of our history and traditions — the Dutch Oath of Abjuration (from alliance to a foreign power) has phrases and clauses that were closely followed in our nation’s Declaration of Independence.

Our nation’s creation, and ideals owe much to Dutch tolerance.

Enjoy the read, by clicking on the title in blue.

Best wishes,  Dr. Bob

 

New York’s 350th Birthday Party? Your Invitation Isn’t Lost in the Mail

BY SAM ROBERTS

Tuesday is the 350th anniversary of the settlement known as New Amsterdam becoming New York in a bloodless regime change. No party is planned.

Robert R. Schenck, MD

President

The Holland Society of New York

1100 N. Lake Shore Drive #33-A

Chicago, IL  60611-5207

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Sent by Firth Fabend

1614

 

The 37th New Netherland Seminar

Saturday September 20, 2014

Albany, New York

 

1614 is the 400th anniversary of the construction of Fort Nassau on Castle Island (now the Port of Albany).  Five speakers will put the Dutch trading post in its historical context as well as offer arguments for its probable location on the island.

 

nyslfnn@mail.nysed.gov

or call 518-474-1195 or 518-486-4815

Registration with lunch is $95.  Pre-registration deadline is September 12.

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Sent by Jim Cozine

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yankee

Dutch origins

 

New Netherland is to the northwest, and New England is to the northeast.

Most linguists look to Dutch sources, noting the extensive interaction between the colonial Dutch in New Netherland (now largely New York StateNew JerseyDelaware, and western Connecticut) and the colonial English in New England (MassachusettsRhode Island, and eastern Connecticut). The Dutch given names Jan (“John”) and Kees (“Cornelius”) were and still are common and the two sometimes are combined in a single name, e.g., Jan Kees de Jager. The word Yankee is a variation that could have referred to the Dutch Americans.[7]

Michael Quinion and Patrick Hanks argue that the term refers to the Dutch pet name Janneke[9] or Janke[10] (“Johnny”), which – owing to the Dutch pronunciation of J as the English Y – would be Anglicized as “Yankee”. Quinion and Hanks posit it was “used as a nickname for a Dutch-speaking American in colonial times” and could have grown to include non-Dutch colonists as well.[9]

  1. L. Menckenderived it from the slur “John Cheese”, applied by the English colonists to the Dutch – “Here comes a John Cheese”[11]– owing to the importance of their dairy cultivation, which introduced the black-and-white dairy cow from Friesland and North Holland to America in the mid-1600s. The modern Dutch for John Cheese is Jan Kaas but this would be spoken Jan Kees in some dialects.[10]

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

This Friday, Sept. 5 @ 1:00 PM I will be giving a one-hour workshop on “Writing Your Own History: Doing for Our Descendants What We Wish Great-Grandma Had Done for Us” at the Public Library in Westville, Oklahoma. Never heard of it? –Right on the Arkansas line, 30 minutes from Siloam Springs. I’ve never been there before either, it is going to be fun – help spread the word! If you are in the area, come on over!

Jon and I just returned from a few days (never long enough) visit to San Antonio for the Federation of Genealogical Societies Conference. Thousands of genealogists from across the country were there. They called it, “Gone to Texas.” The San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society and the Texas State Genealogical Society hosted it, but there were hundreds of vendors and speakers on all imaginable subjects related to history and genealogy and technology. I came out feeling like my head was going to explode from all the information available. Great speakers and subjects — and lots more available in the exhibit hall. I have talked a couple of the presenters into coming to speak at the Edmond Genealogical Society (EGS) soon. Our speakers are always great, you won’t want to missWayne Pettigrew speaking on his “DNA SURPRISE” this month Sep 15.

We stayed in the Marriott Riverwalk hotel across the street from the stunning Convention center which is built on both sides and OVER the canal. it is all glass and the views are amazing. Note: The trees are much bigger and more lush than our OKC Bricktown Riverwalk because it is years older. I love ours too!

Blessings, Carolyn

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Letters 9/23/2014

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky. THEY HAVE IT SET FOR:

September 18 & 19, 2015 at the Frankfort Convention center.  PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.

 

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

 

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together. Feel free to forward this newsletter, as long as you state the origin, Dutch Letters CarolynLeonard@me.com.

Mailouts: over 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

———————————————–

Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so the mass mailer program switches to a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net

———————————————–

from facebook

350 years ago, on Sept. 8, 1664, English soldiers took control of the Dutch city of New Amsterdam, on Manhattan Island.

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Sent by Kelly Westerfield

Carolyn,

I talked to Claude Westerfield the other day and he said that he has to get his computer and email fixed.  He is okay and he is hoping the computer and email can get fixed in the next couple of weeks.

 

Thanks

Kelly Westerfield

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Sent by Patty Hoenigman

I am a direct descendant of John Van Arsdale and his wife, Mary Crawford. Their daughter Elizabeth married James Riker whose son, James RIker, wrote the Annals of Newtown, however I am a descendant of the other brother, John Lafayette Riker, who died in the Civil War. This week I was in touch with a friend whose name is Van Artsdalen. We were comparing notes from each of our family records to see if my Van Arsdale/ Van Orsdoll line might intersect with his. His relatives seem to have gone to Bucks County, PA and were there in the early 1800’s. The ones I know about in my line were in New York, Long Island area, in the late 1700’s…but I know there are lots of descendants that I don’t have names for and that’s where our lines might connect…somewhere in all that! So I’m writing to you to ask if you can refer me to any particular source of information that might help us figure this out.

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Sent by NewMarc-L

Come Join us in September 2015, as we change Battery Park into New Amsterdam.

Sincerely, on behalf of New York’s Founders,

Henry Hudson, Jan Rodrigues, Asser Levy, Catalina Tricot, Joris Rapalje, Manuel, Adriaen van der Donck, Griet Reyniers, Anthony van Salee, Margaretha van Varick, Jacob Leisler and Petrus Stuyvesant.

Visit our website at: www.nyorigins.org

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Sent by

 

The New Amsterdam History Center Lecture Series

In conjunction with The Gotham Center and Baruch College History Department

presents

 

Slave Life in New Netherland

 

 

A Panel Discussion With

 

David Blight

Professor of American History at Yale University 

Director of the Gilder-Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition

 

Christopher Moore

Curator and Senior Researcher

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library

 

Susanah Shaw Romney

Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Author

New Netherland Connections:

Intimate Networks and Atlantic Ties in Seventeenth-Century America

 

Moderated by

Patricia U. Bonomi

Professor of History Emerita – New York University

 

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

6:00 to 8:00 PM

Baruch College Performing Arts Center

One Bernard Baruch Way

(Enter at 25th Street, btwn 3rd and Lex)

New York

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Sent by News from the Netherlands

herberg was an inn. Herbergen played an important role in the community. It was where people came after work or after church, where they stayed if they were travelling and where they met business partners to discuss deals. Innkeepers often played a role as informal scribes, writing documents for clients who could not read or write.

Things could get rowdy. When things got so rough that someone got injured or killed, so you can find inns featured in court records. If your ancestor was an innkeeper, it is well worth going through the local court records to find out if he was called to testify in such cases. The testimonies by him and his patrons can give you a vivid picture of what was going on in the inn.

cardplayers-672x536.jpg

Card-playing farmers at an inn. Vincent Malo, 1623-1650. Credits: Rijksmuseum

  • he Erfgoed Leiden en Omstreken [Heritage Leiden and Surrounding areas, which includes the Leiden archives] has published a series of indexes of Leiden records on their website. [Source: Geneaknowhow]
  • Images and indexes of church records from several Gelderland municipalities have been put online by the Gelders Archief. [Source: Genealogiedomein]
  • Indexes of several church records of the Netherlands Antilles have been published online at the West India Company website. [Source: Geneaknowhow]
  • The Municipal Archives of Goes have published indexes to the orphan chamber records of Goes, covering the period of 1566-1796. [Source: Geneaknowhow]
  • 600 maps have been added to the website Deventer in Beeld [Deventer in the Picture], consisting of over 550 plat maps (“kadasterkaarten”) of Deventer and Diepenveen and 34 maps of the Schipbeek river. The oldest map dates to the 16th century. [Source: Stadsarchief en Athenaeumbibliotheek Deventer]
  • WieWasWie, the largest genealogy website in the Netherlands, now contains over 100 million mentions of people. [Source: @Coret]
  • The Digitale Bibliotheek der Nederlandse Letteren [Digital Library of Dutch Literary Works] has found a new home. As of 2015, this collection of digitized publications will be maintained by the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the Royal Library of the Netherlands. [Source: Koninklijke Bibliotheek]
  • ———————————————–
  • Sent by New Netherland Institute
  • Our Cozine cousin, Firth Haring Fabend
  • is speaking!
  • Patroons and Plowmen, Pietism and Politics Dutch Settlers in the Hudson Valley in the Seventeenth & Eighteenth CenturiesDr. Fabend’s most recent book is New Netherland in a Nutshell: A Concise Historyof the Dutch Colony in North AmericaTThursday, October 9, 2014 at 3 pmBook Signing to FollowFor more information, please contact Fernanda H. Perrone at848-932-6I54 or hperrone@rulmaiJ.rutgers.edu ~RUTGERS
    University Libraries
  • This presentation is part of the celebration of the 350th anniversary of New Jersey,and one of a series of programs highlighting Special Collections and University Archives’ 20I4 exhibition, New Jersey Before the Revolution: Land and People.
  • Remigio U. Pane Room, 1St Floor, Alexander Library, New Brunswick
  • Restitution View of New Amsterdam. with New Jersey in the background.
  • presented by Dr. Firth Haring Fabend
  • ————–
Letters 10/12/2014

arbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky. THEY HAVE IT SET FOR:

September 18 & 19, 2015 at the Frankfort Convention center.  PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.

