Letters 2015

CAUTION- This page would be about 280 pages if printed!


Letters 1/6/2015

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.

 

NEXT DUTCH GATHERING!  Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society. Block your calendar now and plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication. Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together. 

(waiting on more information on the conference hotel location)

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and why – their Dutch connection.

Just in case anyone is stumped by my email addresses: I do have several addresses, but they all come into the same mail box.  The address the email comes to tells me what it is about.   Also, when on the road I can only receive the  gmail.comme.com and mac.com addresses.  It is all good!

 

Mailouts: More than 900 on the mailing list.

I do not sell, trade or give my mailing list to anyone for any reason.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by John Antonides, NYC (Brooklyn)

NOTE from Carolyn herself – a little genealogy here:  John’s ancestor, the Dominee Vincentius Antonides (ca 1660 – 1744) performed the marriage of my 8th great grandmother Belitje (Jacobs Quik Cosynszen) when married second to “THEUNIS JANSE, a widower from the Bay.  Banns were published 16 Dec 1706 and they married 16 Jan 1707. …their marriage took place at the home of V. ANTONIDES (New York Gen Bio Records Vol 6 page 188; also Flatland marriages, page 42 Long Island History Soc.”

Belitje was the widow of Gerrit Cozine/cosynszen and the ancestor of everyone who descends from the Rev. Cornelius Cozine of Conewago Colony.

Here’s John’s translation:

Carolyn: Here is a free translation of Mary Jo Gohmann’s Christmas wishes:

Subject: Best Wishes

 

Almost Christmas

 

One star brightens the night,

One word shortens the day,

One hand dispels loneliness,

One kind look lessens pain,

One Child brings a new dawn.

 

For all those friends to whom I’ve not sent a card this year, I send this note, with best wishes for now and the coming year.

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Just so you understand the liberties I’ve taken, a more literal translation of the heart of the poem would be:

One star makes the night less dark,

One word makes the day less long,

One hand makes the loneliness less onerous,

One warm look makes the pain more bearable,

One Child is the beginning of a new future.

Of course, there’s always room for improvement in any translation. I might even have departed too far from the literal. I’d welcome your critique.

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(here is the original from Dutch Letters 12/29/14) Subject: Bêste winsken

Bijna Kerstfeest,

Eén ster maakt de nacht al minder donker,

één woord maakt de dag al minder lang,

één hand maakt de eenzaamheid minder zwaar,

één warme blik maakt de pijn draaglijker,

Eén Kind is het begin van een nieuwe toekomst.

Voor al die vrienden die ik dit jaar geen kaart heb gestuurd, toch nog een berichtje, met de beste wensen voor nu en het komende jaar

lieve groet,

Mary Jo

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Sent by Bob VanArsdall of Chapel Hill NC

Ruby Bishop Ingram sent her wonderful remembrance of Christmas at the Mt. Pleasant Church. Here are some photos of it:

Here is a listing of those buried there, but I have no idea if it is complete: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GScid=2156458

Cornelius A. B VanArsdall was my gr-gr-gr-gr-grandfather. He built the original log house, expanded by his son Daniel Brewer VanArsdall, where Ruby grew up. She has been very kind in sharing memories of it with me.

Bob VanArsdall

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[NOTE: From Carolyn (herself)]

That list is from the findagrave website. I am a volunteer for findagrave and I can assure you that is NOT a complete list, but wonderful of you to send the hotlink. The photos are on the first page of the findagrave site for Mt Pleasant, and are copyright by Robert Adlet.  I have two questions for the VanArsdall researchers.

First, I wonder if  Cornelius A. B. VanArsdall would be the one my Cozine ancestors referred to as ABC VanArsdall, who was somehow related?

Second, I have spent long hours pondering over this newspaper notice in   The Harrodsburg Democrat, Harrodsburg, KY Vol 1, No.21 Friday, June 6, 1884:  Funeral Saturday, a funeral cortege left the depot, and wended its way to Mt. Pleasant Church about three miles west of town. The infant of Mr and Mrs Thomas Cozine, that had died at Lexington on Friday, was brought on the train to this place, where they were met by their uncles, Col. C P and Capt Andy Whitenack and other friends. The cherub was in Heaven when the kind friends laid the remains in the cold grave of God’s half acre. May the parents, as little children, ever be ready to meet their child in the great hereafter.

I have not found a record of that burial, and we have been unable to find a marriage record (or any other records)  for Thomas Cozine, my 3rd great uncle, who would have been the son of Harvey Cozine and his first wife, Mary Ann (Snider) Cozine. Except for a note by his much younger brother in 1885 saying “Brother Thomas was in Missouri last we heard …” Thomas and his seven brothers were all Civil War Union soldiers, according to another brother. I have found military records for the others, but not for Thomas or his father.

The “uncles” referred to in the news article, CP and Andy Whitenack, are both buried in the cemetery but there is no COZINE child burial memorial record we have found. CP and Andrew Whitenack are the sons of Abraham D. Whitenack and “Annie” Comingo Whitenack (buried in a family cemetery near Mount Pleasant), and so far none of their daughters are known to be married to a COZINE. It’s a mystery! would love to hear from anyone who could help solve it.

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Sent by Marilyn E. Douglas, VP NNI

The journal New York History will soon publish a special issue dedicated to the colony of New Netherland and the Dutch in early New York. If you’re interested in participating, please submit a two-page abstract (msword attached document) of your topic and research by February 1, 2015 (topublications@nysha.org). Selected authors will be notified shortly afterward, and final drafts will be due by June 1st. Submission guidelines can be found at www.nysha.org.   New York History is the only journal devoted entirely to the history of New York StatePublished quarterly, now in our 95th volume, we are dedicated to producing a stronger, more valuable journal than ever before. If you haven’t checked us out in a while, we encourage you do so at www.nysha.org. All articles are peer-reviewed, and the journal is edited by scholars with decades of writing/editing experience.   If you have questions regarding this specific issue, please contact Dr. D.L. Noorlander at SUNY Oneonta: (607) 436-3253danny.noorlander@oneonta.edu.

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Have you heard of the Avalon Project?

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/17th_century/charter_011.asp

Grant of Exclusive Trade to New Netherland by the States-General of the United Netherlands; October 11, 1614

The States-General of the United Netherlands, to all to whom these presents shall come, greeting.

Whereas Gerrit Jacobz Witssen, ancient Burgomaster of the city Amsterdam, Jonas Witssen, Simon Morrissen, owners of the ship named the Little Fox, whereof Jan de With has been skipper; Jans Hongers, Paulus Pelgrom, Lambrecht van Tweenhuyzen, owners of the two ships named the Tiger and the Fortune, whereof Aedriaen Block and Henrick Corstiaenssen were skippers; Arnolt van Lybergen, Wessel Schenck, Hans Claessen, and Berent Sweertssen, owners of the ship named the Nightingale, whereof Thys Volckertssen was skipper, merchants of the aforesaid city Amsterdam, and Pieter Clementssen Bronwer, Jan Clementssen Kies, and Cornelis Volckertssen, merchants of the city of Hoorn, owners of the ship named the Fortuyn, whereof Cornelis Jacobssen May was skipper, all now associated in one company, have respectfully represented to us that they, the petitioners, after great expenses and damages by loss of ships and other dangers, had, during the present year, discovered and found with the above named five ships certain new lands situate in America between New France and Virginia, the sea coast whereof lie between forty and forty-five degrees of latitude, and now called New Netherland. And whereas we did, in the month of March last, for the promotion and increase of commerce, cause to be published a certain general consent and charter setting forth that whosoever should thereafter discover new havens, lands, places, or passages might frequent or cause to be frequented, for four voyages, such newly discovered and found places, passages, havens, or lands to the exclusion of all others from visiting or frequenting the same from the United Netherlands until the said first discoverers and finders shall themselves have completed the said four voyages or cause the same to be done within the time prescribed for that purpose, under the penalties expressed in the said octroy, etc.; they request that we would accord to them due act of the aforesaid octroy in the usual form.

Which, being considered, we, therefore, in our Assembly, having heard the pertinent report of the petitioners relative to the discoveries and finding of the said new countries between the above named limits and degrees and also of their adventures, have consented and granted, and by these presents do consent and grant, to the said petitioners now united into one company that they shall be privileged exclusively to frequent or cause to be visited the above newly discovered lands, situate in America between New France and Virginia, whereof the sea coasts lie between the fortieth and forty-fifth degrees of latitude, now named New Netherland, as can be seen by a figurative map hereunto annexed, and that for four voyages within the term of three years, commencing the first of January, sixteen hundred and fifteen next ensuing, or sooner, without it being permitted to any other person from the United Netherlands, to sail to, navigate, or frequent the said newly discovered lands, havens, or places, either directly or indirectly within the said three years, on pain of confiscation of the vessel and cargo wherewith infraction hereof shall be attempted, and a fine of fifty thousand Netherland ducats for the benefit of said discoverers or finders; provided, nevertheless, that by these presents we do not intend to prejudice or diminish any of our former grants or charters. And it is also our intention that if any disputes or differences arise from these our concessions, they shall be decided by ourselves.

We, therefore, expressly command all governors, justices, officers, magistrates, and inhabitants of the aforesaid united countries that they allow the said company peaceably and quietly to enjoy the whole benefit of this our grant and consent, ceasing all contradictions and obstacles to the contrary. For such we have found to appertain to the public service. Given under our seal, paraple, and signature of our Secretary at the Hague the 11th of October, 1614.

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Sent by Jack Taylor (Johannes)

Castello Map of 1660 New Amsterdam

 

 

In continue to be intrigued with the enhanced versions of the Castello Map of 1660 New Amsterdam. Much historical research has been done on the map that have resulted in enhanced versions of the map showing much detail.

 

This version is the best I have seen that identifies things on the map. By selectively choosing what you want identified you place your cursor on a specific location and a pop up give more details!  Of special interest for us are the old New Netherlands Ancestral Names! So far I see 2 that are my direct line ancestors.

http://www.ekamper.net/gr-misc.htm

The Castello Plan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castello_Plan

 

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Sent by

good research site

http://www.wdl.org/en/search/?q=nieuw+amsterdam

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Sent by leonard kelsay

I’ve enjoyed the  decade-long exchange of letters between President Jefferson & Samuel R. Demaree posted on “Founders Online” & am curious what else your membership might know about this central Kentuckian.  Does anybody know whether any book from his collection survives?

Where did he live, using the Mud House as a center point?

Where is  the “stone schoolhouse on Harrod’s Run”  (mentioned online elsewhere) in which he taught about the time

Jefferson advised him on the development of his collection? Is it   the dependency (long destroyed) of Father Rice’s house? Has anyone read his newspaper, The Informant, of which several issues are microfilmed?

 

NOTE: From Carolyn (herself) – am I the only one who never heard of this?  Okay your DEMAREE experts – sign on here!

Here’s a hotlink to a letter to T. Jefferson from Samuel R. Demaree

http://founders.archives.gov/?q=%22Samuel%20R.%20Demaree%22&s=1111311111&sa=&r=1&sr=

Samuel R. Demaree, a teacher and newspaper publisher, carried on an infrequent correspondence with TJ during his presidency and retirement, primarily on topics related to education. In 1805, TJ forwarded Demaree’s thoughts on orthography to the American Philosophical Society, whose committee report on the subject was sent to Demaree by the president. Later that same year, Demaree and Samuel Ogilsby commenced publication of theInformant in Danville, Kentucky. Although TJ did not reply to the above request for book recommendations, he did respond to another request from Demaree in 1809 by supplying him with an extensive list of titles

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Sent by Kim Ross

Willis Van Devanter served on the Supreme Court from 1911 to 1937  Possibly another Dutch Cousin?

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Letters 1/7/2015

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.

 

NEXT DUTCH GATHERING!  Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society. Do you have your hotel reservations yet?  Better not wait!  Block your calendar now and plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication. Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together. 

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and let us know their Dutch connection.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by David Coleman, Old Ft Harrod State Park

Carolyn, when I worked in Frankfort for Parks central office, my office was in the tower right next door to the Plaza Hotel.  I have eaten in the restaurant many times and had meetings in their banquet rooms.  While I have never been in any of the overnight rooms and cannot offer any opinions on those accommodations, I can speak very highly on their lobby, meeting rooms and restaurant.  It is a very nice place.

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Sent by Luther Davenport

Carolyn   FYI There is a Best Western hotel in Lawrenceburg. That is really nice and several B&Bs.

Prolly 7-8 miles from Frankfort and prolly 18-20 from Harrodsburg. Right on highway 127 across from Anderson County High School

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Sent by Patty Hoenigman, Texas

 

I am working on my application to Colonial Dames based on my earliest New York ancestor, Abraham Rycken, and his son, Abraham Riker. They ask for copies of 17th century documents to prove the line. In this case that would be land ownership, three different lots of land including Riker’s Island. I’m having a hard time finding this. Can any of my Dutch cousins help me out?

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Sent by Albert Cozine

i live in frankfort so i will be there

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Sent by Robert Adlet

I had not heard of this before. My attempts to identify this Samuel R Demaree failed. In my wife’s line I have Dr Samuel R Demaree 1782-1815 born in Conewago and died in Shelby Co., KY. The Demaree Genealogy says he settled in Shelby Co., KY and was a doctor for 10 yrs but died at age 33. I searched everywhere for Samuel the teacher and newspaper man. Several documents list him and S Ogilsby as starting “The Informant” in Danville, KY from 1805 to about 1810 but they do not identify him specifically. The reference to “stone schoolhouse on Herrod’s Run” was fromhttp://vanarsdaleleefamilyhistory.blogspot.com/ and was about Peter VanArsdale and did mention Dr Samuel R Demaree. Unless I can positively identify Samuel I cannot provide further details.

 

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Sent by Vince Akers

Hi Carolyn!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!  There’s almost always something interesting in your Dutch Letters.  There were a couple especially interesting items in today’s issue.

The link to the Castello Map of 1660 New Amsterdam sent by Jack Taylor was something I could spend a lot of time with!

The link to the Samuel R. Demaree correspondence with Thomas Jefferson sent by Leonard Kelsay helps accomplish one of my hundreds of “to dos”!  I knew S.R.Demaree had requested and received a list of books from Jefferson, but had never had time to track down the letters.  How great that they have been transcribed and published on-line!  At least a few of S.R. Demaree’s books do still remain in our family.

My mother was a Demaree.  Her great-great-grandfather was Judge David Demaree (1769-1814) who was the older brother of Samuel R. Demaree (1782-1815).  Samuel R. Demaree is No. 6-132 in the 1964 edition of THE DEMAREST FAMILY (No. 573 in the 1938 edition).  He only lived to be 33 years old.  Like many of the Demarees (and other French Huguenot families) he gravitated toward the professional rather than the farming life.  The Demarees had a unusual high representation among the Low Dutch teachers, doctors and lawyers.  Samuel R.’s letter indicates his arm injury led him to teaching.  He eventually became a medical doctor.  As you know, wills and probate records–especially inventories and estate sales–provide a wealth of information about the “material culture” of the past.  Samuel R. Demaree’s will was signed May 17, 1815 and proved in the August 1815 County Court of Shelby County (Shelby County Will Book 3, pages 312-3).  It makes no mention of his books.

At the March 1816 Shelby County Court his widow and other executors produced an inventory dated October 4, 1815 (Shelby County Will Book 3, pages 400-1).  That inventory includes “Fifty Volumes of Books” valued at $75.00.  A very long and wonderful description of the estate is given in the 8-page record of the estate sale dated November 15, 1817 and returned to the November 1817 County Court (Shelby County Will Book No. 4, pages 93-100).  The purchasers, titles and price paid for a couple dozen books are listed.  The most expensive book sold was “Saml. Demaree Encyclopedia” for $7.70.  The Samuel Demaree who purchased the book was Samuel R. Demaree’s nephew, the oldest son of S.R.’s older brother Judge David Demaree.

Samuel Demaree (1792-1857) the purchaser was my mother’s great-grandfather.  In 1839 he built a brick Federal-style home outside of Defoe, Kentucky, in the east corner of the Low Dutch Tract.  The home still stands today.  The home went to Samuel’s unmarried daughters around the time of the Civil War and around 1907 was willed to my mother’s father, John Owen Demaree (1862-1957), a lawyer, school teacher and local historian.  My mother was born (1923) in the home.  By the time her father died in 1957 the house was full of books and family papers.

My uncle, David Demaree (1911-1977), salvaged most of the books and papers and moved them up the road to the house and barn on his farm.  When I showed some interest in the family history as a college student in the late-1960s my Uncle David Demaree gave me free reign to gather up the papers and study them.  He had a large “secretary” desk/bookcase full of old books acquired by the Demarees.  Somewhere I have a list of the books in the secretary, but I can’t locate it tonight.  My cousin now has the secretary and books at ther home in Louisville.  The 4-volume encyclopedia set purchased in 1817 by Samuel Demaree from the estate of his Uncle Samuel R. Demaree is among the books.  I recall it being published in 1804 and having Samule R. Demaree’s name written inside the front covers.  Other books may have also had S.R.’s name, but I only see one other in the estate sale purchased in 1817 by the nephew Samuel which was described as “Natural Theology” which I don’t recall being in the secretary.  I do recall a large dictionary published in 1800.  Also there was a very old leather-bound volume of Plutarch’s Lives which I see on Jefferson’s recommended list of books.

Certainly most of these books were collected by Demarees other than Samuel R. Demaree.  They were all book lovers and consummate collectors of books and papers–something I have certainly inherited!  For example, Samuel R. Demaree’s older brother Judge David Demaree actually named books in his will dated August 16, 1814 and produced in the October 1814 Shelby County Court (Shelby County Will Book No. 3, pages 186-9).  He left “Newtons works in 6 vol. and Zions Pilgrims” to his widow Rachel and “To my eldest child and son Samuel Demaree I give $10 worth of Books  Walkers dictionary at $5 my executors to fix the price on such other Books as he may choose (Murrays Grammer and Walches Arithmetick reserved for the use of the family generally.”  I’m pretty sure the 1800 dictionary in the secretary was the Walker’s dictionary willed by Judge David to his son Samuel who in 1817 bought his Uncle Samuel R. Demaree’s 4 volume encyclopedia which is also in the secretary.

I could go on with many more tales of Low Dutch books and other “material culture” but this is already way too long a reply to the question whether any book from Samuel R. Demaree’s collection survives.

Vince

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Sent by Bob VanArsdall

 

Carolyn –

Cornelius Abraham Brewer (CAB) VanArsdall was born at Conewago (we think), but died in Harrodsburg in 1855. The ABC VanArsdall you mention is most probably his son, Abraham Brewer Cornelius VanArsdall. He is mentioned in CAB’s will along with CAB’s other heirs. Attached is CAB’s will and inventory from the Harrodsburg records.

 

Although I can’t help with Thomas Cozine, it may be that the infant has not been baptized or was stillborn and thus was not formally recorded. My gr-grandmother, Margaret James VanArsdall, died in childbirth and is buried in the James plot at the Spring Hill Cemetery in Harrodsburg. When I was researching family records in Harrodsburg, I found the record of her burial with a small note “infant child buried next day”.

Bob

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Sent by Robert Adlet

Happy New Year Carolyn. I also wanted to relay a humorous story I found from the info you posted about your 8th great grandmother  Belitje Jacobse Quick 1656-. Her father, Jacob Theuniszen Quick 1630-1689 was the deft in a lawsuit in court in New Amsterdam. From “The records of New Amsterdam from 1653-1674 anno Domini” Vol VI Chpt Court Minutes of New Amsterdam pg 60 year 1667 Abram Carpyn pltf v/s Jacob Teunissen Quicq, deft. Carpyn’s wife had stormed into the home of Jacob Quicq and per 3 witnesses called him a Roge and a Pokie Roge after which he picked her up in his arms and removed her from his house. Carpyn accussed Quicq of kicking her, but the witnesses said they never saw him kick her. The Judge ruled that they each would pay their own court costs and they are to be peacable to each other from now on.

Robert Adlet

PS All the other ancestry trees showed Belitje date of death as 16 Jan 1707, the date you have of her second marriage. I made the correction in my tree but do you have her correct date of death?

That’s a good one Robert!  Thanks for sending.

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(reply from carolyn herself) Have to admit I do not put much stock in ancestry trees unless each item is sourced – and they rarely are. Too many just keep repeating another trees wrong info.  Mine may be wrong, I’ll have to do some more research to be sure it is right, but not today – got too many irons in the fire!  Here’s what I have on Belitje. I don’t have a death date for her but would have been after 17 Nov 1728.

The first child and first daughter of JACOBS THEUMZEN QUICK de Looper of Naarden, North Holland, on the south shore of the Zuider Zee, some fifteen miles east of Amsterdam, and NEELTJE CORNELIS LOPERS van Amsterdam, (BELITJE JACOBS QUICK).

They (the parents Jacob and Neeltje) were also married in the Dutch Church, on the 24 of March 1655.They (the parents) lived on the west side of Broad Street in New York, between Wall and Beaver Streets.  Jacobs was a Baker.  He sometimes signed his name “de looper” which was really a nickname meaning a runner – or in English, a messenger.

The Baptismal records at Albany are missing, so we have no birth records of their children. However we know they had at least four children:

BELITJE, CORNELIS JACOBSEN, GERRITJE, AND THEUNIS JACOBSEN  All baptized between 1718 and 1737.  (MY NOTE: Belitje was born 1657, but not baptized until 1718? At age 61?)  BELITJE was named after her grandmother Belijtgen Jacobus (MY NOTE: Van Vlechtenstyn).

Her first marriage to Gerrit Cosynszen (Cozine)  was at Fort Orange, 25 Oct 1873.  dicto. Daniel Waldron, j. m. Van Amsterd. en Sara Rutgers, j. d. Van Wesop. 11 Octob.

* Eodem. Gerrit Cosynszen, j. m. Van N. Nederland, en Belitje Jacobs, j. d. Van’t Fort Orangien, beyde op Stuyvesants bouwerye. 25 dicto.

After Gerrit  COSYNSZEN died in 1703, his widow Belitje (Jacobs Quik Cosynszen) married second to THEUNIS JANSE, a widower from the Bay.  Banns were published 16 Dec 1706 and they married 16 Jan 1707. …their marriage took place at the home of V. ANTONIDES (New York Gen Bio Records Vol 6 page 188; also Flatland marriages, page 42 Long Island History Soc., perhaps also Quick Family pages 3 to 9 and 22 to 23; XXI to SSV)

Marriage record gives her name only as Belitje Jacob of Fort Orangien. Westerfield gives the name as Belitje Jacobs QUICK, as does Mrs. Dorr.  Dorr says Belitje is the first child and first daughter of Jacobs T. Quick & Neeltje C. Lopers, however that doesn’t match birth dates of children given by Dorr.

She was a witness at a baptism at the Reformed Dutch Church of New Amsterdam okn 21 Sept 1718; and mentioned in the records of RDC  17 Nov 1728.

Love the court fight story!  Our Dutch were a litigious bunch!

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Carolyn, About your infant and the lack of a grave.  Often because of the size of a baby, they were simply buried in the plot of another family member vs a separate plot of their own, especially when the body was being returned from elsewhere vs. being a member.  That was quite a common practice in many communities and comforting to the parents.  Often a separate stone was not erected or the existing one ingrained.  Gravestones were expensive and carving more so. The intention might have been to rebury the baby into the parents plot at some point in the future but as so often occurred, life went on and the parent remained  and were buried in their new home area.

Regarding your question about Cornelius A B Vanarsdale and ABC Vanarsdale. Bob Vanarsdall of Chapel Hill, NC was kind enough to share his family papers with me.

Cornelius A. B. Vanarsdall aka.Cornelius Abraham Brewer Vanarsdall or C. A. B. Vanarsdall was the son of Abraham Simon Vanarsdale and Antje Pierle was born in Berwick Township, York County, Pennsylvania on 8 February 8, 1772 and baptized at the Conewago Low Dutch Church 31 May 1772.  Perhaps he was visiting friends or family in Mercer County, Kentucky where he married Mary Brewer 5 January 1799 in Mercer County, Kentucky with the consent of her father. Maria the daughter of Abraham Brewer and Sarah Van Orden, was baptized 8 November 1778 at the Conewago Low Dutch Church. A. B. C. Vanarsdale, the eldest son of Cornelius Abraham Brewer Vanarsdale was born 20 January 1802. His first wife was Charity G. Terhune who he married 9 October 1832, while his second wife was Eliza P. Davis. Source: Copy of original Bill of Sale for Harriet, courtesy of Robert VanArsdall, Chapel Hill, N. C.; Mercer Co. Will Bk. 15::99-102, 224-225, the Will of Cornelius A. B. Vanarsdell, courtesy of Robert VanArsdall; Kentucky Death Records 1852-1953Ancestry.com. Harriet born in Mercer County, KY died March 1856, Owner A. B. C. Vanarsdalle, [The Choices were Father or Owner, the transcriber just inserted father for many slaves.]

  1. B. C. Vanarsdalwrote his will on 15 December 1874, dying 21 September 1877; his will was recorded 3 December 1877. He mentions his wife Elizabeth, sons Cornelius and Merrit, daughters Mary Bell and Abriella. Source:Will of A. B. C. Vanarsdal, Mercer Co. KY Will Bk. 18:276-278,

Daniel Brewer Vanarsdell was the son of Cornelius Abraham Brewer Vanarsdall and Mary Brewer. His wife Leah Stagg, born 23 July 1805 was the granddaughter of James Stagg and daughter of Daniel Stagg and Mary Cownover. Daniel Brewer Vanarsdale’s son, William Stagg Vanarsdall, stated that he was a farmer and a miller. There was a grain mill on the Salt River directly across from the old Vanarsdall homestead that the family operated. The house, which was torn down in 2006 was located on “Bohan Pike” near the town of Bohon, NW of Harrodsburg. The foundation stones of the mill and the mill dam are still visible on the bank of the river. Many of these documents were never filed at the local court house and were handed down in Vanarsdale family papers. A copy of a deed of sale from the estate of Thomas Williams to Daniel B. Vanarsdell dated 4 November 1854 reads as follows: “Rec’d of Dan’l B. Vanarsdell four hundred and fifty one dollars the full amount of the purchase money of the negro woman CLOE brown color about twenty nine year of age and her boy child WALTER SCOTT about nine months old formerly the property of Thomas Williams, Admr. sold by me as commissioner in the Mercer Circuit Court in the Equity Suit of Thomas Williams, Admr., adj’t of Thomas Williams heirs … under a decree of said court given under my hand this 11th day of November 1854.” [appears to be Geoff Thompkins] Commissioner. A pencil written receipt from the Sheriff, N. Adams, stated that “this day sold one negro girl slave named ELIZABETH aged about three years old for eighty one dollars and Daniel Vanarsdale become the purchaser.” She was sold as part of a settlement in the case of “Sam Jones vs Ben Allen,” 6 Dec. 1852. Daniel also purchased “negro boy named JIM about four years of aged for three hundred dollars and the “said boy was warranted for life, sound in body and mind on 4 March 1754.” There was a slave cemetery at Vanarsdell/Vanarsdale’s mill as the death records for JOHN age 4 years who died 15 December 1856, slave of D. Vanarsdale who reported that he was buried at the Vanarsdale mill. Source: Original document of Slave Bills of Sale in possession of Robert Van Arsdell, Chapel Hill, N. C.; Kentucky Death Records, 1852-1953Ancestry.com., perhaps the grain mill owned by the family.

These Vanarsdales were all slave owners and many of their slaves are buried on mill land.  In addition, several members of the United States Colored Infantry including  JOSEPH VANANSDALE OR VANARDSDALE: Enlisted in Company D, 100th USCI at age 28 on 27 May 1864 in Lexington and then was sent to Louisville. He was a Sergeant at the end of the War. He is credited to Mercer County and Congressional District 7 and his owner is listed as A. B. C. (Abe) Vanarsdale. aka. Abraham Brewer Cornelius Vanarsdale. He was born in Mercer County and was a laborer or farmer. Joseph is described as being 5’9” tall. He was promoted to 1st corporal in August 1865, later promoted to sergeant and then reduced to private in Dec. 1864. In January of 1865 he was promoted to 4th Sergeant.

Source:  NARA Compiled Military Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers Who Served with the U. S. Colored Troops, Courtesy of Robert Bell.

Joseph Van Arsdale (alias Joseph Tilford), husband of JAN TILFORD, Company D. 100th USCI applied for a Pension in Kentucky as Joseph Van Arsdale 5 July 1890, stating he was an invalid; both surnames were listed on the application. Jan, his widow, was listed on the application 27 September 1897 after Joseph’s death. She later filed as his widow on 17 September 1906, her attorney was Mr. B. Stevens & Company.

Three of ABC’s female slaves died of Scrofula in 1856 which was Tuberculosis of the neck glands and highly contagious includingHARRIET who died March 1856, MARGARET born 25 November, 1837, died December 1856 and HANNAH age 2 born about 1854 died Feb. 1856; they were buried at Vanarsdale’s mill, owned at one time by Daniel B. Vanarsdale.[Kentucky Death Records 1852-1953Ancestry.com. Harriet born in Mercer County, KY died March 1856, Owner A. B. C. Vanarsdalle, [The Choices were Father or Owner, the transcriber just inserted father for many slaves.] Harriet originally belonged to CAB.

This family should not be confused with the family of A. B. [Abrim] Vanarsdale and his father Cornelius O. who migrated directly from New Jersey but who was a neighbor of the family of CAB and ABC and Daniel Brewer Vanarsdale.

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Letters 1/7/2015 Hotel Information

Dear Cousins,

Block your calendar and make your hotel reservations now. Plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication, so check in at Frankfort the 24th and out the 27th. Later I will post info on the hotels at Harrodsburg. 

We previously made you aware of some concern about the Capital Plaza Hotel which is right next to the History Center where Barbie and Janice have our meetings set up Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society. I believe the Hotel is going to be fine, but Janice blocked rooms in other venues as well in case some cousins wanted to stay elsewhere. 

Steve said he and Heather would both talk to the Plaza management, and he hopes others of us would do the same. Steve said the lobbyists stay at the Plaza during legislative season so it must be okay. It is always a good idea to check with TripAdvisor.com to read the reviews before booking a room anywhere. Here is a hotlink to read about the hotel: http://bit.ly/1FhHXMP  I love old homey places, but safety and cleanliness are top priorities.

The phone number at Capital Plaza is 502-227-5100, so when you call to make your reservations just mention you read some reviews that concerned you and you are hoping the issues have been taken care of before we get there. Be sure to say you are with the Dutch Cousins so you get the discount price and do it now because they are full most of the time. You have to put it on your credit card to guarantee the room, but it is not charged until you check in. You have until 6 pm the day of your arrival to cancel with no charge.

I called to make my reservations today and had a very nice conversation with Terry, the front office manager. She said have free highspeed internet, an indoor pool, exercise room and restaurant with free parking under the hotel. Atrium lobby with waterfall fountain. I don’t believe they have free breakfast, altho the website says they do, but you do get 10% off in the restaurant with your room key. I mentioned the bad reviews I had read and she assured me those issues were being addressed and that we would be happy with the hotel as long as we remember it is an historic type building — thirty years old.  I told her I thought 30 was young!

Janice researched other hotels in the area and blocked rooms at several so you can take your pick. More info on the schedule will follow soon.

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

See the 2013 Newsletter http://goo.gl/MLnha

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson

We also have a facebook page, Dutch Cousins of Kentucky

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Here’s the info you need to pass along to the Cousins.

You may change any wording you think necessary.

Blessings,  Janice  🙂

TIPS for the hotels listed;

These are hotels in the Frankfort area and ONLY suggestions. By no means are the hotels recommended by the Dutch Cousins group.

They all have ratings from excellent to poor so you will need to research on your own and decide which one is best for you.

Our check-in time is Friday Sept. 25 & check-out time is Sunday morning Sept. 27, 2015.  If you want to come any days earlier OR stay days later, you must call early and get the days you need.  The days before and after are NOT blocked.

Capital Plaza Hotel – Blocked 80 rooms

405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky

502-227-5100

Discount price –  $89.00 + tax

Group code – DUTCH COUSINS

NO Continental breakfast but restaurant that opens at 6:30 am

cut-off date to RSVP is Sept. 3, 2015

______________________________________________________

The Hampton Inn is SOLD out for the DC dates

___________________________________________________

Holiday Inn Express – Blocked 25 rooms

1000 Vandalay Drive, Frankfort, Ky

502-352-4650

Discount price – $95.00 + tax

Group code – DUTCH COUSINS

YES – Continental breakfast – 6:30 – 9:30 am

Cut-off date to RSVP is Aug. 31, 2015

______________________________________________________

Fairfield Inn – Blocked 25 rooms

40 Chenault Road

I-64 exit 58

Frankfort, Ky

502-695-8881

Discount price – $99.00 + tax

Group code – DUTCH COUSINS

YES Continental breakfast –  6-9 am

Cut-off date to RSVP is Aug. 25, 2015

___________________________________________________

Best Western Hotel – Blocked 30 rooms

exit 58 – US 60 & I-64

Frankfort, Ky

502-695-6111

Discount price – $84.60 + tax

Group code – DUTCH COUSINS

YES Continental breakfast – 6 – 9:30 am

Cut-off for RSVP is Aug. 17, 2015

___________________________________________________

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and let us know their Dutch connection.

Letters 1/10/2015

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.

 

NEXT DUTCH GATHERING!  Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society. Do you have your hotel reservations yet?  Better not wait!  Block your calendar now and plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication. Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together.

Barbie and Janice tell me everything is set up for our meetings from 8:30 am to 9 pm on Friday and Saturday in the Brown-Forman Kentucky Room at the Kentucky Historical Society, 100 W. Broadway, Frankfort, KY 40601, phone 502-564-1792. The gals have blocked 80 rooms for us next door at the Capital Plaza Hotel phone 502-227-5100 at a special rate, so when you call be sure to say you are with the Dutch Cousins. We are able to keep the cost for registration and meals the same as last year thanks to an anonymous donation of $300 toward the Kentucky Center 2-day rental, and the kindness of the center in accommodating us (good work committee!). I am working on the registration forms now. Those should be out in a week or so.

STEVE HENRY is going to have the Rosemary Clooney house at Maysville open for the Cousins, so we need to know how many are interested in going there – it is about 1 hr 45 min northwest of Frankfort so Thursday would probably be the best day for that.  Steve is also arranging a tour of the Lt. Governor’s Mansion, the Governor’s Mansion/Capitol tour, Frankfort Cemetery and other official sites to chose from, probably on Friday afternoon. 

We’ve got some great speakers on tap — more about that later.

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and let us know their Dutch connection.

I do not post the email addresses from other writers due to concern about spam and identity thieves. Also the replies to the queries may help another reader on the same line.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by Phyllis Miller

Perhaps you could put a little “blurb” in your Newsletter about my family’s search for my Dutch 4th great grandfather, WILLIAM (WILHELM) VAN DYKE.  He appeared in Westmoreland County, PA in the 1770’s, seemingly without other family members.  He was said to be the first Dutch person in that area.  He was probably born in the 1750’s.  Around 1780 he married Anna Barbara Moyer/Meyer and had a large family of children.  Most of his sons had the name “Johannes” in their names, leading me to believe his father’s name could have been John Van Dyke.  He later moved to Armstrong County, PA where he died in 1806.   We do not know if he is descended from the large Van Dyke family of New York/New Jersey or of a separate family from Holland.  Years of research has turned up nothing!   I have considered that he could have been part of the Conewago settlement in Pennsylvania as there is a John Van Dyke and a Peter Van Dyke listed there.

Also,  I did have my DNA done by Ancestry and wondered if other Van Dyke families are registered.  Thanks!

 

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Sent by Katie Hortenstine

“I am trying to find proof of marriage between Samuel Westerfield (1760-1832) and wife Catharine Montfort (1762-1844). According to online posts they were married 28 February 1782, Kentucky. I have tried civil records for Jefferson County and was unable to find anything. Does anyone know of a Bible record (there was a post on Ancestry mentioning a family bible), or church records that might exist from that time period and place? I’m looking for my own records as well as to allow me to prove connections for DAR Patriots. I would appreciate any help or advice in the hunt.

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Sent by Karen Prather

Hi Carolyn,

Just thought I would let you know that I have made a reservation at The Meeting House, a B&B in Frankfort that is within walking distance of the museum etc. They currently have several rooms available and offer a full breakfast by candlelight, cookies and soft drinks in the room and a discount for staying more than one night. I like B&B’s when I travel so thought maybe someone else in the group would like to consider this as an alternative to a chain hotel/motel.

themeetinghousebandb.com

Looking forward to seeing you in September.

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Sent by Robert Adlet

Thanks for asking how I am related to Jacob Theuniszen Quick. Sometimes I get so involved in the extended lines that I forget how I am related. Well I have spent this time figuring it out. My wife, Beverly J Arnold dau of Eleanor M Demaree thru Demaree to Judge David Demaree 1769-1814 to his granddaughter Susan J Demaree 1823-1882 m William Thomas Shuck 1824-1900 their son Samuel Nelson Shuck 1849-1896 m Lucinda Margaret “Maggie” Terhune 1852-1936 to Garrett Terhune 1756-1821 m Catherine Van Nuys 1761-1833 whose father Isaac Van Nuys 1739-1804 m Vrouchie Vroutie “Flora” Quick 1739-1829 gr  Granddaughter of Jacob Theuniszen Quick 1630-1689.

So yes we are related.

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Sent by Joan Murray

Hi Carolyn,  It was exciting to see the Castello Plan of New Amsterdam.  Jacques Cortelyou is a direct line ancestor of me through my father’s mother.  All the Low Dutch lines are through my father’s grandmother’s line.

She was Sarah Ellen Bonta England.  Joan E. Murray

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Sent by Lilly Martin Sauhouie

I would like to offer my help to Robert Adlet on Dr Samuel R Demaree 1782-1815 born in Conewago and died Shelby Co., KY.

*********************************************************

I have in my FTM database this man.  He is son of Samuel Demarest 1746-1810 and Susannah Brouwer 1746 d. after 1791.  I do not have any info, or notes on his life or career.  I have his name and his birth as October 07, 1782, and his death as about 1815.

I was not sure if Robert Adlet already had the ancestry of Demarest and Brouwer?  If not, here it is:

Samuel Demarest 1746 NJ, s/o David Demarest 1699-1768 (m. Katryntie Van Houten), s/o David Demarest 1676 NY-1768 NJ, s/o David Demarest 1651 Germany- 1706 NJ, s/o David Demarest 1620 France -1693 NJ (m. Marie Sohier) , s/o Jean De Marets 1592 France – 1683 Holland.

According to “The Demarest Family,” Demarest Family Association, 1964:

“David with his parents was forced to flee from France because of their Protestant religion. They moved, in 1642, to Middleburg, on the island of Walcheren off the west coast of Holland, where they joined a colony of Belgian and French refugees.”

“…on 1 May 1678 the entire family removed to their new home on the Hackensack, then called the Herring River. David Sr. was in his 58th year; his eldest son Jean had just reached the age of 33 and had been married ten years to Jacomina deRuine, daughter of one of the earliest settlers in Harlem, and had four children. David Jr., aged 28 years, had not been married for three years to Rachel Cresson, and had one child living. Samuel, not yet 22 years old, was unmarried, but he returned to Harlem in a few months and took back with him Marie, the 16 year old half-sister of Jacomina deRuine, whom he married in the Bergen Church (Jersey City). Although Marie Sohier was living when the family left New York, she survived only a short time and is said to have died of small pox. She at the time was a member of the Reformed Church at Bergen. She probably was the first person buried in what came to be known as the French Burying Ground.

***********************************************

Susanna Brouwer 1746 (m. Samuel Demarest), d/o Daniel Brouwer 1719-1791, s/o Abraham Brouwer 1675-1731, s/o Pieter Brouwer 1646- after 1700, s/o Adam Brouwer 1620 Cologne-1692 Gowanus, Kings Co, NY.

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Sent by Betty Cole Willerton

Recently there was a Dutch Cousins Letter that had an article by Mike Banta. He had included a link to his dvd of Epke Banta’s home. Can someone repost Mr. Banta’s Link, please?

Thanks,

NOTE FROM CAROLYN (HERSELF)

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson, SO YOU can go there to find it if no one reposts.

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Apparently I neglected to add, in this submission, that Abraham Vanarsdale and Anatje Pierlie moved to Hampshire County West Virginia from Conewago and Berkeley Co., where he died in 1810. They did not migrate with the rest of the Low Dutch from Conewago to Kentucky in the 1780’s.

I should clarify in case someone is wondering.  By SIZE of the baby, I actually meant when a new born or even a child under 1 year died, their bodies were often small in size with baby sized caskets and if the family wished them to be buried in a family plot, which may have had limited space, they were often buried with another family member, with the casket placed and interred at the base or foot of the adult family member.

I hope that that makes more sense.

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Sent by Dutch Genealogy News

 

All articles in this newsletter are written by Yvette Hoitink, a professional genealogist in the Netherlands and owner of Dutch Genealogy Services.

Overspel is the Dutch word for adultery. Depending on the period, adultery was not only a private matter, but could be criminally prosecuted. The church council also wanted to find out so that both parties could be censored.

One of my own female ancestors was fined for insulting another woman, saying “You are keeping company with my man” and other more derogatory terms. As far as I know, the husband or the woman he was having an affair with were never prosecuted. Stories like these sure help to understand where all those strange DNA matches come from!

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Sent by Lilly Martin

Please refer to your original posting, which I listed below.  Please note the name Pieter Clementssen BROUWER.  (typo: the n should be an u)  The Mercer county, KY group has a Daniel BROUWER, who was a descendant of Adam Brouwer, the immigrant ancestor who arrived in Manhattan in 1642.   The Kentucky family used an English spelling as BREWER.  We do not yet know the father of Adam Brouwer.  He named his eldest son Pieter.  It has been theorized that Adam’s father may be a Pieter Brouwer.  However, it is not likely that the Pieter Clementssen Brouwer, of the Dutch West Indies Company was his father.  The man listed below in the 1614 document was a wealthy and powerful man, and it is thought that Adam Brouwer, the immigrant from Cologne was not in the same social-financial status.

Best regards, Lilly Martin

 

Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Have you heard of the Avalon Project?

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/17th_century/charter_011.asp

Grant of Exclusive Trade to New Netherland by the States-General of the United Netherlands; October 11, 1614

The States-General of the United Netherlands, to all to whom these presents shall come, greeting.

Whereas Gerrit Jacobz Witssen, ancient Burgomaster of the city Amsterdam, Jonas Witssen, Simon Morrissen, owners of the ship named the Little Fox, whereof Jan de With has been skipper; Jans Hongers, Paulus Pelgrom, Lambrecht van Tweenhuyzen, owners of the two ships named the Tiger and the Fortune, whereof Aedriaen Block and Henrick Corstiaenssen were skippers; Arnolt van Lybergen, Wessel Schenck, Hans Claessen, and Berent Sweertssen, owners of the ship named the Nightingale, whereof Thys Volckertssen was skipper, merchants of the aforesaid city Amsterdam, and Pieter Clementssen Bronwer, Jan Clementssen Kies, and Cornelis Volckertssen, merchants of the city of Hoorn, owners of the ship named the Fortuyn, whereof Cornelis Jacobssen May was skipper, all now associated in one company, have respectfully represented to us that they, the petitioners, after great expenses and damages by loss of ships and other dangers, had, during the present year, discovered and found with the above named five ships certain new lands situate in America between New France and Virginia, the sea coast whereof lie between forty and forty-five degrees of latitude, and now called New Netherland. And whereas we did, in the month of March last, for the promotion and increase of commerce, cause to be published a certain general consent and charter setting forth that whosoever should thereafter discover new havens, lands, places, or passages might frequent or cause to be frequented, for four voyages, such newly discovered and found places, passages, havens, or lands to the exclusion of all others from visiting or frequenting the same from the United Netherlands until the said first discoverers and finders shall themselves have completed the said four voyages or cause the same to be done within the time prescribed for that purpose, under the penalties expressed in the said octroy, etc.; they request that we would accord to them due act of the aforesaid octroy in the usual form.

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Letters 1/25/2015

Dear Cousins:

A few days ago I was honored to be invited on a conference call with other Dutch history enthusiasts.  They wanted to know about this group called the Dutch Cousins. We discussed that the Dutch Cousins get together is a week following the (New Netherland Institute) NNI Seminar in September in Albany New York.

<http://www.aadas.nl/blog/20th-anniversary-aadas-conference-2015>

They encouraged all Dutch Cousins to  attend both sessions.  They would very much like for Vince Akers, our historian, to come there and talk about our group.  The NNI Seminar focus will be in conjunction with the Association for the advancement of Dutch American studies.  The conference focus is on the relationship with the Dutch in the East and the Mid-West.  Charly proposed the Dutch Cousins put together a paper for the NNI Seminiar because there is not a lot of information on the migration to Kentucky after the Revolutionary War.

Here is who was on the call, and the amount of time we were each given to talk about our subject.  My five-minutes went fast.

Call Welcoming:  Jippe Hiemstra (President NNI) – 5 minutes

 

Charley Gehring (15 minutes)

  • Discuss the mission of NNI
  • Summary of the work accomplished thus far
  • Plans for 2015

Dirk Mouw (10 minutes)

  • Brief summary of background
  • Summary of studies
  • Plans for 2015

J Brumm & R Gasero  (10 minutes)

  • Brief summary of the RCA historical research
  • Summary of studies
  • Plans for 2015

Carolyn Leonard (Dutch Cousins) (5 minutes)

  • Brief summary of the society
  • Plans for 2015

Open discussion (15 minutes)

  • Exploring opportunities to share and discuss ideas of working together
  • Future calls?

And here is a summary of the conversation:

MINUTES OF JOINT NNI, RCA & DUTCH COUSINS ROUNTABLE DISCUSSION

January 22nd 2015

This was first of many meetings to come.  We concluded this meeting with excitement and interest in having recurring quarterly meeting.  I’m proposing the next meeting to be April 16th at 11:00 EDT.  The goal of having a joint meeting is as follows:

  • Advise each other of events taking place throughout the  year and their locations
  • Perhaps having guest a speaker(s)  from each others organziations
  • Sharing our membership and news letters to show members collectively what is going on with our research, our programs, and events of interest.

Mike Vande Woude took role call of participants and introduced Jippe Heimstra who began the call representing NNI.

Jippe:  NNI’s goal and mission is exploring our Dutch heritage.

  • Our primary purpose is the translation of Dutch Colonial records that were stored at the New York State Capital in Albany.
  • Our secondary mission is to educate society about the Dutch influence on “freedom of speech”, “freedom of trade”.
  • We also develop a number of educational programs to spread the word.
  • Enlightened the group about the New Netherlands Institute website www.newnetherlandinstitute.org

Charly Gehring:  Head of New Netherland Institute Research Center.

  • The New Netherland Project began in 1974.  The goal was to take up the translation of the Dutch records that were held by the New York State Library – the archives division had not yet been established.  Charly was initially hired for 1 year.
  • Since then the translation has included 18 volumes of documents (approximately 7,000 pages).
  • Just completed volume 8, (council minutes from 1656 – 1658, 750 pages).  Goal to have it in print by end of year.
  • Initiated the outreach program – the first being the Rensselaer seminar program.  We just had our 37 seminar which is now called The New Netherland seminar.  Out next seminar is scheduled for this September.
  • Started a newsletter 30 years ago. Ties together all of our members and informs them of programs, New Netherlandish studies and Dutch related actives (17thcentury publications)
  • Several years ago opened a room in the NY State Library on the 7thfloor (Cultural Education building) titled the New Netherland Research Center.  This allows researchers to go to one central location to do their research.  Nothing travels outside of this room.
  • National Endowment for Humanities – Funding received for over 30 years and acquired over 1 million dollars during that period.

The NNI promotes what the research center does e.g., newsletter, seminars, outreach programs, student scholar, senior scholar, educational material involved with the curriculum of NY State education department.

Marilyn Douglas – VP NNI – Marilyn heads up the administration and operations of NNI

  • Membership has grown over 25 years
  • Continue to grow – we now approximately 500 members – over 1100 on the mailing list
  • Contacts members regarding lectures, books, programs and grant opportunities
  • Carolyn Leonard (Dutch Cousins) also distributes this information to her members.
  • Goal  is to make our information to as wide an audience as possible.

Dirk Mouw – Worked with and a fellow of the Reformed Church Center and its archives.

  • Has worked with NNI before and translated the De Hoogus memorandum book
  • Has done research at the New Netherland Research Center
  • Has translated family records of members of the Reformed Church
  • Currently working on a couple of pieces for publication on the social movement of the 17thand 18th century in the Netherlands, the US and other Dutch outposts around the globe.
  • Working with the Reformed Church of Schenectady NY and Reformed Church Center about abolitionism and slavery in the 19thcentury.
  • Wants to do a project on the Raritan Valley NJ and the Reformed Churches in that area.
  • Charly has done translation of Reformed Church of Tappan and Kingston Church records.

James Brown – Director of the Reformed Church Center at the New Brunswick Seminary in New Jersey.

  • Moderator for the commission on the history of the Reformed Church of America.
  • Has published documents through the historical series of the Reformed Church
  • Information available through various sources and libraries within and outside of the Reformed Church
  • The Church center is revamping its web services and therefore also looking at linking other websites where resources and research is available
  • The purpose is to give members of the Reformed Church and other interested parties looking for the history of the Reformed Church to also have links to other Dutch historical research.  The Board is open and anxious to link to other forms of Dutch history here in the US on the Colonial period and slavery.
  • Conference planned for next spring in Schenectady and later in the year in New Brunswick NJ also in the Raritan Valley.
  • The Reformed Church seminary is also the sponsor the Albert Smith fellowship
  • Proposals will shortly be on-line for the 2015-16 Academic year.
  • There is also a Hazel Ganadyfellowship beginning next year on the contributions of women in the Reformed Church of America

Russ Gasero

  • The archives is a Corporate archives for the denomination
  • Not involved as much in research but as a facilitator for other peoples research
  • The RCA provides access for research
  • Congregations can use this facility to archive their records, but not mandatory
  • If the Church disbands, then it is mandatory to turn over their records to the seminary.

Carolyn Leonard (Dutch Cousins)

  • Goal is to establish pride in the group in their Dutch heritage
  • Also restoring the Old Mud Meetinghouse built in 1800 by the Low Dutch at Fort Harrod, now Harrodsburg, Kentucky
  • Dutch Cousins of Kentucky are descendants of the original Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey and then moved 150 families establish (1500) people and established a colony in Gettysburg PA (the Conewago Colony.  See website below. Most of the Dutchmen were Revolutionary soldiers in their own outfit led by Capt Simon VanArsdalen. As the war was winding down they began moving to Kentucky.http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard.com/Conewago_Colony.html
  • Reverend Corneilus Cozine was the first minister and almost only minister at Conewago.
  • They floated down the Ohio in the 1780s to the Kentucky frontier, first settling in Mercer County near Fort Harrod, later buying a track of land 8000 acres still known as the Dutch Tract.
  • Vince Akers is the Dutch Cousins historian.
  • They are identified as the “Low Dutch” as they immigrated from the low Dutch lands of Netherlands.
  • The Dutch Cousins meet every two years.  This year it will be in Frankfort, Kentucky 9/25 and 9/26. Ending the 27that the Old Mud Meetinghouse in Harrodsburg.
  • There are 850 members on the email list and about 200 using regular mail about the gathering.
  • Last gathering (2013) Dr. Bob Schenk, President of Holland Society was a guest speaker.  This year his wife is on the schedule.

Letters 1/21/2015

Dear Dutch Cousin

We look forward to meeting you in Frankfort September 25!

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.

 

NEXT DUTCH GATHERING!  Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort, Ky. at the Kentucky Historical Society. Do you have your hotel reservations yet?  Better not wait!  Block your calendar now and plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication. Watch the DUTCH LETTERS to learn more as the crew gets the Gathering schedule together.

Barbie and Janice tell me everything is set up for our meetings from 8:30 am to 9 pm on Friday and Saturday in the Brown-Forman Kentucky Room at the Kentucky Historical Society, 100 W. Broadway, Frankfort, KY 40601, phone 502-564-1792. The gals have blocked 80 rooms for us next door at the Capital Plaza Hotel phone 502-227-5100 at a special rate, so when you call be sure to say you are with the Dutch Cousins. We are able to keep the cost for registration and meals the same as last year thanks to an anonymous donation of $300 toward the Kentucky Center 2-day rental, and the kindness of the center in accommodating us (good work, committee!). I am working on the registration forms now. Those should be out in a week or so.