 

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

 

Mailouts: over 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

———————————————–

Sent by DUTCH GENEALOGY NEWS

What’s a “timmerman”?

timmerman is a carpenter. In the days before all houses were made of concrete or brick, carpenters built the frames. In the Middle Ages, most houses were made of wood. The houses had timber frames filled up with wicker and mud/clay. Later, bricks were used to fill in the timbers.

Many carpenters were also employed to build ships. In the 17th century, the Russian Czar Peter the Great came to Zaandam to be apprenticed as a shipwright.

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Sent by DUTCH GENEALOGY NEWS

Great tips for any researcher!

How to find the father of an illegitimate child

26 September 2014 | Yvette Hoitink

 http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/how-to-find-the-father-of-an-illegitimate-child/

In most families, sooner or later you will encounter a child born to an unwed mother. Finding the fathers of these ‘illegitimate’ children can be difficult, but not necessarily impossible.

I’ve researched dozens of these cases, both in my own tree and for clients. In four cases, I have been able to prove who the father was. In two other cases, I have developed good theories which I hope to prove through DNA. In the majority of cases, I ended up with a list of possible fathers, but no clear candidates. With the growing popularity of DNA testing and advances in tools for exploring DNA matches, it may be possible to solve these cases in the future.

While working these cases, I developed some strategies that may help you with your own cases too. I will use anonymized examples from my own research to illustrate how you can find out who the father of the illegitimate child was.

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Sent by Charles Vanorsdale

 

Concerning:

Sent by Patty Hoenigman

I am a direct descendant of John Van Arsdale and his wife, Mary Crawford. Their daughter Elizabeth married James Riker whose son, James RIker, wrote the Annals of Newtown, however I am a descendant of the other brother, John Lafayette Riker, who died in the Civil War. This week I was in touch with a friend whose name is Van Artsdalen. We were comparing notes from each of our family records to see if my Van Arsdale/ Van Orsdoll line might intersect with his. His relatives seem to have gone to Bucks County, PA and were there in the early 1800’s. The ones I know about in my line were in New York, Long Island area, in the late 1700’s…but I know there are lots of descendants that I don’t have names for and that’s where our lines might connect…somewhere in all that! So I’m writing to you to ask if you can refer me to any particular source of information that might help us figure this out.

Here is what I can offer:

 

Everyone in the US named Van Arsdale, Van Artsdalen, Van Osdoll, Vannosdoll, etc. (even including some Simonsons) descends from one Dutch/Flemish immigrant, Sijmon Jansz van Aersdaelen. He arrived in New Amsterdam in 1653 and had two sons here, Jan Simonsz and Cornelis Simonsz (in that order). Jan Simonsz, in turn, had a son Simon who was born in Flatbush NY but later moved, with his family, to Bucks County PA. He spelled his surname “Van Artsdalen”. More about him and his descendants may be found in The Vanguard (July 2000) which may be found online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vanaersdalen/newsltrno5.pdf

 

Getting back to Jan Simonsz, he had another son Christoffel Jansz (“Stoffel”). Stoffel’s son (John Van Osdoll) provided the line into which James Riker married. Stoffel’s background and descendants may be found in the December 2000 Vanguard athttp://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vanaersdalen/newsltrno6.pdf

For more on James Riker and his Van connection, please see  the final issuehttp://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vanaersdalen/newsltrno11.pdf

The Vanguard series may be found online at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vanaersdalen/VanguardIndex.html

Due to time and work constraints, I had to cease publication of the magazine in 2003.

 

So, Patty, the two lines you mention both share the same ancestry through Jan Simonsz van Arsdalen, eldest son of the family progenitor in the US.

Happy hunting, Charles R. Vanorsdale

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Hello Carolyn.  I wonder if you know or if any of the cousins know the cemetery where Peter Vanarsdale, died 28 OCT. 1857, Brighton, Il, son of Major Simon Vanarsdale and his second wife Aeltje Cozine?

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Sent by Morris McKee

By way of introduction I am the husband of Judy McKee a Dutch cousin of yours.

I found the account of your Day Trips from Harrodsburg to New York online.  You made reference to Peter Voorhees who was married to Sophia Van de Bogard.  I have reason to believe that their daughter Helena married the above reference Richard Gregory making them my direct ancestors.

The most pressing mystery I have is who was the father of Richard Gregory?  How did. where, and when did Richard and/or his father get tied up with Henry Banta my wife Judy’s Patriot?

Any guidance will be much appreciated.

Morris Cabell McKee

(note from Carolyn:  Can anyone of the Voorhees or VandeBogard familes help here?)

here’s a short link: http://bit.ly/LCsaul

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Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg where they established the Conewago Colony, and made history when they later settled the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse these ancestors built near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.

————————

Executive Committee:

President: John C. Westerfield of Pennsylvania <jcw44@juno.com301-535-8633

Vice President: Tommy Green of Oklahoma <tagreen@swbell.net580-716-0936

Secretary: Carolyn Leonard of Oklahoma <Buffalo234@cox.net405-720-2324

Treasurer: Diana Davis of Virginia <dianadavis8@aol.com757-536-1905

Webmaster: Pam Ellingson, Lakewood, WI <ellingson.pam@gmail.com715-276-7129

Finance Chairman:  Vince Akers of Indiana <VinceAkers@yahoo.com317-695-4514

Board of Directors:

Barbie Abbott Hamman of Kentucky <barbie@thekidzclub.com> 502-291-3093

Jim Cozine of Nevada <coz999@embarqmail.com702-871-5304

Barbara Whiteside of Indiana <ktdink@gmail.com812-945-9067

President Emeritus Claude Westerfield of Iowa <dcwesterfield@yahoo.com712-435-9150

———————————————–

Please check to be sure my several email addresses are in your address book. That was identified as the problem in some of the cases recently where the Dutch Letter emails were bouncing. Sometimes one of my email addresses won’t work for one reason or another, so the mass mailer program switches to a different one.

CarolynLeonard@mac.com

CarolynLeonard@me.com

Carolynswebmail@me.com

editor234@gmail.com

Buffalo234@cox.net

———————————————–

Sent by Gert Tetteroo

Carolyn,

Bill Greer was so kind to connect us, as I’m working on a new project about New Amsterdam:  Origins – Light on New York’s Founders.

You can watch the short Origins video, that was launched last week, here.  Please feel free to share this little film about New Amsterdam with all your fellow Dutch Cousins!

The little film radiates our message well: how NYC became this amazing and diverse City of Opportunity. Origins is a living open air light exhibition, where visitors come face-to-face with some of the first settlers of New Amsterdam. Origins will be on display in Battery Park from Sept. – Dec. of 2015, and will be remounted in following years. There is still plenty of opportunity for refinements or additionsThe Origins website, www.nyorigins.org,  is live as well. The site will become a platform for the organizations that will work with us to make Origins a reality.Can I tell you a bit more about this enlightened project celebrating the contribution of the early settlers to New York’s culture?Best, Gert Tetteroo

Executive Director Henry Hudson 500

www.nyorigins.org

www.henryhudson500.com

———————————————–

Letters 10/31/2014

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky. THEY HAVE IT SET FOR:

September 18 & 19, 2015 in Frankfort KY.  Originally the plan was to hold our gathering at the Frankfort Convention center, but they are requiring some expensive liability insurance – plus their use fee is more than double what we have ever paid before.  I think the team is still investigating possibilities.

PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.  Greg Huber, a Dutch Barn expert from Pennsylvania, is planning to come and bring some things to show on Dutch American material culture and talk about them. Haven’t heard yet who the other speakers will be but this is sure to be a special event!

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together. Feel free to forward this newsletter to other cousins.

 

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

 

Mailouts: More than 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by Gayle

Yvette Hoitink is a professional genealogist in the Netherlands. She has been doing genealogy for 20 years. Her expertise is helping people from across the world find their ancestors in the Netherlands. Read about Yvette’s professional genealogy services. The October/November 2014 issue of theInternet Genealogymagazine features an article about Dutch genealogy: “Find Your Dutch Ancestors Online.” In the six-page article, Yvette Hoitink shares websites and tips to help you find your ancestors from the Netherlands.

http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/

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Sent by Yvette Hoitink, Dutch Genealogy

Trouwen met de handschoen literally means “marrying with the glove” and means a proxy marriage. People marry “with the glove” if they can’t be in the same location during the marriage ceremony. The bride or the groom is represented by someone with a power of attorney and the marriage will take place as usual, probably with the exception of the kissing of the bride! Originally, a glove was displayed to signify the absent party, which is how the procedure got its informal name. The formal name is trouwen bij volmacht (marriage by power of attorney).

Marrying with a glove is still possible if the bride or groom are unable to attend the ceremony, for example because of illness, inability to travel or incarceration. A glove is not enough, it requires a license by the Department of Justice which is not issued lightly.

http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/

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Sent by Marion Duckworth Smith

NOTE: IF YOU CAN’T GO, MAYBE YOU CAN CONTACT HER FOR INFO.

Join Marion Duckworth Smith on a personal tour of the historic Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead circa 1654, the oldest private home in New York City on the National Register of Historic Places. The tour includes the Riker burial ground containing 132 Rikers and Riker descendants, a walk thru the downstairs living quarters and the outdoor gardens which surround the acre of land.

Tour Dates: Sunday, October 26th, 3:00 PM   Saturday November 1st, 3:00 PM

Each tour is $25.00 per person. Please mail checks in advance, payable to:

Marion Duckworth Smith

7803 19th RoadEast Elmhurst, NY 11370

Or $25.00 cash at the door.

Meet at the front gate which will be opened at 3:00 PM.

Thank you,  Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead

www.rikerhome.com

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Sent by Renee Roderiques

My Cozart/Cossart lines are in North Carolina:  Mary Cozart who married

Riley Vickers.  Past her I am stuck because many trees list her as a

daughter of Pieter Cozart and Maria Duryea, but none that I have seen offer

any evidence of the connection nor explain how some of their children were

born in NC and others in Kentucky.  This is the anomaly I am hoping someone

can explain.  I wish I had found all of this about ten years ago when I

lived in Kentucky.  We lived very close to Harrodsburg and the Old Mud

Church, but I had no clue there might be any ancestral connection to it.

 

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – CAN ANY OF YOU COZART/COSSARTs/DURYEA/DUREES

HELP THIS GAL?

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Sent by Dutch Genealogy <news@dutchgenealogy.nl>

The Waterschap is the water board, the government agency responsible for water management. With half our country below sea level, that is a big responsibility. Just last night, the water boards decided to close the storm surge barriers between the North Sea and the rivers to prevent major flooding.

Water boards have been around for a very long time. The Hoogheemraadschap Rijnland water board for example, was invested by count Floris V of Holland in 1286. That water board exists to this day and ensures that my own house isn’t flooded and that we have fresh water to drink.

Water management shaped Dutch culture and values. To claim land from the sea and keep it dry, you need to collaborate on a regional level. Compromises need to be made. To this day, collaboration and compromise are at the core of Dutch politics. Even our right-wing parties are probably more socialist than most left-wing parties in other countries.

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Sent by DUTCH GENEALOGY

landbouwer is a farmer. There are several related terms that you may encounter in the records:

  • Boer (farmer)
  • Boerenknecht (farm hand)
  • Landgebruiker (literally: land user, often a tenant farmer)
  • Landman (farmer)
  • Bouwman (farmer)
  • Akkerbouwer (field farmer)
  • Veehouder (cattle holder)
  • Varkenshouder (pig holder)
  • Graanboer (grain farmer)

Most farmers did not own the farms they worked on. Many were tenants. Originally, their rent would have been a percentage of the yield, usually 1/3. Later, this rent in kind was changed to a monetary rent. In most places, that shift took place in the 17th or 18th century. The desire to own their own land is one of the reasons that drove many farmers in the 19th century to emigrate.

http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl

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Sent by MARY Townsend Bates

On Oct 30, 2014, at 2:49 PM, Mary Bates wrote:

> Hi Carolyn,

> Got home and have sent you some pictures that I took when I was at Old Mud this summer.  I know that I have sent some of them more than once.  Do hope that they have been received and if you can use any of them, please do.  I was there with Amalie Preston who graciously escorted me and my husband last summer through the site.  Amalie was so gracious to spend her Sunday afternoon opening up the Meeting House for us.  The whole cemetery is chained and has security, so someone must be there to open it for guests.  I would love to get my great great grandfather’s grave marker back where he is buried.  If it is in the pile, and I do not know that it is, do you know how I might go about it?  The URL that you gave me showed that it was on his grave by her (Rachel wife of Garret Terhune).

> Thanks for all that you do for us.

> Grateful cousin,

> Mary

[from Carolyn herself: I posted the photos Mary sent to the Dutch Cousins Facebook page.

Garret Terhune born 3 Jul 1787  Harlingen,Somerset Co NJ, died 10 Nov 1871 Mercer Co KY

married Rachel Rinearson (Reyniersen) 14 Jan 1814 Mercer Co KY; she was born 21 Feb 1790 died 9 Sep 1866 Mercer Co KY

Both buried at the Old Mud Meeting House – I found photos of both tombstones standing in 2005 at our gathering and sent them to Mary and to Amalie.  This Garret Terhune was a wagonmaker like his father – also named Garret – and they have a son named Garret Terhune (1821-1873)  who was also a wagonmaker, so three generations or more of Garret Terhunes.]

———————————–

Sent by Amalie Preston — update on Old Mud

No new vandalism–thank heavens for Vince’s security system!  Who is Mary’s great grandfather?  I can look for it.  What I am now finding is that the natural weathering is erasing inscriptions and we do need to get all stones back to their original sites while/if we can still tell who they are.  If she has a photo of the stone and its location, that would help.

To update you on Old Mud, we have contracted with a fine young craftsman, Monty Kelly, to repair the mud inside the church.  He has finished a test panel inside his own old barn at McMurtry’s Station, and is amazed by the strength of the mud.  When he tried to remove the test panel, he had to pry and beat it apart with a hammer.  We always have new respect for our forebearer’s craftsmanship as we go through each step of this renovation.

When the mud repair is complete, the reclaimed flooring will go down over the present sub-floor and that will basically complete our work at the church.

While the pews and pulpit are removed to install flooring, we will repair the wine glass pulpit base, set it back up under the high windows, and bolt it to the wall.

Won’t Claude look grand officiating  at our next Dutch Cousins worship service!

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Sent by carolyn

attaching two photos of Old Mud by Mary Bates

 

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Busily working on my next book – TO ISRAEL, WITH LOVE. I am amazed that one city, Jerusalem, is revered by so many faiths. Just finished the 4th rewrite of the manuscript, first edit by my engineer, done and entered; son James is doing second edit, then will send to the Book Doctor for third edit.

Can’t wait to see Jerusalem, the Movie.

Sent by Karen Prather

Thanks Karen Prather for the Halloween card.  Don’t know if this will work, but I am going to try to share it with everyone.

Click on the hotlink — and whether it works or not – HAPPY HALLOWEEN to all our Dutch cousins!

http://www.jacquielawson.com/viewcard.asp?code=5016975062765&source=jl999&utm_medium=internal_email&utm_source=pickup&utm_campaign=receivercontent

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Letters 11/12/2014

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky. THEY HAVE IT SET FOR:

 

Friday and Saturday September 18 & 19, 2015 in Frankfort KY. Originally the plan was to hold our gathering at the Frankfort Convention center, but they are requiring some expensive liability insurance – plus their use fee is more than double (triple actually) what we have ever paid before AND they wanted a big percent added on from the caterer. They are out of our price range, so is the Kentucky History Center.  Our hope right now is the Kentucky State University, recommended by Rodney Dempsey – still checking on that.

We need:

A room for seating 100 to 150 (preferably banquet style) with tables and space around the perimeter for 20 or 30 table-top displays of family trees of Low Dutch families. A roomy reception area to register guests and hand out badges, etc;  lectern, mic, screen for powerpoint presentations,  a protected alcove to display books for sale on our Low Dutch ancestry and our silent auction items. Also access to a big copier, a lot of people want to make copies of what they find on their family.

We have a caterer from Salvisa we have used before (excellent food and service) who are willing to come to Frankfort for us so we would like to have our meals in the same room if possible. The meetings will run from 8:30 am to 6:30 dinner and out by 10, both days. Reasonable accommodations close by would be a plus.

On Sunday we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication.

 

PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.  We have some great ideas for speakers and entertainment, including Greg Huber, a Dutch Barn expert from Pennsylvania, who volunteered to come and bring some things to show on Dutch American material culture .

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together.

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

 

Mailouts: More than 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by Ann Boughman

Would like to receive the Dutch letters.  My grgrandparents were of Dutch descendency, that of Banta and Low/Lau/Lawe.  The Banta’s go back to Epke Banta who brought his family from Holland in 1659.

 

I also have the Banta book if anyone needs a look up.

 

———————————–

Sent by Martha Banta Boltz

 

Carolyn this is just so fascinating. I read all of the Dutch genealogist’s information and she must have second sight or just be a genius at what she finds.  Mad me wonder if we have actually nailed down Arum as I recall it to be, the apparent original site of the Banta farm, etc.  Or have  you all talked to her and found any more information?  I know I will never get to Holland, but I am so fascinated and interested in getting as much information as possible on our family.  Thank you for all you do!  Hope to see you next September now that I have moved to Kentucky and am closer than before!!

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Sent by Wanza Merrifield

Is there a printed list of those buried in the Old Mudd Cemetery?      Wanza

(Note from Carolyn, herself:

Here is the list on findagrave:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&GSln=Terhune&GSiman=1&GScid=187228&CRid=187228&pt=Mud%20Meeting%20House%20Cemetery&

Here is the list online at Harrodsburg Historical Society:

http://kymercer.heliohost.org/hhs/mmh.shtml

and here is the list posted on my website:

Located behind the “Old Mud Meeting House,” this burial ground three miles southeast of Harrodsburg, Kentucky, is located off of U.S. Highway 68 on Dry Branch Road.

Land for the church and burials was purchased in 1800 by a colony of Low Dutch people. Their ancestors settled New Amsterdam in the 1600s (now New York) they lived for a time in “west Jersey” (now New Jersey), formed a colony in Pennsylvania – then Conewago in York County and in the 1780s began migrating to the Kentucky frontier.