STEVE HENRY is going to have the Rosemary Clooney house at Maysville open for the Cousins, so we need to know how many are interested in going there – it is about 1 hr 45 min northwest of Frankfort so Thursday would probably be the best day for that.  Steve is also arranging a tour of the Lt. Governor’s Mansion, the Governor’s Mansion/Capitol tour, Frankfort Cemetery and other official sites to chose from, probably on Friday afternoon.

We’ve got some great speakers on tap — more about that later.

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list – and let us know their Dutch connection.

I do not post the email addresses from other writers due to concern about spam and identity thieves. Also posting the replies to the queries on these letters may help another reader on the same line.

If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, “remove me” — and I will do so immediately !

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by Mike Banta

Hi Carolyn,

Here is the link Betty Cole Winston requested for my YouTube video of “Epke’s Home in Friesland”.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqhXeetNVZw

 

YouTube posts the number of clicks to the videos on “My Channel.”  I’m amazed at the number of Dutch Cousins who have watched this YouTube video since you posted it in a Dutch Cousin News letter.

Theodore M. “Mike” Banta

 

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Sent by Betty Cole Willerton

Recently there was a Dutch Cousins Letter that had an article by Mike Banta. He had included a link to his dvd of Epke Banta’s home. Can someone repost Mr. Banta’s Link, please?

Thanks,

NOTE FROM CAROLYN (HERSELF)

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson, SO YOU can go there to find it if no one reposts.

———————————–

Sent by Vince Akers

Hi Carolyn!

I notice in yesterday’s Dutch Letters that Robert Adlet says his wife is descended from Susan Demaree (1823-1882) who married William Thomas Shuck (1824-1900).  He probably has come across this before, but here is a link to a 40-year old article in the INDIANA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY which includes photos of W.T. and Susan Demaree Shuck and their log cabin built in 1847 along with letters written by W.T. Shuck

Vince

Democratic Attitudes in Johnson County during the Civil War Era: A Look at the Demaree Papers | Eidson | Indiana Magazine of History

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Sent by Ed Nutt

Patty,

Abraham Rijcken, our immigrant ancestor, was involved in several parcels of land, most notably Riker’s Island that was earlier known as Hulett’s Island. Abraham acquired it as a grant (patent) in Dutch from Director General Peter Stuyvesant on August 19. 1664.  The original is item #46.422.1229 of the Greater Ridgewood Historical Society, Inc. while the English translation is item #46.422.1227B.  The grant was confirmed om December 24, 1667 by Governor General Richard Nicolls as per idem #46.16.411.1226.

By his will of March 9, 1688/89, written in English and proved on April 10, 1689,  Abraham left to various of his children only sums of money while to his “Sonn Abraham Rick”   “all ye rest  of my Estate Viz Lands Goods & Chattels”.  The will and inventory are Ridgewood’s item #46.411.1224 (which I believe I misrecorded as #16.411.1224.  Abraham Jr. left a will which specified Hulett’s Island and is Ridgewood’s item #46.411.1699.

Abraham Sr. had other parcels of land which I assume you are not interested in.

You asked regarding my book “The Rikers: Their Island, Homes, Cemetery and early Genealogy ….”. I have a few remaining copies that I can send by  “media Mail” at $13.50 per copy.

———————————–

Sent by Larry Woodward  (Vanarsdall cousin)

For us new to the list, is there any formal registration process for the Dutch Gathering in Frankfort?  Or does one pretty much just show up??

NOTE from Carolyn herself:  Hi Larry – we look forward to meeting you in FrankfortSeptember 25!

We are a little late in getting things together this year. I am working on the registration blank now and hope to have it out in a couple weeks with all pertinent information.

———————————–

Sent by cassidy

Perhaps the cousins would like to know that copies of Arthur Weaners book, Taxables of the Low Dutch Settlement of the Conewago, York County, Pennsylvania 1762-1799, can still be purchased from the Adams County Historical Society Gift Shop, P. O. Box 4325, Gettysburg, PA 17325 and it only costs $10.00 which is a bargain.

The phone number is 717-334-4723.

———————————–

Sent by Barbara Meridith

Got your note and enjoyed looking through the recipes!  Definitely going to try some of them.  Denise and I met with a DAR Registrar person in Kennett, MO on Saturday.  We gave her all of our information that we had put together(actually only what she wanted, we had way too much proof!) She only wanted birth, marriage and death certificates.  We had photos of all the stones we could locate, Census’, obituaries, newspaper articles.  Brought most of it home.  Hopefully, in the next few months we will actually be DAR members.  She took our money and was going to retype everything and print it on DAR acceptable paper, get it all signed and get it back to us.  She seemed to think we had supplied her with everything she needed. Denise is going in on the Ward’s and I am going in on the Westerfield’s.  This lady is actually a Dutch descendant as well. We gave her the information on the Dutch Cousins and the reunion.  She will probably get in touch with you.  Her name is Kathy Bruce.  Said she and her husband would probably come to the reunion.  See you in September!

———————————–

Sent by Kelly Westerfield

Thanks.  The Breakfast Recipe Book printed fine.

———————————–

Sent by Carolyn Mills

Carolyn, thanks, how wonderful!  Download worked fine.  Happy New Year!  Hope to see you in September.

———————————–

Sent by Charlie Westerfield

Enjoyed your post very much. As for the up-coming Dutch Cousins’ festival, if you could use a bonus program I have a slide show called “One Man’s America”. It features beautiful photos, great music, and an extremely intelligent live narrator (me) if you could use it. Look forward to September!

Note from Carolyn:  You are set for 2 pm Saturday!

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Letters 1/26/2015

There should be four attachments (pdfs) in this email. Sometimes they get stripped off by the email providers, so let me know if that happens on yours and I will try to send them by dropbox instead.

———————————–

by Carolyn B. Leonard

Just a reminder of our many names, but one Heritage of Low Dutch Cousins.

Fifty families of Low Dutch settlers first came to Kentucky by 1781 from Conewago Colony in Pennsylvania, after settling earlier in the 1600s in Nieuw Amsterdam (now NY) and New Jersey. Banta Bergen, Bodine, Brewer, Demaree, Dorland, duree Cosart, Cozine, Monfort, Ryker, Shuck, Smock, Terhune, VanArsdale, Van Nuys, Van duyn, voris, Voorhees, Westervelt – are some of the names. All have a variety of  spellings. They settled first around the Salt River in Mercer county and later bought many thousand acres of land in Henry and Shelby Counties from Squire Boone, which is still known as the “Low Dutch Tract”.

  • What started probably more than twenty years ago as a Westerfield family reunion, expanded in 1998 to include Cozines, and in 2003 the group decided to include all decendants of the Kentucky Dutch settlers.
  • in 2005 all Dutch Cousins were invited to Harrodsburg, KY where we learned a little more about our history.
  • In 2007 the VanArsdale, and Demaree family associations joined us at Shelbyville, as well as Darlands, Bantas, Brewers, Montforts and Vorhees/Voris.
  • 2009 found us in Harrodsburg again with 150 registering from 26 states from New York to California, Wisconsin to Texas.
  • 2011 after meeting in Harrodsburg, part of the group loaded into a charter bus and followed our Dutch footprints all the way to New York.
  • 2013 at Madison, Indiana,  the Ryker family association disbanded and became part of our Low Dutch Cousins.
  • 2015 at Frankfort Kentucky we will gather all the Cousins again in Kentucky and welcome other descendants to join us as well.
  • ———————————–
  • Sent by James Hart Brumm
  • Also, anybody who has links to sites with research materials connected to Reformed Church congregations, please send those links to me at jbrumm@nbts.edu. JamesDirector, The Reformed Church Center(See Call for proposals below)
  • at New Brunswick Theological Seminary
  • James Hart Brumm, MDiv, MA, MPhil
  • Peace,
  • I am attaching the call for proposals the Reformed Church Center’s 2015-16 fellowships. Application materials should be up on nbts.edu shortly. In the meantime, interested parties may contact me at jbrumm@nbts.edu.
  •             ———————————–
  • BE VERY PROUD!
  • BETWEEN 2005 AND 2014  total contributions by Dutch Cousins to the HHS Old Mud Meetinghouse Restoration Fund came to $133,386.
  • of which at least $76,000. was contributed by Vince Akers alone!
  •                       sent by Gary Stanford
  • Westervelt/field Massacre in KY
  • ———————————–

I finally found out what happened to Jacobus Westervelt that caused his wife and children to relocate to Eden, Ohio in 1785.  Unfortunately, it is the same reason why our genealogy line seems to stop at Samuel Leander Westerfield.  His Father was brutally killed in Kentucky during the American Revolutionary War.

One week ago, I received an email from Mr. Richard Larimer in Ohio (another descendent).  In his message he said that he too was having difficulty finding the father of James Westervelt, (Jacobus Westervelt).  I really became concerned by the fact that I wasn’t the only descendent of the Westerfield family having difficulty finding James Westerfield’s father, Jacobus.  The note that my Uncle Bob left me began to haunt me somehow (as strange as it may sound).  I began researching why, where and how Jacobus Westervelt had been killed.  I knew whatever had happened had obviously somehow broken our genealogy chain. I spent days on the internet researching the Westervelt Massacre once I discovered it had happened.  During my research, I discovered the terrible truth of how, where and why Jacobus Westervelt had been killed.  Please note that Jacobus ( now known as James) Westerfield’s wife, Mary Westerfield (Maria DeMaree) hid in a sink hole with her three of her daughters when the Indians came that night.  Mary Westerfield (Maria DeMaree Westerfield) witnessed the brutality of the murder of her family and extended family.  Mary Westerfield testified as to what had taken place that horrible night.  The next day, other settlers followed and buried the seventeen body’s in or near Floyd’s Fork or Broad Run, Virginia.  Today, the exact location of the mass grave is unknown but it is believed to be Shepardsville, Kentucky a south suburb of Louisville, Kentucky (in Bullitt County).  Attached are some articles which I have found on the subject and there are even more out there.  I hope they somehow help you all further research this horrible but historic event in America’s history.

Westerfield History attachments:

Yes, you have my permission to post and distribute any family documents which I send you.  When I made my promise to my Uncle Bob, his reply was “I just don’t want the world to forget our family”.  The Westerfield family in southern Indiana in 1800’s and 1900’s became distributed all over the place and ALL vital records had been destroyed in a Courthouse fire in Rush County, Indiana.  Thankfully, many of the vital records were still on microfilm and my Uncle Bob made copies and handed them down to me.  I went to findagrave.com and slowly began to piece our line together.  Many Westerfield family members were not listed online as I even had to get local help to find their final resting places.  Some used nicknames that were actually on their headstone, some have no headstone or marker at all.  There are many Westerfield’s but the ones in southern Indiana were very difficult to find (Rush and Shelby Counties were very difficult).  I’m very thankful that I made this promise to my Uncle Bob as it has opened my eyes to the tremendous sacrifices made by our amazing family. Yes, I would be honored to be a Dutch Cousin.  Please add me to that list.  Thank you again for all that you have done to honor our family.

————

Posted by Carolyn (herself) Here is how the story is told in the Draper Manuscripts:  (letter of HR Safford/Stafford to Lyman Draper 1865) “My Grand Father, James Westerfield {born 1735 NJ, father of the Rev. War Vet James Westerfield who married Phoebe Cozine} was a large man weighing 333 pounds himself and family left Berkeley Co via about 1780 and emigrated to Ky by way of Pittsburg to Louisville intending to go to Harrards Station in now Mercer Co Ky Him and company about 30 persons started from Louisville to the station camped for the night on the waters of bargrafs {Beargrass Creek} about 12 miles out and sometime in the night was attacked by a party of indians while asleep, and but few escaped death.  The old man and two of his daughters {were} among the number kill{killed}. After killing the old man, they seemed to think they had killed a giant. Three buttoned themselves in his big coat and danced.

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Sent by tom green

Thanks for the update. I plan to be there and am looking to my reservations soon. The committee has done a great job getting things done. Let me know if I need to do something. Looking forward to the Gathering.

 

———————————–

Sent by Charlie Westerfield

Carolyn, sign Marilyn and I up for the tour.

God Bless!

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Sent by GERALD Westerfield

Not sure whether my previous reply to Katie Horenstine’s inquiry got through or not.

 

Two most likely sources for this purpose are Mercer Co. Ky. Historical and DAR Library re: Dr. Isaac Newton Westerfield.

 

Good luck, Katie!

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Letters 1/28/2015

Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, are working hard on the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky Sept 25 & 26.  I am working on the program schedule and registration form. Send me a note right away if you have a program suggestion.  Would anyone like to volunteer to do a newsletter?

Our meetings will be in The Kentucky Historical Society, 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY.  40601.  Barbie and Janice have our meetings set up Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!  On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort on Sunday the 27th to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and DEFINITELY a rededication. More info will be coming soon.

book your rooms now! Ol blue eyes and I have our room reserved for Sept 24-27th – get yours next to us if you can!

Capital Plaza Hotel – Blocked 80 rooms (Capital Plaza Hotel is right next to the History Center.)  405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky   502-227-5100    Discount price –  $89.00 + tax    Group code – DUTCH COUSINS

Blessings, carolyn

  • ———————————–
    sent by Russell Gasero

Hi Carolyn,

It was a pleasure to talk with you during today’s meeting and to hear about the Dutch Cousins. I hadn’t been able to place that group until you explained it.

I visited Old Mud just over 30 years ago to meet with some folks from the Harrodsburg Historical Society. There was an event going on at that time and we worshiped in the Meeting House–I provided an old sermon for the occasion from just after the American Revolution.

You mentioned Readington and those records have been the most used of all the records in the RCA Archives. I recall a Franklyn Frick who had written some on the Banta family there in the 80s. I don’t know if he is still related or with us.

It was good to hear your update and to properly place the Dutch Cousins and how that fit into the mosaic. It brought back the old memories and enhanced the meeting even more for me.

Cheers,

Russ

Russell L. Gasero, CA, Archivist

Reformed Church in America, 21 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08901

NOTE FROM CAROLYN:  Russ has agreed to speak to us at the Old Mud Meetinghouse.  He is coming all the way from New Jersey so we will give him a real Kentucky welcome — even those of us who just WISH we lived there!

  • ———————————–
    sent by Thelma Little

Dear Carolyn:

Extremely interesting,RE:Westerfeld, at KY..Who (?)  marched from Low Marsh Creek settlement Eastward? And whether John Crownover 1747 was also included in that marching group.?

  • ———————————–
    sent by Jack Taylor

Two ways to KY, the Ohio River and the  Cumberland Gap

 

Yes, the Conewago families were a closely knit bunch of our ancestors that got to KY very early.  But, there are others of our New Netherland kin who entered KY just as early. Some took the Wilderness Road through  the Cumberland Gap  instead of down the Ohio River.

 

One of the reasons for the American Revolution that is underplayed by us Americans today was that the Colonists wanted to settle land west of the colonies across the Alleghenies.  The English did not want that. The English did not want to offend the French who claimed much of that area.

 

As it tuned out that’s just what happened.  As the American Revolution began the Colonists started moving west. The French were offended.  The French came into the middle of the Revolution on the Colonists’ side.  Without the French we probably would not have won independence, at least at that time.  UUMmm, maybe the result of not winning would have been similar to Canada’s history.  We would have won our independence slowly and US & Canada would be one country today??

 

I have often wondered how much the Conewago families knew our kin who came in by the Wilderness Road directly from NJ . They certainly knew each other in KY. My direct line ancestors, Barent & Ann BANTA REYNERSON (many spellings) were married 1789, Nelson County, KY. Barent is not found in the Connewago bunch. His immigrant ancestors were from Hengelo, NL, to Staten Island 1650,s. He was born in NJ.  All known of his ancestors were New Netherlanders.

Pioneers at Fort Boonesborough 1775

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kycampbe/PioneersFtBoonesborough.htm

Banta, Duree, Ripperdam, (van) Swearingen, Deban (DeBaun),

  • ———————————–
    sent by Diane Carkhuff

I have been reading your “Dutch Letters” for less than a year. Looking through the Conewago Colony list, I recognized the Smock name. Gr-Aunt Ellie gave a diary to my Gr-Grandma with some vital record dates of relatives. It was like a Bible to me!  My Gr-Uncle John Wesley Dean married Chloea Ellen Smock at Assumption, IL in 1891. Her father was J. J. Smock, 1844-1927.  Some of these families then migrated to Oklahoma.

Somewhat coincidentally, while researching ancestors from Pennsylvania, I stumbled onto the “Dutch Letters of Connecticut Colony purchases in Wyoming Valley, PA”.  If you have not previously sent this link, it is for the Luzerne and Susquehanna counties in the mid-1700’s when the Dutch Colony moved into northeastern PA:

http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/1pa/history/local/ss18/pass18-1.txt

Like your Westervelt Massacre, many of these colonists fled out of the area in 1788 after a great massacre by the Indians, allied with the English and Tories.  For that history and list of slain, read

http://files.usgwarchives.net/pa/luzerne/history/local/wyomrun.txt

  • ———————————–
    sent by Bill Clark, A Dutch cousin

Carolyn,

I found an email copy in my stuff which you must have sent in about 2007 regarding a reunion in Kentucky. I wondered if that is still happening on a regular basis? My ancestors were Smocks with Hendrick Smock arriving in Long Island, NY in 1654. The family moved to New Jersey, then Conewago, PA and then Mercer County, KY. My ancestors came to Indiana in about 1806 and to Marion County, IN in 1836.

(Note from Carolyn — Bill you have been added back into the email list! — and YES!  That Dutch Cousins “thing” is still happening! — Hope to see you there this fall.)

  • • ———————————–
    sent by Mr. Lynn Martin

Attached is my file (one single page) on the Mavity Cemetery.  My interest is the burial site for Debora (nee Ryker) who married Mason Watts. Debora is a sib of my direct Ryker ancestor. Mavity Cemetery is located in Rexville, Shelby Township, Ripley County, Indiana.  You are welcome to pass this info on as appropriate, eg, decoration of RW vets graves, State of Indiana cem register, etc.

William Mavity (Nov. 8, 1747 – 1832/4) and wife Mary (nee Jones) Mavity are buried in the Mavity Cemetery, Rexville IN.  William served in the Revolutionary War as a Sergeant Major in the 2nd Battalion, Virginia 4th Regiment, under Colonel Walker.

An account indicates that those buried there, in addition to William Mavity and wife, were their son John and wife; Charity Watts Mavity and her mother, Deborah Riker Watts; Mary Mavity Beckett and her daughter, Martha Beckett bales; and Margaret Mavity daughter of William.

Sons James and Morton of William and Mary Mavity married sisters Margaret & Charity Watts who are daughters of Mason and Debora (nee Ryker) Watts (1777 NJ -1837).  Mason married Debora in 1793 at Shelby Co KY.  Mason and Debora Watts were very early settlers in Jefferson County IN.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN (herself) Here is a hotlink to that burial ground on findagrave, but most of the names above are not in there.  Lynn needs to add them! http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gsr&GScid=2434359

Book The Mavity Family, Norman Bloss Mavity, 1954 is available on line at http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/005731687

and  https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE4558258

  • • ———————————–
    sent by Katie Hortenstine

Thank you Gerald Westerfield for the ideas! This is what’s been making me think something is out there- a post from 2000 on Ancestry on a message board- “looking for any information in regards to Jacob Reeder Westerfield (1/24/1802-8/19/1852)….His father’s name was Samuel and his mother’s name was Catherine but that is as far back as the family Bible goes.” Unfortunately, as a friend of mine pointed out, the internet is getting old. So getting in touch hasn’t been possible.

Just for clarification, for Mercer Co, would that be the Harrodsburg Historical Society? (YES.)

And for DAR Library, is that just a general search for Dr. Isaac Newton Westerfield? I’ll hopefully be there in June for NSDAR Continental Congress, so I can look for things then. Isaac I think is my direct ancestor, so if they have anything on him I’d love to find it :-).

  • ———————————–
    sent by Rick Larimer

I found this link on the Westervelt Massacre.

http://carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard/LowDutchHeritage/Entries/2008/12/12_36d._Westervelt_Massacre_May_1780.html

The Long Run Massacre has many interesting stories.

http://carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard/LowDutchHeritage/Entries/2008/12/10_39._The_Long_Run_Massacre_1781_%28Akers%29.html

List of Massacres

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_massacre

 

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – yep that is a VERY GOOD WEBSITE – LOL

On Sat, Jan 24, 2015 at 10:54 PM, Gary Stanford  wrote:

Hello All,

I have discovered some very important information about the location of the Westervelt Massacre victims.  There are 24 unmarked graves in what was known as the Pioneer Cemetery in Shepardsville, Kentucky.  The Westervelt Massacre took place in what is now known as Shepardsville, Kentucky (Bullitt County). The graves were relocated from Pioneer Cemetery on Bells Mill Road in Shepardsville (Bullitt County) to Bethany Cemetery in Valley Station, Kentucky (Jefferson County).

This is all that the findagrave note said:

Cemetery notes and/or description:

The Pioneer Cemetery was relocated to Bethany Cemetery from Bells Mill Road in Bullitt County. There were 24 Unknown burials moved from the original location.  Bethany Cemetery is in Valley Station, Kentucky (Jefferson County).

I have a message sent to Doug Wilson who seems to have posted this note.  Hope to hear back from him soon and will let you know what he tells me.  Also, I am sharing a photo of these 24 unmarked graves which was known as the Pioneer Cemetery.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN: In its early days, the major industry in Shepherdsville was salt production from nearby Bullitt’s Lick.  I could not find Pioneer Cemetery in Shepardsville, on findagrave, but I did find this info and photos on the BULLITT CO HISTORY MUSEUM. Kentuckyhttp://bullittcountyhistory.org/cem/pioneer_cem_moved_to_beth.html

BUT this one could be it too: http://www.bullittcountyhistory.com/bullitthistory/cem/shepherdsville_pioneer_gr.html

  • ———————————–
    sent by John C. Westerfield

Carolyn here are some web sites the cousins may want to visit before our gathering in September.

Kentucky Historical Center

http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/

 

THOMAS D. CLARK CENTER FOR KENTUCKY HISTORY

http://www.kentuckytourism.com/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/1720/

 

Archives Research Room

http://kdla.ky.gov/researchers/Pages/visitingthearchives.aspx

 

Kentucky Military Museum & History

http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/kentucky-military-history-museum/

 

Kentucky Military History Museum

http://www.ohwy.com/ky/k/kymihimu.htm

 

In your e-mail of special New Year Greetings you mentioned that your grandfather was William Parsons.  Phyllis’s mother was Margaret Parsons I do not know if there is any connection but it could be possible you and she share ancestries.  Just thought it was interesting.

Cousin John

  • • ———————————–
    sent by Carolyn (herself)
    Image.jpeg &

West of the Salt : early Terhunes of Mercer County, Kentucky and their Dutch kin and Scots-Irish neighbors /

Bibliographic Record Display

  • Holdings Information

    Holdings Record Display
    • Database:Kentucky Historical Society-Library Catalog
    • Location:Library – General Stacks
    • Call Number: 929 T318t
    • Status:Available
    • Older Issues: 1,2, 3
  • Title:West of the Salt : early Terhunes of Mercer County, Kentucky and their Dutch kin and Scots-Irish neighbors / Paul & Barbara Terhune.
  • Author:Terhune, Paul.
  • Other Author(s):Terhune, Barbara.
  • Publisher:Debary (134 Florence Blvd.), Fla. : P. Terhune, c2011.
  • Description:3 v. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 29 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (sd., 4 3/4 in.)
  • Format:Book
  • Contents:v. 1 In the beginning
    Land patents and early settlers
    Second generation lands and their settlers
    Vanderveer/Vandivier settlers
    DeMotte family
    Stagg family
    Westerfields
    Van Arsdalls
    McAfees
    Banta/Bonta family
    Demaree/Demarest/des Marets family
    Joseph “Joe” Morgan
    Curry settlers
    Carnine family
    Smock family
    Comingore family
    Van Nuys family
    Dorland/Darland/Darling family
    Voorhees family
    Brewer/Brouwer family
    Terhunes
    Later generations of Terhunes
    Two 19th century Van Arsdall lines
    Later generations of Whitenecks
    Early churches & cemeteries
    Epilogue
    v.2 Maps
    v. 3 Terhune family
    Whiteneck family
    Cozine/Cosyn family
    Brewer-Brouwer family
    DeMotte family
    Stagg family
    Demarest-Demaree family
    Vanderveer-Vandivier
    Van Nuys
    Comingore family
    Banta family
    Smock
    Van Arsdall
    Gardner
    Index.
  • DatabaseKentucky Historical Society-Library Catalog
  • Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
  • Subjects:Terhune family.
    Mercer County (Ky.)–Genealogy.

*Persistent Link to this record:http://khscatalog.kyvl.org/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=51005

*Copy and paste link to a document for quicker access to this record in the future

  • ———————————–
    Family History Displays

Pam Ellingson, a librarian up in Lakewood Wisconsin, is one of our hardest working cousins! She is not only our webmaster but also volunteers as the family display chairperson at our gatherings every two years.  This year we are going to have a very special EXHIBITOR badge for each person who brings a family history display for the event.  This is one of the favorite and most educational things at each gathering, so put on your thinking/planning hats right now!  Here is Pam’s message – and we will remind you again before September – you can count on it. I am already working on a new display for my branch of the COZINE family — I want one of those badges!

  • sent by Pam Ellingson

It’s time to start planning a display for the Dutch Cousins Gathering 2015 (or dust off the one that you used at a previous gathering). It doesn’t have to be super fancy. You might want to contact a cousin and work on a joint project. I have been assured that there will be plenty of space for displays in Frankfort.

I am a visual person and enjoy and learn so much from these displays. Last summer I saw an exhibit of New York historic art by Len Tantillo. A beautiful book, “A Moment Past: L.F. Tantillo Paints New York History” was compiled from this exhibit.

All of the names of Dutch Cousins who register to exhibit a family history display by September 5, 2015 will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win  copy of this fantastic book.  All exhibitors will get a special ribbon to add to their name badge.

Please enter your plans to display on your registration form and specify space needed (1 table, 1/2 table or 1/3 table).

I’m looking forward to some great displays in 2015!

  • ———————————–
    sent by Thelma Little

I’m trying to  explain that Marytje SPRONG b:1705 was m: to Jan John Crownover Kouwenhoven, Conover b: 1703 ,both born and married at Brooklyn NY.

They were parents of John Crownover, Conover, van Kouwenoven b: 1746/7  died 1832 at  Straben,

buried  at  Low  Dutch Cem. at Conewego colony area Adams co. PA.

So no request  for changing or adding anything was intended regarding John CROWNER..

Just that his mother is Mary SPRONG  (not Mary COZINE as had been previously thought). Have checked that out by various postings regarding GABRIEL SPRONG, father of MARTJE SPRONG.

thank you for responding.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN: here is a hotlink to the memorial for John Cownover (many spellings)

short link: http://bit.ly/1v6tLlO

or long link: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=41&GScid=2386142&GRid=115652710&

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Letters 2/2/2015

sent by Bill Billings

Hi Carolyn.  I would like to be added to your mailing list.  I just recently discovered the website and have enjoyed reading some of the old letters.  My connection is through a relative of my wife.  Her 4xgreat grand mother was Sarah Vanarsdall who married Byrant Power in Bath County, Kentucky in 1819.  I have been having problems identifying her parents.  I would appreciate any information that anyone may have.  Thanks and I look forward to future newsletters.  Bill Billings

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sent by Jo Ellen Villines

Hi Carolyn,
Always love to receive Dutch letters from you!

I would like to connect with Bill Clark who wrote that he is a Smock descendent as am I.  You my or may not know that some of the Smock family are credited with being the settlers of Greenwood Indiana.

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sent by David Smock

Hello Carolyn,Although my genealogy work has been on hold since my illness, I continue to read the very interesting and informative Dutch Cousins newsletters and took special note of the following

submission by Diane Carkhuff.  Since my branch of the Smock family also lived in central Illinois (in and near Assumption), I would be interested in knowing what additional information Diane Carkhuff might have pertaining to her Smock family members and how they might be related to my Smock family.  Would you be good enough to identify me to Diane, inform her of my interest in sharing information with her, and give her my e-mail address.

I am delighted that the New Netherland Institute has taken cognizance of Low Dutch settlement in the “west” and of Dutch Cousins and has asked Vince Akers to speak at the next forum.  This is a significant development that puts Dutch Cousins in the top scholarship league, and all concerned merit our hearty thanks and congratulations.  Likewise, plans for the Dutch Cousins 2015 reunion sound grand.   With best regards,   David

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sent by Russell Gasero, CA, Reformed Churches of America

I am delighted to do this (come to the Dutch Cousins gathering in September). I can also bring greetings on behalf of the Reformed church. I’d be happy to rework Lnn’s sermon for the occasion if that would be helpful. William Linn was the first chaplain to the House of Representatives as well as a minister in the Reformed Church in America.

You can find a copy of the sermon on Goggle books at this link:

https://books.google.com/books?id=EihdAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA1&dq=william+linn+blessings+of+america&hl=en&sa=X&ei=lk3KVKSANsmbyASz1ILQBg&ved=0CB0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=william%20linn%20blessings%20of%20america&f=false

I look forward to meeting you and being a part of the re-dedication. As we move closer, I’ll see what can be done in the RCA to generate some interest as well.  Russell

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sent by Joan Murray

To Carolyn, et. al.

It’s exciting to have the Archivist from the Archives at the Reformed Church in America speak to us at Old Mud.  He mentioned Franklyn Frick.  I have files full of things Franklyn sent to me a long time ago.  Franklyn passed away on 26 February 2003 six months short of his 95th birthday.  He was a wonderful man and so willing to share everything he had.  Franklyn is buried in Yankton, SD at the Sacred Heart Cemetery.

I plan on having a table display and would like one table.  I will bring some of the material I received from Franklyn.   I have already confirmed with Janice Cozine that I am willing to handle the “Book Party” at the reunion.

In regard to Jack Taylor’s remarks above wondering whether the Dutch who traveled by the Ohio River were familiar with those going down to Shepherdstown, WVA and through the Gap, I can certainly say, that “yes they were.”   My ancestors Hendrick and Antje Demarest traveled by way of the River, while their oldest, Samuel and his wife, Dyna Dorland, traveled by way of WVA and through the Gap.  I suspect the reason may have been because Dyna was pregnant, and had a child during their wintering-over in WVA.

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sent by Beth Higgins

Hi Carolyn!  Thanks for all of your tireless efforts with the Dutch cousins.  SOMEDAY, I hope to join a reunion, but for now, I have school aged children and cannot get away at that time of year.  I do enjoy reading from the sidelines, as it were.  If you could pass my email along to Bill Clark, I would love to contact him.  My guess is that we are 3rd cousins.  If you think it’s appropriate for the newsletter, this is what I have to share:

I wanted to let everyone know that my great aunt, Mildred Smock, 94, passed away last May.  She was the last in our family with the Smock name and her lifetime spanned 4 generations.  She helped her father document some of his Smock family genealogy, but later in her life she was very focused on college scholarships and library/church fundraising. Her link to the Dutch cousins follows from Jacob Smock, Samuel Smock, Archibald Smock, Charles Smock (who married his first cousin Sarah C. Smock), to  A.Thomas Smock, her father.  Sarah C. Smock descends from Abraham Smock.  Mildred’s biography can be read at The Daily Nonpareil.

We found a tin-type of Sarah Catherine Smock in my great aunt’s basement that hadn’t been seen before.  I encourage everyone to share your pictures and information with your family before it’s too burdensome or late!!  And to keep it all in a well labeled, organized space!

Also, I think it is of interest that it’s my grandmother (Mildred’s sister) who is my Dutch cousin connection, and yet when I started to research my grandfather, Henry Plummer, I found that he and my grandmother were 6th cousins, twice.  He descended from the Lent (alternate Ryker surname) and Wiltsee families in New Amsterdam, but his families did not take the same route to Iowa as the Dutch cousins.  They travelled Pennsylvania, Illinois, Iowa and typically married non-Dutch.  Interestingly, the direct ancestors they share are both original immigrants. Fascinating stuff.

Thanks again for such a wonderful newsletter!

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sent by Thelma Little
Dear Carolyn;
Jim Cozines extensive research produced no possible Mary Cozine.
James Streeter Clarified  the MARYTJE and MARYs Cozine versus SPRONG.
with the compilation by– Mrs W.S. Conover  1969  of 680 Beaumont Ave, Harrodsburg KY compilation of 6 generations has the Mary Cozine .Gen’s 6,5,4 contain this error. with all of her resources. The surnames of: Kouwenhoven, and Van Kouwenhoven, and  and Covenhoven. and Conover.and Crownover d:1832.
Is on the headstone at the Low Dutch cemetery near Gettysburg Adams co PA.
Streeter supplied the Dorr manuscript with the  correctional footnotes for  Martje SPRONG.
Gabriel SPRONG as being her father. Mrs Dorr’s manuscript contains her sources
also. Dorothy  Koening did additional checking to verify Lammentje Covenhoven (bp: 1779 at DRC
in Straben. by Cornelius Cozine.). therefore Lammentje aka Amelia Conover Ferguson as daughter of John  Covenhoven   b: 1746/7 and Caty, Catherine Coevert.
Many more fam. trees and archives confirm when search  from Gabriel Sprong.
thanks for your support.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN:  Again, here’s a hotlink to the findagrave memorial for John Cownover/various spellings.
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=115652710
If you have the memorial number for his father, also naned John, who died 1761 in Bushwick, Long Island, New York, please send me his number and I can connect them.
Just FYI for any other descendants:

From the NYG&B Society Record
Vol 71 – 1940 pg 274 shows in the V an Kouwenhovn-Conover Family a 2nd marriage for John to a Maria Cozine
Vol 95 – 1964 pg 239 Additions & Corrections – you may want to read the whole page but in part it says –
Neither wife was Mary Cozine as appears in Bergen ESKC. One wife presumably the second, from the names of the children, was

Marytje Sprong, baptised Brooklyn, August 7, 1705, daughter of Gabriel Sprong and wife Geertruy, daughter of Dirck Janse Woertman.

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sent by Gerald Westerfield

Jacob Reeder Westerfield and my ancestor, Samuel Demarest Westerfield (b.25 Oct,1795 d.28 Aug,1827) were brothers.
I have a version of the family’s history dating back to about 1550 and will gladly share it with Katie. Please pass this info along as I do not have her e-mail address.

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sent by Robert Adlet

    • I recently came into possession of this book. It also contains info on Demaree and Banta lines. Of special interest is pgs 31-35 a letter to  G W Demaree from his brother D V Demaree which is a complete history of the Low Dutch Migration from Conewago to Ky and to Johnson Co., IN. I don’t know if this can be added to the newsletter as a PDF or if you can just include the letter I mentioned. I also have it attached to David Des Marest b. 1620 in my tree on ancestry.com
    • Robert Adlet
    • NOTE FROM CAROLYN – The booklet did not attach properly, it is called LIST FAMILY NOTES BY Howard List. If you want Robert to send you a copy, just send an email to me and I will forward it to him.  I have a copy of that booklet and was lucky enough to meet the author several years ago, because Margaret List (also spelled Lys, Lysbet) is my 5th great grandmother.  I had forgotten about the collateral families included.  Thanks for sharing this Robert!
    • ———————————–
      sent by Phyllis WesterfieldI  want to remind every one that we will have the Silent Auction same as last gathering.  BUT bigger and better this time, so everyone please take a moment to think about what you want to bring this year.  Let’s have a fun time with our silent auction.
      Please post int he Dutch Letters some things you plan to bring so we can be prepared to show them off – and take bids!
    • ———————————–
      sent by Cynthia VannAusdall
  • I know its been a long time since you’ve hear from me!  I plan on attending the Gathering this year.  Made my reservation!I belong to a “Van Arsdale” facebook group and was going to put the Gathering information on it in the hopes of attracting more “Vans”.  However when I use the www.DutchCousins.org link it doesn’t go anywhere and I did want to put in on the posting. (later email says she got it fixed.)I was going to put the information about the group, the gathering information and applicable web sites.  I can get to yours.
    • ———————————–
      sent by Jill VanOsdol BonarPlease add me to the email list.
      Simon Jansen Van Arsdalen is my ancestor.
      Grandfather is LeRoy VanOsdol
      Father is Kenneth R VanOsdol
    • ———————————–
      sent by David Smock
      One of my correspondents reported in 1983 that he had examined in the courthouse at Harrodsburg, Kentucky, the original marriage bond for Jacob Smock and Elizabeth Stephens, signed on 23 May 1807, by Jacob Smock with a crude “X – his mark,”  by Garret Cozine as bondsman, and witnessed by Thos. A Allin.Garret Cozine was a son of the Rev. Cornelius Cozine, whose son John Cozine married Annatie Smock.  Annatie Smock’s brother Jacob Smock married  1) Lemma van Arsdallen and married 2) Anna Banta, daughter of Pieter Banta and Elizabeth Cozine, sister of Gerrit Cozine.  Thus, there was a close family relationship between members of the Cozine and Smock families residing in Mercer County, Kentucky. I had a theory that Jacob Smock married 3) Elizabeth Stephens, but some of the facts do not fit, I have found no subsequent record of  the couple,  wonder whether a marriage actually took place, or if it did, whether it involved some other Jacob Smock who possibly removed from the area?My question is:  Does anyone know the identity of the Jacob Smock who signed the marriage bond or have any information about Elizabeth Stephens?[NOTE from Carolyn (herself): I have the genealogy a little different in my data base. Two of Rev. Cornelius Cozine’s eleven children married SMOCKs. I am pretty sure this is correct.
      * Garret Cozine’s BROTHER  Johannis/Jan/John Cozine married Anatie (legal papers in her adult life show her name HANNAH) SMOCK, dau of John Smock and Sara Fontaine, and
      * Garret Cozine’s SISTER Ante “Anne” Cozine married Barney SMOCK, son of Hendrick Smock and Maria Garrettse SCHENCK. and
      * Another sister Elizabeth COZINE married Peter BANTA.  Other than that my records agree with yours.  I do show that Peter Banta/Eliz Cozine’s dau Anne Banta married a Jacob Smock and
      * and that Jacob Smock married 3rd to Elizabeth STEPHENS. I have a transcription of the marriage license (I think you sent it to me).  Maybe one of the SMOCKS or the BANTAs on our Dutch Letters will know which Jacob Smock this is who married Elizabeth Stephens.
      The Jacob Smock who married Anne Banta was baptised at Conewago 27 May 1770. There is more than one Jacob Smock at Mercer County in this time period.
    • ———————————–
      sent by Joan Murray–About the BOOK TABLE at the Gathering in Frankfort Sept 25&26. – If you are coming to the Gathering and have published a book, we hope you will sign up for the Book Table display and be at the Book and Author Party.I am wondering how the Kentucky History Museum, where we are meeting, would feel about us asking book dealers from the area to come in and set up in the space we have reserved.  I am sure they have a museum shop which carries books and it would conflict with their business.  I think our chairmen who worked with them on contracting the space would have to deal with them on that issue.  I do know that the book dealer from Madison, IN did not seem to be selling much.  He was right across from me and I felt rather sorry for him sitting there. I’m hoping Vince had enough books left over last time, that he will agree to sell again.  His books were really selling well, and I am not surprised because they’d been out-of-print for quite a few years.
    • ———————————–

Letters 2/6/2015

Sent by Carolyn

all about the Gathering Sept 25-26

Dutch Cousins gathering coming soon!

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601. Thanks to Janice for getting me straightened out on the Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history all in Frankfort and close, but not the same.

Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away. (NOT right next to where we will be meeting as I thought previously.) –

SPEAKERS:

Friday Keynote speaker is FIRTH HARING FABEND, author of “New Netherland in a Nutshell”, “A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies” and other history books of interest to our group.

Saturday lunch keynote is GREG HUBER of near Allentown PA, a Dutch barn and house historian, co-author of the book “The new World Dutch Barn.” In addition, Greg is offering to organize a major tour of house and barns in Hunterdon and Somerset Counties NJ in the year 2017 and to give a talk or two on the greater architecture of NY and NJ.

CHARLIE WESTERFIELD, professional photographer and Dutch Cousin of Louisville KY will present a slide show called “One (Dutch) Man’s America”. It features beautiful photos, great music, and an extremely intelligent and entertaining live narrator.

VINCE AKERS has agreed to be our Saturday Dinner keynote. He is going to prepare a slide show and info about the history and restoration of the Old Mud Meetinghouse, with the assistance of his son.  So appropriate for the night before our rededication of the restored church and especially since we have Russell Gasero coming representing the Reformed Churches of America. Many of our cousins don’t even know the reason this building is so important to us. I plan to call Bill – who began the restoration back in 2000 and ask him to come so we can honor and thank him for his work.

OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE: On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and DEFINITELY a rededication. It is going to be a marvelous event. BE VERY PROUD!  Between 2005 and 2014  total contributions by Dutch Cousins to the HHS Old Mud Meetinghouse Restoration Fund came to $133,386. of which at least $76,000. was contributed by Vince Akers alone!

RUSSELL GASERO, an official of the Reformed churches of America, coming from New Brunswick NJ to help us celebrate the restoration of this wonderful 215-year- old Dutch treasure.

WORSHIP: Sunday worship at the Old Mud Meetinghouse is being planned by our Prez – John C. Westerfield, with his son Jeff coming to assist in the service.

VOLUNTEERS:  We can always use more volunteers in this all-volunteer Dutch army!

 

2017 COORDINATOR: Mr. Lynn Rogers of Columbus Ohio, who did such a good job planning, coordinating and narrating the tour to Pleasant at Madison in 2013, has agreed to be Coordinator for the 2017 gathering. He will pick the place and time and let us know. So the cousins will go on! We need a volunteer assistant to help Lynn with the details.  Let me know if this is something you would like to try.

NEWSLETTER: Denise Merideth Perry of Somerville, Tennessee, agreed to be the new Dutch Cousins Newsletter Editor!  Wow! we are moving on!  What a wonderful group of people to work with. Each of the Committee chairpersons need to send a little information for the newsletter, telling what you have planned for the gathering and what you need them to do.

PLANNING COMMITTEE 2015: Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, are working hard on the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.  More info will be coming soon, I AM still working on the schedule and registration form. Keep watching the Dutch Letters and our website www.DutchCousins.org.  We still need some helpers:

AUTHOR AND BOOK FAIR: Joan Murray of Palatine Illinois agreed to take care of signing up authors and advertising the books that will be available, so be sure to send a note (I will forward) if you have a book to show off and sell.  Author OR book must have a low Dutch connection.

Look at all these wonderful Volunteers!

REGISTRATION: Janice Cozine of KY is our queen!

HISTORIAN: Barbara Whiteside of Indiana agreed to continue keeping our history.

DISPLAYS: Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin is in charge of the Family Group displays, also our wonderful webmaster!

HOSPITALITY:  Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will serve coffee and bagels every morning

SILENT AUCTION: John & Phyllis Westerfield will collect items and handle the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, our own personal official Dutch Cousins pro photographer

Tee SHIRTS:  Missi Mercer and Barbie Hamman, Missi is our old friend and angel from Shelbyville 2007

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK – as my Dutch grandmother used to say.

We still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

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Sent by Anne Westerfield Brown

Would it be possible to link me with Gerald Westerfield?   I’d love to see the material he has.  My connection is through John Montfort Westerfield (b.1793).  He and Samuel were brothers, sons of Samuel and Catherine Montfort Westerfield.    Thanks!!

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Sent by Jim Cozine

I would love to have the “List Family Notes” from Robert Adlet pushed to me

I’ve only seen a few pages of it over the years.

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Sent by Mr Lynn Rogers

Carolyn- Could you put me in contact with both Jo Ellen Villines and Beth Higgins (Dutch letters 2 Feb 2015) as you did with Bill Clark? (We share Smock ancestors in Indiana 1806; I am trying to untangle the Jacob Smocks in PA & KY, including the Sgt.)

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Sent by William “Bill” Clark

Beth-We are cousins somewhat removed! My Smock line is through my mother. Her ancestry is Jacob, Samuel, Jacob ( who came to Marion Co IN in 1836, he was a brother of your Archibald), William H, and her father Alfred.

Bill C

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Sent by Susan Fuhr-Dunn

I am a novice searching for my VanArsdale roots. My great, great grandfather was James Thomas VanArsdale(1830-1901).His son Hugh McKee VanArsdale/Arsdall was the father of my grandmother, Lily Elizabeth VanArsdall.

I think JT’s father was Isaac and his mother Nancy “Polly” Smock. But the further back I go, I am lost in a sea of Cornelius O, A, B &C. Not to mention prolific VanArsdales, Terhunes and Vandiviers.  I know my roots are in Mercer County but I get lost in interesting side trips. Which of the many resources would you suggest I concentrate on?  Thank-you for any assistance.

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Sent by Betty Jean Willerton

Hi Carolyn,

I have tracked my husband’s Banta line on Ancestry.com. Wondered if I have connected to the right ancestor. Is there one person who could look over my records and advise me if there is a mistake?  I have:

Jacob Banta, b. 3 Apr 1782, Henry, Kentucky, d. 8 Oct 1861, Washington County, Indiana. He and his family are buried at Covenanter Cemetery at Salem, Washington, Indiana.  Jacob Banta married 4 Nov 1810, Harrison, Indiana to Sarah Davidson Yound, b. 10 Dec 1787, NC, d. 21 Feb 1862, Washington County, Indiana. She was the daughter of James J. Young (1756-1829) and Elizabeth Davidson (1764-1846).

Can anyone tell me the parents of Jacob Banta?

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Sent by Albert Cozine

do we have any amish cousins and what is the origan of our name is it dutch, german or what?

(NOTE from Carolyn – You are joking – right Albert?  The Cozine’s are definitely Low Dutch from The Netherlands. YOu may have some other nationalities mixed in there by marriage – but the name Cozine is Low Dutch. That’s why we are having the LOW DUTCH GATHERING of our Dutch Cousins this fall in Kentucky. Come join us and learn about your heritage.)

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Sent by David Smock

(NOTE from carolyn – I thought this very interesting Dutch family history and asked David for permission to put it in the Letters.) His reply: I am not sure that this item would be of very much general interest. However, if you wish to post it in Letters with my reservations, I have no real objection.

James (JACOBUS) SMOCK (2728), son of John Smock (272) and Sarah (Sally) Fonteyn, was bp 28 Sep 1783, Conewago DRC. 74 & 460  He removed to Mercer Co., Ky., presumably with his parents and other family members, in 1794.  Jacobus, or James, married 3 May 1806, Mercer Co., Ky., by Rev. Thomas Kyle, Charity Brewer74 b 5 Apr 1788. 428  The bondsman was Daniel Brewer. 292  It seems that James and his family removed to Indiana in 1824. An article in the Greenwood Gazette, states: “By 1824, the Smock brothers had convinced their brother James to move his family to ‘Smock’s Settlement.’ . . . The first post office was established on March 31, l928 at the George Noble Inn which was at the southwest corner of Madison and Fry Roads.  James Smock served as the first postmaster. . . . Greenwood was first known as Smocktown in honor of the Smocks, the first settlers.  The post office was established as Greenfield on May 31, 1828, and changed to Greenwood on March 6, l833. James Smock was the postmaster.” 465  James was one of the first elders of the Greenwood Presbyterian Church. 74 “The church was organized on December 31, 1825 in the home of John B. and Jane Brewer Smock.  There were fewer than ten members at the time.Garret Brewer and Rev. Isaac Reed donated land for the church, school and cemetery.  The property was located on the east side of Madion Avenue between Longdon and Noble Streets.  The Greenwood Presbyterian Church was the first church building erected in Johnson County. 465

James died 9 Feb 1830, and was buried in Greenwood, Ind. 74 His widow, Charity Brewer, married 2) 13 Jul 1831, Garrett Sorter, with whom she had several children. 74  Charity died 8 May 1860, in Greenwood, Ind. 74

  

Children of James Smock and Charity Brewer (Smock) 74 

John R. (27281) b 5 May 1807, Mercer Co., Ky., d 17 Feb 1869, Benton, Iowa, m 12 (or 15) Sep 1829, Johnson Co., Ind., by Rev. Jeremiah Hill, Mary (Polly) Voorhies, b 10 (or 15) May 1807, Mercer Co, Ky., d 1893, Hartley, Iowa, buried Marcus, Iowa. She was a daughter of John Voorhies and Hannah Titsworth. Mary was a sister of Harvey Voorhies, who married Jane Smock (27283).

Harvey (27282)died in infancy.

Jane (27283)b 9 Apr 1811, Mercer Co., Ky., d 9 May l854, Greenwood, Ind., m 21 Sep 1837, Johnson Co., Ind., Harvey P. Voorhies, b c 1816, Mercer Co., Ky. Harvey m 2) 14 Jun 1859, Mary J. Cozine. He served as a sergeant in Co. C, 71st Reg., 6th Cavalry, in the Civil War. He d 30 Apr 1864, of measles, in Nashville, Tenn., where is was buried. 428 Nashville. Harvey was a brother of Mary Voorhies, who married John R. Smock (27281).

Abraham W. (27284)b c 1813, Mercer Co., Ky.   

Sarah “Sally” (27285)b 1815, Mercer Co., Ky., d 5 Jan 1846, Johnson Co., Ind., m 13 Aug 1835, Fielding Ransdell Voorhies (later spelled Voris), b 16 Jul 1810, Mercer Co., Ky., d 31 Aug 1887, Vinton, Iowa, son of Jacob Voris and Jael Ransdell.

David Brewer (27286)  b 8 Jul 1817, presumably Mercer Co., Ky., d 5 Sep 1844 (or 1845), 428 m 30 Mar 1837, Ann B. Smock (ADD GIN #), b 8 Aug 1815, d 17 Dec l904, ner Vinton, Iowa, daughter of John B. Smock (27241) and Jane Brewer.  Ann m 2) 23 Jun 1846, Fielding R. Voris, widower of Sarah Smock (27285).

James B. (27287)b c 1820, d May 1847, m 20 Nov 1843, Nancy R. Freeman, b 25 Jun 1816, d 3 Mar 1894, daughter of Moses Freeman and Martha (Patsy) Covert.  Nancy m 2) 28 Feb 1851, James C. Tilson.

Martha Ann (27288) b 26 Jan 1824, probably Mercer Co., Ky., d 10 Jan 1880, Vinton, Iowa, m 10 Apr 1845 (or 29 Mar 1845), Johnson Co., Ind., Lewis Wood St. John, b 5 Jun l825, Pleasant Ridge, Ohio, d 20 Oct 1907, Garrison, Iowa.  Lewis m 2) _____, who outlived him.

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Sent by Carolyn Leonard

Question for Brewer/Brouwer researchers:  I am curious about Charity Brewer b. 1788 who married James (Jacobus) SMOCK (above) – Marriage bondsman was Daniel Brewer.  (I have Charity the dau of John Brewer & Jannetta Vanarsdale,)

My Mary D. Brewer (b. 1755) married Cornelius (Jr) Cozine 1775 Conewago. Mary was the daughter of Daniel Brewer born 1719.

Do you think it is the same Daniel Brewer?

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Sent by Pam Ellingson

I found this lovely Dutch shoemaker bell ornament when I was in Schenectady last summer. He will be going into the silent auction at the upcoming gathering.

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Sent by Carolyn (herself) & Lilly Martin

Lilly Martin recommended this website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brouwergenealogydata/

This is not the usual kind of post.  Please say Prayers NOW for our Dutch Cousin Lilly and her family who live in Syria. The city where they live, Latakia, Syria, is now being bombed.  It is a long story but the USA is responsible.  Lilly is a descendant of the Brouwers (name later evolved to Brewer) in Gowanus (now Brooklyn) New Amsterdam (now New York) Adam Brouwer owned a flour mill in the Dutch Colony there in 1690.

The William B. Bogardus Collection

I am so sad about this and feeling helpless.

Begin forwarded message:

From: “Lilly Martin Sahiounie”

Subject: Re: from Lilly

Date: February 5, 2015 11:52:04 AM CST

Dear Carolyn,

Today was the worst in Latakia. 6 missiles strikes in one day, Feb 5. 2015. I don’t have death or injury info yet. The internet is DOWN, we don’t know why. You will receive this later, as soon as internet service resumes.

Damascus was the WORST. They have been hit by over 100 mortar strikes. They all came from the area called DOUMA. These are all Free Syrian Army. This is not ISIS, not Al Qaeda and not Jibhat al Nusra. This is all from Free Syrian Army, who are still fully supported by USA. The hospitals in Damascus are over flowing. The TV news channels are showing the worst scenes in Damascus.