Many Revolutionary patriots are buried here, at least 35 patriots with Low Dutch Connections are memorialized with markers placed by the Dutch Cousins and the Sons of American Revolution.

The property is now owned and maintained by the Harrodsburg Historical Society.

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kymercer/hhs/mmh.html

(This list made in December, 1967)

Name Born Died Notes
Adams, Archibald Died May 25, 1850 age 64 years
Adams, Phebe March 19, 1789 April 17, 1848 consort of Archibald
Adams, Elizabeth Jane . 1840 .
Adams, Martha A. July 5, 1816 Feb. 19, 1820 dau. of Archibald and Phebe
Adams, David Died Jan. 19, 1825 age 69 years
Adams, William Nov. 15, 1790 July 18, 1861 .
Adams, Priscilla Nov. 25, 1791 Nov. 9, 1856 wife of William
Adams, Jane Oct. 8, 1804 Aug. 16, 1864 wife of John W.
Adams, John W. April 29, 1792 Sept. 15, 1865 .
Adams, James July 18, 1798 Sept. 29, 1855 .
Adams, Rebecca Oct. 16, 1803 Oct. 16, 1881 wife of James
Adams, Joshua Sept. 7, 1843 Feb. 8, 1905 “Father”
Adams, Nannie Oct. 7, 1844 Nov. 6, 1895 wife of Joshua
Adams, Mary 1879 1880 dau of D.T. and E.G.
Allen, Jane Feb. 13, 1825 May 11, 1863 wife of W.J.
Boice, Ann M. Jan 6, 1823
Jessamine Co., Ky.
Sept. 1, 1883 1844 – professed religion
Boice, Harrison Sept. 20, 1812 Nov. 28, 1870 .
Boice, Jacob * July 1, 1772 April 13, 1823 .
Boice, George * May 6, 1815 . broken stone
Boice, Mary July 31, 1775 Dec. 27, 1851 .
Bonta, Mary March 22, 1786 Oct. 31, 1871 .
Bonta, Peter G. Aug. 9, 1809 July 25, 1857 .
Bonta, Lany * Sept. 15, 1786 June 10, 1853 .
Bonta, Garret * Nov. 4, 1789 Aug. 30, 1860 .
Bonta, Peter Nov. 1, 1780 Oct. 18, 1827 .
Bonta, Rachel Nov. 4, 1784 Sept. 10, 1860 wife of Peter
Bonta, Elizabeth Aug. 28, 1802 Jan. 9, 1863 .
Brown, Margaret W. July 9, 1848 June 6, 1849 dau of N.D. and M.J.
Brown, James J. Dec. 11, 1860 Dec. 11, 1860 son of N.D. and M.J.
Brown, Charles A. May, 1820 August 184? son of J.D. and S.H.
Clark, Mary A. May 20, 1823 Aug. 5, 1857 wife of James M.
Cockrell, Anna E. Dec. 12, 1840 Aug. 11, 1871 wife of Gen. F.M.
Comingo, Sarah died 1839 .
Comingo, John died Oct. 13, 1841 age 56 years
Comingore, Rachel Oct. 11, 1803 Oct. 26, 1820 dau of A. and I.
Cozatt, Jordan D. May 25, 1829 May 1, 1861 .
Cozatt, Elizabeth A. May 12, 1833 Oct. 7, 1860 wife of Jordan D.
Cozatt, Frances May 2, 1859 Jan 8, 1860 dau of J.D. and E.A.
Cozine, Garret March 20, 1802 Oct. 27, 1822 .
Cunningham, Murla N. Dec. 22, 1893 June 29, 1894 dau of J.T. and Mary R.
Cunningham, Catherine G. Dec. 7, 1881 Aug. 11, 1892 dau of J.T. and Mary R.
Davis, Wesley 1835? Aug 22, 1857 son of Cornelius and Sally
Davis, Phoebe Jane May 20, 1844 June 6, 1849 dau of S. and C.
Davis, Jackson M. July 4, 1833 Dec. 17, 1839 son of C. and S.
Davis, John died Nov. 6, 1841 age 70 years
Davis, Catherine died Sept. 8, 1855 wife of John
age 74 years
Davis, Isaac died Dec. 23, 1849 age 33 years
Davis, Ann Feb. 10, 1807 July 25, 1864 .
Davis, Mrs. Margaret M. March 7, 1827 Sept. 28, 1850 .
Davis, William T. Dec. 26, 1815 Jan. 29, 1852 .
Davis, Oliver P. Nov. 6, 1846 January, 1849 .
Davis, Ann W. April 30, 1815 Jan. 5, 1884 .
Davis, W.T. Sept. 25, 1804 Sept. 30 1874 .
Davis, Isaac O. May 5, 1855 July 24, 1882 .
Davis, Mary C. Feb 1, 1814 Nov. 16, 1890 .
Davis, David B. * Sept. 28, 1811 Aug. 9, 1890 .
Davis, Susan * Aug. 26, 1811 Aug. 21, 1892 .
Davis, James Jan. 29, 1819 May 15, 1867 .
Davis, James Harry May 15, 1827 Dec. 10, 1901 .
Davis, Juantha April 5, 1845 . wife of J.H.
Harris, Louvica C. Feb. 16, 1830 April 2, 1909 .
Harris, Andrew T. April 27, 1833 April 20, 1904 .
Hine, Samuel N. died Feb. 22, 1849 son of H.H. and Julia
Hogue, Samuel Dec. 18, 1787 May 10, 1839 .
Hogue, Mary Nov. 12, 1788 July 24, 1839 .
Hogue, Elizabeth Dec. 1, 1827 July 31, 1845 .
Hulett, Margaret A. died Aug. 11, 1875 wife of Benj.
age 42 years
Hurt, P. died Feb. 20, 1828 .
Irvine, Rice M. July 29, 1843 April 9, 1863 .
Irvine, George A. March 22, 1841 Jan. 21, 1864 .
Jennings, John C. * Jan. 27, 1811 June 15, 1859 .
Jennings, Jane B. * Oct. 12, 1812 Dec. 2, 1880 .
Lewis, John Q. Oct. 8, 1828 Dec. 7, 1875 .
Mann, Jackson April 10, 1812 April 15, 1812 son of J. and M.
Mann, William T. March 19, 1819 July 13, 1819 son of J. and M.
Mann, William Barnes died Sept. 18, 1837 age 3 years
Mann, Jackson April 9, 1775 March 7, 1858 .
Mann, Mary Dec. 1, 1788 Oct. 29, 1823 wife of Jackson
Mann, Margaret July 1, 1848 Nov. 22, 1868 .
Mann, James B. Nov. 7, 1807 Feb. 27, 1886 .
Mann, Mary Terhune Dec. 22, 1814 Oct. 18, 1896 wife of James B.
Mann, Katie Aug. 21, 1849 May 2, 1884 dau of Jas.B. and Mary
Mann, Mary Irvine Nov. 26, 1846 Jan. 2, 1878 dau of Jas.B. and Mary
Mann, Cosby Edward Sept. 4, 1855 Feb. 24, 1858 son of James and Mary
Mann, Major J.J. March 19, 1819 July 6, 1876 .
Mann, Letita R. July 3, 1829 July 30, 1871 wife of J.J.
Mann, Madison E. Oct. 19, 1862 Sept. 23, 1864 son of J.J. and L.R.
Mann, William A. Sept. 21, 1859 April 21, 1873 son of J.J. and L.R.
McAfee, Elizabeth J. May 18, ???? Jan 27, 18?? dau of James and Elizabeth
McAfee, Elizabeth Jane July 3, 1802? June 8, 1847 consort of James
McClanahan, Elizabeth Dec. 19, 1804 Sept. 23, 1868 .
McClanahan, Richard March 21, 1782 Jan. 19, 1861 .
Milburn, Joseph July 7, 1787 Aug. 17, 1868 .
Milburn, Mary April 19, 1783 April 18, 1851 wife of Joseph
Parker, Mary V. Oct. 27, 1856 April 28, 1872 .
Parker, Dr. J.B. March 19, 1822 May 13, 1867 .
Reed, Henry March 1828 March 14, 1899 .
Riker, Charles Jan 25, 1774 June 12, 1857 .
Riker, Mary Feb. 25, 1781 Aug. 10, 1865 wife of Charles
Rue, Theodore F. Jan. 14, 1844 Jan. 14, 1845 son of Nelson and Margaret
Rue, Emma C. Nov. 8, 1865 March 28, 1881 .
Rue, Jonathan Oct. 7, 1787 Aug. 27, 1867 .
Scanland, Benjamin F. Aug. 31, 1798 Oct. 9, 1868 .
Scanland, Sarah Ann T. May 14, 1825 Aug. 11, 1886 wife of R.
Scanland, Lovisa Ann 1866 1869 dau of R. and S.A.
Schamp, Mary Aug. 11, 1824 Nov. 19, 1847 .
Schamp, Cynthia H. March 12, 1830 June 19, 1847 .
Schamp, Flora Aug. 6, 1789 no death date .
Schamp, Henry Oct. 20, 1785 June 12, 1841 .
Schamp, George Dec. 23, 1816 Jan. 30, 1841 .
Scomp, John V. Feb. 27, 1815 June 22, 1881 .
Scomp, Cathreen Wilson April 16, 1817 Nov. 22, 1891 wife of John
Scomp, Sally Jan. 22, 1788 Sept. 15, 1868 .
Scomp, Cornelius December, 1818 Aug. 14, 1868 .
Silcocks, William died May 20, 1810 or 40 .
Smock, John Sr. 1814? . .
Terhune, John died March 27, 1860 .
Terhune, Sanford McBrayer Jan. 7, 1851 Nov. 30, 1852 son of B. and E.C.
Terhune, Mary Bell Nov. 19, 1844 July 25, 1845 .
Terhune, Garrett July 3, 1787 Nov. 10, 1871 .
Terhune, Rachel Feb. 21, 1790 Sept. 9, 1866 wife of Garrett
Terhume, Elizabeth C. Dec. 4, 1827 July 14, 1862 wife of Barnett
Tumey, Virginia died Oct. 27, 1853 wife of P.W.
age 34 years
Tumey, Martha V. June 17, 1851 Dec. 14, ? dau of Wm. H. and Mary A.
Tumey, Edgar Nov. 10, 1849 June ???? son of Wm. H. and Mary A.
Tumey, Thomas William died June 22, 1848? son of J.L. and S.B.
age ?0 years
Tumey, Harris J. July 16, 1852 May, 1853 son of J.L. and S.B.
Van Anglen, Charles Sept. 18, 1834 Oct. 14, 1849 .
Van Arsdall, Cornelius Jan. 5, 1840 (Gov’t. marker) Lt. Quick’s N.J. Troops – Revolutionary War Soldier
Vanarsdall, Alexander March 2, 1777 Nov. 14, 1855 .
Vanarsdall, William S. died October, 1851 age 44 years
Vanarsdall, John S. * died April 1844 .
Vanarsdall, Benjamin * died June 6, 1849 .
Vanarsdall, Sarah J. Dec. 29, 1839 Aug. 28, 1849 .
Vanarsdall, Mary Frances April 17, 1856 Sept. 19, 1860 dau of Peter and Sarah
Vanarsdall, Cornelius Feb. 15, 1766 Oct. 14, 1866 .
Vanarsdall, Cynthia Jan. 1, 1755 Oct. 3, 1868 wife of Cornelius
Vanarsdall, Mary Jane Dec. 2, 1833 Nov. 21, 1860 wife of Aaron
Vannice, Cornelius died April 16, 1820 age 65 years
Vannice, Mary died May 13, 1845 age 82 years
Vannice, Isaac Dec. 30, 1785 Nov. 18, 1834 .
Vannice, Laney May 31, 1788 Jan. 9, 1836 .
Vannice, Cornelius Dec. 2, 1810 May 10, 1848? .
Vannice, Cornelius June 22, 1799 June 3, 1846 .
Vannice, John W. April 26, 1828 Dec. 12, 1833 .
Vannice, Ann Sept. 7, 1795 Sept. 18, 1852 .
Vannice, James Feb. 20, 1804 Nov. 29, 1878 .
Vaught, Mary died Jan 19, 1848 age 25 years
Westerfield, James C. died March 2, 1867 age 84 years
Westerfield, Benjamin P. Dec. 24, 1841 Nov. 29, 1861 “Shot by John W. Penny”
Westerfield, James J. June 28, 1806 Sept. 12, 185? broken stone
Westerfield, Deliah July, 1805 Aug. 3, 1855 wife of J.J.
White, Mary A. Nov. 21, 1807 April 5, 1876 .
Woods, Mary died July 1820 age 85 years
Young, Harriatt Sept. 24, 1852 Feb. 6, 1877 wife of J.E.
The list of inscriptions which Mrs. Cunningham copied in 1910 had twenty-two names which were not found in December, 1967. Those inscriptions which were not found in the latter copying are:
Adams, Margaret 1773 1810 .
Adams, ____ 1816 1820 dau of Archable and P.
Bonta, C.V. 1799 1846 .
Brown, Cintha no dates .
Brown, John no dates .
Brown, Dr. James J. Jan. 23, 1824 Nov. 24, 1850 .
Brewer, Daniel 1718 1791 .
Comingo, Leroy Sept. 25, 1853 Sept. 17, 1864 son of J.B. and T.J.
Comingore, Henry 1747 1837 .
Huff, Abraham Soldier of Revolutionary War
(inscription carved on an old rock)
Lyster, Peter May 31, 1761 Jan 5, 1830 married in 1784
McAfee, Elizabeth Jane died 1811 .
McAfee, James died 1811 .
McAfee, ____ Jan. 7, 1747 ???? .
Scomp, Infant ???? 1843 child of John and Catherine
Scomp, Infant died 1848 .
Silcocks, Isaac died Dec. 15, 1834 .
Van Nice, John W. 1736 Dec. 12, 1816 .
Vannice, Cornelius died 1816 .
Vanarsdall, Tabitha December, 1780 1840 .
Vanarsdall, Joiny 1844 ???? .
Voughn, Mary died January, 1848 .
Woods, Mary 1725 July, 1810 age 85 years

———————————–

Sent by Mary Townsend Bates

Carolyn,

His son Barnett Terhune was my great grandfather and he is buried in Bellevue Cemetery in Danville.  His son, Baker Ewing Terhune is my grandfather and his daughter Louise Terhune Townsend is my mother and is buried in the Terhune family plot in Bellevue.

You sent me the URL to find Garret Terhune and I saw Rachel’s grave when I was there.  His tombstone is pictured in findagrave, but not at the site.  There was a pile of tombstones, one on top of the other at the site and I just wondered if it was in the pile. If so, could it be put back next to Rachel’s where I presume that he is buried?

Thanks,

———————————–

Sent by Judy Cassidy

Carolyn, I was interested in the email sent by Mary Townsend Bates about Garret Terhune.Jr.  His father Garret was a slave owner and I wanted to learn more about the fact he was a wagon maker.  He left a will dated 1 Nov. 1848 in which he mentions his slaves as well as his son Garret. He drowned in the Salt River on 1 Feb. 1848. Can you give me the source of his being a wagon maker and where his place of business was in Mercer County.  Probably his farm most likely at that early date.

Thanks and Happy Halloween

———————————–

Sent by Jim Woodfill

City convention centers are a good place to stay away from.

I go to 2 or 3 conventions a year at these places (APS Stampshow, SME Annual Meeting, Mining Show in Las Vegas), and find that there is a lot of walking, as all events seem to be 50 miles apart!  I am not a young man any more.

I much prefer to meet in a nice hotel, many of which have their own convention centers, only on a smaller scale.  The Clifty is a good example of a small one.  A group our size would be lost in the Frankfort Convention Center.

Also, figure on paying at least double for things like coffee and snacks, including lunch.  Convention center catering is one big ripoff!

I don’t know the city of Frankfort, but I’ll bet there are any number of hotels we could meet at that would suit our group quite nicely.  We don’t need a big convention center.

———————————–

Sent by Gary Dunn

Thank you for your past emails and all of the information contained therein and the links.  My wife and I are planning to attend next year.  May we send a small check to help defray some of the costs?  Address?  Thank you, Gary & Ginny Dunn

———————————–

 

Letters 11/17/2014

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry are working on plans for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.

 

Friday and Saturday September 18 & 19, 2015 in Frankfort KY. Originally the plan was to hold our gathering at the Frankfort Convention center, but they are requiring some expensive liability insurance – plus their use fee is more than double (triple actually) what we have ever paid before AND they wanted a big percent added on from the caterer. They are out of our price range, so is the Kentucky History Center and the Plaza Hotel.  Just got a personal note of sympathy from a professional tour person saying “Frankfort is a nice place to visit, but an expensive town compared to the rest of the state.”

Our hope right now is the Kentucky State University, recommended by Rodney Dempsey and it looks like a good possibility thanks to Rod’s connections there. – Janice and Barbie are scheduled to check KSU out this week. We need:

A room for seating 100 to 150 (preferably banquet style) with tables and space around the perimeter for 20 or 30 table-top displays of family trees of Low Dutch families. A roomy reception area to register guests and hand out badges, etc;  lectern, mic, screen for powerpoint presentations,  a protected alcove to display books for sale on our Low Dutch ancestry and our silent auction items. Also access to a big copier, a lot of people want to make copies of what they find on their family.

 

We have a caterer from Salvisa we have used before (Family Affair -excellent food and service). They are willing to come to Frankfort for us so we would like to have our meals in the same room if possible. The meetings will run from 8:30 am to 6:30 dinner and out by 10, both days. Reasonable and comfortable accommodations close by would be a plus.

 

On Sunday we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication.

 

PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.  We have some great ideas for speakers and entertainment, including Greg Huber, a Dutch Barn expert from Pennsylvania, who volunteered to come and bring some things to show on Dutch American material culture .

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together.

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

 

Mailouts: More than 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

———————————–

Sent by carolyn (herself)

OH MAN!  I WANT TO BE in NYC for this! I think we need to have another Dutch Cousins bus tour to New York next September!

Battery Park, New York City September – December 2015

Every night, from 7:00 pm to midnight, Battery Park will be transformed into a living open-air light exhibition. Visitors will come face to face with some of New York’s first settlers. Through their life stories we celebrate New York, originally called New Amsterdam, the enlightened and diverse city of opportunity.

Come Join Us!

Last week we launched a new and illuminating Origins website, produced by our sponsor Incentro. Check it out, especially the Founders Hall of Fame, at:
www.nyorigins.org
Your Family’s Story
Do you have any ideas for historic early settlers — perhaps a relative — we should include? Any other feedback? Please contact us at info@nyorigins.org.