God help us.

Best regards,

Lilly Martin

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Letters 2/17/2015

Sent by Carolyn

about the Gathering Sept 25-26

Dutch Cousins gathering coming soon!

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can!

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601. Thanks to Janice for getting me straightened out on the Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history all in Frankfort and close, but not the same.

Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away. (NOT right next to where we will be meeting as I thought previously.) –

SPEAKERS:

Friday Keynote speaker is FIRTH HARING FABEND, author of “New Netherland in a Nutshell”, “A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies” and other history books of interest to our group.

Saturday lunch keynote is GREG HUBER of near Allentown PA, a Dutch barn and house historian, co-author of the book “The new World Dutch Barn.” In addition, Greg is offering to organize a major tour of house and barns in Hunterdon and Somerset Counties NJ in the year 2017 and to give a talk or two on the greater architecture of NY and NJ.

CHARLIE WESTERFIELD, professional photographer and Dutch Cousin of Louisville KY will present a slide show called “One (Dutch) Man’s America”. It features beautiful photos, great music, and an extremely intelligent and entertaining live narrator.

VINCE AKERS has agreed to be our Saturday Dinner keynote with, “A Photographic History of the Old Mud Meetinghouse”  He is going to prepare a slide show and info about the history and restoration of the Old Mud Meetinghouse, with the assistance of his son. Vince has culled historic photos from 1900 to the present. He has copies from several photo archives like the Historic American Buildings Survey in the early 1930s.  His own photos cover the last 40 years beginning in 1972.  So appropriate for the night before our rededication of the restored church.

OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE: On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and DEFINITELY a rededication. It is going to be a marvelous event. BE VERY PROUD!  Between 2005 and 2014  total contributions by Dutch Cousins to the HHS Old Mud Meetinghouse Restoration Fund came to $133,386. of which at least $76,000. was contributed by Vince Akers alone!

RUSSELL GASERO, an official of the Reformed churches of America, coming from New Brunswick NJ to help us celebrate the restoration of this wonderful 215-year- old Dutch treasure.

WORSHIP: Sunday worship at the Old Mud Meetinghouse is being planned by our Prez – John C. Westerfield, with his son Jeff coming to assist in the service.

VOLUNTEERS:  We can always use more volunteers in this all-volunteer Dutch army!

 

2017 COORDINATOR: Mr. Lynn Rogers of Columbus Ohio, who did such a good job planning, coordinating and narrating the tour to Pleasant at Madison in 2013, has agreed to be Coordinator for the 2017 gathering. He will pick the place and time and let us know. So the cousins will go on! We need a volunteer assistant to help Lynn with the details.  Let me know if this is something you would like to try.

NEWSLETTER: Denise Merideth Perry of Somerville, Tennessee, agreed to be the new Dutch Cousins Newsletter Editor!  Wow! we are moving on!  What a wonderful group of people to work with. Each of the Committee chairpersons need to begin now preparing a little information for the newsletter, telling what you have planned for the gathering and what you need them to do.

PLANNING COMMITTEE 2015: Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, are working hard on the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.  More info will be coming soon, I AM still working on the schedule and registration form. Keep watching the Dutch Letters and our website www.DutchCousins.org.  We still need some helpers:

AUTHOR AND BOOK FAIR: Joan Murray of Palatine Illinois agreed to take care of signing up authors and advertising the books that will be available, so be sure to send a note (I will forward) if you have a book to show off and sell.  Either the author OR book must have a low Dutch connection.

Look at all these wonderful Volunteers!

REGISTRATION: Janice Cozine of KY is our queen!

HISTORIAN: Barbara Whiteside of Indiana agreed to continue keeping our history.

DISPLAYS: Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin is in charge of the Family Group displays, also our wonderful webmaster!

HOSPITALITY:  Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will serve coffee and bagels every morning

SILENT AUCTION: John & Phyllis Westerfield will collect items and handle the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, our own personal official Dutch Cousins pro photographer

Tee SHIRTS:  Missi Mercer and Barbie Hamman, Missi is our old friend and angel from Shelbyville 2007

Harrodsburg & Old Mud rep: Amalie Preston

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK – as my Dutch grandmother used to say.

We still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

Certificate and award creator

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Sent by Jack L. Taylor of Texas

 

I recently made another trip to the New York Holland Society. Two people were maning the desk. One was a young lady who was reared in The Netherlands, so she can help with translating Dutch.   The other was a man named WESTERVELT. He may be the one listed below as the treasurer. I told hiabout the many WESTERFIELDs in the KY Dutch Cousins group. He was not aware of his KY WESTERIELD cousins. 

 

The present President of the NY Holland Society is well known to us who attended the last KY Dutch Cousin Reunion

 

President Dr. Robert R. Schenck. Treasurer Donald Westervelt.

 

The following link is to the New York Holland Society Internet Site.  At the site click “membership” for an extensive list of surnames.  Each surname has a link to genealogy for that name.

 

http://www.hollandsociety.com/index1.html

.

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Sent by David Smock

Can you identify the Cornelius Cozine who was the guardian of the children of John Smock and Ann Banta?

 

As of 1821, Cornelius Cozine was the guardian of John and Nancy Smock, heirs of Jacob Smock, per Mercer Co., Ky. Wills, Estate of Jacob Smock, Oct. Court 1821.

458

Further checking shows that this Cornelius Cozine(was not the son of the Rev. Cornelius Cozine, since he died 23 May 1787, in Harrodsburg. (Jim Cozine, Finding Our Woodoen Shoes, My Cozine Family History & Album with Genealogy, Part I.) Another reference work states that the will was probated on 23 May 1787, in Mercer Co., Ky. (Cozÿne / Cozine, Vol. 1, compiled and printed by Mrs. E. T. Dorr, p, 35.)  To sum up what I found in Mrs. Dorr’s booklet, the Rev. Cornelius Cozine and Antje Staats had 11 children, 7 daughters and 4 sons (p. 35.)  Each of the four sons had a son named Cornelius.  Following is a summary of information on each of them:

  1.  Peter, bp 3 Sep 1740,Readington, NJ, d 26 Oct 1779, Conewago, m Williamtje Wyckoff (p. 35).  Their son Corneliuswas b 28 May 1770, Conewago. In 1781, the court in Conewago appoints James Brinkerhoff, of Mount Pleasant Township, as guardian for the four minor children of Peter Cozine, deceased. His widow remarried in 1780 in Readington Township, NJ, Abraham Voorhies (pp. 39, 41 & 42).
  1. Cornelius, bp 14 Jan 1753, Flatbush, LI, will probated 23 May 1787, Mercer Co., Ky., m Marya Brouwer (p. 35).  Cornelius’ will names sons:  Daniel and Cornelius, and daughters Anney and Sarah. (p. 46).
  1.  John, bp 9 May 176@, Raritan, NJ, d before 1835, m Annetie Smock (p. 63).  Their son Corneliusis believed to have died before 1835 (p. 63).
  1.  Garret, bp 16 Nov 1766, NJ, d 23 Sep 1849, will probated in Hendricks Co, Ind., m Margaret List (Lyst) (p. 66).  Their son Corneliuswas bp 12 Nov 1786, Conewago, d 1838, Mercer Co., Ky. (p. 66).

If you cannot identify the Cornelius Cozine in question, perhaps someone in Dutch Cousins could.  Someone might also know when Ann Banta died.

{NOTE: FROM CAROLYN – I give up!  Maybe Jim Cozine can help.}

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Sent by Lilly Martin

(question posted earlier) My Mary D. Brewer (b. 1755) married Cornelius (Jr) Cozine 1775 Conewago. Mary was the daughter of Daniel Brewer born 1719.  Do you think it is the same Daniel Brewer?

**************************

Dear Carolyn,

Charity Brewer 1789-1860, daughter of Johannes Brouwer and Jennie Van Arsdale.  The Daniel Brewer who was Charity’s bondsman was her brother Daniel Brewer b. 1784.

Here is the ancestry of Charity Brewer Smock:

Charity Brewer b. 1789

Johannes Brouwer b. 1761 NJ

Daniel Brouwer b. 1719 NJ

Abraham Brouwer b. 1675 NY

Pieter Brouwer b. 1646 Manhattan, aka New Amsterdam, aka NYC.

Adam Brouwer b. about 1620, of Cologne (now called Germany), married in New Amsterdam 1642, married Magdalena Verdon 1645. Finally settled at Gowanus, Kings Co, NY (aka Brooklyn).  He is our immigrant ancestor.

Pieter Brouwer was the eldest son and first born child of Adam and Magdalena.  Adam probably was not Dutch, but German (thought German did not exist then).  Adam’s name may have actually been Adolf, or Adolphus.  His descendants used the name Adolphus many times in the early generations, and we think this was in honor of Adam.  He may have adapted his name to Adam for some reason.  He arrived in Manhattan as a soldier in the employ of the Dutch West India Company.  He had served in Brazil, and then came to New Amsterdam, he had been a mercenary soldier.  He built the first tidewater Flour Mill in North American history.  His Mill remained in the family until sold in 1798.

Thanks to David Smock for the children of Charity Brewer Smock, I did not have those previously.

(NOTE: FROM Carolyn – Adam may have been German, but he lived near the Dutch in Bushwich, Long Island; and his descendants  REALLY liked us – LOL.

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Sent by Frank Cooper

Carolyn: The Feb 6 2015 newsletter contained a request from Susan Fuhr-Dunn for information on her Low Dutch ancestors (Vanarsdales & Smocks). I would be more than happy to share what I have on them, if you care to give her my contact information. And thanks so much for all you do for the Dutch Cousins. I’m afraid my traveling days are pretty much over, but I can still enjoy the fellowship through the newsletters. Bless you! Frank Cooper.

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Sent by Marilyn Douglas, NNI

Also, anybody who has links to sites with research materials connected to Reformed Church congregations, please send those links to me at jbrumm@nbts.edu.

Call for proposals the Reformed Church Center’s 2015-16 fellowships. Application materials should be up on nbts.edu shortly. In the meantime, interested parties may contact me atjbrumm@nbts.edu.

* If you do not receive De Nieu Nederlanse Marcurius in paper copy, please consider becoming a member of the New Netherland Institute. email Marilyn Douglas *

From New Netherland to Empire State: New York Furniture

Go to: www.winterthur.org/furnitureforum

 

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Sent by Jonathan Demotte

Please add me to your mailing list.  I’m a seventh generation descendant of Laurens DeMotte, through Johannes and Anna Cozine DeMotte.  I recently visited the DeMotte / Banta family cemetary in Cove Spring, Kentucky near Harrodsburg where they are buried.  Their oldest son, my great great great grandfather Lawerence, moved to Pike County in Southern Indiana in aproximately 1815.

Lawrence DeMOTTE #4501 (144.Johannes4, 37.Laurens3, 5.Dirck2, 1.Michiel1) born 3 Sep 1794, Harrodsburg, Mercer Co.,  KY., Occupation Farmer, married 11 Nov 1819, in Pike CO., IN, Phoebe BANTA #4509, born 7 Apr 1799, Mercer Co.,  KY, (daughter of Jacob BANTA #4517 and Mary _____ #4518) died 12 Dec 1854, IN.  We have a rich family history and I’m glad to be in your company.

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Sent by Lynn Rogers

Carolyn-

In the file “The Westerfield Family” attached to a recent Dutch Letter, there is a quote from John Ryker’s RW pension claim R9129, “In the month of __ 1781 went with a party of men under Floyd Whittaker to Bullets Lick to bring back families defeated and massacred by the Indians (such as survived) while moving from Beargrass to Harrodsburgh, massacre was at Clear Station. Went on 2nd trip to bury the dead. Distance not now recollected, suppose it was fifteen miles. Time occupied in going both trips was about 3 or 4 days.”  In my transcript there is an “and” between “Floyd” and “Whittaker.”  Quite some time back, I tried to follow uncle John’s geography and calendar, but had to give up.  In the Louisville SAR library, I did find “Clear’s Station (1783), on Clear Run near Hubers, four miles north of Shepherdsville near Blue Lick Gap.”  I think that I remember there was a RR station at/near Hubers.  I will share my map if it ever re-emerges from my phile.  John’s father was killed at Floyd’s Defeat, and his brother, Gerardus, my ancestor, moved to Jefferson County IN; the 2013 Dutch Cousins bus paused at the cemetery where he is buried.  Note that the dates do not agree.

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Sent by Marilyn Douglas, NNI

“Peter Stuyvesant’s Guide to Style: What to Wear in the Seventeenth Century,” a lecture on the clothing of the Dutch colony of New Netherland will be presented at 1:00 pm on Saturday at Crailo State Historic Site, 9 ½ Riverside Avenue, Rensselaer, NY.

Anne Matusiewicz will discuss colonists’ dress styles as well as resources for researching and recreating their clothing.

Matusiewicz has been researching and reproducing historic clothing for more than a decade and has written on the topic and lectured on New Netherland at the Textile History Forum.

Admission will be $5.00, $4.00 for Friends of Fort Crailo. For more information, or for reservations, call 518-463-8738.

Thanks Marilyn

Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President

New Netherland Institute

note from Carolyn:  Oh I would LOVE to see that! –

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Sent by

judy cassidy

To the Cousin who was seeking to figure out the Vanarsdale men who used initials vs spelling out their names. Lliving in Mercer Co., were Cornelius Abraham Brewer Vanarsdale or C. A. B. Vanarsdale oven 1772, son of Abraham Simon Vanarsdale and Antje Pierle, moved from Conewago to Hampshire Co., VA with his parents and then to Mercer Co., He married Maria Brewer d/o Abraham Brewer and Sarah Van Orden, Their son was Abraham Brewer Cornellious or A. B. C. Vanarsdale born 1802, his wife Charity G. Ternune. They owned Vanarsdale’s Milllocated near Boahn Pike NW of Harrodsburg.

Cornelius C. Vanarsdale, wifes Catherine Huff and Ida B. Vories, were the parents of Abram. B., Simon and Jackson Vanarsdale, they were distillers and attended the New Providence Presbyterian Church in McAfee, Mercer Co.. The Vanarsdale distillery was established in 1866 along the Meaux Creek near the Salt River, 9 Miles NW of Harrodsburg.

There was also a Cornelius O. Vanarsdale of the same generation who I believe came directly from New Jersey in the 1800’s.

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Letters 3/18/2015

Sent by Carolyn

about the Gathering Sept 25-26

Dutch Cousins gathering coming soon!

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center. (NOT right next to where we will be meeting as I thought previously.)

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601. Thanks to Janice for getting me straightened out on the Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history all in Frankfort and close, but not the same. We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication, Moday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open only for us from 10 to 3.

– The Martin F. Schmidt Research Library is located upstairs in the same building.  Hours of operation are Wed, 10am to 4pm , Thurs, 10am to 8pm, Fri & Sat, 10 am to 5 pm.  A copier will be available and the copies are .15 each except for Microfilm copies which are .30 each and we can feel free to bring iPads, phones, laptops, tablets etc. to access any available info at no cost. They are happy to run a tab and we can pay at the end of the event. Parking is located in front of building off Broadway Street in the old railroad depot lot. Parking is limited so car pooling is highly recommended. The Capitol City Museum, 325 Ann St., next door to KHS is free. The Paul Sawyer Pubic Library where we can also research is down the street a couple blocks,  M-TH. 9am-8pm, Fri. 9am-6pm, Sat.9am-5pm and Sun. 1pm-5pm.

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SPEAKERS:

Friday Keynote speaker is FIRTH HARING FABEND, author of “New Netherland in a Nutshell”, “A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies” and other history books of interest to our group.

Saturday lunch keynote is GREG HUBER of near Allentown PA, a Dutch barn and house historian, co-author of the book “The new World Dutch Barn.” In addition, Greg is offering to organize a major tour of house and barns in Hunterdon and Somerset Counties NJ in the year 2017 and to give a talk or two on the greater architecture of NY and NJ.

kentucky fiddling!  As a special treat for the Cousins on Saturday night from 6 pm to 7 pm we will be entertained by MISS KENTUCKY 2015, presenting Kentucky music on the violin.  A little dinner music!  Wow!  We are so lucky  – and Steve and Heather are sponsoring this so it won’t cost the cousins.

CHARLIE WESTERFIELD, professional photographer and Dutch Cousin of Louisville KY will present a slide show called “One (Dutch) Man’s America”. It features beautiful photos, great music, and an extremely intelligent and entertaining live narrator.

VINCE AKERS has agreed to be our Saturday Dinner keynote with, “A Photographic History of the Old Mud Meetinghouse”  He is going to prepare a slide show and info about the history and restoration of the Old Mud Meetinghouse, with the assistance of his son. Vince has culled historic photos from 1900 to the present. He has copies from several photo archives like the Historic American Buildings Survey in the early 1930s.  His own photos cover the last 40 years beginning in 1972.  So appropriate for the night before our rededication of the restored church.

OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE: On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and DEFINITELY a rededication. It is going to be a marvelous event. BE VERY PROUD!  Between 2005 and 2014  total contributions by Dutch Cousins to the HHS Old Mud Meetinghouse Restoration Fund came to $133,386. of which at least $76,000. was contributed by Vince Akers alone!

RUSSELL GASERO, an official of the Reformed churches of America, coming from New Brunswick NJ to help us celebrate the restoration of this wonderful 215-year- old Dutch treasure.

WORSHIP: Sunday worship at the Old Mud Meetinghouse is being planned by our Prez – John C. Westerfield, with his son Jeff coming to assist in the service.

VOLUNTEERS:  We can always use more volunteers in this all-volunteer Dutch army!

 

2017 COORDINATOR: Mr. Lynn Rogers of Dayton, Ohio, who did such a good job planning, coordinating and narrating the tour to Pleasant at Madison in 2013, has agreed to be Coordinator for the 2017 gathering. He will pick the place and time and let us know. So the cousins will go on! We need a volunteer assistant to help Lynn with the details.  Let me know if this is something you would like to try.

NEWSLETTER: Denise Merideth Perry of Somerville, Tennessee, agreed to be the new Dutch Cousins Newsletter Editor!  Wow! we are moving on!  What a wonderful group of people to work with. Each of the Committee chairpersons need to begin now preparing a little information for the newsletter, telling what you have planned for the gathering and what you need them to do.

PLANNING COMMITTEE 2015: Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, are working hard on the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky.  More info will be coming soon, I am still working on the schedule and registration form. Keep watching the Dutch Letters and our website www.DutchCousins.org.  We still need some helpers:

AUTHOR AND BOOK FAIR: Joan Murray of Palatine Illinois agreed to take care of signing up authors and advertising the books that will be available, so be sure to send a note (I will forward) if you have a book to show off and sell.  Either the author OR book must have a low Dutch connection.

Look at all these wonderful Volunteers!

REGISTRATION: Janice Cozine of KY is our queen!

HISTORIAN: Barbara Whiteside of Indiana agreed to continue keeping our history.

DISPLAYS: Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin is in charge of the Family Group displays, also our wonderful webmaster!

HOSPITALITY:  Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will serve coffee and bagels every morning

SILENT AUCTION: John & Phyllis Westerfield will collect items and handle the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, our own personal official Dutch Cousins pro photographer

Tee SHIRTS:  Missi Mercer and Barbie Hamman, Missi is our old friend and angel from Shelbyville 2007

Harrodsburg & Old Mud rep: Amalie Preston

GREETERS:  ROD DEMPSEY! (but we still need a few more)

OFFICERS: We need officer candidates; 2-year term, no pay but lots of fun.  If you are willing and able to take any of the elected officer positions, please hit reply and let me know ASAP. Please consider placing your name in nomination for a position. We’d like to have more than one for each position. Please do not nominate anyone without permission and an acknowledgment that the person is willing to serve (including yourself). We need people who will remain active, posting and responding to emails, willing to pitch in and stretch their limits! We need cousins who LOVE their Dutch ancestry and wear it with pride.

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK – as my Dutch grandmother used to say.

We also still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

Certificate and award creator

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Sent by Mr Lynn Rogers

Carolyn-

fyi.  Not a biggie, but I live in Dayton OH, not Columbus, which you have had in the letters.

NOTE from Carolyn:  OMG – I apologize and have corrected!

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Sent by Rodney Dempsey

Carolyn, please keep me on the mailing list. I am sending a copy of this email to other DeMotte’s to see if they want to be added. Some probably are on the mailing list. I am asking my Sister Mary to extract the DeMotte article and send it to all the Dempsey cousins. Hopefully some may be interested in coming to Frankfort for the gathering of the Dutch Cousins.

My Brother in Law, Dennis Gudorf has accumulated a pretty thorough DeMotte History. He and Susan have a son named Jonathan,living in England. Please send me the email address of the the Jonathan Demotte that submitted the letter in this isssue. Dennis Gudorf and I would like to contact him to compare notes on the Demotte geneology.

I would love to have my Sister, Mary Bruner send out the DeMotte history to her mailing list of our family. They all need to know of their Dutch Ancestory and that they qualify to become members of the Sons or Daughters (SAR or DAR) of the American Revolution.  You will be properly credited for the content of our Newsletters.

All of our family has Dutch DNA. It could be that scientists in the future may find a common propensity for certain diseases that we Dutch cousins share. Cancer, maybe. I know you, Mary Bruner, Susan Gudorf and I have had cancer. Maybe we Dutch could use Claude Westerfield’s voluminous Dutch family directory for a survey of how extensive the disease is among our Cousins and let some University doing DNA research use our information to help us to take measures to protect ourselves.

I volunteer to be a greeter or do anything else you may want me to help with at the Reunion. Back in1965-67 I was the Executive Vice President of the Frankfort Chamber and also volunteer Vice President of the Frankfort Jaycees. There may be a few ancient people who remember me that I can promote the Reunion to via the State Journal.

One of my best friends is Beth DeJong Avent. He Father was a Dutch Reformed Missionary who preached in Appalachian KY. She, hopefully will be interested in attending. Her Husband, John, is a CPA, with an office facing the History Center. He may be able to provide us with a prime parking spot.  The Avents would be a great addition to our Dutch Cousins. Maybe Beth knows others with Dutch heritages that she can tell about our upcoming meeting.

Carolyn, you do a GREAT job keeping all of we Dutch Cousins chickens in the same barnyard, under your watchful Mother Hen wings. Reading you emails is very exciting to me. I really enjoy what you do and applaud you mightily for all the research you provide for us as the Clearinghouse for the Dutch in America.

Respectfully,

Rod  Dempsey

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Sent by Jack Taylor

Recording of presentations at the Dutch Cousins Reunion

 

If wanted and permission is given by the speaker and leadership I can audio record presentations at the next Dutch Cousins Reunion.  I could also do a video.  But, I could not do both at the same time.  If there is someone who has experience in video or audio recording contact me directly we can discuss the technology involved.

 

I have the equipment. There would be no cost for my part in such a project.

 

Good audio requires a microphone that is placed at optimal distance from the mouth of the speaker.  If a video camera alone is used it is difficult to get good audio. Consider how many audio, video, lighting, editors, etc. are credited at the end of a movie that are involved in making a professional movie.

(NOTE from Carolyn:  That sounds like a GREAT idea to me, Jack. A video recording online sounds even better! Any volunteers to help Jack with this project?)

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Sent by David Smock

Unless I missed it, would you please insert the following query in the Dutch Cousins newsletter?  Thanks.

Ann Banta, daughter of Peter Banta and Elizabeth Cozine, was the second wife of Jacob Smock, bp 27 May 1770, Conewago, son of John Smock and Sara “Sally” Fonteyn.  Jacob Smock signed a bond to marry Ann Banta on 20 Oct 1796, in Mercer Co., Ky.  They had several children, the last one being Nancy, b 27 Nov 1806, Mercer Co., Ky.   QUESTION: When did Ann Banta die?

(NOTE FROM CAROLYN – Ann Banta SMOCK, we have some COMINGOs on this list I know, I think Jacob and Anne Smock’s daughter Elizabeth married Henry R. Comingo on 26 Jan 1815 in Mercer County. So maybe the Comingos may have some info on Ann? )

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Sent by Bill Davidson

Carolyn,  the UEL newsletter for 1 March 2015 mentions a  Dutch Loyalist (Am.Rev.) Andres Ten Eyck.

There was a query about Dutch Loyalists a month or two ago.

NOTE: THE UEL Newsletter is much too long to quote, but you can learn more at

 Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/UELAC

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

We are looking for volunteers for this all-volunteer army of Dutch Cousins of Kentucky!

We need officer candidates; 2-year term, no pay but lots of fun.  Any volunteers?

We need people who will remain active, posting and responding to emails, willing to pitch in and stretch their limits! We need cousins who LOVE their Dutch ancestry and wear it with pride. We would like to see some new people taking responsibility and indeed we do have some new people stepping up to the plate – So excited about that.

Elected officers:  President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer

We need helpers:

Greeters

Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

Blessings, carolyn

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Willempte Wyckoff was raised at her father’s “Mountain Farm” 3 or 4 miles from Whitehouse in Hunterdon Co., NJ. Willeptje kept a record of her family. It was written in Dutch and about 7 pages long. These pages have been pasted into a historical scrapbook prepared some years ago for the Readington Reformed Dutch Church in NJ. It lists her four children by Peter Cozine who were all baptized at the Conewago Colony, and 6 children by Abraham Voorhees, her second husband, of Hunterdon Co., NJ.

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Did you hear my latest escapade? I am laid up with a broken leg for the next 8 weeks.  Have been telling people I was skydiving, which sounds a lot more interesting than what actullly happened – tripped on a  rug and fell in the garage.  So maybe God said — I fixed it so you could stay at home and finish that  book!

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Sent by Vince Akers

“A Photographic History of the Old Mud Meetinghouse and Its Preservation” ?  Sound OK?  I’ve collected and taken many hundreds of photos of Old Mud.  Historic photos date from around 1900 and have been culled from newspapers and several photo archives like the Historic American Buildings Survey in the early 1930s.  My own photos cover the last 40 years beginning in 1972, just prior to the 1970s restoration work.  There are a good many photos of the 1970s restoration from the Harrodsburg Historical Society files.  I also have several hundred of Bill Faulconer’s photos of the 2000-2003 restoration work when the building was jacked up on steel beams so the rotted sill plates could be removed and replaced.  Goals of the presentation will be to show the unique way Old Mud was constructed, how it was modified over the years, how it was about to fall apart in 2000 and how we have restored it to last another couple centuries.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN (HERSELF) – Sounds wonderful to me!

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Sent by New Netherland Institute

RECENTLY PUBLISHED: TWO ADDITIONAL BOOKS IN DUTCH AMERICANA

“EIGHT HISTORIC DUTCH AMERICAN FAMILIES”, 2015 Kindle Edition.

“FIFTEEN HISTORIC AND CONTEMPORARY DUTCH AMERICAN FAMILIES”, 2015 Kindle Edition

The first book replaces:

“TEN PROMINENT DUTCH AMERICAN FAMILIES”,

which has been withdrawn from publication.

THE ABOVE TWO BOOKS ARE THE LAST IN THE SERIES ON PROMINENT DUTCH AMERICANS. No more are planned.

available at Amazon.com

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Under the Shad Moon, Chwame Giscuch, the Lenape New Year, Sunday, March 29, 2015, 1-5 pm.

For this event, archaeologist and author Dr. Meta Janowitz will give an illustrated talk at 1:30 pm on Sara Roelofse, a remarkable woman who lived in remarkable times. Born in Amsterdam, she came as a young child to New Netherland (1630) where she came into contact with settlers from many European countries and members of both the Lenape and Iroquois peoples, as well as enslaved Africans. She married at a young age and raised nine children while acting, when the occasion required it, as a translator and cultural mediator between Europeans and Americans. During her lifetime New Amsterdam and New Netherland experienced wars and two changes in government but her family remained intact. We know about her official activities from brief entries in government documents and her domestic life from even briefer accounts in other sources, but we can piece together a picture of her life and influence from these and from artifacts excavated at the site where she and her first husband, Hans Kierstede, and later her daughter Blandina Bayard lived.

Some documents indicate that Oratam, sachem of the Hackensacksgave Sara 2,260 acres in what is now Ridgefield Park, Teaneck and Bogota, NJ. Blandina later established a trading post in Mahwah. Dr. Janowitz participated in the African Burial Ground project in lower Manhattan.

3:00 pm: Chief Dwaine Perry of the Ramapough Lenape Indian Nation will speak.

Historian Kevin Wright, author of 1609: A Country That Was Never Lost, will follow with an illustrated talk entitled The Peach War of 1655. In keeping with the Lenape New Year, his talk explores a little known chapter in Bergen County history, illuminating the relationship between its Native American inhabitants and Dutch settlers. The talk reviews the events of September 15, 1655, when 64 canoes, carrying 500 warriors from ten Indian tribes, landed on the western shore of Manhattan island, instigating a destructive conflict misnamed the Peach War, which resulted in the death of 50 colonists; the capture of another hundred, mostly women and children; the burning of 28 farms, together with 12,000 schepels of grain, and the loss of nearly 600 cattle.

Selections from the Bergen County Historical Society’s collection of local Native American artifacts will also be displayed. The lectures take place in the Steuben House.

The Jersey Dutch blended significant contributions from Native people, Netherlanders, Africans, English, Germans, French Huguenots, Scots, Scots-Irish, Scandinavians, Polish Silesians, and others, into a distinct regional folk culture. Approximately 195 of the much admired Bergen County sandstone houses still exist.

Historic New Bridge Landing:

Bergen County’s Premier Historic Site. American Revolutionary War Battleground featuring 3 Jersey-Dutch Sandstone Houses including the Zabriskie-Steuben House – all OPEN for this event, Exhibits, Artifacts, Tavern, Gift Shop & Outkitchen. $7 adults, $5 children, BCHS members free. The newly restored Westervelt-Thomas Barn may be open depending on the weather.

HNBL, 1201-1209 Main St., River Edge, NJ. Take the train north from Secaucus Junction on the Pascack Valley line to New Bridge Landing, walk one block north and east.

201-343-9492   contactbchs@bergencountyhistory.org  www.bergencountyhistory.org

Letters 3/23/2015

Sent by Lilly Martin

Dear Carolyn,

 

I know you probably have seen the below email sent by Marilyn Douglas.  I saw the houses on the map below.  I do know the history of the Campbell-Christie House.  William Campbell b. about 1717 in Antrim, Ireland (The North) He came to NJ and married Elizabeth David Demarest.  I ‘assume’ she was the daughter of David Demarest, the son of the immigrant ancestor, David Demarest.

 

The house passed down to a Jacob Campbell, who in May 1774 sold it to a Abraham Brower, who was later a Rev War soldier, serving at New Bridge.  His father was Jacob Brouwer (Jannetje Vanderberg), son of Abraham Brouwer (m. Elizabeth Ackerman), s/o Uldrick Brouwer (m. Hester Devoe), s/o Pieter Brouwer (m. Petronella Kleyn), s/o Adam Brouwer, the immigrant  ancestor.

 

The Mercer Co KY Brewer family is from Daniel Brouwer, s/o Abraham Brouwer (m. Leah Demarest) , s/o Pieter Brouwer (m. Petronella Kleyn)

 

Abraham Brower sold the house in 1795 to John Christie.

 

The ownership of the house went from Campbell, to Brower, to Christie.

 

Best regards,

Lilly Martin

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Sent by Larry Vanice (Vannice, VanNuys)

of Wayne County Indiana

Around 1964 or so, I went to the ACPL (demolished to build the present building) and found their original 1916 printing of the Vanice/Van Nuys family history by Carrie Allen in the small genealogy room.  I still have the note card I used that day to record my ten generations going back to Aucke Jans Van Nuys, who arrived in New Amsterdam in 1651.  My oldest Vanice uncle had, and now his son has, the book his parents had bought in 1916, but I was never able to buy an original for myself.  Now the ACPL has on the shelf a reprint by University Microfilms that is missing a page their automatic camera skipped.  The same version missing a page is on Ancestry.com and I have a CD of it that I bought on eBay.  ACPL also has a reprint of the book that someone laboriously copied on a typewriter, and that version has all the pages.  I do not know what became of the ACPL’s original book, but I guess it is in storage.  Ms. Allen was a school teacher and wrote the book after she retired.  She must have been an amazing person to do all that research a hundred years ago.  Still, I have found some errors and omissions in what she wrote about my line in the 19th century.  I am sure the problems came from my grandparents and other people who told her what they remembered.  The Internet has certainly changed the game for genealogy research.  I learned of the Low Dutch KY colony from your Dutch Cousins website soon after one of our stays at the Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill.  Ms. Allen only said we had lived near Pleasureville.  Someone at the Shaker Village said your group had been there just a week earlier, so I looked you up when I got home.  When we left the Shaker village, we drove to Pleasantville to see the yarn shop/church.  As we passed the historical museum in New Castle, I stopped on a whim.  The man running it turned out to have a few nuggets of Vanice legal papers from the Low Dutch Tract days.

 

I joined Ancestry for a couple of years, but it became too expensive.  I was told that I could use Ancestry on the ACPL computers for free, but I have not yet needed to.

My wife is “High Dutch,” from Swiss Mennonite ancestry and her Smucker family has been researched and documented by distant relatives.  She has not had to do any research herself.

We both recently mailed spit to Ancestry and I am curious what we will learn.

 

Feel free to use whatever you think will be of general interest to the group.  I do not know how I am related to Rebekah V. Cunningham, but it would possibly be through James Van Nuys or his father.  My Isaac C. Vanice moved from KY to MO in 1840.

 

Here is my line, mostly quoted from the 1916 book:

1st generation in America, arriving 1651: Aucke Jans Van Nuys ?-1698

2nd gen. 7th child: Jacobus Van Nuys ?-1710

3rd gen. 4th child: Isaac Van Nuys 1695-?

4th gen. 2nd child: Isaac Van Nuys 1739-1804

5th gen. 7th child: James Van Nuys 1777/8-?

6th gen. 3rd child: Isaac Covert Vanice 1810-1899

7th gen. 4th child: George Bingham Vanice 1849-1883

8th gen. 2nd child: Dunlap Woodbridge Vanice 1873-?

9th Gen. 7th child: Amos Freyman Vanice 1909-1967

10th gen. 1st child: Larry Lee Vanice

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Sent by Lora Westerfield

Hello Carolyn How are you holding up with your injury?  I hope you heal  with little pain.  I was excited to see that Ohio County native Miss Kentucky Ramsey Carpenter will be performing for us.  Brag Brag I am also an Ohio Countian.  I have procrastinated reserving a room for so long I hope they are still available.  I don’t live very far form Frankfort and could drive up and rtn home on Saturday with no problem, however, I might not make it to Harrodsburg in time for Church Service and don’t know the way to Old Mud anyways. Wishing you well.

Well Miss Laura – Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS! We want to see you there!  And we will give you good directions and a map to get to Old mud on Sunday!

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Sent by

Tentative schedule for Dutch Cousins gathering Sept 24-28

– almost ready:  Note schedule is flexible, may be changes so stay in touch. We will have the schedule posted several places at the venue in Frankfort. It is going to be a wonderful week!  Don’t miss it.

Low Dutch Cousins Schedule 2015, Frankfort, KY History Center, Brown-Foreman Room.

 

*Thursday, Sept 24

Time 4 pm Set up Family History Tables, Silent Auction items, book displays & sales

4 to 6 pm Early Registration in Brown-Foreman Room, KHS

Dinner on your own or box lunches for workers

7 pm:  Kick off! Charlie Westerfield slide show called “One (Dutch) Man’s America,” featuring beautiful photos, great music, and an extremely intelligent and entertaining live narrator.

 

*Friday, Sept 25 (Open to public unless business meeting in same room)

8:30:  Coffee & registration in KHS Brown-Foreman Room

9:00:  Family History Tables, Silent Auction items, book displays & sales open

11 30-3pm Box Lunch and business meeting (Officers, Board and Registered cousins only)– meeting maybe in another room or in the garden so we don’t have to shut out any visitors to view the books, displays, etc.

3:00-5:00 Steve Henry leads Caravan tour to Lt. Governor’s Mansion, the Governor’s Mansion/Capitol tour, Frankfort Cemetery (planning still in process)

5:30: Tour returns to Capital Plaza, KHS

6:30:  Dinner Buffet – Keynote – Firth Haring Fabend ““Patroons and Plowmen, Pietism and Politics”

 

 

*Saturday, Sept 26 (open to public until noon)

9:00   Coffee – Brown-Foreman Room open- Meet your Cousins, Family Genealogy tables, Networking, Silent Auction, Books for sale, displays open

10:00 Welcome by Mayor, our cousin “Forever Miss America Heather French Henry” sings God Bless America, leads My Old Kentucky home

10:30-11:30…..TBA

11:30-12  Group photos – Charlie Westerfield

12:00  Lunch: Speaker –Greg Huber, “How the Dutch Built Their Barns”

2:00  Speaker – Charlie Westerfield, “One (Dutch) Man’s America”

4:00  Book sale & Autograph Party, with 5-10 minute spots for each author

5:00  Book sale and Silent Auction ends.

6:00  A little dinner music! by Miss Kentucky 2015  (Steve Henry intro)

7:00  Dinner buffet – Keynote speaker ~ Vince Akers “A Photographic History of the Old Mud Meetinghouse KY”

 

 

*Sunday, Sept 27

9:30  Check out & leave Frankfort

9:30 Caravan (one and a half hour drive) to Harrodsburg, KY

11:30 Lunch at 19th Hole, Harrodsburg, KY

1:00 Gates unlocked and open at Old Mud Meetinghouse

2:00 Worship at Old Mud Meeting House, Harrodsburg, KY -PUBLIC INVITED

Lay speaker: Jeffrey Westerfield –

Music: Eddie Sherrow of Harrodsburg

3:00 Re-dedication of Old Mud – Russell Gasero, CA, New Brunswick, NJ

 

*Monday, Sept 28

10 till 3:  Harrodsburg Historical Library open especially for cousins to research; You might also want to bring some of your Dutch history materials to donate to the ONLY archive for Low Dutch history.

Other activity suggestions for Monday:

Enjoy a day at the living history of Pleasant Hill Shaker Village about ten minutes away from Harrodsburg maybe on Monday – delicious food at the Trustees house, reservations required  – http://www.shakervillageky.org/

 

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(although almost all of them were tanners)

(NOTE FROM CAROLYN HERSELF: John Houts b. ca 1745 PA died fall 1780 York Co PA; married Ida VANARSDALE dau of Simon Vanarsdalen and Lammetje Voorhees. The WDYTYA show this week featured Angie Harmon and her ancestor Michael Harman who settled in Mercer Co KY. Michael was indentured to John HOUtS at/near Conewego PA. The Cornelius Cozine who bought Houts tannery in 1790 and sold it 1796 could not be our Rev. CC who died 1786 PA, his son CCJr died in KY 1787, his grandson CCIII moved to KY 1784)

May have been grandson CC son of Peter (1770-1817) who married Lammetje Houts, daughter of John (above)

Sent by Judy cassidy

for those who missed the special WHODOYOUTHINKYOUARE show

What really caught my eye watching the show tonight is that when Angie Harmon is at the Philadelphia Historical Society, they are looking at the original  book called “Records of Indentures of Individuals bound out as Apprentices, Servants and of German and Other Redemptioners in the Office of the Mayor of the City of Philadelphia” which shows that Michael Harmon was indentured to two different men dated 23 Dec. 1772. The name of the first man was William Will and the name of the second man Michael Harman was indentured to was JOHN HOUTS, a tanner. The entry reads: “Michael Harman last from Rotterdam, servant to William Will, Pewterer of Philadelphia and by him assigned to John Houts, Tanner on the other side of Cunnewago Creek Settlement.” A copy of the book, title above, appears in the (The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. 33, no. 4 (1909): 486). It is often assumed that bound servants getting off the ships in Philadelphia remained in the area, but that is not true, Philadelphia was a large “market” for bound servants and many of those who indentured them came a great distance, especially if it were known they had a specific craft. They served 7 or so years and then were free of their obligation, which was payment of their passage from Germany to the Colonies.

The Houtz family had been tanners for generations and were probably tanners in Germany. John Houts, originally arrived in Manhattan pre. 1765 and he had a tannery and owned property, his business, on Nassau Street and Maiden Lane. He and his neighbors John Will (perhaps related to William Will), Cordwainer, John Sebastion Stephany, Pewterer and John Wentzel, Apothecary signed a document of “Joint Tenacy by virtue of certain deeds of lease and release dated 30 March, 1765.” This land was sold to a German Reformed Congregation. (Rev. Labaugh, whom you know because he was sent by the Synod to serve the Salt River Congregation which he did for 6 weeks or so was the minister at this Church for several years beginning in 1804.)

John Houts/ Houtz removed from New York to Conewago and was a deacon there from 1777-1779. He patented land in Mt. Pleasant Twp, York Co. for 198 acres in 1767, and bought land in York in 1769 near Abbotstown, Houts married his second wife Ida Vanarsdale at Conewago.  His tannery was located in Franklin Twp., York which his son Christopher was in possession of after his death in 1780.

Chris Houts sold the tannery to Cornelius Cozine on 19 May 1790, advertising i the Pennsylvania Herald & York County General Advertiser, that “A Tanyard for sale with 57 acres with stone dwelling house barn stables, tankard in Franklin Twp. York Road on the great road leading from York to Chambersburg. Cornelius Cozine who in turn advertised it for sale in the Pennsylvania Herald & York General Advertiser on 22 Nov. 1796 before his departure for Kentucky. Both Cornelius and Christopher moved to Mercer County, Kentucky. Christopher continued the tannery and later to Missouri where his family kept up a tanning business. Chambersberg is north of Gettysburg closer to Harrisburg yet still in York Co. at that date. Later it would become Adams County.

Michael Harman does not appear in the Church records at Conewago, but that may be because the Tannery was closer to Chambertsburg and I don’t believe John Houtz actually lived on the premises. After Michael Harmans service in the Rev., he moved to Mercer County, Kentucky and I don’t think that was by chance, most likely it was because of his connections to the Low Dutch Community at Conewago.

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Letters 4/4/2015

Sent by Luther Davenport

A good number of the low dutch married into the McAfee clan of Mercer County. I have extensive files on this family that goes back to 1600’s Scotland.  If any one wants to share info or I will be happy to check my data base for names if anyone is interested.

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Sent by Ruby Bishop Ingram

I knew it had been too quiet on your front.  So, you broke a leg.  I

am so sorry and hope you mend well.  No more sky diving, please!

Spring is coming to Kentucky, with some bulbs up and blooming and

grass turning green.  I am so ready for this after all the snow we

have had this winter-25 inches the last round…but as they say, not

like Boston.

Hugs,

Ruby Bishop Ingram  (VanArsdall and Coovert ancestors)

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Sent by Martha Roach

so sorry to hear you are “laid up” again.  is there any thing I could do to help.  I take a friend to procure on Tuesday’s for her chemo treatment of about 5 hours, so could bring you guys a meal while she is getting her treatment if that would help.

(Note from Carolyn:  my Dutch Cousins are wonderful – thank you Martha, but we are doing okay. I have home health and my wonderful engineer and my kids are driving down to help on weekends so we are okay.  They are just mean about not letting me work on computer as much as I want to!)

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Sent by Eddie Price

Thanks Carolyn.  Please keep in touch.

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Sent by Lee Rogers

Carolyn:  Please put me on the list for info.,  Thanks

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Sent by Erika Miller

Thank you for getting back to me. As far as I know, our Low Dutch connection is through Floyd Westerfield, however my father, Steve Jacobson has been receiving the updates and passing them along to me. I thought it would be easier to get myself on the list.

We live in Houston, TX, but my husband’s family lives outside of Louisville. We are hoping to make it up that way for one of the Dutch cousins reunions sometime.

Thank you for organizing this. What an amazing undertaking!

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Sent by KURT WULLSCHLEGER

My mother’s side of the family includes Andrew Carnine (1761-1836) who seems to fit in the Conewago-Kentucky group.  I am interested in learning more about this family and your groups. It appears that your group will be a good resource for me as I build our family history files.

Here is a document that I found online that another Carnine cousin has assembled and updated:

http://www.carnine.com/Docs/Carnine%20Record%20Rev1.pdf

I live in Fort Myers, FL and Omaha, NE so we may try to stop by Frankfort, KY on our way to FL in September as I have wanted to stop by the Mud Meeting House in Harrodsburg.

My mother (Marian Steckel is one of 3 living daughters of Pat and Esther Steckel from Emporia, KS.  Esther’s dad was William Carnine who was the son of Peter M. Carnine, who was the son of Andrew Carnine.

Here is the start of my website for the Steckel-Carnine Family history pages.

https://sites.google.com/site/steckelcarnine/

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Sent by Dennis Carnine

My address and phone has changed from Connecticut to Florida where we are permanent residents.

One of my websites is http://www.carnine.com with some photos and a genealogy of one branch of the Carnine family.

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Sent by Damien Prather

My name is Damien Prather, about 3 years ago I purchased 200 acres on Six Mile Creek just outside of Defoe (12606 Castle Hwy (SR 421).  I believe it was owned by Samuel Demaree.  I have been trying to locate a copy of the map of the original Low Dutch Tract.  Do you know anyone who has a copy?  I have also been trying to find a contact number/email for Vince Acres(?) to see how he is coming along on his book.  Until this year, we had one of the last low country Dutch Barns on our property.  We had to disassemble it piece by piece after a wind storm compromised the structure, but we took plenty of pictures.

I appreciate any help you can be.  Please put me on your email address for any activities related to the low Country Dutch.  I found your information on a flyer for a 2013 gathering.  Thank you very much.

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Sent by Kurt Wullschleger

Thanks for the email regarding registration for the Dutch Cousins get-together. I have not yet decided to attend as we have a very busy summer so I need to ration my outside activities.  At this point I am going to try to attend.

Researching my Carnine roots is what has brought me to this point and maybe you can help me with a few things:

Names – Of course the Carnine name is only one of the many spellings that I have now traced – Canine, Conine, Conyn, Connine, Conyne and it may even be possible that Cosine is a variation… still working on that. My lineage is through Andrew to Dirck Conyn.

Conewago – I have found evidence that Andrew and Lydia (Bice or Buys) lived briefly in this settlement in York County, PA as they were married there in 1787. He served in the war until 1781 with the Virginia Militia.

Caughnawaga, NY (Albany County) – I have found scant reference to this settlement in any of the Low Dutch materials.  The 1790 census and some war documents record several Conyn’s – Casparus, Laurence and Jeremiah.  And Leendert Phillipsen Conyn as far back as 1663.

Slaves – I know that a slave was often granted as part of the Dutch India Contracts but I was surprised to discover the number of slaves that the Conyn families owned (one is shown with 9 in the 1790 census). I have not found Andrew Carnine’s will but it will not surprise me that he owned several.  If you have more references on this aspect of the Low Dutch I would be interested. I find it interesting that later Carnine’s actually moved from Kentucky to Indiana (an apparent abolitionist move) and then to Kansas in an obvious attempt to populate that state with abolitionists!

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Sent by Alice Hostetter–

So sorry I won’t be able to be there. My friend, Jan Whaley, and I so enjoyed the last one. I know you will all have a great time.

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Letters 4/17/2015

From Carolyn:  Whew!  Just had a scary thing happen – My Draft mailbox disappeared with all my template emails I use for mailing lists like this one, and my business.   This is tragic. I was ready to send this Dutch letters and it was GONE!.  My virus checker notified me I had a trojan in my mail, in the backup file, so I trashed that file.  Now what?  How do I find those emails?

Luckily the apple communities was able to help and I found this.  Now still looking for emails that disappeared.  If you sent one and I haven’t replied – please resend.

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about the Gathering Sept 25-26

Dutch Cousins gathering coming soon!

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center. (NOT right next to where we will be meeting as I thought previously.) Thanks to Janice for getting me straightened out on the Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history all in Frankfort and close, but not the same so it may be too far to walk for some people (like me – LOL)

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and (we hope) rededication, Moday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open only for us from 10 to 3.

– The Martin F. Schmidt Research Library is located upstairs in the same building.  Hours of operation are Wed, 10am to 4pm , Thurs, 10am to 8pm, Fri & Sat, 10 am to 5 pm.  A copier will be available and the copies are .15 each except for Microfilm copies which are .30 each and we can feel free to bring iPads, phones, laptops, tablets etc. to access any available info at no cost. They are happy to run a tab and we can pay at the end of the event. Parking is located in front of building off Broadway Street in the old railroad depot lot. Parking is limited so car pooling is highly recommended. The Capitol City Museum, 325 Ann St., next door to KHS is free. The Paul Sawyer Pubic Library where we can also research is down the street a couple blocks,  M-TH. 9am-8pm, Fri. 9am-6pm, Sat.9am-5pm and Sun. 1pm-5pm.

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Just a reminder for those who may have joined recently:

A colony these of Low Dutch settlers – 50 families in all – first came to Mercer County KY in 1781 and built the Old Mud Meetinghouse. After a few years around Harrodsburg, they purchased from Squire Boone the “Low Dutch Tract” of eight to ten thousand acres with Bantatown (present-day Pleasureville) at the center. Land titles became clouded with conflicting claims, and it was many years before those battles were settled.  In the meantime, industrious Low Dutch people continued fighting off Indian attacks and struggling to turn the frontier into their homeland dream.

If you had an ancestor named Banta, Bergen, Bodine, Brewer, Demaree, Dorland, Duree, Cosart, Cozine, Monfort, Rider, Shuck, Smock, Stagg, Terhune, VanArsdale, Van Nuys, Voris, Vorhees, or Westervelt/Westerfield (various spellings on all names) then you are probably one of us – Dutch Cousins, or descendants of the Kentucky Low Dutch Settlers. A colony these of Low Dutch settlers – 50 families in all – first came to Mercer County KY in 1781 and built the Old Mud Meetinghouse. After a few years around Harrodsburg, they purchased from Squire Boone the “Low Dutch Tract” of eight to ten thousand acres with Bantatown (present-day Pleasureville) at the center. Land titles became clouded with conflicting claims, and it was many years before those battles were settled.  In the meantime, industrious Low Dutch people continued fighting off Indian attacks and struggling to turn the frontier into their homeland dream.

Our ancestors adopted the term “Low Dutch” to distinguish themselves as being from the low countries of Holland and Europe rather than High Dutch from Germany, who were also called Dutchmen. Well-known historian, author and speaker Vincent Akers, in his book, History of the Low Dutch, copyright 1981, says our ancestors were always very careful to refer to themselves as Low Dutch.

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Sent by Anne W. brown

We won’t make it to the reunion, but I do enjoy the newsletters.  I found a new connection I will follow up on.  In case she contacts you, her name is Jane Westerfield  (married name.  I don’t know here husband’s name). They live in Lampasas TX and are friends of my sister-in-law.

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Sent by susan furr dunn

Carolyn,

I am so happy to have found my Dutch Cousins and wish I could make the Sept trip.  I feel like I will be missing a tremendous opportunity for research and connection. I have a question for Charlie Westerfield or anyone knowledgeable regarding photography. I am searching for any photos of my VanArsdall, McKee, Best and Vandivier relatives. They lived in Harrodsburg and Louisville. I have a professional photo of Kathleen Vanarsdall (1894-1972) taken in Louisville in  approximately 1898 at “Charlton H. Elrod & Bro.” I have no photo at all of my great grandfather, Hugh McKee Vanarsdall (1872-1956). All this to ask what happens to the photos at these studios as time passes? Are there collections somewhere? Is there a best resource for attempting to locate family photos?

Thank you for any and all suggestions.

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Sent by Rod Dempsey

I read in the NY Times today about the problems that OK is having with earthquakes. I thought that the tornadoes were quite enough of a problem!

Hope that you are not in the earthquake area around Prague. I looked it up on my atlas,and it looked maybe 50 miles east and south of Edmond, but that does not mean much, because Oklahoma is so underlaid with waste water from oil drilling. My understanding is thet that oily water permeates the porous limestone, making it heavier, which some scientists claim causes the rock formation to shift and cause earthquakes. Because of the Oil elconomy in OK, most citizens choose not to believe this is the cause. (See NY Times article 4/4/15). Are you a sesizmologist, Carolyn?