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Sent by Wanza Merrifield

Thank you so much [for the Old Mud graveyard list in last Dutch letters], diidn’t find what I was looking for, but there are Manns llisted, and tht is one of my families, so we will see!!!.

Wanza

———————————–

Sent by Carolyn

Fold3 Offers Free Access to the World War II Collection Until November 30

The Fold 3 Blog reports:

“In honor of Veterans Day, Fold3 is offering free access to our World War II Collection November 10-30. Explore the records of the war that shaped America’s “greatest generation”—and look for your family’s own WWII heroes along the way. You can read all the details at http://blog.fold3.com/free-access-to-the-world-war-ii-collection.

If you or a member of your family are interested in joining one of the lineage societies, such as DAR or SAR, war of 1812 or even the Witches of Salem!

If you have already documented your U.S. ancestry to 1760 or earlier, you already have an excellent chance of finding either a Patriot or a Loyalist in the family tree. Boys as young as 16 were allowed to serve, so any male ancestors born in 1760 or earlier are possible veterans. You can even find a few younger boys who served as drummers or assistants in the Revolutionary War and later were credited as veterans, even though they were not considered soldiers during the war itself. Almost all federal pension applications have survived, even the applications of those who were later turned down. In most cases, the veterans had to prove they were true veterans and therefore eligible for pensions. The “proof” often consisted of testimonials from relatives, neighbors, or from other military veterans with whom they served. Such testimonials often provide a wealth of genealogy information, frequently mentioning parents, spouses, siblings, and children. Even the applications that were eventually rejected can be valuable to today’s genealogists. (partially copied from Dick Eastman’s online Genealogy Newsletter; more info below)

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Sent by Helen Mckinney

Carolyn,

 

After reading the first part of this email, I wanted to let you know about a facility in La Grange, KY that would probably meet all of your needs.  I know you are planning to meet in Frankfort, but La Grange (Oldham Co, KY, right off of I-71) has several hotels/B&B’s and a new meeting facility known as CityPlace.  Below is the contact info. for CityPlace sent in a recent email to me, if you are ever interested in La Grange.    Helen McKinney

Hello from CityPlace!

 

I wanted to be sure you have my new email address and the contact information for CityPlace.  For more information about CityPlace you are welcome to call, email or visit our website.

 

We hope to see you at CityPlace soon!

 

Phone:                 502-225-0870

Mailing:               112 South First Avenue

LaGrange, Kentucky,  40031

Email:                   kgreenwell@cityplaceexpocenter.com

Website:              www.cityplaceexpocenter.com

 

 

Karen Greenwell

Administrator, CityPlace

Phone:  502-225-0870

kgreenwell@cityplaceexpocenter.com

www.cityplaceexpocenter.com

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Sent by Dick Eastman

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

Are you curious about your family history but don’t want to pay $20 a month to join Ancestry.com or $10 a month to use MyHeritage or other commercial services? You don’t have to! Your local public library or a nearby Family History Center probably offers a free membership that provides access. In some cases, you may be able to access some of these huge online databases from the comfort of your own home.

However this access does not include the ability to contribute your own genealogy records, or to make use of the special sensitive “matching” capability to bring you suggestions, also does not allow you to post and receive messages.

For those options to work automatically, you will have to go home and sign up for an individual (paid) subscription.

IIf your library has invested in any of these services, why not take advantage of them?

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Sent by  Daughters of Holland Dames

Sinterklaas party on Friday, November 21, 2014 6 to 9 pm at the Old Dutch Church in Kingston, New York.

$25 per person in advance

For info 845-339-4280

Facebook – sinterklaaskingston

THE MENU

 

From our Dutch Roots

 

Hollandse Kaasplankje

(Dutch Cheese Plate)

Gehaktballen mit Jus

(Dutch Meatballs with Gravy)

Haringpate

(Herring Spread)

Worstebroodjes

(Sausage in a Dough Jacket)

Gevulde Eieren mit Garnaal

(Deviled Eggs with Shrimp)

Rode Biet Taart

(Beet Tarts)

Andijvie und Geitenkaas Taart

(Endive and Goat Cheese Tart)

Kerststol

(Christmas Bread)

Speculaas

Sinterklaas Cookies

 

Throw in a little Spain…..

 

Manchego Cheese Straws

Anchovy Spread

Olives with Caper Berries

Roasted Potatoes with Romesco Sauce

 

 

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Sent by Dick Eastman

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2014 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

Do you want others to know all about you?

Instant Checkmate also provides the names and addresses of sex offenders who live near the person in question. Yes, you can pay for a search on yourself to see what information Instant Checkmate has about you, and the company will then provide the names and addresses of sex offenders who live near you. Of course, sex offender information is available elsewhere (free of charge) at the U.S. Department of Justice web site at http://www.nsopw.gov as well as on a number of other web sites as well.

Court records are public, as are real estate transactions, birth records, marriage records, death records, and much more.

So where does Instant Checkmate obtain all this information? The answer is “from legal sources as all of it is collected from public records.”

[from CAROLYN: this is the part that scares me – ]If you post information or a picture of your newly-born child on Facebook, that information is available to everyone, including to Instant Checkmate and other companies that collect personal information.

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Sent by Jerry Sampson

The dates of the homes tour is December 6th 2014 and the tea room is December 5th & 6th.

23rd annual Holiday Homes Tour Harrodsburg Historical Society 1-6 pm

They will be touring SEVEN historic homes, places.  One of those is our Old mud Meeting house and the cemetery.  If you can go, please take photos to share with us. I would love to be there and see the other places too, but it is too far from OK. For more info call 859-734-5985859-749-2485 or 800-355-9192 or email harrdsburghistorical.org. Tickets are $15 each.

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Sent by HHS newsletter

Thank you to the 26 anonymous contributors for adding to our Microfilm/CD collection. We now have 321 of 438 needed. Tax deductible donation $23 per disc covering the years from 1780 to 1865. Needed because the records were removed when Mercer County Courthouse was torn down a few years ago. for more info email: harrdsburghistorical.org

–and don’t forget about donating your research to the Low Dutch Archives while you are at it!

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Sent by Dick Eastman

FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online.

US, Kentucky Death Records, 1911–1961 173,963

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Letters 12/12/2014- 2015 Dutch Gathering info!

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.

 

I have some exciting news.

Janice Cozine just let me know they have finally nailed down the date and place for our next Dutch Cousins gathering. The date of our gathering is changed. We will gather Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society.

Sorry for the delay and the change of date, but thanks to Steve Henry’s pull he was able to get us into the history center and get a better price than we had previously been quoted.

Here is what Barbie Abbott Hamman wrote today: The Historical Society is a beautiful building on the corner of Ann and Main streets in Frankfort, Kentucky just up the street from the old Capital building and just outside the gate of the Lt. Governor’s mansion. The Society building has a spacious meeting room with restrooms conveniently outside the meeting room, and a beautiful garden outside. The registration area is separate with plenty of room to register, sell t-shirts and things, and lots of room to store everything while not in use.

More information, including street address of the history center,  hotel data, and a tentative schedule will be in the next DUTCH LETTERS. Plan on arriving by Thursday Sept 24th and staying in KY through Monday the 28th if possible so you don’t miss a thing. Put it on your calendar now.

 

On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication.

We really appreciate everyone who pitched in to help get this together, especially Rodney Dempsey who set up an alternate meeting site at Kentucky State University.

 

PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.  We have some great ideas for speakers and entertainment, including Greg Huber, a Dutch Barn expert from Pennsylvania, who volunteered to come and bring some things to show on Dutch American material culture.

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together.

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

 

Mailouts: More than 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Letters 12/22/2014

HO HO HO and a Very Merry Christmas to everyone.  A special gift is at the bottom of this letter, a Genealogical Will for you to use free, to be sure all your research and records are not trashed.

The name Santa Claus comes from the name Sinterklaas. On Christmas Eve night, Dutch Children believe that Santa Claus, (who is also call ‘Christmas man’ / ‘Kerstman’ to avoid confusion with Sinterklaas!) comes from Lapland in Finland to deliver more presents.  In Dutch Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Prettig Kerstfeest’.

Here’s a little video with Christmas song:  http://yhoo.it/1weLyR6

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Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.

 

Janice Cozine just let me know they have finally nailed down the date and place for our next Dutch Cousins gathering. The date of our gathering is changed. We will gather Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society.

Sorry for the delay and the change of date, but thanks to Steve Henry’s pull he was able to get us into the history center and get a better price than we had previously been quoted.

More information, including hotel data will be in the next DUTCH LETTERS. Plan on arriving by Thursday Sept 24th and staying in KY through Monday the 28th if possible so you don’t miss a thing.  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication.

 

PUT IT ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW.  We have some great ideas for speakers and entertainment, including Greg Huber, a Dutch Barn expert from Pennsylvania, who volunteered to come and bring some things to show on Dutch American material culture .

Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together.

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

 

Mailouts: More than 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by John C. Westerfield (our president)

I want to wish all a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.  Remind everyone to be thinking about the Silent Auction and send the information to Phyllis so she will know what to expect. We have had a very busy year just like everyone and plan on staying in PA for the winter.

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Sent by Rogene Smith

Carolyn, I recently met some people who are interested in the Ryker name/family. and different spellings,.

I evidently didn’t keep the program from the last Dutch Cousins reunion .  I do remember  Ryker family members said they would not have any more reuntions and joined us.  Did the tour we took in the bus take us to Ryker farms/land?  Do  you have a name and  address I could give to my contact?  Thank you,

Rogene Smith

(note from Carolyn – I am not sure what name & address you are asking for?  Do you want a Ryker family contact?  Maybe they will respond here.