NOTE:  I’M not a seismologist, Rod, but we are having LOTS of earthquakes and WE believe it is because of all the fracking of oil wells in our area. – carolyn (herself)

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Sent by Larry Vanice

In reply to Damien Prather, the Henry County Historical Society has free maps of the Low Dutch Tract with the family names associated with each parcel.  I was able to identify the location of the Vanice farm and then find it on the Google Earth satellite view.  Many of the old property lines on the map are still visible as roads and lines of vegetation along the field edges.

http://history.henrycountyky.com/

 

The man at the museum also had original 19th century papers that I believe once were stored at the local court house.  He made copies for me of the marriage bond posted by Isaac Vanice when, in 1837, he married Eleanor Smith, daughter of Robert Smith, who was born in Scotland.  He also had land transfer documents on the Vanice farm.  Here are some details of my tree from 1810 to 1840.  I saw the name Bice mentioned in the latest letters, along with a comment about slave ownership.  Isaac’s mother was Tinnie Bice Van Nuys and Isaac owned one young female slave in 1840.  Shortly after the 1840 Census, Isaac and his family moved to the boom town of Arrow Rock in MO, a slave state.  Isaac was a wagon maker and Arrow Rock was on the Missouri River at the east end of the Santa Fe Trail and the route to Kansas.  Isaac did not own a slave in 1850 or 1860.

1810

1916 Book, p. 263 (first edition): Isaac Covert Vanice Born 24Aug1810 Henry County, KY to James and Tinie Bice Van Nuys.  This date is also given in the 1899 obituary notice.  But see 1811.  Our Van Nuys family had lived in the Low Dutch colony, a communal area of 8000-12000 acres around Six Mile, later Bantatown (now Pleasureville), KY since 1791.

http://home.comcast.net/~neal4/shkylowd.htm

1811

Family Search, no source cited: Isaac Covert Vanice Born 24Aug1811 in KY to James and Tinie Bice Van Nuys.  This date agrees better with the age of Isaac given in the various census records, but conflicts with the genealogy book and obituary.

http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp?PAGE=/eng/search/ancestorsearchresults.asp

1818

1916 Book, p. 161: Eleanor Smith Born 12Oct1818, father Scotch Robin [Robert] Smith.

[The 1880 Census says her father born in Scotland and mother in VA.]

1835

Ref. 15, P. 136: Isaac C. Vannice admitted to the Six Mile Presbyterian Church by profession of faith on 21Jun1835.  The 1824 post and beam church building has been moved and reconstructed and is now a fiber art establishment near its original site outside Pleasureville, KY.

http://www.sweet-home-spun.com/dutch.htm

1837

1916 Book, p. 161: Isaac married Eleanor Smith 28Sep1837 near Eminence, Henry County, KY

1899 Miami (MO) News obituary for Isaac Vanice confirms the date.  Eminence is a larger town a few miles west of Six Mile (Pleasureville).

1838

1916 Book, p. 161: William Dodd Vanice born 18Jul1838 near Pleasureville, KY to Isaac and Eleanor.

1839

Ref. 15, P. 136: Ellen Vannice admitted to the Six Mile Presbyterian Church by transfer from Drennon Creek Church on 12Apr1839.  Drennon Creek runs into the KY River a few miles north of Six Mile, but I could find no information on the church, which was likely Presbyterian.

1840

1840 US Census: Western Div. Henry County, KY

Isaac C Vannice [sic] head of family

Free Whites:

Males under 5: 1 [William Dodd Vanice, age 1, born 18Jul1838]

Males 15 & under 20: 1 [A relative of Isaac or Eleanor?]

Males 20 & under 30: 1 [Isaac Covert Vanice age 29, born 24Aug1810]

Females 20 & under 30: 1 [Eleanor Smith Vanice age 21, born 12Oct1818]

Slaves: Females under 10: 1

No. of persons engaged in manufacture & trade: 1 [Presumably Isaac]

1916 Book,

  1. 161: Isaacand his wife and son lived near Pleasureville [Henry County], KY until 1840

[after the census], when they removed to Miami [more likely Arrow Rock], MO.

 

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Sent by Katie Hortenstine (Westerfield, Montfort, Demarest, etc

Another plea for help.

I’m still trying to find documentation (marriage record, bible record) for the marriage of Samuel Westerfield and Catherine Montfort. General consensus online has it occurring  February 1782. Place ranges from Preble Co, Ohio to Jefferson Co. Kentucky and Lincoln Co. Kentucky as well as Ft. Boonesborough and Beargrass Station. One tree even had New Jersey. I’ve contacted Jefferson County and they weren’t there. I looked online and Samuel and Catherine are not on transcribed marriage records for Lincoln County. Fayette County, the only other Kentucky County at the time, didn’t record marriage records in 1782, same as Preble County, Ohio. There’s nothing in the Dutch Reformed Records on Ancestry and the church doesn’t have records for Kentucky. I don’t know what else to do since no one has cited the information. I’m lost as to where people are getting the dates. Is there another source I can check? I would be very grateful for any guidance.

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Sent by  Mary (Banta-DeWitt) Hunter Linneman

I found a copy of a VANARSDALEN/Van Arsdale/Van Arsdoll, etc. Bible record while looking through some back issues of the NGS quarterlies.

Would you like a transcript of it for our Dutch Letters?  Just let me know!

NOTE – from Carolyn – yes!  definitely!

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Sent byJudy Cassidy

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Sent by mary woodfill park

Dear Carolyn,

What a wonderful program you all have planned!

It appears at this time that I probably won’t be able to attend the Gathering in September.

In about six weeks my husband is retiring and we are “transitioning”.  That means we will be most probably start and hopefully complete the downsizing process this year so we can sell our home and move into a more manageable space—place to be determined.  It also means that we will be traveling to visit our families in Germany, New York and Chicago.  I know many of you have completed this process and will understand just how difficult it can be.

Thanks to all of you who are working so hard to make the Gathering another outstanding event!

All best, Mary

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Sent by Dutch Genealogy News

Five reasons why it’s awesome to have Dutch ancestors

Apr 17, 2015 09:00 am | Yvette Hoitink

Do you have Dutch ancestors? Congratulations! Here are five things that are awesome about having Dutch ancestors.

1. Dutch records are excellent

  • Since 1850, the government did not just keep census records, they kept them up to date so they always know who’s living where. These are called population registers.
  • Civil registration of birth, marriages and deaths was introduced in 1811 (or even earlier in some southern parts of the country).
  • Church records of baptisms, marriages and burials usually go back to the early to late 1600s.
  • Court records often start earlier than that, in the mid to late 1500s.
  • There were crazy taxes like hearth tax, step tax, window tax, salt tax, horse tax and spice tax. Guess what they did with people who paid these taxes? That’s right, they recorded them!

2. Dutch records are often available online, for free

Websites like WieWasWieZoekakten and websites of archives provide free access to millions and millions of indexed and scanned records. Check the Digital Resources Netherlands and Belgium site for links to find online sources.

3. Dutch women are recorded by their maiden names

Records mention women by their maiden names, even after marriage. Makes Dutch women muuuuuch easier to find than their counterparts in many English-speaking countries.

4. Dutch people speak English

If you need help, you can just ask in English. All the archives, municipalities and local historical societies will be able to understand you and write you back in English. Some elderly relatives may speak limited English but they usually have a younger relative willing to translate.

5. The Netherlands is a wonderful place to visit

We have stroopwafels. We have windmills. We have cheese. We have tulips. We have Rembrandt. We have bikes. We have dikes.

If you want to come over, here’s 11 things you should know before coming to the Netherlands.

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Since some of the cousins may be driving to the reunion in the fall and may be interested in Civil War sites, I submit the following information.

For those of you who are Civil War buffs, Camp Nelson Civil War Heritage Park and Museum is located in southern Jessamine County, Kentucky, 20 miles south of Lexington.  this was established in 1863 as a depot for the Union Army.  The address is 6614 Danville, Rd., Nicholasville, KY, 40356, (859) 881-5716,www.campnelson.org/home.htm. Camp Nelson provided the Union Army with over 10,000 African American Soldiers, thousands came with their families to Camp Nelson because even though it was in Kentucky it was a Union installment.

Reverend John Fee, the founder of Berea College came to Camp Nelson in 1864 to teach and minister to the refugees.  There were several Low Dutch slaves who enlisted there including Sam Banta, slave of Andrew Banta whose father Henry Banta settled in Bourbon County; Jerry Demaree, slave of Samuel Demaree of Mercer County; Alecky/Alexander, John, William and Dick Kuykendall slaves of John Kuykendall; George Smock and Robert Albert Smock slaves of John Smock of Marion County grandson of Garret Smock  and his son Henry of Monmouth Co., NJ; James, Vanarsdale slave of Abrim M. or A. M Vanarsdale, distiller living near Salvisa, Mercer County and Jospeh Vanarsdale, alias Joseph Tilford and Joseph Vanarsdale both slaves of Abraham Cornelius Brewer Vanarsdale of Vanarsdales Mill, near Harrodsburg.  Robert Albert is buried in Arlington Cemetery.

Regarding the Post by Kurt Wullschleger:  “Slaves – I know that a slave was often granted as part of the Dutch India Contracts but I was surprised to discover the number of slaves that the Conyn families owned (one is shown with 9 in the 1790 census). I have not found Andrew Carnine’s will but it will not surprise me that he owned several.  If you have more references on this aspect of the Low Dutch I would be interested. I find it interesting that later Carnine’s actually moved from Kentucky to Indiana (an apparent abolitionist move) and then to Kansas in an obvious attempt to populate that state with abolitionists!”

Carolyn, I have never seen any evidence of this at all.  Would you kindly ask him for his source?

Judy also wanted every one to know about the group of Low Dutch that settled in the McAffee area near Salvisa and established the New Providence church when they were unable to get a Dutch Reformed minister to the Old Mud Church.  She also posted this on the Dutch Facebook page and in the Vanarsdale newsletter so you may have already seen it there.

On October 8, 1812, Lanty Armstrong, Daniel Brewer, Kort Vories, Cornelius Demaree and Garret Dorland [former members of the Salt River congregation, ie. Old Mud Meeting House] engaged the services of Reverend Thomas Cleland to become the Pastor of the New Providence Presbyterian Church near Salvisa, five miles north of Harrodsburg. Rev. Cleland in his Memoirs mentioned ” I entered my pastoral duties in New Providence Church, the first sabbath in April 1813. I was employed by a small church of the Dutch Reformed about four miles south of Harrodsburg and for my services they paid me promptly $50.00 in semi-annual installments. Among those families were Garret Dorland and his daughter Christina/Styntje/Tiny Dorland, her husband Thomas Lanty Armstrong their son Lambert Darland Armstrong. Garrets son, Garret Ward Dorland and wife Catherine McAfee, Daniel Brewer and Theodosia or Dooreti Dorland, their son Lambert Darland Brewer and his wife Sally McAfee, A. M. Vanarsdale and wis Dorinda Bohan, d/o Elijah Bohan and wife Lucy, Cornelius C. Vanarsdale and wife Catherine Huff & wife Ida Voorhees, Daniel Brewer Vanarsdell and wife Leah Stagg, granddaughter of James Stagg and d/o Daniel Stagg and Mary Cownover, Cornelius A. B. Vanarsdale and wife Mary Brewer, d/o Abraham Brewer and Sarah Van Orden, his son’s: Abraham Brewer Cornelius Vanarsdale and wife Charity G. Terhune and wife Eliza P. David, Simon Vanarsdale and wife Harriet Ann Bohan and Jackson Vanarsdale and wife Pricilla Jane Brewer.

The Shawnee Run Baptist church is another Church, located in Mercer Co, attended by Peter T. Banta, Lambert Banta and Cornelius Terhune.

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Letters 4/18/2015

Sent by Gary W. Stanford

Katie Hortenstine (in reply to your query in the most recent Dutch Letters)

Hi ,

Samuel Leander Westerfield was my 4g-grandfather, through his son, John Monfort Westerfield.  I saw your post in the Dutch Letters about the marriage of Samuel Leander Westerfield and Catherine Monfort.  I have been handed down information within the family and would like to share it with you.  What I found of interest is the exact day of their marriage.  I hope this helps you find your answer.

Samuel L. Westerfield (Westervelt) (son of Jacobus (Westervelt) Westerfield and Maria DeMaree was born February 18, 1760 in New York, New York, and died February 02, 1832 in Lanier Township (now Eaton), Preble County, Ohio.  He died at age of seventy years old.  He married Catherine Monfort on February 28, 1782 in Jefferson County, Kentucky.  Samuel Leander Westerfield spent most of his life in Kentucky as he spent only his last days back in Preble County, Ohio.

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Sent by Kurt Wullschleger

Concerns: William COZINE, Richard DITMARS, Stephen COMBS & more

I noticed that there was a request for references regarding my comments about slavery and abolition among the Carnine/Canine/Conyn members of the Low Dutch.

Here is reference to an article about the founding of a “Low Dutch” settlement in Carlyle, Kansas: (Note that in the 3rd paragraph the reason for the community is to do something about the “political situation of Kansas”.)

THE FOUNDING OF CARLYLE, KANSAS

[NOTE: This article first appeared in the “Hopewell Herald”, in Franklin, IN, on 3 Sep 1915. It was reprinted in Jan, 1966, in the “Treesearcher”, the magazine of the Kansas Genealogical Soc.]

“An interesting ceremony was observed on Wednesday afternoon, August 25, 1915. In the presence of three men who might be called “old” by those who count only in years, a little stone marker was set up by the gate leading from the Hopewell Manse. [A Manse is the residence of a Presbyterian parochial minister.] In the stone was placed a copper box containing letters and some writings which shall be history for the next generation.

“Fifty-eight years ago to the day, there set forth from this gate for Kansas seven young men: William Cozine, Richard Ditmars, Stephen Combs, Peter [Marion] Carnine [son of Andrew & Nancy, bapt 3 May 1835], Archibald and Garrett Van Nuys, and Jackson Utterback, the first four of whom are living, and the first three present at this time.

“The matter of western imigration had long been talked of. The Hopewell Academy had attracted many youths outside of the community as well as within it. In a live debating society the problems of the day were earnestly discussed. The political situation of Kansas was more than once the topic of conversation. It was felt by many that the time was ripe for sending out a settlement from the old community. So the older men were to go by train to Kansas City; this was the end of the line. There they were to be met by these seven young men, propvided whith two wagons and teams, who were to drive overland and take the whole party on from Kansas City. On August 25, 1857, the neighbors gathered at the home of Mrs. Cozine, which later became the Hopewell Manse, and there they said good-bye to the boys. It was a very serious parting. To the great unknown west there were going; there were many dangers possible. The party was accompanied by some of the neighbors as far as Waverly, where the first stop was made on White River. There, T. P. Killen made the boys a farewell speech, which they all remember. He urged upon them the necessity of close organization on their journey; they took his advice. All seven boys were members of the Hopewell Church, and real Christians. They did not travel on Sunday. Twenty-two days they were on the road, not including three sundays. All this, R. V. Ditmars told in his remarks.

“Mr. Cozine told the story they all vividly remember. As they drew near Kansas City, not much of a city then, however, four of the boys decided they would walk on, and reach town sooner than the wagons. A rain came up suddenly, and, to avoid getting wet, they dodged into the trees as we know it, but under some scattering trees; they hurried from tree to tree, seeking the best comfort. It was important that their one suit of clothes be kept dry. Their actions aroused suspicion. A little while before, a bank in the vicinity had been robbed, and seven thousand dollars in new money taken. As soon as the boys reached the city, two of the four were arrested, the other two escaping to tell the horrible tale to their approaching comrades. Fortunately, the elder members of the company had reached Kansas City the previous evening. To make such close connections as these, when one party went by team and the other by train, must have taken nice calculation. The senior members of the party sought to explain to the officials the movements of the boys, but the two boys were kept in jail all night, and the whole party was searched for new money. The mistake was humbly acknowledged the next morning, but there were some sore feelings towards the officials of the city.

“Leaving Kansas City, the two wagons were now crowded. After travelling together a short time, the party divided, one wagon going south into the beautiful country along the Neosha, on to the Geneva prairie, where a pocket was formed by the Martin and Deer Creeks. Here, the colony settled, taking up claims on the land which had not yet been put into market. After the settlements, they all returned home except Richard Ditmars and Peter Carnine, who remained through the winter, building a cabin and looking after the claims. When spring came, a large colony of settlers arrived many of them from the Hopewell neighborhood; among them were David Covert [This was an error, it was Daniel], and his three sons; John Newton [son of Daniel & Rachel, bapt 16 Aug 1631]; Dr. George W. [bapt 1 Dec 1833], and Samuel H. [bapt 22 May 1836], all heads of families. T. P. Killen, and Dr. [John?] Scott, who was the practicing physician of the colony, were elected elders in the church which was almost immediately organized, the Carlisle [Carlyle] Presbyterian Church which had thirty-seven charter members. [Peter Madison Luyster and his family joined the new settlement in 1859.]

“The second wagon turned west by south, going by Emporia toward the Indian Council House, which took the name of Burlingame. Here, [Stephen] Combs, [one of the] Utterback[s], and [Richard] Ditmars were left for the winter to look after the claims and build a cabin or two. When the winter was over, other colonists arrived; among them were: William T. and Margaret (Wheat) Voris, and Addison Cozine, brother of William; and here also a church was organized, with ten charter members, of whom three were from Hopewell.

“And now, after these fifty-eight years, three of the men and some of their friends gathered at the starting place to renew old memories. The services were very simple; reading of scriptures and prayer by Mr. Ferguson; the remarks of Mr. Cozine and Mr. Ditmars, and the placing of the stone by Messrs. Paul Covert and John McCaslin. The leading spirit of the movement has been William Cozine, who returned to Hopewell for a visit after an absence of forty years. We appreciate all these efforts to keep the past in the knowledge of the present. Such work as this is going far toward making the centenniel year of Indiana count.”

And here is the text from the will of Peter Carnine:

WILL OF PETER CARNINE

I, Peter Carnine, of the County of Shelby, and State of Kentucky, do hereby make my last will and testament in manner and form following:

First, I will to my wife Hannah Carnine, one bedstead, bed and furniture, one horse and saddle and bridle suitable for her to ride, which she is to do as she pleases with at her death.

Second, I wish my executers hereafter named as soon as convenient after my decease to sell all the perishable part of my estate and out of the money arising therefrom. to pay all my just debts and funeral expenses and the balance to be equally divided among my several children taking into consideration the amount each one has received heretofore.

Third, I will my negro woman by the name of Addaline to my wite for the term of three years after my decease, at the expiration of which time I wish her, the said Addaline, to be set free. I further desire that my negro man, Dave, shall serve my wife during her life time and at her death I wish him, the said Dave, to be set tree.

Fourth, I wish my executers as soon as convenient to sell my young negroes, namely – Jane, Margaret, James, George, and Frances – the proceeds to be equally divided among my children and I wish my executers to allow the above negroes the liberty of choosing their masters.

Fifth, I desire in the event I should outlive my wife I wish the above named Addaline and Dave to be set tree at my decease.

Lastly – I do hereby constitute and appoint Claybourne L. White and Robert Doake executers of this my last will and testament hereby revoking all others as former Wills or testaments by me heretofore made.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this 8th day of January in the year of our Lord 1841.

Signed and sealed in the presence of Arthur Chambers and William Chambers Peter Canine Probated – February, term of Court, 1841

Will Book 14, Page 90 Shelby County Court House, Shelby County, Kentucky Research made by Mrs. E. B. Smith, Genealogist, 721 \7. Main Street, Shelbyville, Ky. Ex-Regent Local D.A.R. Chapter, Shelbyville. Ky., Mrs. L. G. Millisor,

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Sent by  FROM CAROLYN (Herself)

William “Billy” and Cornelius Addison “AD” COZINE (my third cousins) were the sons of Samuel and Susannah Flagg (Wyckoff) COZINE, who moved from Henry County KY to (Hopewell) Johnson County Indiana.

Here is WA “Billy” Cozine’s obit, he apparently never married.

Obits of Mar 6th, 1924  from Osage County KS)

“BILLY” COZINE DEAD

Under date of February 28th, 1924, Col. W.W. Denison writes us from his home in Topeka as follows: ” I received a letter this morning from John H. Crumb, late of Co. I, 11th Kansas cavalry, now at the National Military Home, informing me of the death of Comrade William A. Cozine, who died at the Home ofFebruary 19th, and his remains were shipped to Iola, Kansas for burial.

You probably have heard of it before this, but for fear you have not I drop you this line. You will remember that Mr. Cozine as sheriff of Osage county, hung Bates, the murderer of Abel Polley, in the court house then located in Burlingame. The event took place this time of the year in 1866, or possibly in 1867, and is said to be the only legal hanging ever made in our state. The death of W. A. Cozine leaves J.H. Crumb and myself the only living persons who left Burlingame on that memorable morning, about September 10th, 1862. We were mustered into the service at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, September 5th, 1862 and mustered

out September 26th, 1865.

and the obit of his brother Cornelius Addison “AD” Cozine:

OBIT:  IOLA REGISTER 15 NOV 1895

DIED AT THE RRESIDENCE OF HIS DAUGHTER, Mrs. Jas. Wakefield in Iola, on Sat Nov 9, 1895, C. A. Cozine in the 62nd year of his age.

  1. A. Cozine was born in Shelby Co KY in 1834. When 4 years of age, his parents moved to Hopewell Indiana where he lived until 1865 when he came to Kansas and located on the farm near Carlyle which he has ever since owned. Soon after coming to this State he engaged in the milling business at Neosho Falls with his brother and brothers-in-law for several years, and he also worked at his trade of blacksmith for several years in Iola at a later period. During the greater part of the time of his residence in Kansas, however he has occupied and operated the Carlyle farm and that was his home at the time of his death. 

Mr. Cozine was married in 1859 to Miss Emma Covert of Hopewell, Ind. 

Eight children were born to them, of whom five are still living: Mrs. Brook Doughty – the wife of a missionary in Japan; Mrs. James Wakefield of iola; Mr. Newton Cozine of Albuquerque NM; and Ralph and Barton – young boys at home.

“ADD” COZINE as his friends familiarly and affectionately called him, was one of the oldest settlers in the Carlyle neighborhood and during the long years that he lived there, he held and deserved the highest popularity.

In his youth he was strikingly handsome, with a bearing andmanner and way of speech that would attract favorable attention to him anywhere, aud which with his musical gifts and many social graces. made him a welcome addition to any compauy. As age crept upon him and silvered his hair it only added to tho distinction of his appearance, and until stricken with his fatal illness his mind retained its brightness and his spirits their buoyancy. He was a gentleman always and everywhere, a Christian in every company, an honest man at home and abroad, a lover to his wife and a devoted friend and companion to his children. Altho active and industrious to the last degree he did not seem to have the knack of amassing wealth. But he won the respect of all who met him, the admiration of all who became acquainted with him, and the deathless love and loyalty of the members of his own household who knew him the best of all. “And so he died rich,” and as long as any remain who knew him or who carry his blood in their veins his name will be honored and his memory kept fresh and fragrant.

The funeral was held at the residence of Mr. Wakefield onb Sunday at two o’clock p.m., and was largely attended by the friends of the deceased both from Carlyle and Iola. Rev. W. L. Squier conducted the services, the music being furnished by the choir from the Carlyle church, and the remaiins were interred in the Iola cemetery.

The sorrowing family may be assured they have the sympathy of all their friends.

(transcribed by Carolyn Leonard 2014)

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Letters 4/27/2015

Sent by Jim Cozine (Van der Cozijne?)

Carolyn and cousins

I’m looking at the Dutch Phone book online again and remember that once you asked me

what the vd stood for behind the Cozijne names I had found like:

Cozijne H vd

Oldenallerhout 166, 3845ED Harderwijk 0341-410717

Well – I see this in the book “At Home in Holland” A Practical Guide for Living in The Netherlands

By The American Women’s Club of the Iague –this is online at google books

pg 123

Tips for Using Dutch Phone Books: First, make sure you are looking in the right city

as most books cover several communities. Dutch phone books are arranged – for the most

part- alphabetically. However, keep in mind: Dutch “ij” is equivalent to “y” and is listed

alphabetically with “y” i.e., “Kontrast” comes before “Konijnenburg” in the white pages.

pg 124

When a name begins with prefixes such as van, de, der and ter, the prefix is treated

as an initial. For instance, Jan van der Molen is written as Molen, J. vd in the phone

book, and listed under “M’ for Molen

So that means that our five COZIJNE finds in the Dutch phone book are

van der Cozijne

And if you need to call 911 in The Netherlands you better dial 112..

How about pronunciation — I’ve often wondered how to say “IJ” — seems it is an Eye sound,

– so like our “I”  — I now have a headache…..

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The Weekly Genealogist, Vol. 18, No. 16, Whole #736, April 22, 2015

from: NEHGS,

Historic Huguenot Street’s Oral History Project

Historic Huguenot Street’s new local oral history project, ‘Stories From Stones,’ intends “to collect and preserve the stories of the New Paltz Huguenots, their descendants, the community, and all who have been impacted by Historic Huguenot Street.”

Brooklyn Brewery Dares Diners To Eat Like Dutch Settlers

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2015/04/18/400511243/brooklyn-brewery-dares-diners-to-eat-like-dutch-settlers

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Sent by Carolyn Leonard

“Did any of my ancestors use a family crest?”

The only way to answer this question is to find a source that includes your ancestor with the crest. This requires that you first research your family tree. Simply finding a crest with your name is not enough, there might have been many people by that name.

One way to find out which people used a crest is by checking the heraldic collections of the Central Bureau for Genealogy. These collections are being entered into the Heraldische Databank [Heraldic Database].

Beware of charlatans

Beware of charlatans out there. There are several firms that will be happy to sell you a picture of “your” family crest. My grandmother had a lovely Marijnissen family crest on her wall, created by a research firm in the US. When I traced the image back to its source, I found that it was for a complete unrelated De Maurissens family. It appears that the firm just looked up the name in a book of crests and chose a crest for a name that had the most letters in common.

from Dutch Genealogy news

24 April 2015

Use Google Street View to ‘visit’ your ancestor’s home town – maybe your ancestral home. My LOW DUTCH Cozines are from Putten, Gelderland, The Netherlands. So let’s go there! There are many photos of the old homes = wish I knew if anyof them belonged to our family (my ancestors probably worked on those places!)

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Putten,+Netherlands/@52.2485051,5.4925847,3a,75y,90t/data=!3m5!1e2!3m3!1s-89OlbCGpRvg%2FVFD8p9FHyrI%2FAAAAAAADAys%2F9fJb4B6Jm_g!2e4!3e15!4m2!3m1!1s0x47c6360e068303f1:0x14724a3adc0912a2!6m1!1e1

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Sent by judy cassidy

This article is NOT about Ben Affleck, rather it is about relationships in todays world between descendants.  I thought your readers might find it of interest and useful.  Bob VanArsdall sent it to me.

http://afroculinaria.com/2015/04/22/i-cant-hide-mine-please-dont-hide-yours-an-open-letter-to-ben-affleck/

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Sent by OOPS!

From Carolyn:  Whew!  still struggling with the loss of many emails. (continuing saga –  My virus checker notified me I had a trojan in my mail, in the backup file, so I trashed that file.  Now what?  How do I find those emails? Luckily the apple communities was able to help and I found some of the lost.  Now still looking for emails that disappeared.  If you sent one and I haven’t replied – please resend.

These turned up and I don’t know if they had been previously sent or not.

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From Linda Hendricks

My d-i-l’s family came into the USA from Sweden and settled outside of McPherson.  MY great uncle lived in McPherson in the 1920 census.  While visiting McPherson for the Scottish games, we found where my

d-i-l’s family was buried.  Later found out my great uncle’s wife came from the same village as my d-i-l’s family.  It appears that most of their village in Sweden came over together.

 

Genealogy..The one with who dies with the most ancestors, still dies!

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From Chad Cossey

Hello Carolyn,

Thank you for including me on the newsletter, here’s what I found thus far.

earliest I can find as far as paper documentation goes.

Jan VanCleef Father to Isbrandt VanCleef is Father to Capt. Aaron VanCleave  Father to Benjamin Samuel VanCleave  Father to Samuel Munson VanCleave is Father to Hiram VanCleave is Father to James Allen VanCleave is Father to Oral VanCleave is Father to Oral VanCleave Jr.  is Father to Victor Lee VanCleave (Cossey)  and Victor Cossey is Father to me Victor Chad Cossey (VanCleave)  and Scott Aaron Cossey (VanCleave).  Bet you hear this all the time, but my father named my brother Scott Aaron without even knowing his family history, my Brother served in the military not as a captain, but as a SGT in the USMC.  Anyways hope this helps, I would LOVE to reconnect, some of these men had other children and Kin themselves.  Jan’s history is amazing so is Capt Aaron’s with the Long Run massacre story 1781.  Because of Ancestry.com and a few other sites I believe I can show paper documnetation to fulfill one of the requirements for allowance into the society?

Thanks again,

Chad

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I, too, enjoyed Vince’s Article written that winter. I then looked up what D.D. Banta wrote ca. Shiloh.  I kept thinking Shiloh E of Franklin, Ind. But soon decided it was in Union Twp., Johnson Co., Ind.  Then looked up the Cem. book for Union Twp. and found the cem and church site. I knew where it was, but did not know the name.

Thanks, Vince, for all the great work you do.

Friend Ivan of Trafalgar

(Ivan D. Lancaster, a BOONE descendant)

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CHARLIE WESTERFIELD, professional photographer and Dutch Cousin of Louisville KY will present a slide show called “One (Dutch) Man’s America”. It features beautiful photos, great music, and an extremely intelligent and entertaining live narrator.

VINCE AKERS has agreed to be our Saturday Dinner keynote with, “A Photographic History of the Old Mud Meetinghouse”  He is going to prepare a slide show and info about the history and restoration of the Old Mud Meetinghouse, with the assistance of his son. Vince has culled historic photos from 1900 to the present. He has copies from several photo archives like the Historic American Buildings Survey in the early 1930s.  His own photos cover the last 40 years beginning in 1972.  So appropriate for the night before our rededication of the restored church.

OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE: On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and DEFINITELY a rededication. It is going to be a marvelous event. BE VERY PROUD!  Between 2005 and 2014  total contributions by Dutch Cousins to the HHS Old Mud Meetinghouse Restoration Fund came to $133,386. of which at least $76,000. was contributed by Vince Akers alone!

RUSSELL GASERO, an official of the Reformed churches of America, coming from New Brunswick NJ to help us celebrate the restoration of this wonderful 215-year- old Dutch treasure.

WORSHIP: Sunday worship at the Old Mud Meetinghouse is being planned by our Prez – John C. Westerfield, with his son Jeff coming to assist in the service.

VOLUNTEERS:  We can always use more volunteers in this all-volunteer Dutch army!

2017 COORDINATOR: Mr. Lynn Rogers of Dayton, Ohio, who did such a good job planning, coordinating and narrating the tour to Pleasant at Madison in 2013, has agreed to be Coordinator for the 2017 gathering. He will pick the place and time and let us know. So the cousins will go on! We need a volunteer assistant to help Lynn with the details.  Let me know if this is something you would like to try.

NEWSLETTER: Denise Merideth Perry of Somerville, Tennessee, agreed to be the new Dutch Cousins Newsletter Editor!  Wow! we are moving on!  What a wonderful group of people to work with. Each of the Committee chairpersons need to sending Denise information for the newsletter, telling what you have planned for the gathering and what you need help with.

PLANNING COMMITTEE 2015: Barbie Abbott Hamman, Janice Cozine, & Dr. Steve Henry, planning committee, have pulled together plans for a wonderful 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort Kentucky with lots of educational and entertaining events and speakers.

AUTHOR AND BOOK FAIR: Joan Murray of Palatine Illinois agreed to take care of signing up authors and advertising the books that will be available, so be sure to send a note (I will forward) if you have a book to show off and sell.  Either the author OR book must have a low Dutch connection. Joan plans to give each author five minutes to show off their book and tell the cousins.

Look at all these wonderful Volunteers!

REGISTRATION: Janice Cozine of KY is our queen!

NEWSLETTER EDITOR:  Denise Merideth Perry –

HISTORIAN: Barbara Whiteside of Indiana agreed to continue keeping our history.

DISPLAYS: Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin is in charge of the Family Group displays, also our wonderful webmaster!

HOSPITALITY:  Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will serve coffee and bagels every morning

SILENT AUCTION: John & Phyllis Westerfield will collect items and handle the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, our own personal official Dutch Cousins pro photographer

Tee SHIRTS:  Missi Mercer and Barbie Hamman, Missi is our old friend and angel from Shelbyville 2007

Harrodsburg & Old Mud rep: Amalie Preston

GREETERS:  ROD DEMPSEY! (but we still need a few more)

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK – as my Dutch grandmother used to say.

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Letters 5/2/2015

For more information about the Gathering, see past letters.
NOTE: 
We also still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

Certificate and award creator

OFFICERS: We need officer candidates; 2-year term, no pay but lots of fun.  If you are willing and able to take any of the elected officer positions, please hit reply and let me know ASAP. Please consider placing your name in nomination for a position. We’d like to have more than one for each position. Please do not nominate anyone without permission and an acknowledgment that the person is willing to serve (including yourself). We need people who will remain active, posting and responding to emails, willing to pitch in and stretch their limits! We need cousins who LOVE their Dutch ancestry and wear it with pride.

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Sent by Janice Cozine (our registration queen!)

I’M SO EXCITED….about the DC 2015 Gathering coming to Frankfort, Kentucky this year.

Frankfort is a beautiful and unique small town that happens to be the capital of our state…….and September is a beautiful time of year.

Frankfort is centrally located about 54 miles east of Louisville and 29 miles west of Lexington, for those of you flying in. There are so many places to visit and exciting things to do and see, I hope you can extend your stay, even for a day or two.

I believe this will be the BEST GATHERING EVER….thanks goes out to Barbie, Carolyn and Steve. They have so many good things lined-up and planned for us. 

If you’re thinking about missing this one…..you need to think again.

We’ve got the best place Frankfort has to offer in the center of town, at the Frankfort History Center and also having the history research library just upstairs. 

Our planned speakers are top-notch as always, so much knowledge about our Dutch heritage. The food is always wonderful coming from ‘The Family Affair’ catering service, we’ve used in the past. 

We can’t forget the Re-Dedication of Old Mud. It’s going to be so rewarding to see all the restoration that has been done on ‘our’ beautiful church. 

Some of the ‘cousins’ have already sent in their registration forms and checks.

Hope you have your RSVP at the Plaza Hotel before we run out of rooms.

I do have info on a couple of other hotels if the Plaza hotel becomes booked-up.

Just send me an email requesting the info. I’m not endorsing these places, you will need to check them out on your own and decide for yourself.  I’ll just give you the info needed to contact them. 

I will send you a confirmation email when I receive your registration form and check in the mail. The t-shirt order form is on page 2 of the registration form, you don’t have to print page 2 but please remember to list your shirt size on one of the forms.

If your check doesn’t clear the bank for several days, please don’t worry.  I will hold some checks until I get several checks to deposit at one time.

Can’t wait to see everyone again!!!

Looking forward to September 2015!!

Janice  Cozine  🙂

Dutch Cousins  Registration  Chair

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Sent by carolyn (herself)

Look at all these wonderful Volunteers!

REGISTRATION: Janice Cozine of KY is our queen!

NEWSLETTER EDITOR:  Denise Merideth Perry – 

HISTORIAN: Barbara Whiteside of Indiana agreed to continue keeping our history.

DISPLAYS: Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin is in charge of the Family Group displays, also our wonderful webmaster!

HOSPITALITY:  Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will serve coffee and bagels every morning

SILENT AUCTION: John & Phyllis Westerfield will collect items and handle the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, our own personal official Dutch Cousins pro photographer

Tee SHIRTS:  Missi Mercer and Barbie Hamman, Missi is our old friend and angel from Shelbyville 2007

Harrodsburg & Old Mud rep: Amalie Preston

GREETERS:  ROD DEMPSEY! (but we still need a few more)

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK – as my Dutch grandmother used to say.

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Sent by carolyn via Eastman Genealogy

The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2015 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

Indiana Genealogical Society Now Has More Than 1,500 Databases Online

(and hundreds of our Low Dutch moved to Indiana from Kentucky)

This is an excellent example of what an active genealogy society can accomplish. This week, the society proudly announced that it now has more than 1,500 databases on its website atwww.IndGenSoc.org! These databases are from all 92 counties, plus numerous statewide collections. Some are available to the public and others are accessible to IGS members only.

If you have Indiana ancestry, you want to check out the announcement at http://indgensoc.blogspot.com/2015/04/igs-now-has-more-than-1500-databases.html.

Do you have comments, questions, or corrections to this article? If so, please post your words at the end of this article in the Standard Edition newsletter’s web site where everyone can benefit from your words. You might also want to read comments posted by others there.

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Sent by Don Lott, via judy cassidy

 I am still managing the Low Dutch Cemeteries. The Trust Funds and the operational Improvement Fund account are all handled through the Adams County National Bank, Trust and Investment Services, P.O. Box 4566, Gettysburg, PA  17325 and the trust accounts are managed by Karen B Arthur, First Vice President & Senior Trust Officer.

Don Lott

140 Westview Drive

Elizabethtown, PA  17022-9794

From Carolyn:  

We visited the Low Dutch Conewago cemeteries on our “Dutch Footprints to New York” tour in 2011, walked among the tombstones and thought of the ancestors who never made it to Kentucky.  Like Rev.Cornelius Cozine.  Here is a hotlink to his memorial and photos of the replacement stone placed by Mr. Arthur Weaner.http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=cosine&GSiman=1&GScid=2386142&GRid=34308193&

 Notice the recent photo posted showing the extensive damage to the wall around the cemetery near Rev. Cosine’s stone.  If you can and wish to donate to the preservation and care of this ancestral cemetery, send a check to Mr. Lott.

The Low Dutch colonists of Conewago colony cleared farms and built homes along a road known then as the Low Dutch road — and the road is still listed and marked the same. When the group migrated thereThe Road extended Southwesterly from the junction of Little Conewago with Big Conewago Creek about 2 miles east of Hunterstown to the “Baltimore Pike” and down the pike to Two Taverns. The Low Dutch colony did not found a town, nor were they ambitious in that direction, but the densest parts of the settlement were those nearest the two extremities. The colony was shaped something like a half moon with a cemetery at either end. Both cemeteries still exist and are maintained. The listings are on FindaGrave, but many of the burials are listed incorrectly in both burial grounds. Efforts to get this corrected has been ineffective.

The Northern Low Dutch (http://bit.ly/1bVkH6b) shows 64 burials at 900 Swift Run Road. To visit the Northern Low Dutch Cemetery, East of Gettysburg PA, just before you get to New Oxford, on Rt 30. Go north on Swift Run Road about 3 miles. The old Banta Cabin is on the left and a short distance further the cemetery on the right. That part of Straban Twp, York County is now in Adams County.

The Southern burial ground Low Dutch Cemetery located at 2010 Low Dutch Road which we visited in 2011, is much smaller.

 The Low Dutch colony did not found a town, nor were they ambitious in that direction, but the densest parts of the settlement were those nearest the two extremities.

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Sent by Jack Taylor

 Visiting The Netherlands?

from Jack TAYLOR

 

This is elementary for most of us, but might need to be reviewed if you are a “Tree Climber” traveling to The Netherlands. 

 

If this following paragraph is confusing to you read further: “If you find someone in The Netherlands with the same last name as your Dutch ancestor that arrived in America in the New Netherlands period of time there is little chance that you have a common ancestor because of that name.”  Why?  Because of different naming systems.   

 

 An Example:  Through my mother’s father’s direct male line I trace back to the first immigrant to America from The Netherlands to Staten Island in the1650’s.  His name was Arent Teunissen van Hengel (with several variant spellings). If I go to The Netherlands today and find someone with the surname Van HENGEL there is little chance that we have common Van HENGEL ancestors.

 

Why?

 

In the time period that our Dutch ancestors arrived in America they were using a different naming system.  Analyzing the name of my ancestor it meant:

1. Arent = a given name. (There was a system which might have been followed in which he was named after an ancestor, but it was not necessarily followed.)

2. Teunissen = Son of Teunis

3. van = from

4. Hengel = a location name.  In this case, Hengelo, Gelderland, NL.

 

So, in that time period people who lived in Hengelo, Gelderland, NL, who were not kin to each other often used van Hengel.  

To further confuse things.  In the process of changing to our present system of naming many different names, often with many different spellings, were adopted. But that is a different story.

 

See many of you cousins in Frankfort, KY, in September.

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Sent by David Smock

Re the pronunciation of “ij:”  The sound does not exist in English but a rough approximation would be “ae,” the same as “ei” in Dutch. However, my van Dale Groot Wordenboek (Dutch English dictionary)  lists works beginning with “ij” under “i) and only “y” words (only 33 total) under “y.”  In old Dutch, both the “ij” and “y” were used, but I am not clear on what the difference was. You are quite right, Jim, about how Dutch names are listed. 

David Smock 

in re: Jim Cozine (Van der Cozijne?)

I’m looking at the Dutch Phone book online again and remember that once you asked me

what the vd stood for behind the Cozijne names I had found like:

Cozijne H vd

Oldenallerhout 166, 3845ED Harderwijk 0341-410717

Well – I see this in the book “At Home in Holland” A Practical Guide for Living in The Netherlands

By The American Women’s Club of the Iague –this is online at google books 

pg 123

Tips for Using Dutch Phone Books: First, make sure you are looking in the right city

as most books cover several communities. Dutch phone books are arranged – for the most

part- alphabetically. However, keep in mind: Dutch “ij” is equivalent to “y” and is listed

alphabetically with “y” i.e., “Kontrast” comes before “Konijnenburg” in the white pages.

pg 124

When a name begins with prefixes such as van, de, der and ter, the prefix is treated

as an initial. For instance, Jan van der Molen is written as Molen, J. vd in the phone

book, and listed under “M’ for Molen

Hi David

cc Carolyn

re “IJ”

Thanks for the help – It’s still a tongue twister for me.

I do see where one Dutch pronunciation guide said 

“ij” is an “ey” sound  – like in day, but close to die

So your right, we don’t have that sound in English – I’m passing on this one..

All the best – Jim C

 You are very welcome, Jim.  Many sounds in Dutch are difficult and I do not pretend to an authority on Dutch pronunciation. (French and Spanish I do know.) Even Germans have a hard time getting the pronunciation of some words right (e. g,. Schevingen). I think that you can hear Dutch words and speech on the Internet but I’m not sure what sites to check. I asked a colleague of mine who had served in The Hague if he had learned any of the Dutch language, and he replied derisively that Dutch was not a language but a disease of the throat! Most Dutch people speak excellent English (and also French and German when I visited there in 1947). I have been reading and studying about the Netherlands since the age of ten and got my first Dutch dictionary when I was in the eighth grade in school, learning most of what I do know about the language on my own, although I took some lessons as a teenager from an elderly Dutch gentleman who, as I later found out, spoke with a Frisian accent!  Incidentally, he was working in South Africa during the so-called “Boer War” and was a member of the militia unit charged with guarding Winston Churchill when he escaped, for which they all caught hell!   

Best regards,

David

 

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Sent by Ellie Burnaford

Carolyn, you have probably already seen all this, but I just happened on to the site and found it interesting…

Ellie Burnaford

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vanaersdalen/VanguardIndex.html

Here you will find the flagship journal of the van Aersdalen Family Association, The Vanguard.

Unfortunately, The Vanguard is presently on hiatus. However, during its publication

from July 1998 to July 2003, genealogical data pertinent to all Vans descended

from Sijmon Jansz van Aersdalen was presented in a lively and colorful

format from Vans across the United States … and even Belgium!

Enjoy!

|| Home ||

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Sent by carolyn

from Dutch Genealogy News

People in the Netherlands did not have ‘middle’ names. They could have one or more first names, followed by their last name. But even if they had two first names, they would be considered two first names and not a first and a middle name.

Before say 1700, most people had just one first name. Afterwards, giving a child multiple first names became popular in some regions. In Catholic families, you can sometimes see a whole string of first names, like “Cornelia Adriana Maria.”

In some regions the second name was used as the call name. For instance, my grandmother Gesiena Wilhelmina Woordes from Winterswijk was known as “Mien,” a diminutive of Wilhelmina and her sister Aleida Gesiena was called “Sien,” a diminutive of Gesiena.

kerk is a church. Before 1811, the records that the churches kept of baptisms, marriages and burials are the main sources for vital events.

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Letters 5/12/2015

about the Gathering Sept 25-26

THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT SOON!   Get your registrations sent to Janice Cozine – here’s a hotlink if you misplaced yours:

GOT #DUTCH?  2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering #Registration – click here: http://bit.ly/1dlO5HH

Dutch Cousins T-Shirt/Lapel pin order click here: http://bit.ly/1GBmf6Y

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center. (NOT right next to where we will be meeting as I thought previously.) Thanks to Janice for getting me straightened out on the Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history all in Frankfort and close, but not the same so it may be too far to walk for some people (like me – LOL)

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and rededication, Moday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open especially for us cousins from 10 to 3.

NOTE: We also still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

Certificate and award creator

OFFICERS: We need officer candidates; 2-year term, no pay but lots of fun.  If you are willing and able to take any of the elected officer positions, please hit reply and let me know ASAP. Please consider placing your name in nomination for a position. We’d like to have more than one for each position. Please do not nominate anyone without permission and an acknowledgment that the person is willing to serve (including yourself). We need people who will remain active, posting and responding to emails, willing to pitch in and stretch their limits! We need cousins who LOVE their Dutch ancestry and wear it with pride.

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Sent by Jean Simon

Thank you, Carolyn, for such an interesting Dutch Letters of today, 2 May, below.  I love languages.  I used to teach French and Spanish.  Before your group went to New Jersey and New York, I had come upon a Dutch native registered nurse in Juno Beach, Florida.  It was she who told me, in my phonetic spelling, dank u vell, was thank you very much, in Dutch.  So much like our thank you well!  Consequently, I remembered passing that phrase on to the gentleman in Farragut (in some mid-west state), before your Dutch Cousins big trip to the east coast, to which our Dutch ancestors came.

 

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Sent by Vince Akers

Carolyn, Vince just sent this information to me regarding the 1800 subscription list for the Salt River Congregation.  Can you please include it in the newsletter.  Perhaps we should try and find out if it still remains with this family or if it was donated and where, if so.  Judy

Here is the site:  Perhaps you can paste and copy it.

https://archive.org/stream/recordoffamilyof00alle#page/61/mode/2up/search/canine

The 1800 subscription paper was first published in Carrie E. Allen, A Record of the Family of Isaac Van Nuys (or Vannice) of Harrodsburg, Kentucky son of Isaac Van Nuys of Millstone, New Jersey (1916), pages 34-35.  She said it was then in possession of S.N. Vannice at Russell, Iowa.

Judy Cassidy

(NOTE FROM CAROLYN (HERSELF) – I have seen this list somewhere a couple times before.  I think it is in the Old Mud Meetinghouse dedication booklet which was handed out at one of our gatherings.  Anyone remember?)

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Sent by Carolyn

I think I lost an email.  If you sent one asking a question and have not received an answer, please re-send.  It has been a crazy busy week here as I have participated in genealogy board meetings and the annual writers federation conference and my granddaughters college grad – and a few other time & energy consuming things!  (besides working on the exciting Dutch Cousins gathering and helping Denise get the newsletter together. Keep watching your mail box – it is coming!)

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Sent by Darwin Saylor

In case we have forgotten.

 http://www.facebook.com/notes/william-j-federer/am

Begin forwarded message:

From: American Minute <mail@americanminute.com>

Date: May 6, 2015 6:30:06 AM PDT

To: 

Subject: Manhattan Island purchase – The Dutch Golden Age

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Sent by Charlie Westerfield

Charlie has created an incredible historic collector print montage of Old Mud Meetinghouse and will have them at the Gathering for sale, with 10% of all sales going to Old Mud preservation.

 

MAT AND GLOSS PRINTS 8×20 or 13×19; Metal prints 20×24 and 11×14.  Metal prints are printed on metal. They come with their own hanger system, and require no frames. The metal makes a print that is so vivid it seems to be illuminated.They are like a glass window, you can spray them with window cleaner and wipe with a cloth to keep clean.   I will have One print available for sale, all others will be on order + shipping and handling extra.  He will also have some of his fantastic “Covered Bridge” Note Cards and calendars. You may want to place your orders now to be delivered at the gathering. <charlie@charliewesterfield.com>

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Sent by Charlie Westerfield

We are planning a photo trip in May to NYC and New England. Plan to come back

by way of Conewago. Can you suggest what we might look for to photograph?

NOTE:  FROM CAROLYN – OMG where do I begin?

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Sent by Carolyn

Now available from Amazon.com

$20.90

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Sent by Kathy Cummings

Hello Dutch Cousins,

 

I have been working with Fort Boonesborough and the Fort Boonesborough Foundation on a new event this June 13 & 14, 2015.

 

It is event to learn more about ancestors that came through Fort Boonesborough in the 18th century. You can read more about it  www.fortboonesboroughlivinghistory.org/html/descendants.html

 

Thought you might want to pass it along to your members. There are also still a few spots open if you were interested in setting up a table.  I was recently reminded while reading the new book Women at Boonesborough by Harry Enoch and Anne Crabbe just how many of the Low Dutch passed though Boonesborough.

I realize the flier and info look complete – but since I do the website we could always get you added should you have anyone that wants to participate as a group. Would also welcome anyone that just wants to come for a day and share their knowledge!

Sincerely,

Kathy Cummings

Graphic Enterprises/Pioneer Times

www.graphicenterprises.net

www.graphicenterpriseswebdesign.com

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Sent by Beverly Sullivan

Carolyn, I am so glad to get your email.  I have been worrying that you made it through the storms okay.  So good to know you are okay.  Jean Pollard, our friend Jo Kilduff and I plan on attending the reunion this year.  I look forward to seeing you again then.

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Letters 5/19/2015

about the Gathering Sept 25-26

THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT SOON!   Send your registration to Janice Cozine – here’s a hotlink if you misplaced yours:

GOT #DUTCH?  2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering #Registration – click here: http://bit.ly/1dlO5HH

Dutch Cousins T-Shirt/Lapel pin order click here: http://bit.ly/1GBmf6Y

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center.  The Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history are all in Frankfort and close, but not the same so it may be too far to walk for some people (like me – LOL)

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and rededication, Moday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open especially for us cousins from 10 to 3.

NOTE: We also still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

Certificate and award creator

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Sent by LISA ALLEN

Hello,

I love your site; it’s been an inspiration for me in my research of my Banta and Demarest ancestors.

Do you have some favorite resources that have been particularly helpful in your research?

Thank you,

Lisa

NOTE FROM CAROLYN- any Banta and Demaree/Demarests have suggestions?

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Sent by carolyn

Obituary: Isaac Newton Durboraw

From the Gettysburg Times, Gettysburg PA July 16, 1895

Squire Durboraw of Mountjoy Township meets a sudden death An honorable ancestry and useful life-he will be missed

A distressing fatal accident occurred at 8:30 o’clock yesterday (Monday) morning in Mountjoy Township one mile north of Two Taverns.  Mr. S. J. Bercaw, who lives along the Baltimore Pike is preparing to build a new barn, and a dozen of his neighbors and friends had gathered there yesterday morning to help him tear down his old barn preparatory to the raising of the new one.  Before harvest, Mr. Bercaw had removed the roof and weatherboarding and the frame, alone remained.  Among those neighbors was Squire I.N. Durboraw.  He was standing on the top of the roof stool and was helping to take down the purling plate.  In letting down the plate it may have jarred the cross-tie on which the Squire stood or it may have been slightly struck by it, or he took a step backward; and the fell from his position to the ground, a distance of 16 feet.  In his fall his head and feet were nearly together and he struck his head on one of the heavy joists.  He was quickly carried to the house by Josephus Mills and Mr. Bercaw.  Dr. G. Noel of Bonneauville was hastily summoned.  He never spoke after the accident though he retained consciousness.  His wife was soon by his side and in answer to her inquiry as to the location fo his injury, he motioned to the back of his head.  He took both his wife’s hands in his his and was thought to have murmured; “I am goin”.  He was carried to his home on as settee but died just as he reached there.

Mr. Durboraw was born October 31, 1838.  His father was Samuel Durboraw who twice represented this county in Legislature in 1858 and again in 1869.  His mother was Mary Jane Horner, daughter of Alexander Horner.  Squire Durboraw enlisted June 8, 1861 in Co. K 1st Pennsylvania Reserves and was wounded at Charles City Crossroads on June 30, 1862.  In 1864 he married Margaret Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Conover to whom were born eight children.  Mr. Durboraw was a lifelong Republican, casting his vote for Abraham Lincoln.  His father served the township for 25 years and he exceeded this by nearly 10 years.  His seventh term would have expired next February.  Though the township was Democratic, Mr. Durboraw was never beaten for justice of the peace and served seven terms as school director.  He settled many estates, was popular and widely known as a reputable, kind, and patriotic man.  He was an extremely useful man in his community and his death will be widely deplored.  He held office under hte last Republican clerk of the House of Representatives at Washington but lost his position upon the election of a Democratic House.  In 1888 he was a candidate on the Republican ticket for the Legislature but was beaten.  The vote was Durboraw 3380; Cole and Brown, Democrats 3757 and 3717, respectively.

The funeral will be held at 10 o’clock Wednesday morning and the interment will be in Evergreen cemetery.  Corporal Skelly Post of which he was a member will turn out to the obsequies.

The Durboraws have lived in Mountjoy since 1804 and have been identified with all that was right and good in [this] life.”

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Sent by Barbara Whiteside

thanks…..got my invite with my BOONE SOCIETY newsletter a couple of weeks ago and hope I can get there…..besides my Dutch lines…Hendrick Banta 3rd and his son, John, in particular, I had several others including Daniels oldest sister, Sarah Boone WIlcoxson there with her husband John and their son Daniel who helped his uncle build the fort………now to get that book mentioned in the email……gotta have it.

barb

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Sent by carolyn

Look at all these wonderful Volunteers for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort KY

REGISTRATION: Janice Cozine of KY

NEWSLETTER EDITOR:  Denise Merideth Perry  of TN

HISTORIAN: Barbara Whiteside of Indiana agreed to continue keeping our history.

DISPLAYS: Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin is in charge of the Family Group displays, she is also our wonderful webmaster!

HOSPITALITY:  Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will serve coffee and bagels every morning

SILENT AUCTION: John & Phyllis Westerfield of PA will collect items and handle the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, volunteer to serve as our own personal official Dutch Cousins pro photographer

Tee SHIRTS:  Barbie Hamman and Missi Mercer of KY; Missi our old friend and angel from Shelbyville 2007

Harrodsburg & Old Mud rep: Amalie Preston of H-burg KY

GREETERS:  ROD DEMPSEY! (but we still need a few more)

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK – as my Dutch grandmother used to say.

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Sent by Jim Cozine of Las Vegas

Thank You, Carolyn –  I’m happy to help you in any way I can.

Sorry I could not step forward but still have no relief

from my Membership Chair with the Navy Vets and it is

eating up 2 + hours a DAY.

Thanks again – Jim

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Sent by Joyce (Westerfield Collins)

Who can help Joyce about the airport?

Dear Carolyn,

What airport should we use to get to Frankfort?

Looking forward to the gathering.

Cousin Love,

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Sent by Carolyn

Someone sent me a note about confusion on our website. I regret to learn someone started a website named Dutch Cousins of Kentucky,

please do not be confused.

 

Our official website is still www.DutchCousins.org.

 

That is where you will find the correct information about our group.

Our webmaster for the past several years is still Pam Ellingson

and she is doing an excellent job.

Kudos to Pam!

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Sent by James Streeter

Last gathering was a joyful time, a lot of new faces, just don’t remember this happy trio.       jim

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Sent by Steve Carlisle

Sorry, I don’t know them.

 

Steve & Jeannie Noe Carlisle

Split Stump Acres

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Sent by Donna Gaines

(the ladies) I wonder if they were part of the Riker/Ryker group that came or local to the area.

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Sent by Chad Cossey

Broken link… 🙁  I can not retrieve the pic.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – I don’t understand the internet, but the dutch letters go out in a mass mail to all 700plus addresses. Some people get the attachments and some don’t.  I don’t know what to do about that.

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Sent by Deandra Bishop

(the laughing ladies) Yes Lela is my mother and Thelma is her sister, my aunt.

I flew to Kansas City to meet them and the three of us drove to the reunion.  We had such a good time and enjoyed being in the places that our ancestors lived.

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Sent by Vicki Bivens

Sorry I have no idea (who they are), but it is a wonderful picture!

On May 15, 2015 4:02 PM, Carolyn <buffalo234@cox.net> wrote:

CAN anyone tell me the names of these three lovely ladies attending their first Dutch cousins gathering in 2013 at Madison Indiana?

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Sent by Juanita Lewis

(the laughing ladies) Sorry the picture didn’t come through. Juanita

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Sent by Carolyn

Janice Cozine sent me her address list, and I’ve spent several hours updating the addresses, and am sending all 700  on to our newsletter editor.

If you want to receive a hardcopy be sure we have your current and correct mailing address. It is very expensive when we mail the Newsletters out and they come bouncing back because someone forgot to let us know their address changed.

If you are part of the Paperless society (LOL) and just want the email copy (which everyone will receive unless their browser strips attachments), please hit reply and let us save the postage on a hard copy.

In the future, Denise will be responsible for the US mail addresses. I will continue keeping up with the emails and the Dutch Letters –unless it gets to be too much LOL.

You can hit reply and send me any addresses which I will forward to her.

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Sent by judy cassidy

Carolyn, I would like to discuss some Vannice family information with Larry, Would you kindly send me his email or give him mine.  Thanks Judy Cassidy

NOTE FROM CAROLYN: The advantage of having questions and answers posted unselfishly on the “letters” is that everyone benefits. I will send Judy’s address to our correspondent Larry and he can do as he pleases.

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Sent by carolyn for Amalie

From the most recent issue of H-burg Historical Soc. Olde Towne Ledger (#148)

Addn to Alma Ray Ison files, gtoup sheets on BANTA: Jacob, James H, Petr J, & Samuel; LUYSTER, Stephen.

OLD MUD: Installed door and transom in the West end, mud panel replacements begun, plan to have reclaimed poplar flooring installed in time for Dutch Cousins homecoming and rededication. New metal roof on school house and plan to add modern facilities here for use, First wedding held in many years by 5th great granddaughter of Jacob Coert VOORHEES, pioneer Dutch member.

Circuit Court Records – 323 of 438 contibuted; $43 per disk for years 1780 to 1865.

HHS Dues ($20 per person) payable each May; Harrodsburg Historical Society, box 316, H-burg, KY 40330-0316.

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Letters 5/24/2015

THE COUSINS ARE COMING!

The Dutch Cousins of Kentucky will gather in Frankfort KY for their biEnnual reunion of descendants September 24-28, 2015.

If you had an ancestor named Banta, Bergen, Bodine, Brewer, Demaree, Dorland, Duree, Cosart, Cozine, Monfort, Rider, Shuck, Smock, Stagg, Terhune, VanArsdale, Van Nuys, Voris, Vorhees, or Westervelt (various spellings on all names) who settled in Kentucky 1780 to 1820, then you are probably one of us – Dutch Cousins, or descendants of the Kentucky Low Dutch settlers.

Our ancestors adopted the term “Low Dutch” to distinguish themselves as being from the low countries of Holland and Europe rather than High Dutch from Germany, also called Dutchmen. A colony of Low Dutch settlers – 50 families in all – first came to Mercer County KY in 1781 and built the Old Mud Meetinghouse on the frontier, the first Low Dutch Reformed Church building west of the Alleghenies. It is a miracle the structure is still there, restored, and to be rededicated at this gathering.

After a few years around Harrodsburg (then Fort Harrod), the group purchased from Squire Boone (brother of Daniel) the “Low Dutch Tract” of eight to ten thousand acres with Bantatown (present-day Pleasureville) at the center. Land titles clouded with conflicting claims, and many years passed before those battles were settled. Title to many acres were lost but the area is still known as the Low Dutch Tract.  In the meantime, industrious Low Dutch people continued fighting off Indian attacks and struggled to finally turn the frontier into their homeland dream.

The Cousins gathering will begin in Frankfort, the capital of Kentucky, founded at a ford on the Kentucky River. Our event features popular dinner speakers and family displays in the Kentucky History Center, tours of the Old Governor’s Mansion and other historic sites, an hour of dinner music by Miss Kentucky 2015, the caravan to Old Mud Meetinghouse and more.

To be on the e-mail list to learn more about the group and the gathering, send an email to Carolyn Leonard at Editor234@gmail.com. or visit my website www.carolynbleonard.com (choose Dutch Cousins); or our official website www.DutchCousins.org

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Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered and long-loved.

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GOT #DUTCH?  2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering #Registration – click here: http://bit.ly/1dlO5HH

Dutch Cousins T-Shirt/Lapel pin order click here: http://bit.ly/1GBmf6Y

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here’s the schedule so far: Low Dutch Cousins Schedule 2015

 

*Thursday, Sept 24

3 pm Start Set up Family History Tables, Silent Auction items, book displays & sales

4-6 pm Early Registration Brown-Foreman Room, KHS

Dinner on your own or box lunches for workers

6:30 pm:  Kickoff: Charlie Westerfield, “One (Dutch) Man’s America” slide show

 

*Friday, Sept 25 (Open to public unless business meeting in same room)

8:30:  Coffee & registration in KHS Brown-Foreman Room

9:00:  Family History Tables, Silent Auction items, book displays & sales open

11:00-2 pm Box Lunch and business meeting (Officers, Board and Registered cousins only)– meeting maybe in another room or in the garden so we don’t have to shut out any visitors to view the books, displays, etc.

2:30 Steve Henry tour will begin at the Old Governor’s Mansion at 2:30. The garden is shared by the KHS and Mansion, a convenient location to begin the tour. We will then travel by bus to the other locations to be announced. At end, bus will drop off at both KHS & the Capital Plaza.

6:00: Tour returns to Capital Plaza, KHS

7:00:  Dinner Buffet – Keynote – Firth Haring Fabend   “Patroons and Plowmen, Pietism and               Politics”

 

 

*Saturday, Sept 26 (open to public until noon)

9:00   Coffee – Brown-Foreman Room open- Meet your Cousins, Family Genealogy tables, Networking, Silent Auction, Books for sale, displays open

10:00 Welcome by Mayor (intro by Barbie), Forever Miss America Heather sings God Bless America?, Leads My Old Kentucky home?

10:30-11:30….. open – TBA

11:45  Group photos – Charlie Westerfield

12:00  Lunch: Speaker –Greg Huber, “How the Dutch Built Their Barns”

2:00  Speaker (repeat?) – Charlie Westerfield, “One (Dutch) Man’s America”

4:00  Book sale & Autograph Party

5:00  Book sale and Silent Auction ends.

6:00            A little dinner music! 2015 Miss Kentucky entertains (Steve Henry intro)

6:30  Dinner buffet – Keynote ~ Vince Akers with a slide show, A Pictorial History of the Old Mud Meetinghouse and Restoration.

 

 

*Sunday, Sept 27

9:30  Check out & leave Frankfort

9:30 Caravan (one and a half hour drive) to Harrodsburg, KY

11:30 Lunch at 19th Hole, Harrodsburg, KY

1:00 Old Mud Meetinghouse gates open

2:00 Worship at Old Mud Meeting House, Harrodsburg, KY -PUBLIC INVITED

Re-dedication of Old Mud – Russell Gasero, CA, New Brunswick, NJ

Lay speaker: Jeffrey Westerfield –

Music: Eddie Sherrow of Harrodsburg

2:30 (or immediately following worship) Old Mud Rededication by Russell Gasero;

Russell GASERO, ARCHIVIST of the REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA, coming from New Brunswick NJ to help us celebrate the restoration of this wonderful 215-year- old Dutch treasure. BE VERY PROUD!  BETWEEN 2005 and 2014 total contributions by Dutch Cousins to the HHS Old Mud Meetinghouse Restoration Fund came to $133,386.  More work awaits, especially on the little old 1900 schoolhouse beside the church.

 

*Monday, Sept 28

10 till 3:  Harrodsburg Historical Library open for cousins to research (usually closed on Mondays)

Other activity suggestions for Monday:   Enjoy a day at the living history of Pleasant Hill Shaker Village about ten minutes away from Harrodsburg maybe on Monday – delicious food at the Trustees house, reservations required  – http://www.shakervillageky.org/ You might also want to spend some time at the Harrodsburg Historical Library and bring some of your Dutch history materials to donate to the only archive for Low Dutch history.

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Please send a thank you note to each of these people who have worked so hard to prepare the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering.

2015 Executive Committee:

President: John C. Westerfield of Pennsylvania <jcw44@juno.com301-535-8633

Vice President: Tommy Green of Oklahoma <tagreen@swbell.net580-716-0936

Secretary: Carolyn Leonard of Oklahoma <Buffalo234@cox.net405-720-2324

Treasurer: Diana Davis of Virginia <dianadavis8@aol.com757-536-1905

Webmaster: Pam Ellingson, Lakewood, WI <ellingson.pam@gmail.com715-276-7129

Finance Chairman:  Vince Akers of Indiana <VinceAkers@yahoo.com317-695-4514

Board of Directors:

Barbie Abbott Hamman of Kentucky <rbhamman@att.net502-291-3093

Jim Cozine of Nevada <coz999@embarqmail.com702-871-5304

Barbara Whiteside of Indiana <ktdink@gmail.com812-945-9067

President Emeritus Claude Westerfield of Iowa <dcwesterfield@yahoo.com712-435-9150

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2016 and (after much arm twisting and begging) here is the Nominating Committee report for the 2017 gathering:

President:  Carolyn Leonard (no one else would accept) of OKC, OK

Vice President: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, KY

Secretary:  Denise Merideth Perry of Somerville, TN

Treasurer: Janice Cozine of Mt Washington KY

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Letters 5/26/2015

Sent by carolyn

From the New England Historical Society

Free Military Database Access
To commemorate Memorial Day we are providing free access to “Colonial Soldiers and Officers in New England, 1620-1775” and “Massachusetts Revolutionary War Pensioners’ Receipts, 1799-1807 and 1829-1837.” These important databases, available only atAmericanAncestors.org, are available to guest users through Wednesday, May 27.

Register as a guest user to begin your search today!

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Sent by Jack Taylor

First Low Dutch Settlers of KY*

“GOAL & MISSION:  We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. . .”

The goal & mission seems to limit membership to the New Netherlanders who passed through the Gettysburg, PA area and not consider the other early Dutch settlers to KY.  Shouldn’t it include their cousins who came directly from Old New Netherlands to KY.

I am a part of the Conewago bunch through BANTA, Des MARETS, etc. who seemed to mostly trace back through PA and the French Patent area of David Des MARETS in northern NJ. But, I also have Barent REYNERSON who probably was never in PA.

Barent was born, 1756, in the “Garden of the Dutch” Raritan River area not far from the Holy of Holy Archives of the Dutch Reformed Church Seminary at Rutgers U.  He probably came through the Wilderness Trail and the Cumberland Gap as many New Netherlanders did to KY.

 

Barrent’s male ancestors including all the mothers were New Netherlanders.  His first direct line ancestor was Arent Teunissen van Hengel, who brought his family to Staten Island in ~1653.

Let me add another New Netherlander family that came through the gap to KY. They are not my kin, but I have worked on the family because I have a friend by that name,  (van) SWEARINGEN. They were at the fort at Boonesborough, KY. They trace back to the far south of New Netherlands on the Delaware River. If there ever were more patriotic New Netherlanders I have not found them. They chose to fight the English instead of what that traitorous Peter Stuyvesant did when Sutyvesant made his famous, immortal, traitorous, surrender speech: “Pour me another beer.”

 

Let me say I am no “expert historian” so the above has questionable thoughts.  But then I kind of agree with the following two people.

 

1.On C-Span a “Historian” who also writes “Historic Novels”  was asked: “Which do you prefer to write, history or fiction based on history?”

His answer: “It’s all fiction.”

 

  1. And, Hitler who during WW 2 said:  “Don’t worry about what we are doing, the winners write the history books.”

 

Want further evidence?  It’s on the Internet, so it must be true.

*First Low Dutch Settlers of KY

 

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~lowdutch/Kentucky/firstldsettlersky.html

 

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Sent by Charlie Westerfield

Carolyn, Leaving Friday, no suggestions yet on what to shoot in Conewago.

NOTE:  FROM CAROLYN

Conewago is not shown on regular maps, however, the roads were, Swift Run Road, Low Dutch Road. The main one is a little north and east of Gettysburg, and a little east of Hunterstown, PA.

Several people, trying to visualize the layout of the Conewago Church,  have asked if there was a village surrounding the Conewago Reformed Dutch Church and the northern cemetery.

The  first Church and Northern cemetery, located along today’s Swift Run Road, was built on the tract of Henry Banta and was surrounded by farms, much as the Northern cemetery is today. Both were situated well north of todays  Rt. 30.

But there was no Conewago Village which sprung up around it.

Any industry such as tanning or blacksmithing seems to have been located on the property belonging to the individual owning the business, much the same as you will see if you visit the “back road areas” of Lancaster County. Also today  “out in the country” you will come across a school or church located on a section of someones farm, the Conewago Reformed Dutch Church was much the same idea. And since the Church was strictly for this group of Reformed Dutch they did not build it for anyone but themselve!

You might even say they were a “closed society” at that time. They were strictly serving the members of their community, unlike other groups who were actively recruiting. So it wasn’t necessary to build in an area which would attract new members not of the Reformed Dutch faith.  Later Rev. Cozine deeded the lot along York Road (Rt. 30) and the church moved to this more central location which was more practical for the congregation travel wise. York Road was a major route of transportation and while there were a few businesses such as a tavern located up and down the road but in those days not actually near the Church but again no village as such.

The Southern cemetery location was strictly located in an area convenient for those whose farms were located in that area, however, other non Dutch families did use it also eventually. This cemetery was built at a later date.

Both cemeteries are maintained by a Trust to which descendants or others contribute

Here’s some hotlinks with info & pics of Conewago:

http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard.com/conewago_photos.html

http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard.com/LowDutchHeritage/Entries/2011/12/4_Day_2%2C_Conewago_Colony.html

http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard.com/LowDutchHeritage/Entries/2013/7/19_The_Church_at_Conewago.html

http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard.com/LowDutchHeritage/Entries/2013/7/16_Entry_1.html

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=cr&CRid=2386142&CScn=northern+low+dutch&CScntry=4&CSst=40&

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Sent by Russell Gasero

Carolyn,

The Dutch Reformed Church changed its name in 1867 to Reformed Church in America. It wasn’t an easy process to change the name. The documents opposing it are interesting and show that for some keeping the name the same was an almost Biblical issue. Some of the simplest issues can create the greatest controversies.

I had an idea this afternoon that some of the books we publish in our Historical Series might be of interest to some of the Dutch Cousins. In particular, three that cover the colonial period:

The Dutch Reformed Church in the American Colonies, by Gerald De Jong (http://www.eerdmans.com/Products/1741/the-dutch-reformed-church-in-the-american-colonies.aspx)

Transatlantic Pieties: Dutch Clergy in Colonial America, by Leon Van den Broeke, Hans Krabbendam, and Dirk Mouw (http://www.eerdmans.com/Products/6972/transatlantic-pieties.aspx)

Sing to the Lord a New Song: Choirs in the Worship and Culture of the Dutch Reformed Church in America, 1785-1860, by David Tripold (http://www.eerdmans.com/Products/6874/sing-to-the-lord-a-new-song.aspx)

I would work to arrange a discount of 20-30% for the meeting and people could pre-order them. I would bring the required number of books with me when I come. This could be publicized in your newsletter, if you allow such items.

It’s a rush on this, however. I’m out in Grand Rapids on June 8 & 9 and can pick up a number of volumes from Eerdmans at that time to bring back with me. I’m coming out with a cargo van of records to put in our off-site storage facility and then going to Chicago for our annual General Synod meeting. If this is an acceptable possibility, I would pick up a carton of each and bring them with me.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – I think that is a great idea, and let’s see how many will pre-order thro the DUTCH LETTERS. I wonder if the Kentucky Historical Society bookstore would be interested in handling any you don’t sell to the cousins?  Maybe Barbie or Janice could send the phone number or check on that for you?

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Sent by Carolyn Reed Miller, Switzerland County, Indiana

The three ladies who were at the Dutch Cousins gathering were myself, my sister Tootie Leap (on Facebook) and my sister Pam Reed at pkreed@sie.edu  (and on Facebook).  We are descendants of the Carnines.  We have one relative left behind when the Carnines came to Switzerland County, Indiana, buried either at Pleasureville Cemetery or on the farm of the Carnines in Shelby County.  If anyone has any information concerning this burial, we would be so appreciative to receive it.

 

Sent by Deandra Bishop

NOTE: from carolyn – now I am really confused.  I thought we identified the three laughing ladies as  sisters Lela and Thelma, and Lela’s daughter Deandra Bishop.

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Sent by carolyn

Seventeenth-Century Persons Who Lived in Holland and North America:

Genealogical and Historical Notes on Their Lives, Families and Activities

Original research projects by Cor Snabel and Elizabeth A. Johnson

Index: http://17thcenturyhollanders.pbworks.com/w/page/742574/Index—————————————————–

Sent by Vince Akers

Carolyn, glad to help!  By coincidence, my daughter and I were taking my father around this afternoon to put flowers on graves in the Greenwood, Indiana, cemetery where four generations of Akers are buried.  My father reminded me there is a section in the old part where the earliest graves were relocated from the old Presbyterian and Baptist graveyards in town.

I had not seen the big bronze historical marker placed there (see attached photos) which says the old pioneers (note the Low Dutch names) came from Mercer County.  Greenwood is indeed one of the “other Indiana churches” besides Hopewell and Franklin that was an offspring of Old Mud as mentioned in my original e-mail response.

My mother, who died just this spring, came up from the Low Dutch Tract after she graduated in 1942 from Pleasureville High School to visit for the summer with distant Demaree cousins whose family had come to Indiana in the first half of the 19th century.  Working in Greenwood she met my father and the rest is history!  Vince

The sign says: Pioneers rest here: Pioneers who were first buried in the Presbyterian and Baptist cemeteries were reburied in this plot. Among those resting here are: Garrett and Mary Verbryk Brewer, original owners of this ground in 1825. John B and Jane Brewer Smock, who built the first cabin in Greenwood in 1823. James SMOCK, original landowner and first postmaster in 1828, and William Kintner the first persob buried ib Greenwood – 1827. Most of the early settlers came from Mercer County Kentucky.

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Sent by Jim Woodfill

(inre: three laughing ladies)

Beats the hell out of me.  I don’t even remember seeing them, although I circulated around quite a bit at that gathering, and saw a lot of new faces.

Sorry not to be of help.  See you in Frankfort!

p.s.  I wonder if one of them was the “young lady” who bought me breakfast at the Clifty, then split?  Naaah–I doubt it!  But that’s stilla puzzle to me.   jw

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Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers

Coordinator for 2017 – update on progress

I am too busy to tell you how busy I am.  6 yards of mulch in my driveway for me to spread, raining.  Depart in 5 days for 2 wk trip, must do some homework. Grandkid houseguest.

I am in love with the Shelbyville site & opportunities.  DC group spectate/ participate at Painted Stone/Long Run Massacre/Floyds Defeat reenactment on Sat & a Fri or Sat joint dinner/program. Bus to Falls of Ohio, then choice get very difficult, so many dutch hist events/locations.  Chenoweth Massacre site? (I have found info about medical treatment of scalping victims.)  Painted Stone Reenactment will be Fri Sep 8 thru Sun Sep 10, 2017.  But, I have not forgotten about your suggestion of Lexington, and will not unilaterally make a decision.  I only know about horses, Morgan’s Civil War raid, UK basketball, not much more.  My ggggrandf Rogers was b in 1793 at Bryan Station, 5 mi NE of Lex.  We will check it out.  Do you know of Dutch opportunities?  We had to be Dutch creative for Madison IN in 2013; they had assimilated. The UnderGroundRR I thought went especially well, non-Dutch.

I have made a few very preliminary contacts.

I am willing to commit to Shelbyville Sep 8-10, 2017, but only if everyone else is also.

Looking for a co-cordination to help with this. A Co-Coordinator is a must; the cost/benefit of serving is favorable.  Total immersion in your Dutch Heritage for as much time as you can spare, maybe more, it is addictive; dialogue with many fantastic Cousins. (and Another wonderful thing about serving as the DC17 Co-coordinator, is that it has an ending. – onetime commitment!)

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Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers

Wonderful article about leah smock ryker being scalped.
ScalpingLeahSmockRyker

Note from Pam: The article is attached at the bottom of this page.

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Sent by NEW COUSIN: James Barry Moore

Thanks, Carolyn,

 

I’ve attached a report showing my Ancestry back to Abraham Brinckerhoff born 1547 in the Netherlands. And here is it in list form:

 

My 10th great grandfather is Abraham Brinckerhoff (1547 – )

My 9th great grandfather is Dirck Brinckerhoff (1575 – 1628) son of Abraham Brinckerhoff

My 8th great grandfather is Joris Dircksen Brinkerhoff (1604 – 1661) son of Dirck Brinckerhoff

My 7th great grandfather is Hendrick Jorisen Brinkerhoff (1629 – 1707) son of Joris Dircksen Brinkerhoff

My 6th great grandfather is Jacobus Westervelt Brinkerhoff (1685 – 1770) son of Hendrick Jorisen Brinkerhoff

My 5th great grandfather is Hendrick Hartman Brinkerhoff Sr. (1710 – 1760) son of Jacobus Westervelt Brinkerhoff

My 4th great grandfather is Hendrick Hartman Brinkerhoff Jr. (1755 – 1826) son of Hendrick Hartman Brinkerhoff Sr.

My 3rd great grandfather is James Henry Brinkerhoff (1799 – 1873) son of Hendrick Hartman Brinkerhoff Jr.

My 2nd great grandfather is Henry James Brinkerhoff (1824 – 1863) son of James Henry Brinkerhoff

My great grandfather is James Henry Brinkerhoff (1845 – 1898) son of Henry James Brinkerhoff

My grandfather is James Irving Brinkerhoff (1874 – 1922) son of James Henry Brinkerhoff

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Letters 6/10/2015

Sent by Marion Duckworth Smith

The following upcoming tours of the 350-year-old Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead are planned for June 2015:

Saturday, June 13th at 3:00 PM
Sunday, June 14th at 3:00 PM
Saturday, June 20th at 3:00 PM
Sunday, June 21st at 3:00 PM
Admission is $25.00 per person payable in advance. Please make checks payable to Marion Duckworth Smith and mail to:
Marion Duckworth Smith
7803 19th Road
East Elmhurst, NY 11370

Space is limited, so please RSVP as soon as possible and please indicate the date(s) for which you would like to reserve a spot.

The garden will be in full bloom and folks are free to stroll thru and take photos. A diagram of the cemetery with the inscriptions of all 132 tombstones is included with the tour. A walk thru of the downstairs living quarters will be given by Mrs. Smith as well. Mrs. Smith’s book, The Romantic Garden, will be available for purchase.

The Homestead is the oldest private dwelling in New York City and is listed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks.

You are receiving this email because you have expressed an interest in the Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead.

Hope to see you soon!

Marion Duckworth Smith
For the Homestead

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Sent by Barry James Moore (Brinkerhoff descendant)

FYI, my name is Barry James, not James Barry

Barry is my first name

James is my middle name

Moore is my last name

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Sent by Rodney Dempsey

please add my son, Tom Dempsey to your email list. He is interested in learning all he can about his Dutch Heritage. 

We became Dutch descendents when the Demott Hugeunots were chased from France by the Catholics. A Demott married a Banta in the 18th Century and joined the group that originally came to America and settled in New York on Wall Street. 

I know John DeMott married Antje  Banta. My Brother in Law, Dennis Gudorf has the most complete and accurate DeMott genelogical family tree. Add him to your list, too. He would be willing to share his information. 

Last week I purchased, “A Frisian Family: The Banta Genealogy: Descendants of  Epke Jacobse, Who came from Friesland,  

Netherlands, to New Amsterdam , February, 1659″ from Amazon.com.   It is over 420 pages of Banta genealoggy, in very small print. It’s author/compiler is Theodore Melvin Banta.  I don’t know who published it, or when. 

Rodney

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Sent by Cor Snabel (Dutch Colonies list)

Dear List,

Early this week the Dutch King Willem Alexander and Queen Maxima visited

Grand Rapids in Michigan. The six o’clock news here in the Netherlands gave

us a short impression of that specific area where a lot of Dutch people had

settled over the years. They also showed us the Dutch windmill ‘de Zwaan’

(the Swan) in Holland Michigan, which reminded me of an interesting

historical fact. Along with the tulips and the wooden shoes the windmill is

THE symbol of the Netherlands. But besides it being a symbol, one specific

kind of windmill brought us wealth and prosperity.

In 1592 Cornelis Corneliszoon from Uitgeest had built the first sawmill by

integrating crankshafts into a windmill, so the rotating movement was

turned into an ‘up-and-down’ movement. By installing several saw-blades

next to each other, a huge tree could be turned into planks in no time.

Before that time, it had taken about 30 days to do the same by hand; two

men with a huge saw had to work for days pushing and pulling. This

invention gave the Dutch a headstart in shipbuilding and for a long time

this small country had a leading role in the naval and trading business.

Basically Cornelis Corneliszoon’s invention was the foundation of the

Golden Age of Holland.

Another factor that helped the Dutch shipbuilding industry in an enormous

way was the attitude of the English hand-sawyers and carpenters. They

didn’t want any sawmills, because they were afraid to lose their jobs. The

first sawmill in England was built near London in 1663 by a Dutchman, but

was the cause of so much riot that it had to be abandoned. Even as late as

1768 a new sawmill near Limehouse was destroyed by hand-sawyers. The

government had it repaired and passed a law against machine breaking

(prompted also by attacks on cotton spinning machines), but it did not stop

the intimidation of the men who worked at the mill. Shipbuilding in England

was a scattered and slow industry, so for centuries England bought its

ships in Holland, as many other European countries did.

The area north of Amsterdam, called the Zaanstreek, was crowded with

shipyards, which all had their own sawmill(s). In 1731 the largest number

of mills was reached at 256 in that area. One single village, West-Zaandam,

had 159 sawmills and 35 mills for other purposes. Most of those mills are

gone, but a few are kept fully functioning as monuments of Dutch history.

http://www.dezaanseschans.nl/en/

We all know that the windmill is not a Dutch invention; they go back

thousands of years. But the open character of the land was favorable to

steady operation of windmills, so the Dutch made optimal use of them and

polished up their techniques as much as possible. The water-mills are quite

famous for creating polders, but there were also the paper-mills,

flour-mills, fuller-mills, malt-mills, mills for grinding dyestuffs and

many other types.

Regards,

Cor Snabel

The Netherlands

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Sent by Barbie Abbott Hamman

The Newsletter is Absolutely Perfect! I didn’t need to say anything anyway.  It’s perfect just the way it is.  I know we will have lots of cousins and great fun.  With the exception of ordering a couple of things, I’m ready on my end ( I think ).  I STILL can’t get the Mayor to answer me on the invite to come speak to us on Saturday, but won’t give up till Friday Night before. But then, we’ve been shunned by better people!, HA!

Hugs,

Barbie

Hope you’re feeling better these days.  You’ve sure had your hands full of problems!

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Sent by Sharon & King Cole

Hi Carolyn:  Are there any coordinated plans for those arriving and staying in their RV (such as a designated park, or the hotel parking lot)?  King & I plan to come in our RV.  We’re mailing in our forms and check this week.  

We are looking forward to the re-union.  We’re coming early and staying late. If you need help at the registration table or greeters, let us know.  We’ll be glad to pitch in. 

BTW, do you need another supply of plastic toothpicks? 

NOTE From Carolyn: SO GLAD the Coles are coming – you were so much fun in 2013!  We will be happy to put you to work, but toothpick supply is good. After you gave me the address I order three boxes!  SHOULD I bring an extra hairspray for you? Hugs Carolyn

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Sent by Joan E. Murray

Attention authors:   All authors intending to sell book(s) at the Dutch Cousins Reunion should send their name, and name(s) of their publication(s) and the price(s) of their publication(s) to Joan E. Murray via the DC Newsletter.  I will prepare signs for you.   

Any authors of books pertaining to the Low Dutch, if unable to attend the gathering, may send a copy their order forms to me via attachment, and I will duplicate their forms and have them placed on our sale table.

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Sent by Marilyn Douglas, NNI 

Check out Russell Shorto’s  review of Michael Pye’s new book ‘The Edge of the World’ which I think you will find of interest. According to Russell, what Pye does broadens the idea of a “Dutch contribution” to western history to include all the lands around the North Sea.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/07/books/review/the-edge-of-the-world-by-michael-pye.html?ref=books&_r=0

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Letters 6/19/2015

 

Letters 6/20/2015

Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers

In reply to Janice Cozine’s request for directions to Old Mud Meetinghouse:

GPS:

Old Mud Meeting House & Cemetery

736 Dry Branch Road

Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Directions from Harrodsburg to Old Mud:

From US 127 go west/southwest on US 68;;

After about 0.1 mile, bear slightly left to remain on US 68;;

After about 1.0 mile, turn left (south) onto Dry Branch Road;;

After about 1.5 mi, Old Mud will be on the right.

This is guessed at from Google Maps; I defer if someone has a better version.

(Note from Carolyn: Thanks Lynn. I think someone is bringing maps to Old Mud to have at the meeting.  I forgot who – if it is YOU please speak up – LOL)

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Sent by Jo Ellen Villines

I am descended from Daniel’s daughter Rachel who married Henry Comingore.  Sue, The person you would want to contact at the Johnson County Museum (IN) would be Linda Talley.  The address is    135 Main Street, Franklin IN 46131

There would be a $ .25 charge for each Xerox copy.  If the documents need to be scanned due to age and condition the charge could be more.

If I can be of any assistance please let me know.

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Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers

In reply to the news of David Smock’s terminal illness – Many of us are saddened to hear of that library closing. He has been our Smock expert and a constant encourager to this editor. He will be missed. (carolyn)

Hélène-

I saw your message in the latest Dutch Cousins Newsletter.

First of all, blessedness on the closing days of your earthly journey together and also in the time to come.

My profound thanks to David, your support of him, and his sharing of the valuable Smock information that he has possession of.  It has been of a wonderful help to me.  It has paid honor to our ancestors and their sacrifices, their values greater than life and death; freedom.

Blessedness to the patient and to the caregiver.

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Sent by Sue Mendenhall

Hello Carolyn  —

 

Below is one letter from Jo Ellen Villines.  I was most interested in the content.

 

My 4th gr.grandfather Isaac Brokaw married Mary “Polly” Brewer, 17 Dec. 1810 in Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.  Mary Brewer was b. 8 Jan. 1789 in Harrodsburg.  Sources were:  “Genealogy of the Van Voorhees family in America,” by Van Voorhis, Elias William, pg. 340;  and, “Our Brokaw-Bragaw Heritage,” compiled by Elsie E. Foster pg. 122.

I have spent a fair amount of time researching the Brokaws and family I learned Mary (Brewer) Brokaw was the daughter of Daniel Brewer/Brouwer (the 2nd), 7th known child, a son of Daniel A. Brouwer, as christened 28 Feb. 1768 in Schraalenburg, Bergen, Province of New Jersey.  “The New Netherlands Connections”  provided additional links, including senior Brewer’s move with his family to Mercer County, as well as Daniel Brouwer’s “will, Mercer Co., Ky, 1-49 probated Feb. 22 1791, exec/ (5-198) Samuel Demaree, lists children below.  Daniel served in Revolution, cavalryman, light Dragoons. … One eighth each to:

“Leah wife of James Stagg;  Susanna wife of (5-56) Samuel Demaree; Abraham, also received Bible and cow;  Rachel wife of Henry Commingore;  Mary wife of (5-198) Samuel Demaree jr.;  John, Phoebe, wife of (6-109) Cornelius Demaree;  [and] Daniel, also received long gun.”

Now I know, I may well have made a wrong turn in my research.  However, that many years ago in Mercer County, it seems to me, if Mary Polly Brewer was the daughter of Daniel, than Daniel fits into the scheme of Brewers in Mercer County in some manner.  It seems, that if I could get copies of the papers Jo Ellen Villines wrote about, maybe I could either confirm my research or readjust my research progress to reflect better accuracy.

 

What I would like to learn is:  Who can I write to in the Johnson county Museum, Genealogy Section in Franklin, Indiana.  I want to order copies of the “four file folders in an archival box of original documents pertaining to the Brewer (mainly Daniel Brewer) family,” including deeds as described by Jo Ellen Villines.

 

Thank you for taking the time to forward my inquiry, hopefully I can get a letter off to Franklin, IN soon.

 

—  Sue Mendenhall>Dobson>Brokaw

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Reply by Carolyn Leonard

I have an interest in this also because mary, wife of Samuel Demaree Jr- mentioned in the will above was married first to Cornelius Cozine Jr. and that is part of my family.  Our Low Dutch group was SO intermarried it is hard to separate them!  The papers would be interesting, but Sue you will find all the family histories at the Harrodsburg Library so if you are coming to the gathering in September and stay to research on Monday, I think your questions will be answered.

If not you can write to the H-burg library and they will send you the research for a very low fee.

I am attaching my family sheet on Daniel BREWER and Maria KONING and their 12 children . [see file below] Perhaps that will help sort them out?

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Sent by Lilly Martin (in Syria)

we are saying prayers for her safety in these troubled times

In reply to the recent comment by Jo Ellen Villines:

 

Here is a follow-up from me, which addresses several important points.  I am thrilled to know that Jo Ellen is contributing  the info she has access to.  This is very exciting, indeed.

 

Best regards,

Lilly Martin

 

#1.  The name was BROUWER.  The immigrant ancestor was Adam Brouwer who arrived in Manhattan in 1642, and married there in 1645 to Magdalena Verdon.  He built the first tidewater Flour Mill in North American history at Gowanus Creek, in Brooklyn, in Kings County, New York.  That Mill remained in the family until 1798.

By 1800 most of the descendants of Adam Brouwer were using a spelling of BROWER.  This is still the largest spelling variation of the name in USA.  However, there were a few cases in which descendants used a spelling variation of BREWER.  One early case was in Monmouth County, New Jersey.  That was the family of Adam BREWER and Deborah Allen.  That specific line of descendant from the immigrant Adam goes like this:  Adam Brouwer, to his son Jacobus Brouwer, to his son Adam Brouwer (Brewer).   This line is not the same branch that is in Mercer County, Kentucky.

The other case of the spelling of BREWER was in Mercer Co, KY.  That was the descendants of Daniel BROUWER 1719-1791 KY.  Many of the descendants of this man used the spelling as BREWER. This line of descendant from the immigrant ancestor goes like this:   Adam Brouwer, to his eldest son Pieter Brouwer, to his son Abraham Brouwer of New Jersey, to his son Daniel Brouwer who left NJ and went by way of Conewago, to finally settle at Mercer Co KY.    These descendants of Daniel used BREWER as their preferred spelling.

Why do people choose BREWER, as opposed to others forms?  I believe they use BREWER to conform to an ENGLISH spelling, promoted by an English community.  Up in New York City and New Jersey, almost everyone was DUTCH ancestry, and many were still speaking Dutch at homes and in the street up to 1800.  However, the ALLEN family in Monmouth Co NJ (Deborah Allen, wife of Adam Brouwer , as previously mentioned) were more ENGLISH  and in fact many were firm Loyalists with Britain in the Rev War.  I feel it was Adam Brouwer’s wife Deborah Allen who gave the influence to use BREWER in NJ.  The rest of his cousins and second and third cousins there were using Brouwer and Brower by then.  In the case of Mercer Co, KY: I believe that the general makeup of Kentucky at the time had more ENGLISH residents than anything else, so the spelling reflected the overall community.

Finally, the name BROUWER is Dutch.  Almost everyone in New Amsterdam (aka Manhattan) were Dutch in those early days of settlement.  But, we think Adam Brouwer may not have been Dutch! He stated his birth place as Cologne.  He could still be from Dutch parents, but born in Cologne.   However, he used an alternate surname of BERKOVEN, and his descendants used the name ADOLF-ADOLPH-ADOLPHUS to honor his memory with sons and grandsons.  Why didn’t they all use ADAM to honor him?  We think he might have been actually Adolf Bruer, which is a GERMAN name.  Or perhaps he was Adolf Berkoven?  Or, maybe he was Adolf, from a place named Berkoven?  We just don’t know.  The name BROUWER, in Dutch, refers to an occupation, such as a “Brewer of Beer”. In German it is BRUER.  In English the same occupation is spelled BREWER.

 

#2.  Anneke Jans owned a farm in lower Manhattan, which she inherited from her first husband when he died.  Prior to her death, she filed a legal Will, giving that farm to her children.  Later on, her descendants sold that farm, legally.  However, as years past, and generations came and went, there was a small group of her descendants that felt they had been cheated, and that they had legal recourse in a suit against the Church who owned the farm.   They gathered money from many descendants far and wide.  The lawsuit was the longest running lawsuit in US history.  It spanned 200 years of court dates and lawyers fees.  People involved used to hold meeting in towns from New York to Missouri and everywhere in between.   The purpose was to claim your descendancy from Jacobus Brouwer, the son of the immigrant Adam Brouwer.  Obviously, most descendants of Adam are not from that son, but from the other 6 of his sons.   However, greed motivated many to ‘phoney-up’ fake genealogies to prove they were entitled to participate in the lawsuit.  The promoters and lawyers were thrilled to receive these fake genealogies, because the more people, who could participate, meant the more fees they could charge the participants.  My own ancestors fell victim to this scam in Missouri in the 1860’s.

 

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Sent by Gary Craig

Thanks for the update on all that is going on with you guys back in Versailles, Lexington etc. It is so very interesting to keep up with you and the others…. My big trip for the year is going back up to Dayton to see some of the wife’s family and my sister who has always been up there where we were born into the Kentucky Craig’s Family… It took me around 65 years to come across that very distant connection to your bunch. Have fun and Enjoy…. Your old lovin’, very distant cousin…Gary (Gary Dee Craig)

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Sent by Bill Van Osdol

  1. In your news letter in the mail today, it mentioned Dutch building stone homes.  WELL,my Van Osdol grandparents were a little better off for old farmers having staked in the Run. The road leading west from south end of the air base was the beginning of part of their land. As a kid I remember this as a castle. They built a stone house, with its own electric system in the basement and water system from somewhere. Heck we had neither when I grew up. This home was placed on the national registry, but during the estate division one of my girl cousins received this property and rented the home out to really bummy bummy people. It caught fire and burned to the ground. A beautiful large two story stone( each about 8″ by 16″ )house with a large front porch and a gleaming wood staircase. We were very upset but nothing could be done. My grandparents had 2 girls 6 boys, 3 boys in WWI one of which was killed and is in Muesse Argonne American cemetery near Verdun. Another one was an ambulance driver and he kept a diary of his entire service, of which I have a copy. My grandmother wrote a diary every day, very interesting. I loaned it to another girl cousin and it disappeared.

My younger, 2 years, brother did our history a few years ago, mostly through cemeteries, courthouses, libraries, etc. but he did a good job considering. It appears we came through Switzerland and Holland and a lot of Nebraska. I’lll have to read it again.  Hope I don’t bore you.  Bill

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Sent by Joyce Collins

Dear Carolyn,

I am , unfortunatly unable to come the the Gathering.

Tthe hip which i broke three years ago is not doing well enough to stand the trip.

I would, however, like to purchase a Tshirt and get a list of the folks who are there.

Please  let me know how to pay for the shirt and postage.

Much Cousinly Love,

Joyce (Westerfield) Collins in West Covina, California

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Sent by Carolyn – we will be leaving for Montreal in two days – taking the power chair since I am still not walking good even with a walker.  Say prayers!  We will be celebrating the 4th of July in Concord Mass – where it all started, so you won’t be hearing from me or receiving the Dutch News for a couple weeks. Housesitter arrived today to keep our little Ginger company and water the flowers.

Letters 6/23/2015

about the Gathering Sept 25-26

THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT SOON!   Send your registration to Janice Cozine – here’s a hotlink if you misplaced yours:

GOT #DUTCH?  2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering #Registration – click here: http://bit.ly/1dlO5HH

Dutch Cousins T-Shirt/Lapel pin order click here: http://bit.ly/1GBmf6Y

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center.  The Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history are all in Frankfort and close, but not the same so it may be too far to walk for some people (like me – LOL)

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and rededication, Monday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open especially for us cousins from 10 to 3.

NOTE: We also still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

More Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

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Sent by Beverly Doris Quinn Morgan

I am a direct descendant to David Demarest and Maria Sohier through my mother’s side Doris Demarest Reger Quinn.  My grandmother was Sara Ann Demarest married to Jonathan Reger.  I have all of the generations marked  if you want it, it is on a piece of paper somewhere in my DAR file with apps.  I have to find it, never enough time to organize, but will do that this summer.  John is fine, he said he was traveling for the next three weeks in Europe.  I am going to try and meet him this summer in NYC.  Sounds like he lives an exciting life.  By the way, is Demaris Phillips on the cooking channel (she is from Kentucky) is she a relative? Demaris is one of the spellings of our name as you know.  I saw a construction sign in Stuart, Florida this Spring that said Demorist Construction.  Guess we are all over.  I would love to come to Kentucky, but can’t have to work.  I work as an Occupational THerapist from September through mid June at a school so that is when work will be going on.  Would love to go to Kentucky sometime though.  Met some people from my DAR Chapter who are in our church, plus our Pastor, Don Lincoln in SAR (related to the President).  If you want the full length of names, let me know and I will type of the lineage for you. I know I am part Dutch as a Van Houten married a Demarest and my mother was baptised at the Harlington Reformed Church in NJ (Dutch), so I guess we all have the same mixture, French and Dutch.  I am also part German on the Reger sidie, Irish and German on my dad’s side.  I have dark hair and dark eyes.  People think I am Jewish and they use to as my mom if she was also.  Let me know if you need any other information from me. I would like to meet you and the “family” someday.

Have a peaceful and blessed Sunday.

Sincerely your cousin,

Beverly

 

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Sent by John Scott McKibben

I am presently adding genealogy to my VanKirk line on Geni.com. Can anyone add further. I would appreciate the help with this or my other line I am working with.

Thanks.

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Sent by Robert Canine

NOTE FROM CAROLYN:  Robert sent the Conine family history, which I copied into a pdf downloadable file and attached it.  Here is how it begins:

PETER CARNINE (CANINE) (Dirk Dirkse Conyn, Dirck Phillipse Conyn, Phillip Leendertse Conyn, Leendert Phillipse Conyn, Phillip Konyn).  Born November 16, 1752 in Bound Brook, New Jersey, in Somerset County, near the NY line and died February 02, 1841 in Shelby County, Kentucky.  He married CHRISTINA (SYNTIE) (CATALYNTJE) SEBRING.  Married 1774 in New Jersey. Born. January 28, 1759 in New Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey.   Died.  1790 in Shelby, KY.

 

NOTES:  Men, who faced the, “infernal Duke of Alva,” had little fear of American savages and so naturally th1s Hollander’s sought the larger, free life of America.  As before said, “The ancestors of our family settled first near New Brunswick. Here was established the Dutch reformed church in America, at Bound Brook, Somerset County, New Jersey.

About this time the “westward ho,” spirit sent these Dutch settlers into southeastern Pennsylvania, some stopping near Philadelphia, while others, pushing on into York  county, founded the famous Conewago community.

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Sent by Mary Jo Gohmann

Hello Carolyn!

I hope you are feeling much stronger! Happy travels and 4th of July. You are quite a trooper and an inspiration! I am so sorry to miss the Dutch Cousins gathering in September. Who would think another Banta  wedding would be scheduled at the same weekend?

As I continue with my Banta genealogy I wonder if any cousins might have photographs of (2183) Gerrit S.Banta DOB 1810 who married Sallie Brinkerhoff

(dau. of James H. Brinkerhoff and Anna Ackerman) at Schraalenburgh, and lived in Englewood, NJ . Gerrit died 1884

Any photos of their descendants would be most helpful -especially John G.Banta 1829 who married Lavina Demarest in 1852 ( dau of Andrew Demarest and Anna  Voorhis);

Their son Garret J. Banta1856 married Ann Elizabeth Durie ( daughter of Helmagh Durie(1830) and Rachael Demarest 1831 -dau of John Demarest and Ann Van Buskirk)

The children of Garrett and Ann Banta : Rachel  A.(1886), George H.(1888), Cornelius V.(1892),Frank G. (1893), my grandfather, Vreeland J. (1895), Daniel D.(1896) and Alice Lavina

Thanks so much!

Hugs,

Mary Jo Banta Gohmann

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Letters 7/9/2015

Letters 7/13/2015

Sent by Jo Ellen Villines

Dear Carolyn,

I am very excited to see the information provided by new cousin Judith Collard.  I too, descend from Henry Comingore and Rachel Brewer.  She is, quite literally to me, a new Dutch cousin!

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Sent by Jim Cozine of Las Vegas (DC Board Member)

Carolyn

cc Janice

Re the Reunion gap

We only have 44 people ( including partners) signed up at 60 days away!

This seems weak compared to past gatherings…

I would again suggest we consider a 3 year gap before

the next gathering for the board to consider.

We are having the same problem with our annual Navy

Vets reunions – fewer and fewer folks are traveling

due to age, health and wealth-expense issues…

Please consider this for the agenda.

Jim C

NOTE FROM CAROLYN – deadline for registration is August 1, less than 3 weeks away.

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Sent by Bill Hoag

Carolyn;

I enjoy reading your Dutch Cousins letters and emails.

Hope to see you in Frankfort.

Bill K. Hoag, (By Terhune Connection)

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Sent by Jim Cozine of Las Vegas (DC Board Member)

Carolyn

Re Judith Collard’s request for information on the Comingore brothers –  I can share with her the text of my tribute at the tombstone marker dedication as follows:

John and TWIN brother Henry were born 16 Sept 1749 in Hanckensack, Bergen Co., NJ

parents Rhyner Kamminga and Annette Aarjansen of Kings Co, Long Is, NY

members of the Schraalenburgh RDC, in NJ

In Aug 1776 a month before his 27th birthday John volunteered as a Private under

Captain Hugh Campbell, York Co. Asso., Simon Vanarsdall –  Co. Lt.

1st Srgt of this company was Cornelius Cozine ( likely the Rev Cozine, as Cor Jr was only 23 yrs old)

He marched to Philadelphia and then on to (S.) Amboy or Perth-Amboy NJ

He was stationed there for a full 3 months, likely guarding the mouth of the Raritan River. This being a

mear 15 miles or less from the former Cozine farm in Somerset Co. & the Sourland Dutch Harlingen tract.

He returned home in December that year at the end of his enlistment. His brother took his place in the company.

John was drafted in Sept 1777 for three months under Major Simon Vanarsdall’s battalion, Penn. Troops

This Simon’s wife was Ellen Cozine, daughter of Rev Cozine

The penson applications indicate that John could not recall the name of the Company Captain – but he was likely

John McElwain, they marched to a place named Darby near Philadelphia, on the Darby River where he was

stationed for a time, then they moved to Mudfort on the Delaware river ( to protect the flank of Fort Mifflin)

where he witnessed an engagement between the Fort (Fort Mifflin on Mud Island) and six British Navy warships

(the Phily airport today is next to the old fort that is still there)

The firing continued through the day and in the evening a fire ball from the fort struck one of the

ships HMS AUGUSTA of 64 guns and it blew up with a tremondous explosion the next day Oct 22nd.

The account of the battle reads as follows: A valiant 5 week battle took place when the British Navy attacked

Fort Mifflin on Mud Island. The garrison of approximately 400 Continental soldiers was surrounded from three

sides. The British attempting to open the supply line for their Army already in the Rebel Capital, They shot over

10,000 cannonballs at the fort, causing the garrison to evacuate on Nov 15th. Over150 Continental soldiers

died as a result of the battle and lead Thomas Paine to write:”The garrison, with scarce anything to cover them

but thier bravery, survived in the midst of the mud, shot & shells and were obliged to give up more to the

powers of time & gunpowder than to military superiority.” This battle allowed General Washington and the

Continental Army to repair to their winter quarters in a place called the Valley Forge. To late in the season for

British General Howe to chase them.

At this place John was discharged as his term expired and returned home in Dec.

John marries Annite Mattees in York Co on Oct 24th 1778 some ahnentafels show the yr as 1776.

but this is not likley in view of his service record.

In 1778 Annie was 20 yrs old and thier 1st son is born 9 months later in July 1779

John  & Annie had 7 children, only their 1st – Henry was born in Conewago, the others in KY.

John Died  6 Oct 1845 and is burned here among the Dutch cousins.

Brother Henry relived his TWIN brother in Dec 1776. He and neighbor Samuel Banta volunteered under

now Capt. Simon Vanarsdall at York and marched to Philadelphia, staying there 10 or 12 days before going on to

Trenton. On the road about 8 miles outside Phily they met the Hessians taken prisoner at the Battle of Trenton –

Dec 26th. They continued on to Princeton, NJ , here and at Kingston they were stationed for their tour acting

as scouts between Princeton and Brunswick and protecting the locals from the Britsh scouting parites during

the winter lull in fighting, he served 4 mons as a PVT.