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Sent by Rod Dempsey

The Committee got you the best place to meet, no question about it. You are right on all the things you said. Barbie left out the most important thing: Upstairs in the building is the largest repository of KY Geneology anywhere. It covers all of KY and, knowing how much you know, I would suggest that you go to their web site and make contact with the Librarian. You two could give the Dutch Cousins a great deal of information. I would bet that if our Cousins wrote the Librarian in advance, she could probably provide them information on their own families that could give them advance advice about whether the Geneology Library has anything on their Ancestors’ names.

This could be by far the nicest place to meet,  and most beneficial information, at any gathering we have ever had. Not only could Dutch Cousins receive new KY information on their kinfolks, the Genelogical Library could benefit from receiving a great deal of Dutch history and geneology from we Dutch Cousins.

Merry Christmas, (Keep Christ up front in your mind – not material gifts)

Rod

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – That is a GREAT idea Rod to make an early contact with the librarian.

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Sent by Daughter of Holland Dames

Mrs. Peter Kimmelman, Directress General, Society of Daughters of Holland Dames

The long awaited New York Family History Research Guide and Gazetteer is READY for delivery in January. We have been offered a special pre-publication opportunity to purchase copies of what is already talked about as the Bible of New York Genealogical Sources.

This comprehensive book has guides to resources available to study families with New York roots and those who entered New York on their way to other areas of the Country. The articles and advice from the experts make this volume invaluable for both beginning and seasoned genealogists everywhere, and it is NOW possible to give this wonderful book, in the form of a card to the gift recipient…….just in time for Christmas. The volume will be delivered in the New Year.

The Daughters of Holland Dames was an early contributor to developing this book and, being Dutch, are delighted to have it offered to us at a good savings.

Special pre-publication pricing is guaranteed until January 21, 2015:

NYG&B Members $60

DHD Members, Associates and Friends $75

Regular retail price $85

All Best for the Holiday Season, Elbrun

order securely online by calling 212-755-8532

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Sent by Chad Cossey

image.jpeg

Hey Carolyn,

Just a thought, what about a LARGE tent [for the Dutch Cousins Gathering].  I have attended functions in them before and have found them to be quite flexible in size and price. Also with a tent we can almost pick and choose a location, thoughts???

(note from carolyn – Great idea!  May need  it next time!  Looks like we may be set for 2015, but there is always 2017.)

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Sent by Carolyn

didja know?

If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle.

If the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died because of wounds received in battle.

If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes 

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Sent by Theodore M. “Mike” BANTA (he wrote the book!)

Hi Carolyn,

Margaret Banta Boltz doesn’t have to go to Holland to find Epke’s home.  Tell her about my YouTube video Of finding Epke’s house in Minertsga and his mill that had been moved.  137 people have watched it.  Here is the URL.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqhXeetNVZw

Theodore M. “Mike” Banta

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Everyone wants to know who they are, where their families come from, Who

am  I?  Some times I feel that the term Genealogy should be changed to

Finding Your Roots because it takes it from what some perceive as a hobby to

a science.

Just about everyone, regardless of race, religion, rich or poor, etc. wants

to  know  about their family origins.  Genealogy is the one area where

everyone can come together and get to know another  and what they have in

common.  It is a normally a peaceful process which is usually a win win

situation  for everyone, one way or the other.  Not only that it gives

everyone a chance to get to know one another on a level playing field where

most people are willing to share their knowledge, learn from one another,

and in the end get to know and respect one another.  New Friends are made

and perhaps helps resolve past conflicts. The long term benefits reach into

everyones lives and I think everyone comes away enriched in one way or

another.

This of us who are Dorlands, Darlands and Vanarsdales share a common linage,

bond and goal.  Family is everything

Judy

[NOTE FROM CAROLYN: Judy it just takes ONE person to get the ball rolling. Find a venue, plan the events and send invitations! That’s what we did and look at where we are now with hundreds on the list.]

———————————–

Sent by Mary Jo Gohmann

Hi Carolyn!

Glad that the gathering is moving forward. Unfortunately with the date change I will not be able to attend. We have a nephew getting married in New Jersey that same weekend and already made plans to attend and visit with all our Banta & Demarest families.

So sorry to miss the gathering again!

Have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy Healthy new Year!

Hugs,

Mary Jo

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Sent by Dutch Genealogy

A begraafplaats or kerkhof is a cemetery. Kerkhof (literally meaning “church yard”) is a cemetery around the church, while a begraafplaats (literally: “burial place”) is a more generic term.

In the Netherlands, Graves cannot be bought, only rented. The usual period is 20-30 years. After that term is up, the grave is cleared if nobody renews the lease.

Most cemeteries have a communal plot where any remains are reburied. In most cemeteries, it is unusual to find graves older than 50-100 years. An exception are Jewish cemeteries, as Jewish tradition prevents them from being cleared.

To see what graves still exist, check here: http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl/online-cemeteries/

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Sent by Ruth Oneson

Feel Free to print out this will and place it with your family papers.

My Genealogy Will is being posted so you can designate who you would like to see

inherit your genealogical research.

Example: You can leave you research to a family member, a society or perhaps a study partner.

MY GENEALOGICAL WILL

Genealogical Will to My Last Will and Testament

To my spouse, children, guardian, administrator and/or executor.

Upon my demise it is requested that you DO NOT dispose of any or all of my genealogical records, both those prepared personally by me and those records prepared by others, which may be in my possession.

This includes but not limited to books, files, notebooks or computer programs for a period of two years.

During this time period, please attempt to identify one of more persons who would be willing to take custody of the said materials and the responsibility of maintaining and continuing the family histories.

Name:                               Address:                                                          Phone Number

 

In the event you do not find anyone to accept these materials, please contact various genealogical organizations that I have been a member of and determine if they will accept some parts or all of my genealogical materials.

List of organizations, addresses and phone numbers at bottom; include local chapters, with their addresses, phone numbers and contact persons if available as well as state or national contact information and addresses.

Please remember that my genealogical endeavors consumed a great deal of time, travel and money.

Therefore it is my desire that the products of these endeavors be allowed to continue in a manner that will make them available to others in the future.

Signature:  ___________________________________________

Date: _______________________________

Witness: ___________________________

Date:__________________

 

 

Witness: ___________________________

Date:__________________

Genealogical Organizations in addition to list above:

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Be sure to include “LDR” [the low Dutch Repository] at Harrodsburg Historical Society Research Library in Kentucky.  The lateral filing cabinets housing the Low Dutch materials is now the first stop for anyone arriving at the Harrodsburg Historical Society researching their Dutch ancestry.  Both family and topical files are represented in the repository.  This continues to be a work in progress with new information being added regularly.  The growth of the repository is primarily due to our (Dutch Cousins) continued donations of genealogical and historical materials.

That’s where all my Dutch research is going (oh wow – too many papers to count).

Carolyn Leonard

Letters 12/22/2014- The 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering (save this)

From Gathering Coordinator Barbie Hamman and Janice Cozine:

Good morning my Cousins!

Since we’ve been working on the reunion and all calling and running in several different directions, I thought I’d give a synopsis of what Janice and I have learned this week.

The site will be The Kentucky Historical Society located at 100 West Broadway in Frankfort, KY.  40601.  We will be in the Commonwealth Hall which has a capacity of 200 people with access to the Cralle-Day Garden, a lovely walled garden that is boarded by Clinton and Ann Streets and the Old Governor’s Mansion.  Our room has a LCD projector, podium and microphone.  The registration area and restrooms are located right outside the meeting room.  I spoke to Nina Elmore yesterday and she waived the $200.00 Damage Deposit (isn’t THAT a God Wink?).                                 

The Martin F. Schmidt Research Library is located upstairs in the same building.  Hours of operation are Wed, 10am to 4pm , Thurs, 10am to 8pm, Fri & Sat, 10 am to 5 pm.  A copier will be available and the copies are .15 each except for Microfilm copies which are .30 each and we can feel free to bring iPads, phones, laptops, tablets etc. to access any available info at no cost. They are happy to run a tab and we can pay at the end of the event.  I will bring my photocopier as well.

Parking is located in front of building off Broadway Street in the old railroad depot lot.  It’s highly recommended that our cousins car pool as much as possible during the day as parking is limited.   

The Capitol City Museum is located at 325 Ann St., next door to KHS (A MUST SEE) and is free to registrants. The Paul Sawyier Pubic Library where we can also research is down the street a couple blocks,  M-TH. 9am-8pm, Fri. 9am-6pm, Sat.9am-5pm and Sun. 1pm-5pm.

The mystery of the Capitol City Plaza Hotel blocked rooms is solved.  When Rod and I went to see the facility in February, the event planner and I spoke of the need for rooms for the event.  What confused me about the details is that we NEVER spoke of them! Only the POSSIBILITY of the dates)!  Nice surprise to find our rooms are blocked, otherwise the hotel is full on those dates due to the Veterans event. The rate is $89.00 per night plus tax and they will be blocked until Sept. 3rd, 2015. Janice learned of another hotel this week. The Bluegrass Inn has rooms for $65.00 per night and has a good rating.  We’ll be going up to look at them soon to see what they look like. The Crown Plaza rooms are great! 