It appears he was again- in effect – his brother’s relief in Captain McElwain’s company

having served 3 months  in the winter of 1777 with a discharge in Feb 1778.

He enlisted a 3rd time in 1779 and served 2 months under Major Vanarsdale in the Penn. Troops.

And he was a minute man in 1781 for about 3 months – until Cornwall surrendered ( Oct 19th)

Some years later (1800 or 1804?) Henry would make the 6 week trip from Mercer Co, KY to New Brunswick,

NJ on horse back to secure the funds to build the OLD MUD and then returned

taking another 6 weeks to get home carrying the money in his saddle bags.

Henry married Rachel Brouwer in abt 1772 & (2nd) Tiny Rynerson on Jan 2nd 1822 at age 72.

in Nelson Co., KY  – Henry and Rachel had 8 children ( 5 sons and 3 daus)

one of these sons – John b 1785 marries Sally Cozine  22 Jan 1807

she was the daughter of John Cozine, who’s house is still standing just a short

distance from here and where we visited at the last reunion

he died 29 Jan 1836 and is buried here among the Dutch cousins

Rest in Peace old soliders your duty done and done well

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Sent by Jake Hannam 

(Note from carolyn:  Attn. Montfort descendants)

(NOTE FROM CAROLYN – Jake has been helping me clean up the Brokaw/Bercaw burial memorials in Conewago on Findagrave – not an easy task. Take a look and offer suggestions if you have new information ; oh yes, I do have three different emails. Sometimes I have trouble sending from one so I use a different one for a while. Buffalo234@cox.net is the one I use most, but editor234@gmail.com andcarolynleonard@me.com are good too.  All three come into the same Apple mailbox.)

Do you have three different email addresses? I sent this two of them plus there is one from cox.net. Which is best to use for you?

As for your changes, I’m not sure if there was any improvement or not but it does appear that findagrave.com accepted the I and II designations instead of Sr. and Jr.

By the way, the Margaret Brinckerhoff who married Peter, Jr.(#2) was a daughter of Gilbert Brinckerhoff and Elizabeth Ackerman. Her sister, Magdalena, married Peter’s brother, George. A third sister, Maria, married a John Bercaw (Berlow) but I’m not sure who he is. It’s possible, if not probable, that he was also a brother of Peter, Jr. and George. At the very least, he was a cousin of theirs.

Yet another daughter of Gilbert and Elizabeth’s, Elizabeth, married my ancestor Peter Monfort. That’s why I’m interested in this line.

My source for this is:

  1. Brinkerhoff, The family of Joris Dircksen Brinckerhoff, 1638, 1887, page 52

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Sent by Andrew Grisham

Just in case some of you have not seen the Space Station, I pass this along to you.  This is a very interesting presentation, but just watching it makes my claustrophobia kick in – LOL – and makes me a little uncomfortable.

https://www.youtube.com/embed/doN4t5NKW-k

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Sent by Kerrylea Stippes

Please add me to the mailing list for the Dutch Cousins:

I am a descendant of Abraham BANTA SHUCK and Abigail Ann VAN ANTWERP.

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Sent by Darrell Kitchen (a new Dutch cousin)

(Carolyn: Note to Jake Hannam – look at paragraph five – Bercaws/Brokaws, daughters of Peter #1 & #2)

I am a descendent of Richard and Margaret Voorhees Kitchen. In the old Conewago and Adams County written records, he is seen many times as Derrick, which I have learned can be a Dutch version of Richard. In addition, the transcription of the Kitchen name has been seen there as Cichim, Kitcheon, Kichin, and Eichim. Regardless, the family has always been Kitchen, as far back as I can research. The Kitchen roots are imbedded in Hunterdon, Sussex, Somerset and the areas around the Raritan Valley of New Jersey. Though I *think* Richard and Margaret were married at the Readington Dutch Reformed Church, a Reformed congregation founded in Hunterdon County in 1719, I do know that the baptisms of their first few children were at the Neshanic Dutch Reformed Church…still an active congregation today.

I have researched my family and the related history for more than forty years and (in addition to many other travels) have visited Adams County, PA several times for a more “hands-on” experience.

My family left Hunterdon, New Jersey as part of the Conewago Colony movement and settled in Adams (formerly York) County, Pennsylvania. Their land was on the Swift Run Road and later on Green Ridge Road in Hamilton Township. The final days of the family were in Hampton. They attended the Dutch Reformed Church and later the Presbyterian congregation

Richard and Margaret did not move to Kentucky with many of their neighbors. Richard Kitchen, the patriarch, died in March 1810 and the children began to move west on their own. They left their Mother (Margaret), sister Mary (spinster), and three unmarried brothers Joseph, Peter and Abraham. They are buried in the Osborne or Low Dutch Cemetery on Swift Run Road in Adams County…but only Joseph has a marker remaining today. His name was transcribed by the stonecutter as “Kitcheon”, though his estate papers, news clippings, deeds, etc. all validate his name as “Kitchen”.

The other children settled in Ohio. They included “four” who married Bercaws (Brokaw, Bercaa, Bercau, etc.). The four included Hannah and Esther. Margaret married their neighbor Isaac Patterson, Richard married Susan Shetron, John married Hannah Bercaw, and the eldest son Stephen married Anne Bercaw.  Sarah married a Jacob King and Henry married a Snevely (later Caldwell. My line is Edward who married Ann Canby. Their settlements were primarily in the Miami Valley in areas including Cincinnati, Monroe, Lebanon, Middletown, Piqua, Pitchin, Springfield, Dayton, Bellefontaine, Findlay and others. There are still many family member who live in these communities today…(including me). The exception to the Miami Valley settlements is the families of Margaret and Isaac Patterson who landed in Hubbard, Trumbull County, Ohio.

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Sent by Leah Beale

I don’t forward many emails…even when they are wonderful.  This one, however, needs to be shared with as many people as possible.

 

Very interesting video and it’s only 90 seconds

Harvard Professor: 90 seconds you won’t regret seeing!  Now here is

Something that absolutely everyone should see — often!!  This could be

Used in so many ways, in so many places … It is stunningly simple, and so

Totally profound…! Note that at the bottom of the clip it gives

Permission to use this clip provided it is not altered. Harvard Professor:

90 seconds you won’t regret seeing!

 http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=YjntXYDPw44&sns=em

 

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Letters 7/21/2015

about the Gathering Sept 25-26

THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT SOON!   Send your registration to Janice Cozine – here’s a hotlink if you misplaced yours:

GOT #DUTCH?  2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering #Registration – click here: http://bit.ly/1dlO5HH

Dutch Cousins T-Shirt/Lapel pin order click here: http://bit.ly/1GBmf6Y

Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center.  The Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history are all in Frankfort and close, but not the same so it may be too far to walk for some people (like me – LOL)

Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and rededication, Monday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open especially for us cousins from 10 to 3.

NOTE: We also still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

More Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone, and do not publish email addresses on the list because of possible scammers.

Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered  and long-loved.

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Sent by Janice Cozine

Only 10 days until registration price goes up!

Dear Cousins…. I’ve received several registration forms  this past week.

Keep them coming!!!

The deadline is drawing near.  You can still register after August 1st, but we need to get a pretty good count of cousins by then to start ordering  food,  tee-shirts, tours etc. so we have to add a little on to the registration fee if you don’t send it by August 1 – only 10 days from now!

September is not far off.  Think about all the fun we’re going to have, seeing family and getting acquainted again.  Lots to catch up on!

The Frankfort History Center will be a super convenient place to do your research, since it’s upstairs from our meeting area. The speakers and tour lined up this year are going to be wonderful along with the re-dedication of Old Mud.

Please think twice……you won’t want to miss THIS gathering.

Hoping to see all of you in September!!!

Blessings,

Janice  Cozine  🙂

Dutch Cousins Registration  Chair

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Sent by Jake Hannam

Thanks for including me on the mailing list, Carolyn!

If I read Darrell’s note correctly, he is referring to the ‘Esther Kitchen’ who  I have marrying Isaac Bercaw on 28 November 1811 in Gettysburg. She was also known as ‘Hetty’ or ‘Hester’. Isaac would have been a son of Peter Bercaw, Sr. and Amy Coshun.

Do I have the right Esther?

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Sent by Jim Cozine of Las Vegas

Please post on the blog & allow me a minute to present info about the HOLLAND SOCIETY at the Gathering.

As you know (or cousin) Dr Robert Schenck is the President of the Holland Society

I’ve gotten the attached brochure from the Holland Society membership team

and will make up copies to hand out at Dutch Cousins…

This 1991 flyer (attached) doesn’t speak of it but there are two types of male applications, a legacy application and a new application. With a legacy application the Genealogy Committee has previously approved the genealogy of a family member. This application takes less time to examine. (most of the DCs will fit into this group) – I have also asked them to make an improved membership offer to anyone that joins this year  in the form of giving them credit for the balance of this year and full credit for next for the price of the 1st annual dues payment. – approval is pending on this point.

Ladies can become Friends of the Society.

I’m willing to assist any Dutch Cousins with the application process.

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Sent by Judith Collard

Wow!

What fun it was to read that I have a new Dutch cousin, Jo Ellen Viliness!

Thank you so very much to Jim Cozine who shared the wonderful tribute he wrote for the Comingore twins.

Hugs, Judy Collard

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Sent by HHS (via newsletter)

Work is proceeding well with replacing the mud at the meetinghouse. Monty Kelly, from a Mercer County family of craftsmen, took on this monumental task, and through trial and error has come up with a good recipe that will stick to the walls. Three generations of Kellys are helping with the project — Monty’s thee sons: Jackson, Trace and Travis; and Monty’s father, Stanley Kelly. Now if only Kentcky weather will cooperate and send us some less humid days to dry the daub.

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Sent by DUTCH GENEALOGY NEWS

by Yvette Hoitink, a professional genealogist in the Netherlands and owner of Dutch Genealogy Services

In genealogy, we are used to children having the same last name as their father. But there are several circumstances in which the child could have a different name:

  • If the child used a patronymic, in which case the name of the child would be derived from the father’s first name, not his last name (e.g. Pier Hessels, son of Hessel Jans). This mainly happens in the period before the introduction of the civil registration in 1811.
  • If the child was illegitimate, in which case it would have the name of the mother.
  • If the family was called after the farm, and the farm came from the mother’s family. Farm names were common in the eastern part of the Netherlands before 1811.
  • If the father’s family did not use a last name, and the mother’s did. This mostly happens around the time when people started using surnames. When that was depends on the region, and can range from the late 1500s in the southern and western provinces to 1811 in the northern provinces.
  • If the child emigrated to a non-Dutch speaking region and his name was changed.
  • SIGN UP for updates about Dutch Genealogy at http://www.dutchgenealogy.nl
  • —————————————————–
    (Ryker/Demarest Family)
    Image.jpeg
  • I am signed up for the Gathering and so looking forward to it!  Thought I’d include a picture from 1962 when my family was in Holland.  Cheers!
  • Sent by Cat Claunch Schwetke
  • —————————————

Letters 7/29/2015

Sent by Marian Bauer, HHS Newsletter editor

Carolyn, our next newsletter will be for September & October and will be glad to put the announcement in about your reunion. Do you want something on our website? If so, we can do that as an item of interest, but would need it written by you just exactly as you want it stated.

You DUTCH cousins are AWESOME. We are praying the weather is dry enough to get the mud done!

Thanks,

Marian Bauer

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Sent by Janice Cozine, Registration chair

Hi Cousins!

Aug. 1st registration dead line is coming soon!

Send in your registration forms today!

You can still register after the 1st….but the sooner the better for all our organizers.

We’re up to 74 people now…….keep them coming in!!!

You can save 5 bucks by mailing now.

Carolyn, Barbie, Vince and Steve have everything in place for a FULL, FUN and EXCITING weekend…..you will not want to miss !!

Barbie and Missi are making the final decisions on our tee-shirt. Please help them in getting your orders in asap.

And….I’m planning our delicious meals as we read….lol

Just a reminder: Frankfort is centrally located about 54 miles east of Louisville and 29 miles west of Lexington

For those of you flying in….. Louisville has the largest airport, Louisville Int’l, and Lexington has a much smaller airport called Bluegrass Airport.

For the ones that may want to bring/drive their RV’s, the two camp grounds are:

  1. ELKHORN CAMPGROUND – Located about 4 miles from down town Frankfort.

165 N. SCRUGGS LANE

OFF US HWY 460 E.

502-695-9154

elkhorncampground.com

  1. KENTUCKY RIVER CAMPGROUND – Located about 8 miles NE from down town.

1489 STEELE BRANCH ROAD

OFF US 127 NORTH

502-227-2465

kyrivercampground.com

A little bird told me they stayed at both camp grounds in Frankfort and they like #1 a little better.

The Capital Plaza Hotel still have rooms available, just call 502-227-5100 or their website is capitalplazaky.com to RSVP.

Don’t forget to mention you’re with the Dutch Cousins to receive your discount hotel price.

Hope this info is helpful….if you have any other questions/concerns…please let me know.  I’ll be happy to help.

Looking forward to September!!

Janice  Cozine  🙂

Dutch Cousins

Registration  Chair

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Sent by “The Pres!” John C Westerfield

Hi Carolyn I have been in touch with Amalie and we are working on a program for the re-dedication program for  Old Mud Meetinghouse onSeptember 27.  The outline for the program is:

Welcome by me.

Opening prayer

A couple of songs from that 1600’s, from the Netherlands that Amalie will lead

Five minutes each for comments from members of our group.

VINCE AKERS, LOW DUTCH & OLD MUD HISTORIAN

CAROLYN LEONARD, FOR DUTCH COUSINS

DICK BAUER, HHS PRESIDENT

MAIN SPEAKER: RUSSELL GASERO, Reformed Churches of America

Closing with a prayer

 

The HHS will provide Bottle water & Porta potties

 

Amalie will put together a picture display of Ole Mud,

Bring the Communion Cup, and a plate for communion bread.

 

This is an outline we have at the present time– MORE TO COME!

 

Cousin John

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Sent by Kerrylea Stippes

Hi Carolyn,

I am unable to attend the Gathering this year but I so very much wish I could! However, I am hoping to join you for the next one.

I am wondering if someone in your group might be able to help me take advantage of an unexpected genealogical opportunity. You see, my son is in the Air Force and has recently been transferred to UN Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. I have been asked, on fairly short notice, to fly to Belgium to transport his stepson there from the Seattle, WA area where we both reside. Since the city of Antwerp, Belgium is very close to Brussels, I was hoping to be able to do some genealogical research there on my VANANTWERP ancestry.

My great-great grandmother was Abigail VANANTWERP who was born in Ripley County, Indiana and married Abraham BANTA SHUCK. Years ago, I spent a great deal of time researching the ancestry of these three lines but I ran into extremely confusing information on the VANANTWERP line that I just could not sort out and eventually had to abandon my efforts when family responsibilities required me to redirect my attentions.

I will be leaving for Belgium on August 17th and I was wondering if there might be anyone in your group who has VANANTWERP ancestry that would be willing to share information with me and perhaps help me trace that line back to Antwerp, Belgium in the short time I have available before I leave. Years ago, I was able to trace the line from Indiana back through Kentucky and back to New Jersey but I couldn’t figure out the (presumed) connection from New Jersey back to New Amsterdam. That is my “brick wall” connection challenge.

Are there any VANANTWERP descendants out there? Any help would be much appreciated.

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

In ref to note from Vince akers. Apparently Old Mud meetinghouse was not built as early as I had thought. I believed it was built in the winter of 1800; Vince said (above) our Low Dutch Ancestors didn’t get a deed to the land until almost 1801, and maybe not completed untik 1804.   I understood they were called the Salt River Congregation before they built the Old Mud Meetinghouse, but apparently that continued for some time afterward.

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Sent by Vince Akers

in the late 1970s Judy Cassidy and Ursula Brecknell found a receipt among the miscellaneous papers in a black case in the safe in the office of the pastor of the Harlingen Dutch Reformed Church (DRC) in Harlingen, N.J.

The DRC back East referred to the Old Mud congregation as the Salt River Congregation, Kentucky.  Old Mud is on the Dry Branch of Salt River.

The Old Mud centenniel history refers to Henry Comingore’s trip to N.J. to raise funds for Old Mud.  The implication is that it was funds for the construction.  Old Mud was supposedly built in 1800, but the date is a bit fuzzy since the deed to the land was not until late December 1800.  Yet the Agreement to build on that land was dated May 1800.  Henry’s 1804 trip may well have been for funds to finish up the construction that started in 1800.  I know the Greenwood Presbyterian Church (a daughter of Old Mud) was started in 1832, but finished little by little over a period of several years.  Old Mud may well have taken years to finish just as it has taken years to restore!
Harlingen Safe 2.jpeg

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Sent by Jim Cozine

Thanks Vince

– What you say sounds right to me – I often wondered how they had time to farm and build at the same time.

Jim Coz

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Hello Carolyn,  Please feel free to share my email with Larry Vannice,  who was inquiring about his ancestor Isaac Covert Vanice, in an earlier Dutch Cousins email.  I recently received a Henry County deed where by his ancestor Isaac C. Vannice  and his brother Dennis B. Vannice are selling land belonging to their father  James in Henry County to George List, Jr. after the fathers death. He might like to have a copy.

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Sent by New Netherlands institute

Guide to Dutch Manuscripts Relating to New Netherland in United States Repositories

In 1977–78, Dr. Charles Gehring combed archival repositories in the United States in search of Dutch-language documents relating to New Netherland. Ever since, A Guide to Dutch Manuscripts Relating to New Netherland in United States Repositories has been an essential aid to scholars of New Netherland. An updated and enhanced version of that guide that incorporates recent findings and provides hyperlinks to available translations, transcriptions, and manuscript images is now available on our website.

http://www.newnetherlandinstitute.org/research/online-publications/guide-to-dutch-manuscripts-in-united-states-repositories-relating-to-new-netherland/

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Sent by New England Historic & Genealogical Society (NEHGS)

New York State Family History Conference
The New York State Family History Conference, September 17-19 in Syracuse, New York, is nearly sold out! Attendance is limited in order to provide a more personal conference environment with top national presenters. NEHGS is a conference sponsor, and our own Henry B. Hoff, Editor of the Register, will be presenting. Other speakers include Judy Russell, the Legal Genealogist; DNA expert Blaine Bettinger; Thomas W. Jones; David E. Rencher; Curt Witcher; Josh Taylor; and Dick Eastman. The New York Genealogical and Biographical Society and the Central New York Genealogical Society are cosponsoring this exciting event in partnership with the Federation of Genealogical Societies.

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Sent by NEHGS

Check out this link for ideas on preserving historic properties – like our Old Mud Meetinghouse and other Low Dutch history. This is about Norwich Mass and how the system works, includes some good ideas.

http://www.townofnorwell.net/Public_Documents/F0000FDA3/Histori%20NorwellBookletFINAL.pdf

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Letters 8/3/2015

Sent by Janice Cozine, Registration Chair and Treasurer elect

Hi Cousins!!

Look who’s on the list for our 2015 DC Frankfort gathering.

We’re up to 96 (NINETY-SIX!) cousins, friends and family from all over the US.

Still time to come join all the fun we have to offer.

Great company, food and activities. What better way to spend the weekend.

You never know what you might discover about your Dutch heritage.

Blessings to all,

Janice Cozine

DC Registration Chair

Jim Cozine

Morris/Judy McKee

Charles/Marilyn Westerfield

Larry/Charlene Woodward

John/Phillis Westerfield

Tonjah ‘Toni’ Westerfield

Jeff/Katherine Westerfield

Emily Welches/Renee Anderson

Carolyn Leonard/Jon Heavener

Larry Westerfield

Jack/Sue Taylor

Barbara Merideth

Gary/Virginia Dunn

Karen Reynard Prather

Albert Cozine Jr.

Larry /Suzanne Voreis

Bill /Sharon Leezer

Richard/Joan Murray

Sharon/James Metcalf

King/Sharon Cole

Jo Kilduff

Juanita Westerfield/Joseph Sinkhorn

Malcolm/Betty Jo Banta

Lynn Rogers

Willis (Buck)/Charlotte Keith

David/Margaret Lynn

Firth Haring/Carl Fabend

Lora Jane Westerfield

Jean Pollard/Margaret Sooy

Pam Ellingson

Gene/Carol heathcoat

Bill/Gayle Hoag

Bill/Betty Demaree

Cathy (Cat) Claunch Schwetke

Mary Bates/Charles Rupe

Cecil/Marie Van Diver

Denise Merideth Perry

Wilbur/Patricia Knapke

Michele Banta Hammann

Joyce Collins

Eddie/Janice Cozine

Marc/Freda Reynerson

Gerald/Nancy Westerfield

Janet Hazell Klein/Pamela Sweets

Jeanne Crowe/Betty Recktenwald

Barbie/Rod Hamman

Preston/Shari Forsythe

Phyllis/Doug/Brenda Byers

Dennis/Carole Karwatka

Rodney Dempsey

Anna Demaree/Richard Nunan

Larry/Geri Cozine

Sharon/Ken Holtkamp

Faris M. Bilby

David/Dena Demaree

Wayne L. Cozine

Next week in Dutch Letters, a new update that will include the states represented by the cousins.  Better hurry if you haven’t already registered – Get on the list!

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Sent by Janice Cozine – AIRPORTS

Suggest you fly into Louisville or Lexington and rent a car.

Louisville Int’l is the largest airport, Frankfort is about 54 miles (an hour) east of Louisville by car

Lexington Bluegrass Airport (west of Frankfort) is much smaller but only 29 miles, half an hour by car.

Frankfort has a small airport for small planes, like 2, 4, 6 seater planes, no passenger plane facilities.

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Sent by Dutch Colonies

It is with great sadness of heart that I need to tell you that our

list has lost one of its special participants, Barbara Terhune. She

passed away on her birthday, July 25, 2015 after a year of illness and

declining health. Her son has written a fitting little tribute: There

is a small funeral July 30 and no flowers are needed. Just keep a strong

woman in your thoughts that left us so much insight into our heritage.

Renee L. Dauven

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Sent by Vince Akers

So sorry to hear that we have lost Barbara.  Attached are photos of her holding the Old Mud communion cup before church services at the 2009 Dutch Cousins Reunion.  Also one of Barbara and Paul by their “West of Salt” exhibit at that reunion.


Image.jpeg

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Sent by carolyn – inre: Paul & Barb Terhune

Barb <oldBat@embarqmail.com> and I had corresponded for several years. I knew she and Paul were having some health problems and couldn’t come in 2013, but so sorry to hear she has passed. They added so much to our group and I’m so glad I got a copy of their incredible book, “West of the Salt”.  The most amazing thing to me was how they discovered, proved and corrected the error made by Rev. Demaree on the maiden name of Rev. Cornelius Cozine’s second wife, Mary Koning, the widow VanOrden.  RIP dear friend.

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Sent by Robert & Beverly Adlet

Answer to Kerrylea Stippes ref VanAntwerp Genealogy.

 

Was able to add Abraham Banta Shuck 1821-1901 into my wifes Demaree tree thru Hendrick Banta Jr. Abraham Banta Shuck m Abigail VanAntwerp 1825-1890 she was dau of William VanAntwerp 1800- m Maria Clinedenny 1800-1844. William son of Johannes “John” VanAntwerp 1774-1841 m Abigail Johnson 1775-. Johannes son of Simon Pieterse Van Antwerp 1738-1808 m Rebecca Mebie 1745-1787. Simon son of Pieter Danielse Van Antwerp 1688-1733 of Schenectady, NY m Engeltje Pieterse Mabie 1697-1742. Pieter son of Daniel Janse VanAntwerpen of Holland m Marietje “Maria” Symonse de Groot 1654-1695. Daniel son of Jan “John” VanAntwerpen 1608-1664 of Holland m unk name 1610-1673. Book Hudson-Mohawk Genealogical and Family Memoirs, Vol 1 Chpt “Hudson and Mohawk Valleys” pg 412 states: “The family name of VanAntwerp has this significance through the Dutch: that the family to which this cognomen was applied resided near the warf, tying up the ships and in this sense also it could signify that before they took up residence in Holland or emigrated to America they came from the great seaport of Belgium, Antwerp, the capital of the province of the same name.”

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Sent by BARBIE HAMMAN, our 2015 coordinator

in charge of rooms, t-shirts and whatever!

Carolyn,

If I could please add to our newsletter:

We are eagerly awaiting the arrival of our cousins to Frankfort.  We have so many fun, entertaining, educational events and wonderful speakers planned and don’t want anyone to miss a moment of it!

I just heard from Ms. McCarron at The Capital Plaza Hotel and at this count, there are still about 20 rooms still in our block, and they are urging registrants to call and reserve your room as there are several other events that weekend (one is a classic car show) and the rooms are going fast.

We also want to pack Old Mud on Sunday for the Rededication service, so PLEASE get your reservations made now at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL.

I can smell that Chicken fryin’!

Barbie Hamman

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Sent by Dutch Genealogy News 31 July 2015

If you see “Holland” in a published source, like a book or an online tree, chances are that the person means the country of the Netherlands.

If you see “Holland” in a Dutch record prior to 1840, Holland refers to the province by that name, in the west of the Netherlands. In 1840, the province was split into Noord-Holland and Zuid-Holland.

As the most prosperous province and the center of international trade, the province overshadowed the other provinces; so much so that its name became synonymous with the country. Kind of like people calling Great-Britain “England.”

Next time you find a source that says your ancestor is from “Holland,” check if they meant the province or the country, so you know where to look.

by Yvette Hoitink, a professional genealogist in the Netherlands and owner of Dutch Genealogy Services

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Sent by

“A History of the Geography of NYC” by Joel Weintraub
image002.jpg

Steve Morse’s “One Step” web site at http://www.stevemorse.org is a gold mine for genealogists.                                                                   It provides simplified tools to access U.S. census records, Canada/UK census records, New York census, Social Security Death Index, vital records, calendars, maps, foreign alphabets, Holocaust, genetic and more. Thousands of genealogists use Steve Morse’s web site every day to simplify their searches of online sites. However, I suspect many of them overlook one hidden gem on the site: A History of the Geography of NYCby Joel Weintraub.

Weintraub’s five-page article provides a a great deal of information about boundary changes within that city and also contains links to Changed Street Names (for NYC as well as some other cities), graphics and other references. If you have ancestors who lived in New York City, you need this free document!

A History of the Geography of NYC by Joel Weintraub is available in three different formats: HTML, PDF, or DOC. Take your choice.

You can find this hidden gem by starting at http://www.stevemorse.org/census/location.htm.

This info is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2015 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.

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Sent by Carolyn

If you are in the area …

Carolyn B Leonard will be speaking to the Oklahoma City Writers on Saturday August 15th at their regular meeting (3rd Saturdays) in the meeting room across the hall from Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 NW Expressway in 50 Penn Place, Oklahoma City. The meeting is free, convenes at 10:15, and the public is invited.

Her topic is, “Four Secret Words to Writing Success: Hey, You, See -So what?”

Leonard said, “Once upon a time a long long time ago… Bonnie Speer came all the way from the University of Oklahoma to the far northwest corner of OKlahoma to teach a writing class.”

A dozen members of that class – who were unpublished and had never met before – became forever friends and later formed the “Writers of Purple Sage” group which is still active and publishing.

“Mrs. Speer changed our lives,” Leonard said, “and showed us how to become selling writers with the magic formula: “Hey, You, See -So what?” And that is the secret  I hope to share with OKC Writers in August. Please bring something you are working on, or a pencil & paper (or both).  The lesson will be a little workshop, sort of, but will also be okay for those who don’t want to work.”

Leonard is author of the popular how-to book “Who’s Your Daddy? A Guide to Genealogy from Start to Finish.” She is also a former rural newspaper editor, winner of many journalistic contests, published in local, state and national publications, and contributed to the best-seller “In Their Name,” a state-endorsed book on the Murrah Federal Building bombing in Oklahoma City. She loves to travel and is currently looking for a publisher for her 80,000 word non-fiction illustrated manuscript, “To Israel, With Love,” a travel and history book of that country which she has visited twice in reality and many times in her dreams. While there she rode a camel on a dare.

She remains a commissioned writer for Persimmon Hill, the award-winning magazine of the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, and has a brief article published in the current Oklahoma Today magazine. She received the highest honor of the prestigious Oklahoma Writers Federation when she was named Honorary Lifetime member.  Leonard lives in Oklahoma City with her retired engineer hubby, Jon Heavener. She also still operates the wheat farm in far northwestern Oklahoma where she grew up.

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Here are references as they appeared in various documents regarding the Congregation at Salt River.  I already sent this to Vince.

I think the building its self was known as the Old Mud Meeting House, while the Congregation was known as the Congregation of the Salt River as referenced below.

The Mud Meeting House and as you know it became a Union Church, used by more than one congregation once the Dutch Reformed scattered so perhaps the various Congregations including the Low Dutch using it were known as the Old Mud Congregation.

Here are the reference I have:

1). The Dutch Synod View taken from ” The Acts and Proceedings of the Generaly Synod of the Reformed Dutch Church in North America”, Vol 1, Embracing the period from 1771-1799. (New York: Ref. Protestant Dutch Church, 1859), 454, 473, 481-82. This is on line and well worth downloading.

454, Article XIII, 1796, The Extension of the Church – The Classis of New Brunswick laid upon the table of the Synod a request, accompanied by a call for a minister from the people of the Salt River Congregation, Mercer County, Kentucky, requesting and earnestly deserving a minister might be sent as soon as possible.

  1.  Article XI, 1797, The Extension of the Church – Mr. Peter Labaugh reported to the Sunod that agreeably to their order he had visited the settlement of Salt River in Kentucky and that he had organized a congregation at that place under the name of Congregation of Salt River consisting of about one hundred families.

481-482. Article XIII, 1799, Extension of the Church.  Resolved that a committee be appointed to endeavor to obtain a minister or candidate to visit the Congregation of Salt River.

2). The deed between David and Elizabeth Adams, dated 22 December 1800 is between the Adams of the County of Kentucky and the Commonwealth of Kentucky of the one part and John Vanbryck, Isaac Vanice & Peter Carnne agents and overseers of the Reformed Church on the dry fork of the Salt River in Mercer County of the other part. the Salt River Congregation paid David and Elizabeth Adams the sum of 4 lbs and 10 shillings Virginia currency.

3). Henry Commigore visited the Sourlandt or Harlingen DRC the name by which it was known later seeking donations to the Salt River Congregation on 22 Oct. 1804. I am sure he stopped off at Conewago and probably other DRC as well. You just published a typed copy I made in the newsletter.

4). The remaining Low Dutch Reformed Congregation for want of a preacher of their own denomination procured the Rev. Thomas Kyle, however several years later he resigned his pastorate.  Upon his departures, the Salt River Congregation struggle on its own later merging with a local presbyterian congregation.  On 9 Oct, 1812 Daniel Brewer, Kort Voris, Conrelius Demaree and Garret Dorland [ former members of the Salt River Congregation] engaged the services of Rev. Thomas Cleland to become the Pastor of the New Providence Presbyterian Church. He mentioned in his memoirs that “I entered my pastoral duties in New Providence Church the first sabbath in April 1813. I was employed by a small church of the Dutch Reformed about four miles south of Harrodsburg and for my services they paid me promptly $50.00 in semi-annual installments.”  This Low Dutch church after a while became extinct as a separate organization and was amalgamated with others, principally with the Presbyterians in their vicinity.

Of course the congregation split with part joining the Haydonites and on 20 May 1822, the Low Dutch Reformed Church members agreed to use the meeting house the first and third sabbath.

Sources: Dutch Reformed Church vs. Christian Church, 20 May 1822, Mercer Co. Ky Deed book 12:363-364; Robert B. McAfee,”The History of the Rise and Progress of the First Settlement on the Salt River and Establishment of the New Providence Church,” Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 29 (1931), on line.; Edward Porter Humphrey and Thomas H. Cleland, Memoirs of Reverend Thomas Cleland, D. D., Comprised From His Private Papers (Cincinnati: Moore, Wistach, Keys & Co., 1859), 98-99. Historic Sketch of Old Mud Meeting House and the Adjacent Grave Yard Near Harrodsburg, Ky, August 25, 1900. published by Daniel Mac-Hir Hutton, Harrodsburg, Ky., 20-21, 24.

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Letters 8/10/2015

Sent by Janice Cozine, Dutch Cousins Registration Chair

Hi Cousins!

WOW….GREAT NEWS from the registration desk.

We’re over the 100 people mark!

We’re at 103 cousins, friends and guest for our 2015 Frankfort, Ky gathering. 

There’s still time to get your forms in and make this total go even higher.

Please mail your reg. form as soon as possible, cause all the committee chairs need to get their counts/info finalized soon.

We’re going to show you a ‘good’ time…….you won’t want to be left out!

I’ve listed below all who have registered, including their states and their ancestors last names. All info taken from your reg. form.   Please check to see if I have all your info correct.

If your name is not on my list….and you want it to be…you know what to do…… MAIL YOUR FORM TODAY! 

Also,  if you’ve had an address change, please let us know.

Help us to keep our records current/updated, so you can be informed.

Blessings to all,

Janice Cozine

Registration Chair

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 Here’s who’s coming! Are you on the list? 

Is your Low Dutch Ancestry name represented?

Look at all the states and the different Low Dutch families coming to our gathering!

AL- Richard/Betty Jean Willerton -Banta

AR- Jean Pollard/Margaret Sooy – Westerfield

AR- Jo Kilduff – not listed

AR- Beverly Sullivan- Banta

CA- Joyce Collins – Westerfield

CO- Sharon/Ken Holtkamp – Comingore

FL- Gary/Virginia Dunn – Stagg/Brouwer

FL- Malcolm/Betty Jo Banta – Banta

FL- Tonjah ‘Toni’ Westerfield – Westerfield

GA- Michele Banta Hammann – Banta

IL- Gerald/Nancy Westerfield – Westerfield

IL- Phyllis/Doug/Brenda Byers –  Westerfield

IL– Richard/Joan Murray – Banta

IN- Bill/Betty Demaree – Demaree

IN- Emily Welches/Renee Anderson – Banta

IN- Larry/Geri Cozine – Cozine

IN- Willis (Buck)/Charlotte Keith -Westerfield

KY- Albert Cozine Jr. – Cozine

KY- Anna Demaree/Richard Nunan – Demaree

KY- Barbie/Rod Hamman – Cozine

KY- Cecil/Marie Van Diver – Vandiver

KY- Charles/Marilyn Westerfield – Westerfield

KY- David/Dena Demaree – Demaree

KY- David/Margaret Lynn – not listed

KY- Dennis/Carole Karwatka – Westerfield

KY- Eddie/Janice Cozine – Cozine

KY- Faris M. Bilby – Swearingen

KY- Janet Hazell Klein/Pamela Sweets – Demaree

KY- Jeanne Crowe/Betty Recktenwald – Cozine

KY- Juanita Westerfield/Joseph Sinkhorn – Westerfield

KY- Lora Jane Westerfield-  Westerfield

KY- Marc/Freda Reynerson – Banta

KY- Preston/Shari Forsythe – Westerfield

KY- Rodney Dempsey – Banta/Demotte

KY- Sharon/James Metcalf – Cozine

KY- Wayne L. Cozine – Cozine

KY- Wilbur/Patricia Knapke — Demarest

MO- Barbara Merideth – Westerfield

MO- Rogene Smith/ Beverly Staley/ Carol Ballard – Luyster

NC- Jeff/Katherine Westerfield – Westerfield

NC- Karen Reynard Prather – Comingore

NJ- Firth Haring/Carl Fabend – Cozine

NV- Jim Cozine  – Cozine

OH- Lynn Rogers – Ryker

OK- Bill/Gayle Hoag – Turhune

OK- Carolyn Leonard/Jon Heavener – Cozine/Staats

PA- John/Phillis Westerfield – Westerfield

SC- Larry /Suzanne Voreis – Van Voorhees

TN- Denise Merideth Perry – Westerfield

TN- Larry Westerfield – Westerfield

TX- Gene/Carol Heathcoat – Durie

TX- Jack/Sue Taylor-  Reynerson

TX- King/Sharon Cole – Stagg

TX- Morris/Judy McKee – Banta

VA- Cathy (Cat) Claunch Schwetke – Ryker/Riker/Demarest

VA-   Mary Bates/Charles Rupe – Terhune

WA- Larry/Charlene Woodward-  Vanarsdall

WI- Pam Ellingson – Westerfield

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Sent by Richard Willerton

Hi Carolyn,

  Just registered at Capital Plaza Hotel in the Dutch Cousins group!!  Richard and I will see all of you there!!!

Rich wants to be with his Dutch Cousins to give him something to learn about and be happy.  He only knew his great-grandfather’s name and where he was buried in Oklahoma. Since Ancestry.com helped tie all the generations together — bless the little leaves.  I learned who the parents of his great-granddad were. Now the line of Banta goes back to the 1500s.

   SO Excited now,

  Got the Registration off in today’s mail. We both are looking forward to seeing all the Cousins!!  Richard’s seventy-third birthday is the 26th of September! Big Party!!

Thanks again for your help and prayers,      

Betty Jean

Richard (Banta descendant) & Betty Jean Willerton

NOTE from Carolyn: JUST a word of caution to all our readers ==about Ancestry – I love it too, but the info you find there is only as good as the person who posted it.  Our motto is:  “Genealogy without reliable sources is MYTHOLOGY!”

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Sent by Joan Murray, Autograph party chair

LOOKING FOR MORE AUTHORS to participate in the Book Sales at the Reunion.  So far only two are signed up.  How about some of our other authors? I know we have several. 

Speakers Firth Fabend, Charlie Westerfield, Greg Huber,  Vince Akers, Russ Gasero, and others? Let me help with your publicity.

Dr. Bob Schenck, Judy Cassidy, and/or any other Dutch Cousin authors who may not be able to come this year could send informational flyers and order blanks via email.

Get signed up now! The event is just a few weeks away!

Hit reply and send book title & authors name, to Carolyn (Buffalo234@cox.net) and she will forward it to me.    

Thank you.  I’ll see you all soon!.   

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Sent by Pam Ellingson, Family Display Chair

Family displays for the Dutch Cousins Gathering 2015

It’s time to start planning a display for the Dutch Cousins Gathering 2015 (or dust off the one that you used at a previous gathering). It doesn’t have to be super fancy. You might want to contact a cousin and work on a joint project. I have been assured that there will be plenty of space for displays in Frankfort.

I am a visual person and enjoy and learn so much from these displays. Last summer I saw an exhibit of New York historic art by Len Tantillo. A beautiful book, “A Moment Past: L.F. Tantillo Paints New York History” was compiled from this exhibit. All of the names of Dutch Cousins who register to display by September 5, 2015 will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a copy of this fantastic book.  All exhibitors will get a special ribbon to add to their name badge. 

Please send an e-mail and specify space needed (1 table, 1/2 table or 1/3 table):

Hit reply and send to Carolyn (Buffalo234@cox.net) and she will forward it to me. 

I’m looking forward to some great displays in 2015!

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Sent by FB-Dutch Cousins in KY

Barbara Whiteside posted this on our Facebook page and It is so beautiful I kept it playing over and over this morning.  Hope it works for you.

Het is goed met mijn ziel – it is well with my soul

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zk3dBlmM9ag#action=share

This hymn penned by hymnist Horatio Spafford after the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, which ruined him financially (he had been a successful lawyer and had invested significantly in property in the area of Chicago that was extensively damaged by the great fire). His business interests were further hit by the economic downturn of 1873, at which time he had planned to travel to Europe with his family on the SS Ville du Havre. In a late change of plan, he sent the family ahead while he was delayed on business concerning zoning problems following the Great Chicago Fire. While crossing the Atlantic, the ship sank rapidly after a collision with a sea vessel, the Loch Earn, and all four of Spafford’s daughters died. Shortly afterwards, as Spafford traveled to meet his grieving wife, he was inspired to write these words as his ship passed near where his daughters had died.

Makes all the problems in my life – past and present – seem like nothing!

It Is Well With My Soul
(Excerpt of Original lyrics)
When peace like a river, attendeth my way,
When sorrows like sea billows roll;
Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to know,a
It is well, it is well, with my soul.
Refrain:
It is well, (it is well),
With my soul, (with my soul)
It is well, it is well, with my soul.

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Letters 8/21/2015

about the Gathering Sept 25-26

THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT SOON!   Send your registration to Janice Cozine – here’s a hotlink if you misplaced yours:

GOT #DUTCH?  2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering #Registration – click here: http://bit.ly/1dlO5HH

Dutch Cousins T-Shirt/Lapel pin order click here: http://bit.ly/1GBmf6Y

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Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered  and long-loved.

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Sent by Dr Steve Henry (via Barbie Hamman)

About the bus tour on Friday afternoon – Steve said he plans for us to visit the Old Capital (Beautiful), Drive thru (and Maybe visit) Daniel Boone’s Grave, Visit the New Capital and the Lieutenant Governor’s Home then back to HS.  He’s trying to fit all this in the time allotted, so everyone will sure want to go.

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Sent by Bill Hoag

Carolyn;

It’s Terhune.  See you in Frankfort in about a month.

Bill K. Hoag

OK- Bill/Gayle Hoag – Terhune

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Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center.  The Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history are all in Frankfort and close, but not the same so it may be too far to walk for some people (like me – LOL)

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Sent by Charlie Westerfield, Dutch Cousins Photographer

“One Man’s America”, to be presented by Charlie Westerfield on Thurs, Sept 24, (professional photographer and Dutch Cousin of Louisville, Kentucky), multi-media slide show which gives a panoramic overview of America’s greatest features.

From shore to shore, it covers our scenic landscapes and from the “Common Man” to Celebrities (including Dutch Cousins), the people who make up the tapestry of America.

It is a lesson in history, past and present, an appreciation for our military, and an inspiration to all patriots who still love this great land.

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Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and rededication, Monday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open especially for us cousins from 10 to 3.

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Sent by Phyllis Westerfield

chairman, Cousins silent auction

If you are donating items for the Silent Auction, you can either bring them with you or mail/ship them to  Capital Plaza Hotel, 405 Wilkinson Blvd., Frankfort, KY  40601.  Mark the package “HOLD FOR DUTCH COUSINS”. We still want cousins or friends who are donating items for the silent auction, to send us the information by e-mail  <jcw44@juno.com> so we will have an idea how many items to expect, also let us know if there is a minimum bid for the item.  We will let Mary Jo know where to send her item.

(NOTE: But if you fail to send advance notice, it is okay to go ahead and bring them to the gathering. We will make room for them.)

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Sent by Alice (Bliss) Hostetter

Just a bit more about the hymn “It is Well”. Philip P. Bliss wrote the music to that lovely hymn. “Bliss” happens to be my maiden name and I have always wondered if there is a connection there. Jan Whaley and I (we were both at the Dutch Cousin reunion 2 years ago) recently played an arrangement of that hymn on organ and piano. The biography of Philip P. Bliss is well worth reading.

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NOTE: We also still need a couple MORE VOLUNTEERS: Let me know what you are interested in and willing to try.

More Greeters

Veteran Rep

2017 Coordinator assistant

Go-fers!

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Sent by Friend on Ebay

Voorhees photos, sharing link just in case someone here is related to this family.

http://stores.ebay.com/4hearts-Photos-and-Treasures?_rdc=1

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Sent by Carolyn Leonard from <info@NYorigins.org>

O my Gosh! This is wonderful. May have to plan another trip to NYC – when my leg heals – remember the walking!

How New York, originally New Amsterdam, became this amazing and diverse City of Opportunity.   A visit to the indoor exhibition, that will also be available on-line, takes 1 hour. There is still plenty of opportunity for refinements and additions.

The outdoor version in Battery Park, featured in the Origins video, is still on our drawing board for the year 2017. (but it sounds on the video like it opens in battery park Sept 2015 ? – that woudn’t work for me)

Go here:  http://www.nyorigins.org/

Then click on the button:  Watch the Origins Trailer

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Sent by Liz Marie Corbin Tyndorf

Hi Carolyn,

How exciting! I won’t be able to make the reunion this year – I have twin sons in 2nd grade and my husband is a pilot so we have to plan things far in advance to coordinate schedules! I can see myself going sometime in the future and making some sisters or cousins or my mother come along!!

Here’s my Genealogy related to Low Dutch – I can go pretty far back and I’m related a few times over (probably like many of us) but here’s the simplest chain:

Harriet Adele Wales Brightman (grandmother)

Elmer Ellsworth Wales (1st great-grandfather)

Sophrona Van Ausdell Wales (2nd great-grandmother

William Van Ausdell (3rd great-grandfather)

John C Van Arsdall & Mary Polly Westerfield (4th great-grandparents)

James Cosine Westerfield & Catherine Sortore (5th great grandparents)

James Westerfield & Phoebe Cosine / Cozine (6th great-grandparents)

Jacobus Westervelt & Marie Demaree (7th great-grandparents

I have a couple more branches that include Van Arsdalen, Vanderveer, LaGrange and DeLaGrange and Molenaar. All should be Low Dutch through New Amsterdam and most made it down to settle Kentucky and some stayed back and settled Albany. My descendants headed west a few hundred years later and settled in Illinois and Iowa. I gate up in Chicago suburbs.

Please let me know what other info you need. I have some Old MudHouse records that probably originated from your group! They helped me get admitted to DAR – so thank you very much!!

Your cousin, Liz

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Sent by John C. Westerfield

Nominating committee report

incoming Executive Committee:

President:  Carolyn Leonard of OKC, OK

Vice President: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, KY

Secretary:  Denise Merideth Perry of Somerville, TN

Treasurer: Janice Cozine of Mt Washington, KY

Webmaster: Pam Ellingson, Lakewood, WI

Finance Chairman:  Vince Akers of Indiana

2017 Gathering Coordinator: Mr. Lynn Rogers of Centerville, OH

2015 Board of Directors:

Barbie Abbott Hamman of Kentucky

Jim Cozine of Nevada

Barbara Whiteside of Indiana

President Emeritus Claude Westerfield of Iowa

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outgoing 2015 Executive Committee:

President: John C. Westerfield of Pennsylvania

Vice President: Tommy Green of Oklahoma

Secretary: Carolyn Leonard of Oklahoma

Treasurer: Diana Davis of Virginia

2015 Gathering Coordinator:  Barbie Hamman

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Sent by Barbie Hamman

T-shirt order goes in next week!

The T-shirts are ready to be ordered and will send in the order onSeptember 1st.  I’m sorry I don’t have a pic of them but they are just like last years except that they are Black with and Orange/White Logo.

See you All Soon!

Barbie

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Sent by Janice Cozine

Hello to all…yes Lynn…WOW!  Things are heating up.

I’ll have everything for our cousins in a baggie (name tags/meal tickets/etc) at the registration desk when they arrive.

Barbie or Missi may be next to me, so the cousins who ordered tee-shirts can pick them up as well.

Since parking is limited, I  arranged for a city bus to pick up the cousins at the Plaza Hotel at 8:15 AM on Friday morning ONLY. The city bus will return to the History Center at 9:00 PM and take the cousins back to the Plaza Hotel.

(Free service to us)

Friday being a normal  work day for employees at the History Center and surrounding businesses, it WILL be hard to find a parking spot for the extra 50/60 vehicles we will bring in.

( Please let me know if these times are good)

I tried to get transportation for the tour on Friday,  but the City Transportation Service could not provide a bus for us. Sorry Steve…..

P.S. Does anyone know some one at the Buffalo Trace Distillery?  They MAY have a tour bus we could use…cheap…lol

For any one who can not make the 8:15 AM hotel bus pick up, Frankfort has a FREE Trolley service starting at 10:00 AM and runs through 2:30 PM.   It runs every 10-15 minutes and stops at the Plaza Hotel and has a stop at the History Center. You may have to ride a few blocks around Frankfort….but it will be a nice scenic view.   Then you could ride the 9:00 PMbus back to the hotel.

For any one wanting to drive to the History Center, depending on the time of day….you may have to circle around a couple of times to find a spot.

Any questions/concerns please ask.

Blessings to all,

Janice Cozine  🙂

Dutch Cousins Registration  Chair

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Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers, 2017 Coordinator

Wow! Excitement!  Things are heating up!  I am pretty new to the Dutch Cousins, but have been around a few other mulberry bushes a few times.

Flag salute:  DAR/SAR (a lot of patriot mil and other service)(I do not know anyone, but am willing to spend time trying to find someone.)

Business meeting non-members: how about announcing that a business meeting, exciting to members, but probably boring to non-members; inform them that they are welcome to stay, but please don’t vote. (my guess is that they will leave on their own.)

(I will not be offended if things go differently.)

I am available to spend some time before the reunion.

Thanks to all,

Lynn

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Letters 8/25/2015

Sent by Joan Murray, Autograph party chair

LOOKING FOR MORE AUTHORS to participate in the Book Sales at the Reunion.

I know we have several authors coming.  Firth Fabend, Charlie Westerfield, Greg Huber, Vince Akers, Russ Gasero, Larry Voreis, Jim Cozine, and others I may not know about.

You may choose to sell your books yourself, or you may choose to have the KY History Center gift shop sell them for you, in which case the bookstore will keep 30% of the selling price for their cut.  You may ship the books to :

Phil Janes, Operations Manager, Kentucky Historical Society

Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History

100 W. Broadway

Frankfort, KY  40601

If you need more info, Phil can be contacted at 502-564-1792, ext. 4443 or email Phil.Janes@ky.gov.

Enclose an invoice in the package with all your contact information and the selling price, and mark the package “Hold for Dutch Cousins Sept 23, 2015”, but either way, please send Joan and me a note to let us know your plan — along with complete info on your books as Joan will be making nameplates and info for you.  We are hoping to have a special nametag label AUTHOR for each one participating.

Dr. Bob Schenck, Judy Cassidy, and any other authors who are not able to come this year could send informational flyers and order blanks via email to me and I will advertise your books for you.

Get signed up now! The event is less than four weeks away!

Send book title & authors name, to joanemurray74@gmail.com.

Thank you.  I’ll see you all soon!.

Joan Murray

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Make your reservations now at the Capital Plaza Hotel – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS-Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-28th if you can! Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center.  The Kentucky Historical Society and the KY History Center, and the Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history are all in Frankfort and close, but not the same so it may be too far to walk for some people (like me – LOL)

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Sent by  Pam Ellingson, Family Group Displays

Is your Low Dutch Ancestry name going to be represented?

Banta, Bergen, Bodine, Brewer, Demaree, Dorland, Duree, Comingo, Cosart, Cozine, Monfort, Ryker, Shuck, Smock, Stagg, Terhune, VanArsdale, Van Nuys, Voris, Vorhees, or Westervelt?

AT this moment we have only four displays registered for the event: Jack Taylor for Banta, Reynerson & related; Carolyn Leonard for Cozine family; Joan Murray for Banta & Reference books; Emily Welches, Banta & Vamarsdall.

Desperately Needed: Family Displays for the upcoming gathering

Your display doesn’t have to be complicated, sometimes the basics tell the whole story. Do you have a notebook of family history, a family heirloom (or picture of the heirloom), family genealogy group sheet? How do you descend from one of our common ancestors? Here are pictures of a few of some of the past displays to help inspire you.

All entries by Sept 5 will be in a drawing to win a copy of the book “A Moment Past: L.F. Tantillo Paints New York History”. Let me know if you would like to reserve a full of half table.

Thanks for your help. e-mail: ellingson.pam@gmail.com

pIoad8sIJlzo6X78I3ZX7cIQySOdshY37-FMbYo99kk=h300-w400-p-nu.jpeg

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Many people do not understand that expense for meals include the charge for service and tips, and rental of the room.

 

It is embarrassing to tell cousins they can’t attend without a meal ticket, but we are charged per person (chair or standing) in attendance

.

We have to turn in the numbers next Monday, so get off the fence and send in your registration blank today!

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Sent by Janice Cozine, registration chair

Hi Cousins,  We’ve added a few more names to our 2015 Dutch gathering list.

Is your name on it?

Check out the up dated list below and see who’s been added.

Maybe someone you haven’t seen for a while, maybe a distant relative and maybe just a good ole friend.

So excited to say, we have some ‘First Timers’ this year.

They are in for a treat!!

Remember, if you have ANY history to share, please don’t leave it at home.

We love and enjoy looking through old family Bibles, pictures, newspaper articles, any ole story you have….that’s what it’s all about….sharing.

We’ll have plenty of tables to display anything of interest you bring.

It doesn’t have to be an elaborate display….we’ll have room for it

Not much time left, September is almost here!

Count down starting NOW….

Blessings to all,

Janice Cozine

DC Registration chair

UP-DATED LIST;

AR Jo Kilduff  not listed

AR Beverly Sullivan   Banta

CA Joyce Collins  Westerfield

CO Sharon/Ken Holtkamp  Comingore

FL Gary/Virginia Dunn  Stagg/Brouwer

FL Malcolm/Betty Jo Banta  Banta

FL Tonjah ‘Toni’ Westerfield  Westerfield

GA Michele Banta Hammann  Banta

IL Gerald/Nancy Westerfield  Westerfield

IL Phyllis/Doug/Brenda Byers  Westerfield

IL Richard/Joan Murray  Banta

IN Vince/Lisa Akers  Demaree

IN Zach Akers/Betty Green Demaree

IN Bill/Betty Demaree  Demaree

IN Emily Welches/Renee Anderson  Banta

IN Larry/Geri Cozine  Cozine

IN Willis (Buck)/Charlotte Keith  Westerfield

IN Steve/Jeannie Carlisle  Vories/Monfort

KY Albert Cozine Jr. / Brenda Stivers  Cozine

KY Anna Demaree/Richard Nunan  Demaree

KY Barbie/Rod Hamman    Cozine

KY Cecil/Marie Van Diver   Vandiver

KY Charles/Marilyn Westerfield  Westerfield

KY David/Dena Demaree   Demaree

KY David/Margaret Lynn   not listed

KY Dennis/Carole Karwatka  Westerfield

KY Eddie/Janice Cozine  Cozine

KY Faris M. Bilby  Swearinger

KY Janet Hazell Klein/Pamela Sweets  Demaree

KY Jeanne Crowe/Betty Recktenwald  Cozine

KY Juanita Westerfield/Joseph Sinkhorn  Westerfield

KY Lora Jane Westerfield       Westerfield

KY Marc/Freda Reynerson  Banta

KY Preston/Shari Forsythe  Westerfield

KY Rodney Dempsey  Banta/Demotte

KY Sharon/James Metcalf  Cozine

KY Wayne L. Cozine  Cozine

KY Wilbur/Patricia Knapke  Demarest

MO Barbara Merideth  Westerfield

MO Rogene Smith/ Beverly Staley/ Carol Ballard  Luyster

NC Jeff/Katherine Westerfield  Westerfield

NC Karen Reynard Prather  Comingore

NJ Firth Haring/Carl Fabend  Cozine

NV Jim Cozine  Cozine

OH Martin Westerfield Westerfield

OH Lynn Rogers  Ryker

OK Bill/Gayle Hoag    Terhune

OK Carolyn Leonard/Jon Heavener  Cozine/Staats

PA John/Phillis Westerfield  Westerfield

SC Larry /Suzanne Voreis  Van Voorhees

TN Denise Merideth Perry  Westerfield

TN Larry Westerfield  Westerfield

TX Gene/Carol Heathcoat  Durie

TX Jack/Sue Taylor   Reynerson

TX King/Sharon Cole  Stagg

TX Morris/Judy McKee  Banta

VA Cathy (Cat) Claunch Schwetke  Ryker/Riker/Demarest

VA Mary Bates/Charles Rupe  Terhune

WA Larry/Charlene Woodward   Vanarsdall

WI Pam Ellingson  Westerfield

Look at all the states and the different Low Dutch families coming to our gathering!

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Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins – both newly-discovered  and long-loved.

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Sent by  The Prez – John C. Westerfield

Sunday Church Service at Old Mud

Welcome                                                              John Westerfield

Song Leader                                                          Eddie Sherrow

Song                      Love Lifted Me                          Congregation

Offertory/Song                                                        Men’s group

Song                      Victory in Jesus                        Congregation

Soloist                                                                   Ronnie Blackwell

Message                                                                Jeff Westerfield

Communion

Benediction             Lord’s Prayer                            Ronnie Blackwell

 

 

Re-dedication of Old Mud

Welcome:    John Westerfield

Opening Prayer:     Jeff Westerfield

Songs:    TBA    Amalie Preston

Remarks:  Dick Beaur, President of Harrodsburg Historical Society

Remarks: Carolyn Leonard, President of Dutch Cousins of Kentucky

Remarks: Vince Akers, Historian of Dutch Cousins of Kentucky

Speaker:  Russell Gasero, Archivist RCA

Questions

Thank everyone for sharing this special occasion with us:  John Westerfield

Closing Prayer:

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Sent by Carolyn Leonard

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK – as my Dutch grandmother used to say.

Look at all these wonderful Volunteers for the 2015 Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort KY

REGISTRATION: Janice Cozine of KY

NEWSLETTER EDITOR:  Denise Merideth Perry  of TN

DISPLAYS: Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin is in charge of the Family Group displays & also our wonderful webmaster!

HOSPITALITY:  Gene and Carol Heathcoat of Texas will serve coffee and bagels every morning

SILENT AUCTION: John & Phyllis Westerfield of PA will collect items and handle the sales.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlie Westerfield of Louisville, our own personal official Dutch Cousins pro photographer

TEE SHIRTS:  Barbie Hamman and Missi Mercer of KY; Missi our old friend and angel from Shelbyville 2007

HARRODSBURG: Dutch Archives & Old Mud rep: Amalie Preston of H-burg KY

GREETERS CHAIRMAN:  Rod Dempsey of Louisville

HISTORIAN: Barbara Whiteside of Indiana agreed to continue keeping the scrapbook.

WHEREVER NEEDED:  King & Sharon Cole of Texas

2015 coordinator – Barbie Hammon

2017 coordinator – Mr. Lynn Rogers

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Our meetings will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and rededication, Monday the Harrodsburg Historical Society and LowDutch Archives will be open especially for us cousins from 10 to 3.

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Sent by Carolyn Leonard

Dick Eastman recently said in his genealogy newsletter: Anyone with a computer can now obtain more genealogy information online that what any public library in a town or a small city can provide. In fact, the computer probably can provide more genealogy information than what was in the Arizona State Library Genealogy Collection in Phoenix with the obvious exception of quite a bit of Arizona-specific information that is not available elsewhere and even that can be fixed by having those specific materials digitized at an expense that is probably much less than keeping the “bricks and mortar” library open.

The online information is available quickly and conveniently, is usually faster to search, and (in many cases) is available for less money. In fact, it is often cheaper to search online than it is to travel to a repository to search. Where copyrights allow, the same digitized books are available to in-home patrons on FamilySearch.orgas well as to visitors at more than 4,700 local Family History Centers around the world. In Oklahoma, Most public libraries offer FREE home access for their card-carrying members to such archive as MyHeritage or Ancestry.com or FindMyPast or AmericanAncestors.org, and many other data banks,  Just ask your local librarian!

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Overview of Ancestral Quest for Mac

Ancestral Quest for Mac allows users to record their family tree, including the names, dates and places of ancestors and descendants, and provides for the recording of notes and sources for each individual, as well as scrapbook collections for each person. AQ for Mac also allows users to print standard forms and charts such as Pedigree charts, Family Group Records, Ancestry and Descendancy charts, birthday and anniversary calendars, and scores of additional charts, lists and reports to help them review and share their family tree. AQ for Mac can create a web-site that can be uploaded to the Internet, showing whatever parts of a family tree users feel like sharing.

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Letters 9/2/2015

Sent by Carolyn

Registrations -look at Janices list below-  (if I counted right) more than 100 cousins coming from 22 states claiming descent from early KY Low Dutch ancestors  (however spelled):

Banta 12, Cozine 18, Comingo 3, Coovert 2, Demaree 14, Duree 2, DeMotte 2, Luyster 2, Monfort 2, Ryker 4, Stagg 2,Terhune 4, Vanarsdall 3, Vanderveer 2, Voreis 3, Westerfield 21

and four didn’t name one of these.

Some cousins listed more than one ancestor, but I only count the first name listed so the total is correct.  Also we only have nametag labels for the 50 early families. Most of us are descended from several Dutch names since the Low Dutch believed in marrying within the church.

It’s a wonder we don’t all have webbed feet!

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To see a copy of the speakers information :

Click here: 2015 Dutch Speakers at Frankfort http://bit.ly/1XheetV

or Go to the DutchCousins.org website .

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Our meetings on Th-Fr-Sat Sept 24=26 will be in Thomas D Clark center for Kentucky history (Ky History Center) http://history.ky.gov/portfolio/thomas-d-clark-center-for-kentucky-history/ 100 West Broadway, Frankfort, KY. 40601.  We will be meeting in the Brown-Foreman Room. 

On Sunday, Sept 27, we leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and rededication, 

The gate will be unlocked at 1 pm and worship begins at 2 pm followed by the rededication. (If you go early and climb over the gate be sure to smile at the security system cameras!)

Monday, Sep 28th the Harrodsburg Historical Society and Low Dutch Archives will be open especially for us cousins 10 to 3.

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(GREAT IDEA) Sent by Pam Ellingson

about the family group displays

WESTERFIELD Cousins— I will set up a table at the upcoming gathering and I hope that you can add to it. Please bring a page showing the basics of how you descend from Jacobus & Phoebe Westerfield (similar to mine below). If you have other items to share, please bring them to the gathering.

1-James (Jacobus) WESTERFIELD * (15 Aug 1755-bef Jun 1826)

+Ufmey “Phoebe” (Femitie) COSINE * (Dec 1759-aft 9 Dec 1847)

2-James Cozine WESTERFIELD * (1783-1866)

+Catherine SORTORE * (22 Oct 1783-28 Jun 1842)

3-David Cozine WESTERFIELD * (4 Sep 1825-28 Mar 1900)

+Elizabeth “Betsy” Ann CARTER * (4 Sep 1829-2 May 1856)

4-Robert WESTERFIELD * (3 Aug 1855-28 Jan 1926)

+Sarah Elizabeth LOOKEBILL (Luckabill) * (18 Mar 1859-22 Feb 1923)

5-Holland Oliver WESTERFIELD * (22 Mar 1877-1940)

+Lillie (Lilly) PETTY * (16 Oct 1882-15 Dec 1905)

6-Florence Elizabeth WESTERFIELD * (12 Jul 1903-12 May 1971)

+Roy William ACKLAM * (23 Feb 1895-17 Dec 1969)

7-Beverly Ann ACKLAM * (19 Sep 1929-24 Jul 2013)

+Neil Ellsworth FERGUSON (28 Feb 1928-27 Dec 2011)

8-Pamela Jean FERGUSON

+Robert Ole Jr. ELLINGSON

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Sent by Amalie Preston (via phone)

Old Mud is looking great with new steps repurposed from Bill’s concrete forms at both doors.  The Historical Society will provide a portable ramp at the back door for anyone who needs it.  A railing is in place at the back door and they hope to have handrails ready for the big front door.

Just look at the new photos on the webpage: http://www.harrodsburghistorical.org/old-mud-meeting-house/

The new flooring is down, which is actually a special purchase from the Ralph Anderson estate.  When our wonderful benefactor and Dutch Cousin died, all his land and property sold at public auction. His immaculate pastures were all surrounded by plank fences painted black to match the outbuildings. The new owners did not want or need the fences. So HHS was able to purchase the planks with a gift from the James Harrod Trust.  These were milled and have now been laid for flooring which awaits a new finish of boiled linseed oil.  The Kellys, a Mercer County Family known for their restoration and renovation expertise, have replaced missing mud, laid the flooring, and are strengthening the wineglass pulpit.  Our worship and rededication are going to be in amazing quarters!

(Amalie, Anna Armstrong, and Dick Bauer have cleaned out the schoolhouse.  With help from Amalie’s nephews, many of the pews were carried and stored there with professional movers transporting the remainder to Anna’s garage.  When the finish is dry on the new flooring, they will reverse the procedure.  It also sounds as if Amalie has examined every niche, pounded many a nail and painted anything that was standing still in addition to using her trusty electric chain saw to do some trimming. Talk about womanpower.)

The little 1900 schoolhouse will be the next project. It already has a new roof and they plan to divide it into two rooms; a front small efficiency kitchen and “bride’s dressing room” and the back into two handicap indoor bathrooms.

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Also Sent by Amalie Preston (via phone)

Harrodsburg Historical Society (HHS) has one librarian assigned just to care for the

Low Dutch Archives and Repository.

Here is the perfect way to ensure that your work on your Low Dutch genealogy is not lost! Donate your research materials and documents (published or unpublished).

The collection is kept separate from other Library holdings. Your materials are filed in acid-free containers and housed in a climate-controlled area. The donations will be filed by Dutch surname in separate collection containers. They want old photos, newspaper clippings, maps, vital records, and other reference material. Think of it like a time capsule.

Go here to learn more about the collection, and the mailing address to send your

materials. Harrodsburg Historical Society holds the only known repository for Low Dutch Archives.

http://www.dutchcousins.org/harrodsburg-low-dutch-repository

Remember to BE KIND: The HHS librarian/docents are volunteers, so be kind to them. .

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Sent by carolyn leonard

Have had requests for a genealogy program demo at Frankfort. There are many to choose from, and are so wonderful to organize your family information and be able to find a person at a click of the mouse. I will try to set up a demo of my Mac program Reunion.  It’s a little high at $$90, but there are other similar programs for less, and I think they offer a free demo program.  There are several free programs for the downloading.

.

Any one willing to set one up on PC?  Legacy is a good program, (right now on sale for $23 online) also Rootsmagic ($30) I’ve used both of those. I’ll fix a handout about genealogy programs for a handout.

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Sent by Claude & Kathy Westerfield (via phone)

Claude and Kathy said to tell all the cousins they love every one, and wish they could join us in Frankfort, but due to health issues it doesn’t look like that will be possible. Claude loves hearing from everyone, so please give him a call (712) 385-8602

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Sent by Janice Cozine, Registration Chair

Hi Cousins!!  Counting down the days in September…….

Can you believe it……only a few weeks away for our 2015 Dutch Gathering!

Hope everyone is getting excited…..I know I am.

The word is still getting out….. I’ve added a few more cousins to our list below.

Tee-shirts are being ordered, our delicious menus are set, speakers are ready, still making arrangements for more family display tables and silent auction items.

There are dozens and dozens of people working together to make this gathering as fun and exciting as possible.

Please don’t forget our re-dedication and church service planned at the

Old Mud Meeting House on Sunday.

Everything is falling into place.

None of this would be possible if it wasn’t for ‘YOU’ and the interest you have in your ‘Dutch’family history.!!!

Blessings to all,

Janice Cozine

ARJean PollardWesterfield

ARJo Kilduff not listed

ARBeverly SullivanBanta

CAJoyce Collins Westerfield

COSharon/Ken Holtkamp Comingore

FLGary/Virginia Dunn Stagg/Brouwer

FLMalcolm/Betty Jo Banta Banta

FLTonjah ‘Toni’ Westerfield Westerfield

FLBill/Gayle LondreeWestervelt, Westerfield

GAMichele Banta Hammann Banta

ILGerald/Nancy Westerfield Westerfield

ILPhyllis/Doug/Brenda Byers Westerfield

ILRichard/Joan Murray Banta

INVince/Lisa Akers Demaree

INZach Akers/Betty GreenDemaree

INBill/Betty Demaree Demaree

INEmily Welches/Renee Anderson Banta

INLarry/Geri Cozine Cozine

INWillis (Buck)/Charlotte Keith Westerfield

INSteve/Jeannie Carlisle  Vories/Monfort

KSKerin/Jim Smith    Covert, (Coovert)

KYAlbert Cozine Jr. / Brenda Stivers  Cozine

KYAnna Demaree/Richard Nunan Demaree

KYBarbie/Rod Hamman   Cozine

KYCecil/Marie Van Diver  Vandiver

KYCharles/Marilyn Westerfield Westerfield

KYDavid/Dena Demaree  Demaree

KYDavid/Margaret Lynn  not listed

KYDennis/Carole Karwatka Westerfield

KYEddie/Janice Cozine Cozine

KYFaris M. Bilby Swearinger

KYJanet Hazell Klein/Pamela Sweets Demaree

KYJeanne Crowe/Betty Recktenwald Cozine

KYJuanita Westerfield/Joseph Sinkhorn Westerfield

KYLora Jane Westerfield  Westerfield

KYMarc/Freda Reynerson Banta

KYPreston/Shari Forsythe Westerfield

KYRodney Dempsey Banta/Demotte

KYSharon/James Metcalf Cozine

KYWayne L. Cozine Cozine

KYWilbur/Patricia Knapke Demarest

KYCynthia VannAusdallVann Ausdall

MOBarbara Merideth Westerfield

MORogene Smith/ Beverly Staley/ Carol Ballard Luyster

NCJeff/Katherine Westerfield Westerfield

NCKaren Reynard Prather Comingore

NJFirth Haring/Carl Fabend Cozine

NVJim Cozine Cozine

OHMartin WesterfieldWesterfield

OHLynn Rogers Ryker

OKBill/Gayle Hoag Terhune

OKCarolyn Leonard/Jon Heavener Cozine/Staats

PAJohn/Phillis Westerfield Westerfield

SCLarry /Suzanne Voreis Van Voorhees

TNDenise Merideth Perry Westerfield

TNLarry Westerfield Westerfield

TXGene/Carol Heathcoat Durie

TXJack/Sue Taylor Reynerson

TXKing/Sharon Cole Stagg

TXMorris/Judy McKee Banta

TXAndy LeathVannuys, Canine, Ryker, Demaree

VACathy (Cat) Claunch Schwetke Ryker/Riker/Demarest

VAMary Bates/Charles Rupe Terhune

WALarry/Charlene Woodward Vanarsdall

WI Pam Ellingson  Westerfield

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Sent by Carolyn Leonard

Wonderful news!

Malcolm Banta of RotondaWest Florida has agreed to accept the nomination for office of Board Member for the Dutch Cousins. He was nominated by Vince Akers and recommended by Barbara Whiteside, who is resigning. President John C. Westerfield made the contact.

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Sent by Mary Rohrer

Mary is looking for information about the wife and family of her ancestor Peter Sheafor who lived with his family a short time in Mercer County KY, 1789 to 1823. Peter Sheafor Sr married Catherine Coolbaugh (also spelled Cowpaw and Kohlback). According to Peter Sr’s will,  his sister married a Hoagland.  One of Peter Sr’s daughter’s married a Van Sickle in Ohio and another married a Vanasoyle in Ohio. If anyone has info tht would help her, email rohrermaryellen@gmail.com

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Sent by judy cassidy

Hello Carolyn:  I was just thinking that you might wish to remind anyone attending the reunion, if they have books that they wish to donate to the Mercer Co. His. Soc, and they are driving, they might consider bringing them with them.  Media Mail does make it possible to ship books economically as well.

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MORE ABOUT THE GATHERING

Friday Keynote speaker is FIRTH HARING FABEND, author of “New Netherland in a Nutshell”, “A Dutch Family in the Middle Colonies” and other history

books of interest to our group.

FRIDAY BUS TOUR led by Stephen Henry, Dutch Cousin and former Lt Gov of KY (and Husband of forever Miss AMerica Heather French Henry) will lead a tour of interesting places around Frankfort.

SATURDAY lunch keynote is GREG HUBER of near Allentown PA, a Dutch barn and house historian, co-author of the book “The new World Dutch Barn.”

Kentucky fiddling!  As a special treat for the Cousins on Saturday night from 6 pm to 7 pm we will be entertained by MISS KENTUCKY 2015, presenting Kentucky music on the violin.  A little dinner music!  Wow!  We are so lucky  – and Steve and Heather are sponsoring this so it won’t cost the cousins.

THURSDAY EVE KICKOFF Charlie Westerfield, professional photographer and Dutch Cousin of Louisville KY will present a slide show called “One (Dutch) Man’s America”. It features beautiful photos, great music, and an extremely intelligent and entertaining live narrator.

VINCE AKERS, author “THE LOW DUTCH COMPANY, A HISTORY OF THE HOLLAND DUTCH SETTLEMENTS ON THE KENTUCKY FRONTIER”   published in de Halve Maen, is our Saturday Dinner keynote with, “A Photographic History of the Old Mud Meetinghouse”  His slide show covers the history and restoration of the Old Mud Meetinghouse.  With assistance of his son. Vince has culled historic photos from 1900 to the present, including copies from several photo archives like the Historic American Buildings Survey in the early 1930s.  His own photos cover the last 40 years beginning in 1972.

So appropriate for the night before our rededication of the restored church.

OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE: On Sunday, Sept 27, we will leave Frankfort to go to Harrodsburg for the Old Mud Meetinghouse worship and DEFINITELY a rededication. It is going to be a marvelous event. BE VERY PROUD!  Between 2005 and 2014  total contributions by Dutch Cousins to the HHS Old Mud Meetinghouse Restoration Fund came to $133,386. of which at least $76,000. was contributed by Vince Akers alone!

RUSSELL GASERO, an official of the Reformed churches of America, coming from New Brunswick NJ to help us celebrate the restoration of this wonderful 215-year- old Dutch treasure.

Letters 9/9/2015

Sent by Greg Huber, Dutch-American Barn expert

How far back would you like to go?  100 years – 200 years – 300 years.  We can tell you some things about Dutch-American architecture, namely barns, that go back to the 1630s. Imagine that, if you would. They built two structures in one – under one roof, that is  – both the house and the barn – and then just barns in the eighteenth century.  More than sixty barns and remnants pre-date 1775 and they consist of more timbers and bigger than those of any other barn type in all of North America.  Hundreds more exist in the 1790 to 1840 era for everyone to see images of. No other ethnic barn type anywhere can boast of this. The wellspring of all this is New York and New Jersey.  Much is out there to discuss – many of them BIG surprises.

 Greg is our Saturday lunch speaker, you won’t want to miss his talk.

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Sent by carolyn leonard

Larry Voreis, author of the monumental book, OUR LOW DUTCH HERITAGE, has agreed to speak to us as keynote on Friday evening. His talk will be on Reflections on Conewago Colony. Larry and his wife Suzanne live in Taylors SC, and have been regular attendees at the Cousins gatherings since the first one in 2005 when he was a speaker.  

We regret that Firth Haring Fabend is unable to attend due to health reasons and we pray her health will improve so she can attend in 2017.

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Sent by Mickey VanArsdall

Hey, my cousin R Thomas VanArsdall just sent me the article ” Who are the Dutch Cousins ” and I believe that would include me (Mickey VanArsdall) I grew up in Mercer County the son of Roger A. VanArsdall, Sr. whose father (my Grandfather) was John Wesley VanArsdall, Jr. who owned a 110 acre farm in Mercer County on the outskirts of Burgin, Ky. 

Please add me to your newsletter and let me know when the Dutch Cousins reunion/gathering will be as I am very interested in attending.

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Sent by Pam Ellingson

I have been using RootsMagic genealogy program for many many years and really like it. I will bring my laptop to the gathering and can show it to interested people. They do have an extensive library of tutorial videos that are very helpful.

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Sent by Roy Van Arsdall

Born in Burgin, KY June 29, 1924. Now Prof Emeritus Ag Economics, University of Illinois – living in Mahomet, Illinois since 1957. My Dutch connection is attached. (see attached file below)

 VANLINE

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Sent by carolyn leonard

New and completed

Kentucky – Lincoln Vol A-U (1781-1865) 542 testators

and it’s not the only county/state online

FREE viewing of more than 400,000 indexed testators lists, through and through, covering more than just Kentucky.

http://www.sampubco.com

W. David Samuelsen

SAMPUBCO

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Sent by Joe Clements

I just read the short article about Dutch Cousins in the latest issue of Olde Towne Ledger.  Please add me to your distribution list.  I am descended from Henry Comingore and Rachel Brewer, whose daughter Rachel married Jacob Cozatt, son of Peter Cozart and Marie Duree.

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Sent by Doris B. Sanders

Hope I have the right e-mail address. 

Just read the article from 12 Dec 2008 Dutch Cousins- 

36d Westervelt Massacre May 1780

posted on the net and wondered if you had read the Jacobus Westervelt/Westerfield entry on Find-A-Grave.

I am descended from the Deborah listed as his child. She was abducted the night of the massacre, ended up in Canada, was ransomed back to Kentucky, married James Baxter, Sr., lived in Jessamine Co., KY.

In their later years, Deborah and James moved to Jefferson Co., IN, where several of their 9 children resided.  James Baxter, Sr. died in 1826 and  Deborah in 1827.

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Sent by Ann Tangemon

My Dutch line 

I am Anne Tangeman b 1950 Ca. and my line goes as follows

Jack Brown Tangeman  1926-1990

Mildred Mildred Brown  1904-1992

Grace Maud Voorhies   1885-1971

Andrew Jackson Voorhies   1833-1923

Joseph Voorheis    1800 Mercer county, Ky;  1874  Benton county, Iowa

his wife was               and they married in Mercer County, Ky by Rev. Thomas Clelland.

Jane Covert         1796   Mercer county, Ky;   1874  Benton county, Iowa

John Voorhees      1771   N.J.    1858   Johnson county, In

                      and they were married in Mercer county, Ky by Rev. John Sutton.

his wife Hannah Tiertsort    1770   N.J.     1855   Johnson County, In

Koert Voorhees       1751  N.J.     1822    Mercer county, Ky.

his wife Rachel Canine        bef 1748         1830-31    Johnson county, In.

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Sent by carolyn leonard

Be sure to bring a warm jacket for the Sunday meeting at Old Mud Meetinghouse. Our ancestors were tougher than we are.  Altho our cousins are warm and friendly, there is no provision for heat or cooling in the building, and some years we felt almost frozen during the services! Also, feel free to come dressed in Low Dutch or Pioneer clothing for the photos. I will be wearing my Dutch hat and dress (made for me by Carole Karwatka!)

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Sent by Charlotte Olson

Saw your article in the “Olde Towne Ledger” this week and wondered if I may be added to your mailing list.

My great grandmother is Mary Virginia Terhune Lucas. I joined DAR through our Patriot James Stagg.

Do you need/want more information? Do I “belong”?

We are also related to the Banta family and several others on the list included in the first paragraph of your article.

This is exciting!

Mom, Mary Elizabeth Lucas Legg, was the last in our line to be born in Harrodsburg. I was the first not born in Kentucky.

We still have family living in Harrodsburg whom with we keep in touch.

Please let me know if there is anything else I need to do to sign up.

Charlotte Anne Legg Olson

dau of Mary Lucas Legg and Howard Legg

          dau of Paul Givens Lucas and Tillie Johnson          

          son of Henry Bohon Lucas and Mary Terhune          

                                                        dau of John Adair Terhune and Emma V. Reece            

son of James P. Terhune and Rachael Stagg

                                         dau of Abraham Conover Stagg and Sarah Banta

son of Daniel Stagg and Mary Conover

son of James Stagg and Leah Brower 

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For our researcher cousins: Still trying to find your Dutch?  

Wanting to break down a brick genealogy wall?

Harrodsburg Historical Society (HHS) has one librarian assigned just to care for the 

Low Dutch Archives and Repository.

Here is the perfect way to ensure that your work on your Low Dutch genealogy is not lost! Donate your research materials and documents (published or unpublished). 

The collection is kept separate from other Library holdings. Your materials are filed in acid-free containers and housed in a climate-controlled area. The donations will be filed by Dutch surname in separate collection containers. They want old photos, newspaper clippings, maps, vital records, and other reference material. Think of it like a time capsule.

Go here to learn more about the collection, and the mailing address to send your 

materials. Harrodsburg Historical Society holds the only known repository for Low Dutch Archives.

http://www.dutchcousins.org/harrodsburg-low-dutch-repository

Remember to BE KIND: The HHS librarian/docents are volunteers, so be kind to them. 

harrodsburg historical society library

220 South Chiles St

Harrodsburg KY 40330

(859) 734-5985

Here is their recently updated webpage: http://www.harrodsburghistorical.org/

The Library and museum is located in an historic building on Morgan Row. They have an amazing collection there and Peggy will be able to help you. It is all volunteer and they are not open every day. It is best to call for an appointment at least a week in advance. They do research at a very low fee and their work is excellent, I have used them in the past.

Sunday & Monday: Closed 

Tuesday: 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM 

Wednesday: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM 

Thursday: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM 

Friday: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM 

1st & 3rd Saturday: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM 

Also the public library in Harrodsburg may have some local history that would help you. Here is their webpage: http://www.mcplib.info/

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Sent by Doris Barfield Sanders

I am a 5th great-granddaughter of Jacobus Westervelt/Westerfield and Maria Demaree/Demarest. Another cousin has brought to my attention  a cemetery called Pioneer that was removed from Shepherdsville, Bullitt County,  Ky, to Bethany Cemetery, Valley Station, Jefferson County, KY, a suburb of Louisville because of construction on Bells Mill road some years ago.

I contacted Bullitt County Historical Museum, but they could tell me nothing.

 The cousin, Gary Stanford, believes that the remains moved were those from the Westervelt Massacre based on some older genealogical material. He says, based on research by Robert E. Westerfield some years ago, that 24 remains, some killed by Indians, were removed by construction workers and the cemetery was named Pioneer by them.

He further states that Maria was buried per her request in 1799 at the site of her husband’s burial site. Her husband, Jacobus Westervelt/Westerfield, is known from the Draper Manuscripts as the large man killed by Indians in the episode known as the Westervelt Massacre. My 4th great-grandmother, Jacobus and Maria’s daughter Deborah, was taken during from this event

to Canada via Ft. Detroit, returned via Philadelphia to Kentucky approximately two years later where she married James Baxter (Sr.) and had 9 children.

Deborah died in 1827 in Jefferson County, Indiana, where the family had moved from Jessamine County, KY, about 1824.

 

 It would help if we knew when the cemetery was relocated and the speculation of its contents at the time. Only 1 or 2 gravemarkers are seen on the Google search and they look like Civil War, the others simply have a blank cement appearance marker  for each of the graves placed in two rows.

Is it possible that some Westerfield or Demarest descendant knows the answers?

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Sent by Barbara Whiteside

I will not be there this year……boo hiss…but other things going on and I am hoping to finally see that new kitchen someone has promised me for the past 20 odd years……and then make a trip to see GrandCurry in something he is doing that weekend…….BUT will see everyone in 2017.

If anyone wants to join us, just put in DUTCH COUSINS IN KENTUCKY in the search line on fb…….and if that fails…I am listed under Barbara Adams Whiteside….you can send me a private message or post something on my site relative to the Dutch Cousins fb site……..or contact me viaemail……ktdink@gmail.com.  

I would like photos and memories and anything else you want to send to me..for the scrapbook and by all means,…..share it on facebook with our facebook siteIt is listed as DUTCH COUSINS IN KENTUCKY…….and currently there are 231 members……..

If anyone wants to join us, just put in DUTCH COUSINS IN KENTUCKY in the search line on fb…….and if that fails…I am listed under Barbara Adams Whiteside….you can send me a private message or post something on my site relative to the Dutch Cousins fb site……..or contact me viaemail……ktdink@gmail.com.  

For those driving south on I 65 from north of Indianapolis….got word the interstate has opened all the way after shutting down suddenly for bridge repairs and putting detours in both directions…..so its a clear shot all the way to Louisville……though there may be some minor construction work south of Indy…no detours that I am aware of at this time.

NOW for Louisville…not much to say except the Bridge NoBody Around Here Wanted  continues to give us new changes almost daily…so hard to tell you how to handle it……for the record……other than patience…..two other options are making the rounds here in southern IN…..get out and swim……or pull out your ruby red slippers, click the heels three times and wish you were in Frankfort…….as you near the bridge/I-65 or Kennedy Bridge…..you want to be as far right as you can possibly get going across as you will need to get into the exit that takes you to the I-71/I 64 split……….the only good thing coming out of this project so far is they have figured out to make it easier to access both once you get to the exit……I 71 will be in the left lane and I 64 to the right……trust me….this makes sense….but for years it was the opposite and made no sense, caused ill feelings between the guy you just cut off…..  and caused you to add a few new gray hairs in the process.   Once you get beyond the Story Avenue exit…its smooth sailing……and be aware….you will want to stay to the left two lanes as you approach Story Ave…the far right lane is for exit to Story only.   All that said…be aware the traffic backs up nearly 2 miles at times ..usually this starts by 10 a.m……….basically slow enough you can text, make phone call, read a book, write a song, write your family history…….as folks try to get to the exit for the split for 71 and 64…..here you need to use extreme caution and try your hand at creative cussing……….

Coming east on I 64…down the big cut in southern IN on the approach to the I 64/Minton double decker bridge…this depends…..some days…today is one of them…..traffic is backed up all the way up the hill…..and no one seems to know why….been monitoring fb friends who use that road often……….normally….after rush hour it’s not so bad…..keep left as you get to KY so you follow the canal and locks of the Ohio River on the left…..you will get into construction zone as you get to downtown Louisville….9th St exit area…..just stay calm, follow signs, and stay on the right to get the exit to get you to Frankfort.

One tip coming home again to Louisville and the two interstates some will be using…as you get to Louisville on I 64…you might consider taking the exit to the Watterson Expressway ……it comes off and divides…you want to bear to the right…….the Watterson is also called I 264……stay as far left as you can till you pass the I 71 exit and entrance ramps…….this will take you straight into what we call Spaghetti Junction….but gets you on the Kennedy Bridge much easier….if you stay on I 64 into the bridge area…you have a dickens of a time getting over to I 64 and the exit ramp to get on the bridge…if you hit it at rush hour….you risk limb and life……..on the exit to the bridge…..its one lane coming off I 264, then as you get to the top of the ramp there are now two lanes….get into the left lane then as you get on the bridge….get to either of the two inner lanes near the middle…….after you get past Eastern Blvd, in southern IN……things start to smooth out…..

This is where I live and hope this might help………..its a nightmare for us living here as things change daily……new lanes open, others close….the old bridge I prefer using is hard to get to now so I either don’t go over the river or use creative cursing to endure it……I cannot imagine how confusing it would be to people passing through……trust me…..the worst will be on the Indiana side…if you can get past that, you can handle anything.

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Sent by carolyn

MailScreenSnapz001.jpg

Letters 9/16/2015

THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT NEXT WEEK!  

If you have been waiting till last minute to send in your registration, you have waited too long!  We are sold out!

We have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS special rate $86 +tax -Blocked 80 rooms. Sept 25 & 26, 2015, but plan to be in KY the 24-26th if you can! 

Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center. I called last week and they still had two rooms left in our block.

Sun-Mon Sept 27 & 28th in Harrodsburg and Old Mud Meetinghouse. 

REMEMBER THE OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE HAS A NEW SECURITY SYSTEM. The gate will be unlocked at 1 pm on Sunday the 27th.  

If you decide to go early, GET PERMISSION FROM HHS before climbing the gate and SMILE for the security cameras. 

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Sent by Larry Woodward

Can you post this in this next newsletter.

Just want to extend greetings to my new found Van Arsdall cousins Mickey and Roger who both posted about their Van Arsdall ancestors in the last newsletter.  We are not too distant cousins through my great grandfather George Washington Vanarsdall.  Hope to meet you both in Frankfort!

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Sent by Charlotte Olson

thanks… wonderful stuff!

Mickey just heard about the DC last week.

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Sent by Mickey VanArsdall

I grew up in Mercer County the son of Roger A. VanArsdall, Sr. whose father (my Grandfather) was John Wesley VanArsdall, Jr. who owned a 110 acre farm in Mercer County on the outskirts of Burgin, Ky. Mickey is Bringing his son Ryan, Sat. evening.

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Sent by Pam Ellingson

So far here are those signed up for family history displays:

So far there aren’t many exhibitors:

Carolyn Leonard- Cozine

Joan Murray- Banta and Reference books

Emily Welches & Cynthia Vann Ausdall- 

Jack Taylor- Reynerson & Banta +++

Lynn Rogers- Ryker, Demaree & Smock

Kerin Smith- Covert

Lora Westerfield & Pam Ellingson- Westerfield

Time is almost up!

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Sent by Jack Taylor

 Walloon Family Names of New Netherlands

Jack TAYLOR

JLTKing@aol.com

 

When Governor STUYVESANT of New Netherlands surrendered to the English the English stopped immigration from The Netherlands.

 

Most of those immigrant families were Dutch from The Netherlands.  But, mostly because of the upheaval of the Religious Reformation, The Netherlands was a melting pot for Protestants.

 

One group was the Walloons of Leiden, NL.  Check out this site for Walloon Names and a little of their history.

 

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nycoloni/nnipeti.html

 

One of the names listed is of particular interest for me. I have a Great Great Grandmother that was a LAMBERT (mother was a DeBAUN). If any of you have LAMBERT (or alternate Dutch spellings of the same name) information please correspond with me directly at JLTKing@aol.com of better, see me at the Frankfort, KY Dutch Clan Gathering.

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Sent by Pres. John C Westerfield

Carolyn the Thursday schedule looks good to me I do not have anything to add. We will be there sometime Thursday afternoon.  I’m looking forward to our Gathering and meeting new cousins.  Barbie and committee have picked a good location for our meeting.

 

See you Thursday

Cousin John

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Sent by Theresa Johnson

Hello Carolyn,

 

I was fortunate enough to meet someone who gave me your brochure.

Only recently did I find that my husband was descended from Pieter Wyckoff in NY in the sixteen hundreds.

And now I am working on an application for him into a hereditary society.

 

He is descended from the original Pieter, Nicholas (Clause Pieterse), Peter, Peter Jr., John, Nicholas, Ralph, Andrew, Naphus, Effa Maud Wyckoff March,

                Stanley March, etc. in Nebraska.

 

The only trouble I am having is locating more information on John Wyckoff b. about 1734 either in Flatlands and possibly moved to Neshanic, NJ.

After that, whether he moved back to NY or moved on to Kentucky I don’t know.

I do know that his son Nicholas did move and died in Switzerland Co., Indiana if I am not mistaken.

 

Could you point me to someone who might know about that particular John Wyckoff?  It would help me so much.

 

My husband and I am so excited about possibly joining the next gathering of the Low Dutch Cousins!

 

In common bonds,

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Sent by Carolyn

Just talked to Dutch Cousin registration chair Janice Cozine and she is working on our name badges and meal tickets today.  We are all excited about seeing everyone in just a few more days!  I am working on our family history display – Are you? 

and loading up a box with items to donate for the silent auction, like a tulip bouquet, the 1850 Kentucky census book, and other items I think you will want to bid on.

See you in Kentucky!

Letters 9/21/2015

Dob’t look for another DUTCH LETTERS for at least 3 weeks!

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Our official website:  www.DutchCousins.org (click on “Gathering 2015” on the left)

Pam Ellingson, Webmaster

Note:  you may want to bring folding chairs to Old Mud if you can. We are often short of seating there.

Also a jacket as it is sometimes quite chilly even inside this time of year.

If you have been waiting till last minute to send in your registration, you have waited too long!  We are sold out!

We have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL – 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100 Group code – DUTCH COUSINS special rate $86 +tax -Blocked 80 rooms.

Sept 25 & 26, 2015 in Frankfort (but plan to be in KY the 24-26th if you can!)

Capital Plaza Hotel is about 4-5 blocks away from KY History Center. I called last week and they still had two rooms left in our block.

Sun-Mon Sept 27 & 28th in Harrodsburg and Old Mud Meetinghouse.

REMEMBER THE OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE HAS A NEW SECURITY SYSTEM. The gate will be unlocked at 1 pm on Sunday the 27th.

If you decide to go early, GET PERMISSION FROM HHS before climbing the gate and SMILE for the security cameras.

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Sent by Randy & Louise (Duree) Ledger

We’re sorry that Randy and I can’t be at the “Dutch Gathering”. Looking forward to see if there are any other “Duree” families that will be present.

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Sent by Russell Gasero

Russ is bringing his wife with him – hooray!

I’ve just returned from a great conference of the New Netherlands Institute in Albany where we also launched officially, the DAG. Plans are settled and I should arrive in Frankfort Thursday afternoon.

I will be bringing with me several titles for sale, including The Dutch Reformed Church in the American ColoniesTransatlantic PietiesLiber A of the Collegiate Church (a translation of the earliest record book of the minutes), and Sing to the Lord a New Song: Choirs in the Worship and Culture of the Dutch Reformed Church in America, 1785-1860. The last book includes a CD of authentic hymns used in the early church by a professional choir. I thought these would be of interest to many of the Dutch Cousins who want to know more about the religious life of their ancestors. I do hope that a book table for them might be available. I may also have some copies of Boel’s Complaint Against Frelinghuisen which can be free with all purchases.

I look forward to joining with you all and especially to participating with the re-dedication of Old Mud. I did find the old bulletin from the earlier re-dedication and I was last there in 1981. It will be good to be back again.

Thanks,

Russell

Russell L. Gasero, CA

Archivist

Reformed Church in America

21 Seminary Place

New Brunswick, NJ 08901

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Sent by Janet Lindsey

i would like to be added to the mailing list. My maiden name was Janet Ellen Van Arsdall.

My father is Roy Neuman Van Arsdall, dob 6-29-24. He had a younger brother named Roger Alan Vanarsdall. He is deceased. His parents were John Wesley Van Arsdall, Jr and Maud Esther Reeves Van Arsdall, his paternal grandparents were John Wesley Van Arsdall Sr and Helena Cook Van Arsdall. His great grandfather was George Washington Van Arsdall. They owned farms in Burgin Kentucky. My dad still owns part of the farm where he was born and raised. I spent many summers on the farm with my cousins. I am married to Ronnie Lindsey who is stepfather to my two biological sons, Michael Andrew Grindley. He is married to Michelle Dwyer Grindley. They have one daughter, Madelyn Elizabeth. My other son is Nicholas Roy Grindley. His wife’s name is Valerie Calfas Grindley. They have two daughters, Emerson Sophia Grindley and Coraline Royce Grindley. They both reside in Mahomet, IL. Their biological father is Robert Lynn Grindley. I have visited the Mud Meeting House a couple of times, keeping track of the renovations. Thank you!

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Sent by  Chaplain Timothy Wells

I would like to attend the Mud Meeting House dedication alone with my wife, Kathy and my daughter Tabitha.

I am a descendant of the Westerfields, Cozines, Demerests.

I am an Army Chaplain stationed at Fort Knox, KY.

I am originally from Bardstown, KY.

Chaplain (Lieutenant Colonel) Timothy Wall

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Sent by Marion Duckworth Smith

Join Marion Duckworth Smith for a Fall tour of the Lent-Riker-Smith Homestead:

Saturday, October 10th at 3:00 PM

Saturday, October 17th at 3:00 PM

$25.00 per person payable in advance to:

Marion Duckworth Smith
7803 19th Road
East Elmhurst, NY 11370

Please RSVP, including date(s) and names of attendees, by email to info@rikerhome.com as soon as possible because space is limited.

Bring your cameras. Leaves will be falling, but flowers are still in bloom. The tour includes the cemetery where 132 Riker and Riker descendants are buried, the Secret Garden and the first floor of the Homestead. Diagrams of the cemetery are included.

The Homestead is the oldest private dwelling in New York City and is listed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks.

 

Marion Duckworth Smith

For the Homestead

www.rikerhome.com

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Sent by Luther Davenport

Fyi  the same weekend as the Dutch Cousin’s gathering, the Dry Stone Conservancy will be holding a workshop on rock fence construction & repair at Hebron Cemetery in Lawrenceburg. Will be just off 127 a few yards. I understand that it is not practical for any of your group to actually attend the 2 day class with all of your other activities, but it would be a nice point of interest for some and observe for few minutes. Maybe attend a future workshop ( they have been coming twice a year)

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Sent by Janice Cozine

Hello Cousins!

Check the list below for new names that have been added.

Please let me know if there are any errors.

The time is drawing near….

See you in a few days!

Janice Cozine  🙂

STATESNAMESANCESTORS

ARJean PollardWesterfield

ARJo Kilduff not listed

ARBeverly SullivanBanta

CAJoyce Collins Westerfield

COSharon/Ken Holtkamp Comingore

FLGary/Virginia Dunn Stagg/Brouwer

FLMalcolm/Betty Jo Banta Banta

FLTonjah ‘Toni’ Westerfield Westerfield

FLBill/Gayle LondreeWestervelt, Westerfield

GAMichele Banta Hammann Banta

ILGerald/Nancy Westerfield Westerfield

ILPhyllis/Doug/Brenda Byers Westerfield

ILRichard/Joan Murray  Banta

INVince/Lisa Green AkersDemaree

INZach & Benjamin Akers/Betty GreenDemaree

INBill/Betty Demaree Demaree

INEmily Welches/Renee Anderson Banta

INLarry/Geri Cozine Cozine

INWillis (Buck)/Charlotte Keith Westerfield

INSteve/Jeannie Carlisle Vories/Monfort

KSKerin/Jim Smith Covert, (Coovert)

KYAlbert Cozine Jr. / Brenda Stivers  Cozine

KYAnna Demaree/Richard Nunan Demaree

KYBarbie/Rod Hamman Cozine

KYCecil/Marie Van Diver   Vandiver

KYCharles/Marilyn Westerfield Westerfield

KYDavid/Dena Demaree   Demaree

KYDavid/Margaret Lynn not listed

KYDennis/Carole Karwatka Westerfield

KYEddie/Janice Cozine Cozine

KYFaris M. Bilby Swearinger

KYJanet Hazell Klein/Pamela Sweets Demaree

KYJeanne Crowe/Betty Recktenwald Cozine

KYJuanita Westerfield/Joseph Sinkhorn Westerfield

KYLora Jane Westerfield  Westerfield

KYMarc/Freda Reynerson Banta

KYPreston/Shari Forsythe Westerfield

KYRodney Dempsey Banta/Demotte

KYSharon/James Metcalf Cozine

KYWayne L. Cozine Cozine

KYWilbur/Patricia Knapke Demarest

KYCynthia VannAusdall Vann Ausdall

KYMickey/Ryan Van ArsdallVan Arsdale

KYAmalie PrestonDurie  (Duryea)

KYBill/Linda Faulconer

MOBarbara Merideth Westerfield

MORogene Smith/ Beverly Staley/ Carol Ballard   Luyster

NCJeff/Katherine Westerfield Westerfield

NCKaren Reynard Prather Comingore

NVJim Cozine Cozine

OHMartin WesterfieldWesterfield

OHLynn Rogers Ryker

OKBill/Gayle Hoag   Terhune

OKCarolyn Leonard/Jon Heavener Cozine/Staats

PAJohn/Phillis Westerfield Westerfield

PAGreg HuberNeighmond

SCLarry /Suzanne Voreis Van Voorhees

TNDenise Merideth Perry Westerfield

TNLarry Westerfield Westerfield

TXGene/Carol Heathcoat Durie

TXJack/Sue Taylor    Reynerson

TXKing/Sharon Cole Stagg

TXMorris/Judy McKee Banta

TXAndy LeathVannuys, Canine, Ryker, Demaree

TXCraig Reynerson   Banta

VACathy (Cat) Claunch Schwetke Ryker/Riker/Demarest

VAMary Bates/Charles Rupe Terhune

WALarry/Charlene Woodward Vanarsdall

WI Pam Ellingson  Westerfield

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Sent by George Kirlin

Carolyn or others,

Please add me to your newsletter list.  Although not a direct descendant, one of my collateral Kerlin lines married into the Smith, Dement, Banta, and Vories families beginning in 1786 and continuing thru the early 18oos.  This Kerlin line  was also moving thru Frederick/Berkeley counties of Virginia in the 1770s-1780s and I hypothesize some of young men set their eyes on the younger women of the families and got to know them better after arriving in Jefferson/Shelby counties.

I would also like to obtain a copy of Vince Akers booklet on the Low Dutch Company settlers but need some ordering information.

Thanks for your assistance.

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PRAYING that everyone has a safe trip to Kentucky.  Dont expect any DUTCH LETTERS for a few weeks.

Sent by

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

See the 2013 Newsletter http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard/DutchCousins/Entries/2013/4/3_2013_Low_Dutch_Cousins_Newsletter.html

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by w

Letters 10/8/2015

Sent by Carolyn (herself)

You probably won’t get another Dutch Letters for a few weeks. If you are so inclined, say a little prayer for me tomorrow (Fri Oct 9) while they are doing some hocus pocus in the operating room to stick my broken leg back together, and then a few more prayers as I learn to walk on only one leg for the next three months while the leg heals.  I’ll be missing talking to each of you.

Love to all my cousins.

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Sent by Tommy Green

Unfortunately I am having to cancel my trip to Kentucky. I have been looking forward to it for a long time and had made reservations. But the bright side is that the reason for the change is a good one. I am going to attend Andrew Wommack’s minister’s conference in Colorado.

 

This past year my son-in-law and I founded a new ministry, Good Plans Ministries. We have been very active in this ministry for several years but have just completed the paper work for getting it “official”. This past year I have been teaching four Bible Studies a week. I live in Ponca City but teach at a drug rehab facility in Tonkawa  each Saturday morning and in Blackwell on Monday evenings. I teach in my home on Sunday evenings. As you can see I’ve been very busy. I work full time as a Probation Supervisor covering two counties, Kay & Noble. As you can tell, helping others through counseling and teaching God’s Word is where my heart is.

 

I am sorry that I have not been involved in the Dutch Cousins as I originally thought I would. It is a great organization with good leadership. With leaders like you it will continue to be outstanding. I wish I could be there as I thoroughly enjoyed the last get together and meeting the “cousins”. However, I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to attend this conference and continue to receive instruction on how to grow in my ministry.

 

May God continue to richly Bless you!  Yours in Christ,

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Sent by Carolyn Leonard

for Sharon Holtkamp

AT our 2005 Dutch Cousins Gathering we toured the John Cozine house:

John (Johannis) Cozine, son of the Dominee Cornelius Cozine, baptized 9 May 1762 Raritan, Somerset Co, NJ, died 12 Jun 1835 in Mercer County Kentucky (found the bill for making his coffin):Rec’d of Abm Comingo and Hannah Cozine, administrators of John Cozine Decd, eight dollars for making decd’s coffin this 12th June 1835. Harry Woods.

and also:

WILL BOOK 10 – page 331, John Cozine Sr.  inventory & appraisal Oct 1835. Appraisers: James Lillard – James C. Westerfield – J. G.. Carter.

n Mercer Cercuit Court 1835 petition in chancery

Abraham V. Brewer, guardian for Brewer children, petitioner

Hannah Cozine, John Comingore and Sarah his wife, later Sarah Cozine, and John C. Cozine, defendants. It was ordered and decreed the tract of land belonging to John Cozine Sr, be sold. said land is located on SALT RIVER in mercer Co, contains 324 acres, a part of Henry Wilson’s preemption and was the same land on which John Cozine Sr lived and died. Land bound by Briscoe’s Settlement – Wilson, Alexander Vanarsdall, Cornelius C. Vanarsdall, Azariah Davis’ Survey O, Mary Bergen,

Comingore was highest bidder and purchased the property for $4961.45, recorded 15 June 1838.

John and his wife Hannah SMOCK were members of the Old Mud Meeting House, but we do not know where they are buried.

Herald-Leader (lexington KY) Date:  December 1, 2001

Location:  Home&Garden p. 14-15 col. 1-6

Title:  “Hewn into history” HISTORIC HOUSES. COZINE HOUSE. December 1, 2001

“Hewn into history” At the end of Bud James Lane, drive through the farm gate and down a gravel driveway to find the Cozine House, a jewel that has stood surrounded by rolling Mercer County farmland for almost 200 years. The 13-room house has been fortunate to have had appreciative owners for its lifetime. Most of it is original and in good condition.

We know more about the original builder, Jan/Johannis/John Cozine born 1762 New Jersey. John was son of  the Rev. Cornelius Cozine (1718-1786), Dominee (minister) of the Dutch Reform community known as Conewago Colony in Pennsylvania near Gettysburg.  Rev. Cozine,  a Revolutionary War patriot, was one of the “intend friends” who signed the 1783 petition to Congress in regard to securing land in Kentucky for the Low Dutch people. They always referred to themselves as “low dutch” to distinguish themselves as coming from the low countries of Holland,  rather than from Germany. John’s son, also named John, made a historic journey at his father’s request, from Harrodsburg to New York City  in 1828. The purpose of the trip was to represent the family in a suit regarding the Trinity Church property in lower Manhattan claimed by the family.  Although the lawsuit was unsuccessful, young John Cozine’s travel diary was published in a book available at the Harrodsburg Historical Society. The publication was financed by Ralph Anderson, a distant relative.