OK Diana, I just need for you to send me a check (pretty please) for $250.00 made payable to Kentucky Historical Society to 1406 Bostwick Ln. Louisville, Kentucky  40245 and I’ll forward it along with the signed contract to Nina.  She said my signature was the only one needed. Our dates are locked in but I would like to send this to Nina and have this part complete.  

Carolyn, I’m sending you a copy of the contract along with a brochure of the Capitol Visitor and Frankfort Walking and Driving Tour.  In these brochures are maps of the city, The Frankfort Trolley Tour, all the info if the hotels, etc.  I know with all your expertise, you’ll love having all this info for the Newsletter and registration packet. 

You have the information on the speakers.  I’ll read all about them in the newsletter.

My Cousins, I really can’t say “Thank You” enough for all the help and patience you’ve given me.  Janice and Steve, you’ve been Godsends and I don’t know what we would have done without you!  Please, any of you, feel free to call or write me with any questions at any time.  I’m at your disposal but I feel we have a handle on our event for now.  In the new year, we’ll start working to finalize plans and get ready to re-union! 

I wish you ALL a  BLESSED Christmas and a Healthy, Safe and Happy New Year.

All my love,

Barbie

Letters 12/29/2014

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.  

 

NEXT DUTCH GATHERING!  Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society. Block your calendar now and plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication. Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together. 

(waiting on more information on the conference hotel location)

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.  

Just in case anyone is stumped by my email addresses: I do have several addresses, but they all come into the same mail box.  The address the email comes to tells me what it is about.   Also, when on the road I can only receive the gmai,  me.com and mac.com (apple) addresses.  It is all good!

 

Mailouts: More than 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by Luther Davenport

btw. The Kentucky History Museum has a permanent walking  tour inside the same building, a tour of old capital building next door, and the Ky Military History Museum just up street, The military museum has kentucky’s contributions to nation’s wars and several rare arsenal pieces.  I think one admission of $4.00/person gets you in all 3.   

Also the Rebecca Ruth Candy factory has tours just across the river (and they give free samples).   The salato center is operated by ky dept fish & wildlife has wildlife museum with native animals & fish also has walking trail through a zoo area with native animals elk, buffalo, deer turkey, bears, bobcats, ect

All worth while to see and the Salato Wildlife Center is a good trip and no trip to Frankfort would be complete without stopping by Daniel Boone’s grave and the military mound at Frankfort Cemetery.  The military mound is in center of frankfort cemetery.  Remains of ky war dead from Indian wars war of 1812 and mexican war were returned home and buried. Has massive 30 ft markers and names of soldiers killed.  Later wars also recognized up until WWII and Korea I think.

And if anyone spends an extra day in state I recommend the Ky Bourbon trail.

We didn’t take a vacation last year. Just spent day in frankfort visiting all these sites.  My teenage kids had a ball.

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Sent by Steve & Jeannie Noe Carlisle

We are thrilled that the Reunion will be at the History Center in Frankfort!  We love that place and have attended LOTS of events there.  Lots of KY history can be found upstairs too.

We have a big concern about the Capital Plaza Hotel.  

We stayed at the Capital Plaza several times — until the last time several years ago. 

We now always stay at Hampton.

 

We checked in and had planned to stay several days to do historical research.  We were put into 3 different rooms before we got one that was clean.  The maids all stared at us moving around and needless to say, we checked out the next day.  We didn’t think it was safe for us to stay another day and leave our items in the room.  The desk clerk was very apologetic and finally to get the 3rd room, he checked the room first himself.   So, I checked out the latest comments and evidently it is no better. 

 I hate that, as the hotel is in walking distance of the History Center, if you can walk a few blocks.  Would have been perfect, but I can’t recommend it.

Is there any chance that you will be checking the Hampton Inn to reserve rooms at a cheaper rate?  If not, we will go ahead and reserve our room now.

Thanks and anxious to attend again this year.

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Sent by Ruby Bishop Ingram 

Christmas at Mt. Pleasant

 Carolyn,

Good to hear from you and the other Dutch Cousins. This is my Christmas greeting to you. 

 It’s 1941 and a little girl stands in front of the congregation at the old country church on top of the hill.  She bounces with enthusiasm   and says, “I want to hang up a stocking, I want to hang up two, but Daddy said, no Ruby that won’t do.”  The old pot bellied stove glows   red with a roaring fire.  Friends and neighbors radiate the love they  have for each other and the Christ Child.  Silent Night, Holy Night,   begins to echo throughout the white framed church, drifting upwards to  the throne of God.  Memories are made this night that will last a  lifetime.  Hearts are joined in praise to the King of Kings.  Brown  paper bags are passed out to everyone.  Inside are chocolate drops,   orange slices, and hard sugar candies, providing a most welcome treat.  Merry hearts, filled with the spirit of Christmas, reach out to each  other, and Jesus Christ is born anew.  Cars, with their lights glowing  glide slowly down the hill, homeward bound.  Their occupants filled  with joy, utter a Merry Christmas to everyone.  Memories of Mt.  Pleasant…so dear to my heart.      

This church, Mount Pleasant, is located on Mount Pleasant Road, a mile from my home (a half mile as the crow flies) where I was born in 1937  and reared on Bohon Road, in Mercer County, Kentucky.  The church is  about 5 miles from Harrodsburg.  

 The history of the Mount Pleasant Presbyterian Church states that the boundaries of three farms met on the hill across from Salt River and these three men, Cornelius Vanarsdall, Josiah Wilson, and Abram Whitenack, donated the land  needed for the construction of this church and its cemetery.   The   construction of Mount Pleasant Meeting House was completed sometime   during the year of 1851.  The church was organized March 31, 1852.   Cornelius A. B. Vanarsdall, Leah Vanarsdall, Mary (Brewer) Vanarsdall,   Daniel B. Vanarsdall, Sarah C. Vanarsdall, William S. Vanarsdall, and   Elizabeth Vanarsdall were among the fifty-seven persons who comprised   the original roll as members of this church.   Now, in December of   2014, this church is going strong, of which I am so happy.  Of course,   I was the little girl in the story above that I wrote.   

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Sent by Theodore M. “Mike” BANTA (he wrote the book!)

Hi Carolyn,

       Margaret Banta Boltz doesn’t have to go to Holland to find Epke’s home.  Tell her about my YouTube video Of finding Epke’s house in Minertsga and his mill that had been moved.  137 people have watched it.  Here is the URL.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqhXeetNVZw

Theodore M. “Mike” Banta

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Sent by MARY JO GOHMANN

But she did not send a translation!

Subject: Bêste winsken

P1050588.JPG

 

Bijna Kerstfeest,

Eén ster maakt de nacht al minder donker, 

één woord maakt de dag al minder lang,

één hand maakt de eenzaamheid minder zwaar,

één warme blik maakt de pijn draaglijker,

Eén Kind is het begin van een nieuwe toekomst.

Voor al die vrienden die ik dit jaar geen kaart heb gestuurd, toch nog een berichtje, met de beste wensen voor nu en het komende jaar

lieve groet,

Mary Jo 

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Sent by Bill Van Osdol

Carolyn, Here’s a response from my friend in Margraten NL. – It appears that Holland, like many other countries, have the same problem.  Never know what the ill wind will blow.   Bill

We both wish and your family a Merry Christmas and a happy 2015.

Here is everything also oke.

I saw the film in Google one coutry was forgotten. Germany because last weeks thousands went on the street against the Moslims in Dresden.

Yelling Germany no Moslimstate.Some Buildings there were burnt out. Buildings for more coming Moslims of all countries of the world.

Here in the Netherlands said The president of the political Group, Mr.Wilders (Wellknow) last year : Do you want more Marocco people. And the answer was a loud NO. Then he said oke we will try to stop it.  6500 people,most of course moslims, were against him by going to the police and now he got  the message: He has to appear in court for insult of people and not for their religion.

Have a good time

charles.

 

Met vriendelijke groeten

Charles Kesselaer

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Sent by Dutch Genealogy news

Midwinterhoorn literally means “Mid winter horn.” It is a wooden horn that is typical for the eastern part of the country. The horns are made of a curved branch of a tree, which is sawed in half length-wise, hollowed out and put back together with a mouth piece attached to it.

In Gelderland and Overijssel, midwinterhoorns are traditionally played during the Advent season. They are often played over a well, to amplify the sound, which can carry over miles and miles. Here’s a link to an experienced Midwinterhoorn player:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8x21P13NX-c&feature=youtube_gdata_player

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Charles Gehring

Charley Gehring NEVER wanted to be a translator!

http://shar.es/1HtxzB

Charles Gehring, director of the New Netherland Research Center at the New York State Library in Albany, recently joined host Jane E. Wilcox on the podcast Forget-Me-Not Hour, for two consecutive episodes. Gehring talked about the Center& his project of transcribing and translating the provincial Dutch records of New Netherland. He shared the astonishing history of the records, his most recent work to put them online, explained what genealogists and historians can find in them, and more. The Center is responsible for translating the official records of the Dutch colony, promoting awareness of the Dutch role in American history and maintaining a center for research in New Netherland at the State Library. This hotlink above takes you to his interview in two parts. I could not get the first part to play, but part two is VERY interesting.

This message was sent using ShareThis (http://www.sharethis.com)

If the above link does not work, try this long one: http://newyorkhistoryblog.org/2014/12/16/charles-gehring-on-new-yorks-dutch-records/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NewYorkHistory+%28New+York+History%29

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Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

See the 2013 Newsletter http://goo.gl/MLnha

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson

We also have a facebook page, Dutch Cousins of Kentucky

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