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Sent by Carolyn (from the Fort Wayne IN newsletter)

SAVING YOUR FAMILY HISTORY PHOTOS/DOCUMENTS

Most genealogists„ at least the fortunate ones have family photographs and/or documents that have been passed down to us. Often this happens because we are viewed as the “keepers of the family historyˇ But the condition of those precious documents might vary greatly and in some cases, we receive items that are in tatters. How can we preserve them so that they, and the information they contain, are not lost to future generations?

Some considerations:

First, if possible, do nothing that will cause the item to be further harmed.

Second, create a high-quality digital file of the item so that even if the condition of the original does continue to deteriorate, you have frozen it in time.

Finally, take steps to preserve the original.

Let˙s take these steps one at a time. First, do nothing to cause further harm or deterioration to the original, if possible. If the document is folded, gently unfold it, taking care because it could be very weak and tear along the folds. If a photograph is stuck to the glass of a frame, you might need to leave it as-is and photograph it without using a flash to avoid glare from the glass. If photos are stuck to the backing in one of those adhesive “magneticˇ albums, you can try working dental floss between the photo and the page to release it, but if it begins to tear, it might be best to photograph or scan the photo as it is before, or instead of, trying further to remove it. Ditto for photos that are stuck to the pages of one of those older-style photo albums with black pages. Scan or photograph laminated documents because lamination will cause them to deteriorate over time.

Create a high-quality digital file of your photos and precious documents. You can take photos of them with a digital camera and upload the images to your computer, where you can crop them and adjust brightness and other factors. You can also use a flatbed scanner, a wand scanner, or another type of portable scanner like a FlipPal. A flatbed scanner is nice for larger items that are loose and can be placed flat on the glass. A wand scanner or other portable scanner is handy when the items cannot be removed from an album and the album will not lay flat. Many portable scanners also have stitching software included that ca n stitch together images if it is necessary to scan a large item in several parts. If you donâ•˙t have a scanner, your local public library probably has one you can use. Many libraries — including the Allen County Public Library –have photocopiers that work as scanners, allowing you to scan documents and photographs and save the images on a USB drive.

TIFF is the best format to use when making an archival scan, because a TIFF file will not deteriorate when opened and edited, as a JPG will. If you decide to use your image online, such as in a blog post or an online tree, you can derive a JPG from your TIFF image. JPG is a smaller file format and more compatible with Internet use. Scan your documents and photos at 600 dpi, if possible, and certainly no less dpi than 300.

Finally, take steps to preserve your original. Many companies have supplies that you can purchase to preserve your precious photos and documents. These include photo-safe albums, file folders, boxes, tissue paper, and more. Store them in a dark, cool place, such as a closet in your home. Do not store them in a garage that is freezing in the winter, or in an attic that is dusty and hot in the summer. Donâ•˙t hang framed heritage photographs or documents on the wall in direct sunlight. If you want to display them, make prints from the scans you created and frame the prints.

Don˙t leave your documents in a shoe box under the bed where their information may be slowly fading away, or those ancestral photographs in an acidic album that is destroying them. Preserve them digitally, then take steps to save the originals if you can, so that these family history records can be shared with future generations.

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Sent by Mary Jo (Banta) Gohmann

 

Hello Carolyn!

A family wedding prevented us from attending the Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort but we hear that a great time was had by all. Pam Ellingson let me know that once again the Cousins enjoyed viewing “Footprints to New Amsterdam” which highlighted our trip in 2011. Apparently many cousins would like to have a copy of the video. If anyone would be willing to make copies of the video,  please notify Pam Ellingson or Carolyn. Otherwise I am willing to make video viewing available for a limited time. Take time to download the video to your computer for the full 30 minute video.

This link should open the video of Mary Jo’s “Footprints to New Amsterdam”. The video is in Pam’s  dropbox. We would like to know how many people view the video and what if any suggestions or comments.

http://bit.ly/1OfCdar

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Sent by Jerry Sampson, H-burg KY

Hey Carolyn,

It was so good to see you the other day.  Hope you’re home safe and sound.

Put a shout out to all the Low Dutch Cousins that if they had any photos of the events at OMMH to post them on the HHS page.

I hate not seeing images of such a great time.  Love the cookbook.

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Sent by Judy Kay Park McKee

Cabell and I had a wonderful time at the gathering. Now we need to start preparing for 2017. I was happy to finally meet Kerin Smith in person and cousin Malcolm Banta. After leaving Kentucky we headed to Great Falls VA then south to Savannah GA. We arrived only hours before a 70 mile stretch of I 95 was closed due to the storms and flooding. We got home yesterday ( Oct. 6 ) and it feels so good to be back in sunshine and San Antonio.

I’ve enclosed four pictures.

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Sent by

Judy Cassidy (also posted on Facebook)

MISSING ANCESTORS NOT BURIED AT THE OLD MUDD.  Garret Dorland played a leading roll in establishing  Conowago, a Captain in the York Co., Militia signer of the 1783 Petition to Congress moving to Harrodsburg in 1790. Although Living in Mercer County, Kentucky,  he was one of the Trustees of the Low Dutch Company, a member of the Salt River Congregation as well as one of the signers in the Petition to the Classis in New Brunswick for a Minister in 1795. Upon the death of Rev. Cornelius Cozine Garret was appointed guardian of his son Cornelius Cozine, the accounts filed in the Mercer Court, 1795, 1797 & 1803.  He was also Judge of Elections, Commissioner and a Mercer County Court Justice from 1795-1798, so you would expect he would have been buried in the Old Mud Cemetery but I could never confirm where he was buried.  Today, I went back through his estate papers, which are on line and here is what I discovered. I knew that in 1812, Garret was among the petitioner’s of the small Low Dutch Church near the Salt River, along with his sons in law, Lanty Armstrong and Daniel Brewer and others to Rev. Thomas Cleland to minister to the New Providence Presbyterian Church near McAfee, Kentucky,  but I wasn’t sure if he actually moved there as he had been living and still owned his land on Azariah’s Run in Harrodsburg at his death. His daughters Lammetje, Dorothy married to Daniel Brewer, Styntje or Tiny married to Lanty Armstrong, Jannetje married to John Gaunt and Samuel Eccles and son, Garret Ward Dorland, a Doctor married to Catherine McAffee. All had moved to the area near McAffee and Salvisa. So I felt that in his old age, perhaps they moved him up there to live with them.

In his Inventory, Settlement and Administration I found the following clues:

  1. Money was paid from his estate to Thomas Cleland for money borrowed, dated 24 July 1820 when Garret Dorlands estate was settled.
  2. By Fee Bill paid Clerk for committee per the Meeting house which was for the benefit of G. Dorland.  Well that could have been for either Meeting House.
  3.  John Jones paid for a coffin.  I did a search and John Jones, a carpenter was a member of the New Providence Church and laid the floors for the new church.

This information added to the fact that his son in law Lanty Armstrong was the Executor and Administrator of his estate led to my conclusion is that Garret Dorland is actually buried in an unmarked or fieldstone marked grave at New Providence and not buried at the Old Mud Meeting house Cemetery as might be expected.  Had he been buried at the Old Mud, the individual making the coffin would have been local. John Jones, made and laid the floors for the New Providence Church as well as the shutters for the galley door and the sash for the Galley windows.  He also purchased a pew and was a member of the New Providence church.

So If you are facing the same puzzle and have a will, inventory and estate settlement go back and read them carefully, as clues as to where someone is buried just might be there.

Sources: Mercer Co. Wills and Estates: Bk 6:299, 7:248, 9:454, and Robert B. McAfee, “The History of the Rise and Progress of the First Settlement on Salt River and Establishment of the New Providence Church,” Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, on line at: [http://jtenlen.drizzlehosting.com/mcafee/church/church1.html.

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Letters 10/18/2015

Sent by Robert Canine

Hi.  I just wanted to drop a line and say hello.  My wife and I visited the old mud hut a few years ago and of course took pictures.  I left a CD, with the Canine genealogy, at the library at Harrodsburg.  My ancestor, Peter Canine, Carnine, was the one that was instrumental in financing and building the HUT.  I am very proud of my ancestors.  Thank you.

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Sent by Mary Vavroch

Mary brought her mom to attend the Dutch Cousins event in KY in 2007 and 2009, when Lucille was in her 90s and she was able to sponsor and present the memorial for her ancestors, “Father” Henry Banta (1718 – 1805) and his son Abraham Banta (1745-1793), who served as trustee for the Low Dutch tract in KY. When he died suddenly in 1793, the serious legal issues of ownership had to be settled in court. ( We all hope the genealogy bug will Bite Mary to carry on her mother’s work.)

This is a note to the Dutch Cousins to let you know that Lucille Wahrenbrock died at Israel Family Hospice House in Ames, Iowa, on August 30.  She was 99 at the time of her death.  I just wanted to let those of you who meant so much to her know about it.  She stayed active with her genealogy pursuits up until close to the end of her life and never lost her interest in tracing her family tree.  We think she spent over 40 years with this hobby and never had a dull moment in her life.  If she didn’t have something else that needed to be done, she was working on family trees for her family or those of others who asked for help.

Her family celebrated her 99th birthday with her in May and most of her family was able to be with her one time or another in her last days.  She loved her life but was ready for the end when it came.

Thank you to all of you who were her friends and helped her pursue her genealogy interests for these many years.  She loved every minute of it.

Mary Vavroch (daughter)

obit

Lucille Ruth Gifford Wahrenbrock died peacefully from natural causes on August 30, 2015, in Ames, Iowa.  She was in the care of Israel Family Hospice Home and was comforted by the presence of family members and many friends.  She was 99.

Lucille was born near the town of Lewis, Iowa, on May 4, 1916, the first child of Edna and Vasco Gifford.  She was raised in or near the towns of Lewis, Lorimor, Osceola and Creston in Iowa.  She attended high school in Valparaiso, Indiana, attended college at Iowa State Teachers College, and graduated from Iowa State College in 1939 with a degree in Home Economics.  The next year she studied dietetics at John Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland.In 1940, she married Earl Wahrenbrock.  In the following years, they moved to a farm near Jewell, Iowa, and had two children.  Her interests included family, teaching Sunday school, church activities, being a 4-H leader, numerous crafts, photography, and reading.  In the early 1960’s she obtained a Master’s degree from Iowa State University and became the librarian for the South Hamilton Community Schools.

Upon retiring in 1980, she developed a strong interest in genealogy and in helping others find their family history.

Memorials may be sent to Jewell United Church of Christ or to the Wahrenbrock Family Scholarship at Enhance Hamilton County Foundation, 501 Bank Street, Webster City, IA 50595 to benefit girls from the South Hamilton School attending Iowa State University.Lucille was preceded in death by her parents and her husband, Earl.  She is survived by her brother, Wayne, son,  James (Kathy), her daughter,  Mary Vavroch (Duane), grandchildren,  David (Danielle), Stephanie Kuphal (James), Dana Niemann (Mark) and Jill Loomis (Jeffrey) and step-grandchildren,  Mattea Sampair (Matthew Breeggemann) and Rory Sampair (Gretchen Van Dusartz).  She is survived by great-grandchildren, Mackenzie, Mark, and Madeline Kuphal, Tanner, Konnor, and Kaitlin Loomis, Sahara, Skylar and Danica Wahrenbrock, and Caleb Niemann.  She is also survived by step-great grandchildren, Tyler Loomis, and Dodge, Aurora, Trace and Morgan Sampair.The family would like to thank Timberland Village, CLG, Home Instead, and Israel Family Hospice House for the wonderful care Lucille received both in her home and at hospice.  We would also like to thank her ministers and everyone who visited, sent cards, telephoned, and in so many ways cared for and supported Lucille and her family.  We have each been truly blessed by all of these acts of kindness.In 2002, she moved from the farm to Timberland Village in Story City, Iowa, where following the lives of her family, including grandchildren and great grandchildren, reading, travel, and genealogy were her primary interests.

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Sent by Phyllis Young

Pub in Twigs & Branches

In this column, I want to share a few brief highlights from my family history on the maternal side.  October is Family History Month and, by coincidence, October 6 was the 332nd anniversary of the arrival of some of my ancestors at the American colonies.

In the Beginning

The earliest we can go back is to two marriages in Germany – 1359 and 1441.  This Von Groben family moved to Holland about 1483.  About this time, the name became more “Dutch” – Op den Graeff.

Like so many others, the family left the Catholic Church, had all their property seized and had to flee for their lives.  Because of their conversion to Protestantism, Abraham Op den Graeff had to divide his family, in the hope that some sons would survive.  For many years, they simply roamed Germany seeking safety.

Not until 1608 was a safe-haven for Protestants found by Abraham’s grandson, Herman, in Krefeld, a town under the sovereignty of the Dutch House of Orange (today a city in Germany). Krefeld wanted to attract skilled artisans and agreed to accept settlers of any religious denomination.  The Op den Graeffs were Mennonites and master weavers.

“Famous” Herman

Herman Op den Graeff established the Mennonite congregation in Krefeld, served as its minister and signed the Articles of Faith in 1632 that formally established the Mennonite Church.  “Famous” Herman, as he became known, and his wife were honored with two glass windows in 1630, presumably by the Mennonite community.  These windows survived almost 400 years of turmoil and today are on display in the Krefeld Museum.  I saw and photographed them when I visited Krefeld in 1983.

The Immigrants

It was “Famous” Herman’s three grandsons, granddaughter and widowed daughter-in-law who emigrated from Krefeld to the American Colonies in 1683; two other grandsons remained in Germany.   The emigrants were Derick Isaac (ca. 1640-97), Herman Isaac (ca. 1646-1704), Abraham Isaac (ca. 1650-1731), Margrit Isaac (1667-1748) and Greitijen Peters, their mother, who died in Philadelphia a few weeks after their arrival.  (Their middle name was their father’s first name.)

The Op den Graeff families wanted to escape the wars and religious strife that had so long plagued Europe.  In the spring of 1683, an agent of William Penn happened by and offered the Op den Graeffs and 12 other Krefeld families an opportunity to purchase land in Pennsylvania.  They took him up on the offer, paid for the land and the trip and departed for their new home in May 1683.

The Trip

The first leg of this journey was to sail down the Rhine River to Rotterdam.  It took almost a month because princes and barons demanded tolls so they arrived in Rotterdam virtually broke.

The next stop was Gravesend, England, where, on July 24, 1683, the families boarded the Concord, a British ship that could accommodate 180 passengers.  The emigrants were advised to bring butter, cheese and clothing sufficient for 2-3 years; iron for building; tools for all kinds of mechanics; rope; fishnets; and guns.  They also brought linen made before leaving Krefeld to use as a means of exchange and a variety of seeds – especially flax seed.  No question that all the families included the tools and equipment necessary to continue their livelihood of weaving and linen-making, as well as books, especially the Bible.

The Concord was not out of sight of the English coast for three weeks because there were no winds.  Finally, they were underway and arrived in Philadelphia on October 6, 1683.

Their New Home

That first winter, they lived in “caves,” accommodations that were half underground and half above ground.  Within three weeks of their arrival, the families drew lots for individual parcels of land – town lots in what would become Germantown and larger acreages for farming.  And within a year, the weavers were making linen and selling it in Philadelphia.  By 1686, a church had been constructed, and Germantown was a thriving community of 44 families in 1689

The three brothers were granted a charter by William Penn in 1689 for the “German Towne” and were chosen some of the first burgesses.  Derick Isaac and Herman Isaac died without children so their land was left to their surviving brother, Abraham Isaac.

Abraham got into difficulties with his Quaker brethren and civil authorities, sold his property in Germantown in 1704 and moved to the Perkiomen area.  He had four children and the descendants bear the names Opdegraff, Obdegrove, Updegrove, Updegraff, Updegrave, Upthegrove, Uptogrove, etc.

The Newcomer

Then, after a lot of additional researching and finding only brick walls in looking for the Updegrove connection to Abraham Op den Graeff, who shows up in Germantown in 1753?  It’s Johann Wilhelm Op den Graeff, a grandson of Adolphus Isaac Op den Graeff, one of the two brothers who stayed in Germany many years ago.

Johann Wilhelm Op den Graeff was on the other side of the brick wall.  He Anglicized his name to John William Updegrove, and it is his line of descendants that follows the trail to my grandmother, Margarett Elizabeth Updegrove.

While the story of this branch of the family is interesting, it is an example of where research can lead you – and often stump you.   It can and does happen to all of us.  However, I am still descended from “Famous” Herman and pleased about that.

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Sent by Marilyn Douglas (NNI)

Explore the Lush, Overgrown Ecology of 1600s Manhattan

Search block-by-block for the animals, plants, and Native Americans who occupied the island before European settlement.

http://www.citylab.com/weather/2015/10/explore-the-lush-overgrown-ecology-of-1600s-manhattan/408367/

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Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers

Here is an item that just now came together. It seems appropriate to distribute it in the Dutch Cousins Newsletter.

SMOCK MEMORIAL STONES JEFFERSON COUNTY INDIANA

Memorial stones of the vintage early 1800s style have been ordered by the Jefferson County Genealogical Society to honor Samuel Smock (1776-1833) and Jacob Smock (1744-abt 1825), son and father.  Samuel will be much celebrated during the 2016 Indiana Bi-centennial.  Among his many contributions were: serving as a Colonel in the Indiana State Militia during the War of 1812, serving as a delegate and signatory of the 1816 first Indiana State Constitution, and serving as a Founding Trustee of Hanover College in 1828 until his death.  In about 1806, while it was still Indiana Territory, he was one of the very earliest permanent settlers of the area that became Jefferson County.  He was the first Postmaster of Jefferson County and established the first Post Office, Smockville.  He was a Justice of the Peace and Associate Judge.  While still in Kentucky he was a wounded survivor of multiple Indian ambushes.  He was a church elder; he and his wife Rachel Ryker had 11 children.  Samuel is buried in the Hanover Cemetery, but the exact site of his grave is unknown.

Jacob, his father, was also an early pioneer in Kentucky and a very early permanent settler of Indiana.  He was a Revolutionary War Soldier accepted by both the DAR and SAR; a revised, accurate account of his service has been recently documented. His family was repeatedly victimized by Indian ambushes.

The Smocks were just one family among the members of the Kentucky Low Dutch Company whose intent was to start a Dutch-speaking colony on the frontier; their contribution was even greater by instead becoming part of the great American Melting Pot and spreading their values much wider, many settling in Indiana.

The memorial stones will be placed in the “new” (from about 1832) Hanover Cemetery, Hanover Indiana, planned before the end of 2015.  In about May 2016, there will be a Dedication Ceremony, a grand event and part of the Indiana Bi-centennial celebration, details TBD and widely disseminated.

The total cost of the 2 stones is quite high due to their vintage style; your financial contribution to defray the expense is invited and will be much appreciated.  Your tax deductible donation honors and memorializes their service in the face of great adversity.  Make checks payable to “Jefferson County Genealogical Society,” (Memo Line: ”Smock Stone Project”) and mail to: Jefferson County Genealogical Society; PO Box 651; Madison IN 47250. Thanks to all those giving of their resources.

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Sent by Jack Taylor

I am near completion on the first program recorded, “What I Saw at the Cane Ridge Revival”,  by Eddie  Price.   I can’t say enough positive about the content of that program. 

 

 I was deeply into making the recording, so, only now as I edit and produce the recording do I recognize the importance of this presentation.   It’s great! I was somewhat familiar with that period of history and Cane Ridge.  This makes it much clearer.   

 

“Eddie, you are doing a great job of helping understand this history.  Keep up the good work.”

 

  I can always see ways of improving a recording, but this is better than I expected.   I had a fairly new Sony 4k Camcorder.  It did a great job.   Usually I use a close miking technique, but was not prepared to do that for these recordings.  In the Historical Society venue the audio that the camcorder picked up is very good.

 

The acoustics, lighting, and the longer distance from the speakers where I set up at the Mud Meeting House made the audio not as good as at the Historical Society.  Probably the audio that Zach AKERS recorded  when mixed with the video that I got will result in a good recording. 

 

I would like to send this first one to Eddie PRICE.  He and the officers of Dutch Cousins can decide how to use it.   However, I don’t have his address.

 

To complete this project of all programs recorded will take time.  More progress reports in the future.

 

Jack TAYLOR

JLTKing@aol.com

281-358-3514

 

PS Many thanks for Amalie PRESTON of the Harrodsburg Historical Society who knew where my REYNERSON Ancestors had a farm and mill on the Salt River and took us there.

My only regret was that the Paw Paws were not ready for “pick’n up” .  LOL

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Sent by carolyn

thanks for all the good wishes and prayers.  They are working — just not as quickly as I would like.

Letters 10/21/2015

Sent by Martha Banta Boltz

Heck I have had nothing wrong,and I’ m sure  not working as f ast as I would like to either> II keep reminding myself that I will turn the big 80 next September,and I don’t like it a bit!

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Sent by Karen Prather

Could you please tell Robert Canine that it is the “Old Mud Meeting House” not the old mud hut? Also his ancestor was not the only one to finance and build the meeting house. John Terhune and John Comingore (and many others) had a hand in it, too.

Glad you are feeling better. These things always take longer than we would like. Prayers going up for you.

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Sent by Deborah Banta Dustman

looking for family of JOHN BANTA, (12 OCT 1805, Banta’s Fork, Preble, Ohio – 30 SEPT 1864, Royal Center, Cass, Indiana)

Carolyn,

My husband and I in the last year have gone on two living and dead relatives tours — the first to Minnertsga, Friesland (The Netherlands) to visit the family home of EPKE BANTA (1619-1655). The second trip included a cross country trek to Virginia Beach (to see my husband’s Mom), starting from our cabin in Camp Sherman, Oregon.  Along the way, we visited sites where my BANTA family lived across Kentucky, Pennsylvania Ohio and Indiana.

I owe a GREAT debt of gratitude to this group for providing all the information necessary to visit these “sacred” grounds where my family lived.  Please let me know if/how you might like me to share some of the many pictures of these sites.

I also am interested in getting in touch with any BANTA family members related to JOHN BANTA, (12 OCT 1805, Banta’s Fork, Preble, Ohio – 30 SEPT 1864, Royal Center, Cass, Indiana). His youngest son was ISAAC, my 2xgreat-grandfather. His father was ABRAHAM (1778-1864); grandfather ALBERT (1747-1820); great-grandfather “Father” HENDRICK BANTA III (1718-1805).

John Banta died 10 miles away from home as he was returning from service in the Union Army. Even though he was an old man, he volunteered for service out of grief after one of his sons died.  When my husband and I visited Indian Creek Cemetery where John is buried, we looked for the headstone pictured on Find-a-Grave:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&amp;GRid=50864710&amp;ref=acom

Unfortunately, it is apparent that the headstone has crumbled and is now gone. I want to replace the headstone, as both his memory and honorable service as a veteran for our country should be commemorated.

If you or others in our DutchCousins group know how to proceed or wish to get involved, please contact me. Thank you!

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Sent by Gary Stanford

Hi Cousin Lynn and Cousin Ed,

I think I am already a member of the Dutch Cousins as I am on their mailing list (I guess that makes me a member?) but thank you for that information.  I have recently been communicating with Doris Sanders on this very same subject.

I will tell you what information was given to me from my late uncle, Robert Edward Westerfield.  He had been doing Westervelt/Westerfield genealogy since the early 1950’s.  I was told that it was Maria DeMaree’s dying request to be buried with her late husband, Jacob.  I was told that she died in February, 1799 and was buried in Shepardsville, Kentucky on the side of the road (which was nothing more than a trail back then) in the exact location where Jacob and the others were killed and buried.  Among my uncle Bob’s notes were a few bits of information.

First, there was the note that said “Catherine moved to Eden, Ohio after Jacob was killed”.  At that time, I had no idea how Jacob had been killed but I knew this sentence meant something important enough to make them move from Kentucky to Ohio.  I later learned that this was Catherine Monfort Westerfield, wife of my 4g-grandfather Samuel Leander Westerfield.  Samuel Leander Westerfield was a son of Jacobus Westerfield and Maria DeMaree (my 5g-grandparents).  I also learned that the town was actually Eaton, Ohio (Preble County).

Second, there was a note that said “Jacob was killed in Shepardsville, Kentucky”.

Third, there was a note that said “Maria died February, 1799.  She was buried with Jacob”.

Unfortunately, the hand written notes were destroyed by me once I took all of the information from them.  At the time I did not think the notes themselves were important, just the information they contained.

Here is what I have learned during my investigation of the burial location.  In April, 1995, while widening Bells Mill Road in Shepardsville (Bullitt County), construction workers located all of the buried bodies.  They respectfully dug them up as they knew they were from Pioneers (and had heard that some were killed by Indians).  The Newspaper had indicated that all of the bones were at least 100 years old.  They transported 24 remains across the County line into an existing Cemetery (Bethany Cemetery) located at Valley Station in Jefferson County.  They respectfully gave each grave a marker and neatly lined them up in two or three rows.  They named it the Pioneer Cemetery.  I’m certain that Jacobus Westerfield, Maria DeMaree Westerfield and others close to our family are buried there.  This information was handed down to me and I have only shared what I have been told.  I have contacted the Bullitt County Museum and they verified the story about the bodies being found and relocated to what is now known as the Pioneer Cemetery.

I later had a conversation with an elderly man (a Historian of sorts) in Bullitt County, Kentucky and he was very helpful. He explained that Bells Mill Road through Shepardsville, Kentucky was one of the main pioneer trails, Wilderness Road, through that area in the late 1700’s.  So, the fact that these bodies were buried along the side of the trail would be consistent with an Indian attack in the late 1700’s.  I have shared with everyone what I know as well as what had been handed down to me within the family.  It took quite a bit of research to determine the location of their final resting places.

I hope this information helps you as well as other family members.  I have now spoken to many family members and am always willing to share what I know.  If you have any additional information I would certainly like to hear it.  Please know that as I was researching the Westerfield family I had a tremendous amount of assistance by many family members just like you.  I have learned what an amazing family we truly are 🙂

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Sent by Mr Lynn Rogers

Thanks for your Find-A-Grave ;;

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=141718166

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Sent by Mr Lynn Rogers
WestMassLCR151019.jpg

I have been doodling with

http://www.mytopo.com/maps/

and google maps.  It appears that the intersection of Bells Mill Rd & Preston Hwy is just a little over a mile from the Huber RR station, supposedly the location of Clear’s Station.  I wonder where McDowell got his map. It looks to me that from #15 to #17 should be more west. Have fun!

Lynn

Sent by Juy cassidy

Responding to Phyllis Youngs account of Herman Op De Graff.  The Ships coming into PA in these years were bringing immigrants from Germany and Ralph Beaver Strassburgs volumes lists the pioneers, as they were called.  The account that Phyllis gives seems to be that of a German Family, not a Dutch family although sometimes the names did sound the same.  I live near Perkiomen and am quite familiar with the history of German families into Philadelphia, Germantownand what we call “upcountry,” etc.  Perhaps the PA German Society might have further information for her.  Judy

The earliest Dutch settlement in PA was located in 1710 in Bensalem, PA which only lasted until about 1716, Some went from there to Abington Presbyterian church with Rev. Malachi Jones, while others established North and South Hampton Church in Bucks County.  Gerret Dorland and his wife Gysbertje from Staten Island were members of this congregation.

On May 20, 1710, the Bensalem Dutch Reformed Church was organized. On that date, Reverend Paulus Van Vlecq was installed as pastor at “Shamminii” (Neshaminy), Bensalem, Jermentouw (Germantown), and the surrounding villages. This is said to be the oldest Dutch Reformed Church record in Pennsylvania, and now belongs to the Dutch Reformed Church at Churchville, Bucks County.

The Consistory Elders, as well as deacons, at Shammenij and Bensalem, installed by Reverend Van Vlecq, on May 21, 1710: Hendrick van Dyck, Senior Elder; Leendert Van der Grift, Junior Elder; Stoffel Van Sandt, Senior Deacon; Nicholaus van der Grift, Junior Deacon.

In 1719, Reverend Malachi Jones, a Presbyterian minister, received these members, (which included the family of John Dorlant the youngersson of Lambert Dorlant, from Staten Island) showing that a new organization had taken place. Previous to this, The record is contained in the journal of Reverend Paulus Van Vlecq (1710-1733). This journal consists of sixty leaves, containing various treatises on Hebrew and theology, personal accounts, and also a record of membership, marriages, and baptisms.

After Reverend Van Vlecq’s departure in 1713 A.D., (it was discovered he had both a wife in Holland and one in Bensalem),  Mr. Christoffel VanSandt, an elder, retained the book. When the Presbyterian congregation of Neshaminy Creek was organized in 1719 A.D., Mr. VanSandt made the entries during the ministry of Reverend Malachi Jones (1719-1723). After that time it seems that the Dutch people withdrew from the Presbyterian organization.

In 1730 A.D., a new effort was made to revive the Dutch organization. Reverend C. Van Santvoort, minister in Staten Island, was called, and on May 3, 1730 A.D., he installed a new consistory, but not until October 5, 1737 A.D. did the Dutch people in Bucks County secure a pastor, Reverend Henry Dorsius. During this time the records were kept by one of the elders, recording the baptisms from 1730-1738. Paulus Van Vlecq was living in New York state in 1702, and in 1709 at Kinderhook, New York, where he was a reader in the Dutch Church.

From “Journal of the Presbyterian Historical Society, Vol. I”, Edited by Professor William J. Hinke.
For the later history of Reverend Van Vlecq, see “Ministers of Presbytery of Philadelphia, 1711-1715”.

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Sent by Mr Lynn Rogers

Gary-

Thanks for your prompt reply.  Is there more information that you can share?

Is the precise location of the original grave sites known?

Is the “at least 100 years old” an archaeological expert opinion?

Was there evidence that “some were killed by Indians”?

Is there government documentation?

Since the graves were re-discovered in Apr 1995, and the massacre happened on June 27, 1780, the burials would have been 215 years old.  The known site of the 1781 Floyd’s Defeat burial in Eastwood KY was excavated with no human remains found, no metal buttons, etc.  There are many circumstances which would explain these facts, but it would be helpful to know that experts examined the physical evidence.  There probably are other examples of both.

It is easy to believe that an experienced guide such as Thixton would avoid the main trail and parallel it, and possibly be on/near the present Preston Hwy, which intersects the Bells Mill Rd.  It is also easy to believe that experienced Indians might have observers and trackers that watched the Westerfield party bed down for the night, or found them.  Some reports were that “the caravan camped by running water.”  The topographical map shows that at Bells Mill Rd there possibly were small streams feeding into Floyds Fork, which could have had flowing water.  Therefore, it becomes important that the precise location of the original grave sites is known, and that expert judgment is that the victims were truly 200 yr old pioneers killed by Indians.  Then, there would be a strong circumstantial case for claiming that the Westerfield Massacre site had been identified.

Regards, Lynn

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Sent by Mr Gary Stanford

Recently I spoke with Cousin Doris Sanders about this very same topic.  She was the person who first notified me that the site had been discovered as late as April, 1995.  I honestly had no idea that it was so recent as I had been thinking maybe mid 1800’s.  The widening of Bells Mill Road when the Pioneer remains were discovered happened in April, 1995 according to Cousin Doris Sanders. She asked me many of the very same questions but unfortunately I do not have the answers.  Our guess was that they were going to widen Bells Mill Road despite funding these historically important remains there.  Why else would they had taken such great care and respect to relocate all of these remains?  We both believe that somebody (or a group of people) involved with the Bells Mill Road widening project knew who they might have been and that they were historically important.  They probably did not want this project to be further delayed so the people in charge probably did the next best thing by respectfully relocating these remains.

According to Cousin Doris Sanders, there was an article in the Newspaper about the discovery and relocation of these remains.  She told me that it said there were two locations involved.  One location was along Bells Mill Road where they found ten to twelve bodies (consistent with the Westerfield Massacre).  They also removed about twelve more bodies from a secondary location.  All twenty-four remains were respectfully buried at Bethany Cemetery in a section renamed as Pioneer Cemetery.  I am enclosing a photo which I found of the Pioneer Cemetery.  You may want to contact Cousin Doris Sanders for more information as I have told you all that I know.  Thank you all for researching this tragic event in American history and within our own family.

Always glad to help our wonderful family,

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Sent by  carolyn

Letters 11/3/2015

Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Sara Cozine, a niece of my ancestor, was kidnapped by Pottawatomies in Kentucky when she was 9 years old. After five years she was released, after Gen. (mad)Anthony Wayne won the Battle of fallen timbers. Sara’s family tried to ransom her but were not successful. After the battle the resulting truce required all the tribes to release their prisoners. Sara was about 15 and made it back to Kentucky. That is all I have been able to learn so far. The Draper Papers tell many such stories but they are difficult to read – most are just scribbled notes Mr. Draper made and intended to write a book -someday (I know something about that – LOL). One comment in the “papers” said Sara was scalped when taken but lived to be an older woman in KY. When you read those accounts, you will learn many scalped victims did live. 

Leah Demaree is one example; daughter of Samuel Demaree and Leah Demarest. Rachel Demaree married Gerardus Ryker who was killed in the Long Run Massacre near Eastwood KY. Rachel was scalped by the Indians at Long Run, but survived, and lived to raise a large family with her second husband John VanCleve, whose wife Mary had been killed in the Boone’s Station Massacre near Long Run. As I remember that story, Mary Vancleave, first wife of John, was carrying one of her twin daughters, Nancy, and Rachel, her oldest daughter, was carrying the other twin, Sally. When attacked they were in a great forest. 

Mary was killed and Nancy was carried away. The other girls were taken prisoner, but Rachel still clung to Sally, who began to cry. The Indians were about to kill the child, when a party of horsemen from Boonesboro rescued the prisoners. 

Nancy, who was carried away by the Indians, was never seen again and her fate is unknown.

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Sent by Deone Percy

Can you inform Deborah Banta Dustman that the government will replace veteran stones that are missing or in very bad shape?  Check with the cemetery sexton and they should be able to direct her on the contact or procedure for replacing the stone through the government.  Thank you,  

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Sent by Darwin Saylor

As always, Thank You for all you do!

I got a nice article from friends in Harrodsburg and the Harrodsburg paper about Old Mud Meeting House.

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Sent by martha boltz

Carolyn — do tell Deborah Dustman that since Epke Jacobse Banta arrived in the U.S. in 1659 with his wife and  5 children (all sons),  It’s rather doubtful that he died in 1655.

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Sent by Carla Gerding

Would love to see some debra banta dustman’s photos of Minertsga.  We were also there several weeks ago and no one was around to ask.  We Believe we found the Banta house, but did not find windmill ruins.  The baker who is the town historian was on vacation in the US!!  As a fun aside, we spent the night on a retired tugboat  in the harbor of Harlingen.  It was a hoot! 

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Sent by Eddie Price, Kentucky Author

Hi Carolyn,

Here is a program that might interest you for the 2017 program.  It is entitled, “Remember the Raisin!” (the battle cry of the War of 1812.)  It is posted at “Pioneer Times” by the folks at Graphic Enterprises. http://www.graphicenterprises.net/html/eddie_price.html  They do a great job on my website.  Thought this might help.  

I did enjoy meeting all the nice folks at the Dutch Cousins reunion.

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Sent by Sharon Holtzkamp

I hope you are feeling a lot better. I know it is a long recovery. It was great getting to know you and all the other cousins.  Ken and I really enjoyed all the activities, especially going to the Mud Meeting House.  Thanks for the information you included in the news letter for me. Remember, eat a lot of protein (turkey) to help your bone heal and drink milk. (that is what the doctor told me to do).  We both wish you a speedy recovery.  You are in our thoughts and prayers!  Love to you,  Sharon and Ken  P.S. Sit and Be Fit helps keep up your strength while you wait on your leg.

NOTE from carolyn:  About keeping fit – LOL. I was doing good but the Physical Therapy and the leg exerciser CPM machine aggravated an old low back injury (bulging disc at L4 & 5) causing an acute sciatica attack, so went back to the Doc and got permission to quit that. Sorry slow to send letters but gotta focus on getting back on my feet!

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Sent by Jack Taylor

 

 

Some of my experiences when visiting the Conewago Low Dutch Location about 28 years ago.

 

The log cabin of Hendrick BANTA and family had a very large fireplace.  I don’t know when it was constructed.  I don’t know if it still exists.  I got the impression  that it might have been used, at some time, for black smithing.

 

 

The Low Dutch Cemetery at: 

695 Swift Run Rd

New Oxford, PA 17350

There was a man there who was cleaning and mowing the cemetery.  He told us there had been only one new grave there since the very early 1900’s.  I think the newest grave was of a soldier of WW I.  He also showed us where some goolish idiots  had recently tried to dig up a grave or two.  As you enter the cemetery the disturbed graves were on the far right.  It looked like they gave up because of roots making it difficult to dig.  (We need a headless horseman to guard the cemetery. LOL)

 

I did locate the other, smaller, Low Dutch cemetery.  It was not being kept up.

 

We visited the Adams County Historical Society which at that time I believe was located in the Lutheran Seminary.  The librarian there showed a little German pride when he found out I was interested in the Low Dutch said the Germans were there before the Dutch.  I did buy some very good publications about the Conewago Low Dutch while there.  And, they guided me to locations important to Low Dutch history.  My thought was that in our part of America that old log cabin would have been designated a historical site and would have been preserved.  I guess in the Gettysburg area there are so many such sites they didn’t place much importance on the log cabin.  I was impressed that someone local, probably a volunteer, had made the effort to work on the cemetery.  He said he belonged to a Civil War Reenactment Organization.

 

The Term “Low Dutch” refers to the elevation of land in The Netherlands, not their social status.  And, “Nationalism” historically has only become important in more recent history.  Probably many of those Dutch and Deutsch along their border spoke the same language, shared their genes, and didn’t even know where the border was when our ancestors immigrated. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rise_of_nationalism_in_Europe

 

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheran_Theological_Seminary_at_Gettysburg

 

Jack’s New Netherland direct Ancestor Lines are (so far). Most were Dutch followed by French.  But, at least one from Germany, Austria & British are also in that group.  There are clues that my LAMBERT Line may have been Walloon from French speaking Belgium, but only about 50/50 possible at this time.

 

Arents, Banta, DeBaun, Demarest, De Ruine, Durie, Fonda, Hendricks, Lambert?, Meet, Pieterse, Reynerson, Rijnders, Snedeker, Sohier, Terhune, Van Arsdale, Van Hengel, van Nuyse, Volleman, Vonk

 

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Sent by Eddie Price, Kentucky Author

Here is a program that might interest you for the 2017 program.  It is entitled, “Remember the Raisin!” (the battle cry of the War of 1812.)  It is posted at “Pioneer Times” by the folks at Graphic Enterprises. http://www.graphicenterprises.net/html/eddie_price.html  They do a great job on my website.  Thought this might help.  

I did enjoy meeting all the nice folks at the Dutch Cousins reunion.

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Sent by Kerin Smith

Hi Carolyn:  I do hope you are healing up well after your surgery, and will soon be up running around under your own steam again.  

At the reunion I chatted with you briefly about the great video of the trip to NY.  I would still like a copy of that, or at least to be able to access it to show to Jim.  Pam says it is accessable from the website, but I sure can’t find where it is.  

Is anyone going to make some copies of this video?  If so, please let me know, as I would be happy to purchase one.

in re:

Sent by Mary Jo Gohmann

(our talented and creative cousin who made the video)

Hello Carolyn!

A family wedding prevented us from attending the Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort but we hear that a great time was had by all. Pam Ellingson let me know that once again the Cousins enjoyed viewing “Footprints to New Amsterdam” which highlighted our trip in 2011. Apparently many cousins would like to have a copy of the video. If anyone would be willing to make copies of the video,  please notify Pam Ellingson or Carolyn. Otherwise I am willing to make video viewing available for a limited time 

This link should open the video of Mary Jo’s “Footprints to New Amsterdam”. The video is in Pam’s  dropbox. We would like to know how many people view the video and what if any suggestions or comments. 

http://bit.ly/1OfCdar

All the best,

Mary jo Banta Gohmann

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Sent by Anne Brown

Thought the Cousins might enjoy this week’s words (A.Word.A.Day–brabble) – all straight from the Dutch.  Details are on the first word page.

brabble

PRONUNCIATION:

(BRAB-uhl) 

MEANING:

verb intr.: To argue over petty matters.

ETYMOLOGY:

From Middle Dutch brabbelen (to quarrel or jabber). Earliest documented use: 1500.

USAGE:

“One can’t help but compare Sr. Toni’s written brabbling on the one hand, with the actual deeds of the brave Christian women who put their lives on the line in Afghanistan on the other hand.”

Joseph P. Zwack; Transfer of Power Not Peaceful; Telegraph-Herald (Dubuque, Iowa); Jan 17, 2002. 

See more usage examples of brabble in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:

Remember, we all stumble, every one of us. That’s why it’s a comfort to go hand in hand. -Emily Kimbrough, author and broadcaster (23 Oct 1899-1989) 

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Sent by Pam Ellingson

Hi from Bolventor!

I just wanted to let you know that I published a new blog entry from Bolventor.

To read the entry, follow this link:

http://www.travelpod.com/z/pamellingson/6/1445882292 

Wish you were here!

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Sent by 

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Sent by Jack Taylor

(our own video expert)

 

Audio/Video Recordings taken at Dutch Cousins Gathering 2015.

 

The content of each program was excellent. Each program showed innumerable hours of research from innumerable sources by the authors.  No doubt if saved and made available they will become more valuable as they become “Blessed with Age”.  Who would not like such from our ancestors from ages past that “puts muscle on the bones of our ancestors”?

 

But,

do each who presented a program already have it in a form that is better than what I recorded?  And, is any part of their program copyrighted 

 

Because of those concerns I am sending master recordings to each who presented a program with the hope that they can use it and make it available to others.  I hope that President Carolyn LEONARD, each of the authors & I (if needed) can work together to make the recordings available.  No doubt many of us Low Dutch Cousins would like copies

 

So far, I have 4 of the programs ready. I am presently sending them out to the authors.

 

* I started audio/video biographical interviews of family members in 1985.  One caution if you have similar old recordings.  You must bring them up to date with present technology or you will have no way of playing the recordings.  Don’t know how? Get your grandchildren involved.

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Letters 11/6/2015

Sent by Mary Jo Gohmann

Hello Carolyn!

I have heard that many cousins would like a copy of my 2013 video which highlighted the Dutch Cousins trip in 2011.

The video, “Footprints to New Amsterdam” was viewed again at the 2015 Cousins gathering.

The cost would be $20 to cover cost of production, mailing and handling.

If Cousins would like a copy of the video on DVD or flash drive they could contact me.

But I hesitate to have my info on the web so

To order your copy, just hit reply with your contact info and Carolyn will send it to me, and then I’ll send you my info.

All the best Cousins!

Mary Jo Banta Gohmann

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Sent by Charlie Westerfield

How about the Photos of the  Low Dutch Cousins Gathering in Frankfort KY and Old Mud Rededication in Harrodsburg KY?

To order a copy of the 2015 Photo CD, send YOUR RETURN ADDRESS LABEL with a check or money order (no cash) of $10 to:

Westerfield Photo Studio

3913 Jenica Way

Louisville, KY 40241-1530

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

Note to Jack Taylor: The last burial in the Northern Cemetery, at Conewago was that of Arthur Weaners brother David Weaner in August of 1969.

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Sent by Jim Cozine of LasVegas

Hi Carolyn

Just a note about the book – Widder’s Landing by Eddie Price — I’m on page 412 now, so about three quarters thru the novel…

I really like it ! – loaded with every day life details – I often wondered what a piggin was, as seen in the Rev Cornelius estate inventory of 1786 as a pigonnet – now I know.

The story would make a wonderful movie or TV mini- series.

I don’t know how many years he worked on this book but I salute his effort with a Well Done!.. Jim Coz

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Sent by carolyn (herself)

Hotlink to order Eddie Price’s book, Winder’s Landing

http://www.amazon.com/Widders-Landing-Eddie-Price/dp/193500199X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446749130&sr=1-1&keywords=widder%27s+landing+by+eddie+price

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Sent by Doc and Laurie (Vanausdle) Shaffer

(about those scalpings)

Carolyn,

Thought you might like reading this article.

http://allthingsliberty.com/2013/05/how-to-treat-a-scalped-head/

(Note from Carolyn – FASCINATING!)

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Letters 11/25/2015

Sent by Marj Enneking

Hi Carolyn – Thanks so much for doing “Dutch Letters”!  I find it always interesting and informative.

I’m wondering if there is a way to contact Deborah Banta Dustman, or to forward this message to her?  I’m very interested to learn more about our mutual Banta connections (and probably also some Rapalje, Commingore, Cossart/Cosat, Durie connections).  Thanks for any assistance or advice you can give me on possible ways to contact Deborah.

 

(Note: Deborah should have contacted Marj by now. Let me know if not)

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Sent by Ruby Ann Ingram

I have said the Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep prayer many times through the years. I was born with a heart problem and was on heart medicine for 40 years. I had ventricular tachycardia and had “spells” again and again, with my heart rate reaching 240+ beats a minute at times. During these occurrences, my blood pressure would fall, and I had a nurse to tell me one time that she knew I was living because I was looking her in the eye, but I had no blood pressure. I prayed, Lord, is this the way people go out into Eternity? “I was only washing my dishes when this happened. What will my mother say when she hears I am dead? What are my teenage children going to do without me?” One time I woke up in the early morning and was having a spell, as I lay flat on my back. As you see I lived through all these episodes, and here I am 78 years old. However, when I was 69, I had a very bad spell, and my doctor sent me to the Jewish Hospital in Louisville, KY, and I had a heart cauterization with ablation, and I haven’t had another spell since then. Saying thanks to my doctor and team, and also to God, didn’t seem enough. I heard God say in my spirit, “Just keep on living for me”. I said to Him, “I can do that”. It was then I was satisfied. So, the prayer, Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep has been the prayer and song of my heart. I am so grateful for life.

Ruby Ann Bishop Ingram

Glendale, KY, formerly of Harrodsburg and Lexington

Your Dutch Cousin

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Sent by Theodore “Mike” Banta

Hi Carolyn,

It’s been a long time since I’ve written to you.  I left my house in Palos Verdes which I’m now leasing and am at a senior independent living facility near San Diego, California.  I’m now 91 and being with folks my age is very pleasant.  It’s so nice to talk about things that happened seventy or eighty years ago and know that everyone in the conversation remembers exactly what I’m talking about.

I just went to your web page and read your book review on “Conquest of a Continent, Nine generations on the American Frontier.”   Thank you.  You have it just right.  All the characters and events in the book are real.  They are woven together in the story by logical interpolation between events to make it a readable story.  Elsa Banta did such a remarkable job in researching all the Banta data through the Kentucky episodes and then publishing it in her book “Banta Pioneers”  that I decided to turn her research into a story.  She permitted me to use several pictures from her book in “Conquest.”

I went to each frontier location to get additional information by visiting the local library history room.  Since the Bantas were the earliest residents, the librarians always found bits of information that added interesting tid bits to the story. I also was able to see the flora, fauna and terrain in the area.  I then continued the story with generations of my line until 1921.

When I became a partner  of Google Books, It became possible for me to let all who wanted to read the book do so for free.  They make the details of the number of pages read and the books sold available to me.  To let you see that people are reading the book, these are the latest figures:

 

Pages read  –  74,551.  Books sold  –  160

 

Theodore M. “Mike” Banta

 

PS,  I’ve attached a copy of a promo for the book that you may want to use.  Clicking at the appropriate place permits the reader to go directly to the book and read it.

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Sent by carolyn (herself)

We have many new members so perhaps it is time to repeat this info about the Low Dutch Repository at the Harrodsburg Historical Library

Here is a hotlink to the special page: http://www.dutchcousins.org/harrodsburg-low-dutch-repository

They had a nice article and photos from our visit this month in their newsletter.

Here’s some info on the library services from their web page:

Harrodsburg, Mercer Co. Research Library Hours

Sun-Mon – closed

Tues 10:00 – 4:00

Wed, Thu & Fri 1:00 – 4:00

1st & 3rd Saturday 1-4

Leave a message @ 859-734-5985 to arrange an appointment.

Closed all holidays.

Use of the library is free to all members, a nominal fee is charged to non-members. Membership is $20.00 per year which includes a bi-monthly newsletter 8 to 12 pages in length. Currently running a series listing the guardian bonds of early Mercer Co., Ky. Queries free to members.

The Genealogical Committee will do research @ $15.00 per hour plus the cost of 20¢ per page for copies. They have a large collection of family records & original documents in addition to a sizable collection of Kentucky books.

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Sent by Tim Thornberry

My name is Tim Thornberry and I am a descendant of Peter Luyster. Before relocating to Kentucky, Peter lived with his family in the Dutch Colony of Conewago, Pennsylvania. He was a Revolutionary War soldier and is buried in Harrodsburg, Ky.  I would like to learn more about the group. I am just learning about my ancestors and thought this group could help. Thanks

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Sent by Carolyn (herself

Do you know about Dropbox?  Free download and great cloud storage. I use it for sending large files.

You just drag the file to the dropbox icon, and send a link to whoever/whomever you want to share it with.  Then they just download it to see it.  They don’t have to have Dropbox themselves.  here’s an example. Click here.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/k1yqnv6cwj0aqw4/AACjHTdG1B5Q8cEdM7v5vq7ua?dl=0

There are no fees, only if you request more storage than the free storage.  They give you 2 GB free when you sign up.  Then if I asked you to join and you sign up as a result of my request, both you and I get an extra 1/2 GB.

People in shared folders can add, edit, or delete the files inside. Anything saved to the folder is automatically updated on everyone else?s computers, so there?s no need to email different versions back and forth.

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Sent by Judi Leonard

In 1995 Judi was an international exchange student to Utrecht University in the Netherlands. She made friends with many people there, and learned to make this soup. When she came home that year she fixed this soup and we all loved it so much we ask her to make it again and again for holidays.  Happy Thanksgiving everyone.

DUTCH SOUP

By Judi Leonard 1996

ingredients:

1  pkg mushrooms, sliced

1 bunch green onions, chopped tops & all

1/2 stick oleo

1 (3 3/4 oz.) jar Wyler’s Chicken Bouillon granules

boneless skinless chicken breast,(1 to 2 lbs.), cut up bitesize

4 carrots (MOL), scraped and chopped

1 (8-oz.) pkg thin egg noodles

2 (14-oz.) cans chicken broth & 2 cans water

1 pkg frozen corn

Saute in big pot, mushrooms and onions in oleo mixed with bouillon.  While that is sauteing, cut up chicken and add those pieces to the pot.  Let it all simmer about 5 to 10 minutes until chicken is cooked.  Add carrots and steam until they are slightly cooked.  Add chicken broth and water.  When that is all heated add 1/2 the package of noodles, and then the frozen corn.  Simmer until cooked, turn off fire, cover  and let set a few minutes before serving.  Makes enough for about 10 people; total cooking time about 20 minutes.  Serve with fresh french bread and butter.  Delicious!

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Sent by carolyn (herself)

I hope you are ready for Thanksgiving with your family all around you. This is going to be a different kind of holiday dinner, but not as different as the year James and I had only bologna sandwiches!

We are having a catered holiday dinner this year, making it easy on me and on my daughter.  I ordered from the grocery Turkey and fixings and Spiral Ham & fix ins. Supposed to feed 14-20 people easy so we should have plenty! Includes dressing, green beans, mashed sweet potatoes, mashed white potatoes, gravy, glazed carrots, broccoli, cranberry relish. The menu includes both pumpkin and apple pie, as well as dinner rolls.

It won’t be MOM’s cooking but we will be together on Saturday — unless the forecasted ice storm hits to prevent it.

Judi will bring our family’s traditional pot of Dutch Soup.

So our guests just need to on a happy face, think of something they are thankful for, and join us.

Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

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Letters 12/23/2015

Sent by Jo Ellen Villines

I would like to contact both Deborah and Marj about their Banta/Commingore information.  My great grandmother was a Commingore who lived in Johnson County Indiana ( descendant of our Low Dutch who migrated to Johnson County from Mercer County).  Thanks in advance.

(Note: Jo Ellen should have heard from them by now. Let me know if not)

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Sent by Sam Mendenhall

I wanted to share with other Low Dutch readers what I recently received, read, and thoroughly enjoyed!  Despite being relatively short, I learned from this article some interesting facts, particularly the places settled and the timeline of events, not just in North Carolina, but up and down the colonies.

“A Brief History of French Huguenots and Associated Groups in Colonial America, with Special Emphasis on the Colony of North Carolina” by Plummer Alston Jones, Jr., PhD., was published in The North Carolina Genealogical Society’s Journal, issue Nov. 2015, vol. 41, issue 4, ppgs. 293-310.

 

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Sent by Mr. Lynn Rogers

The Planning Committee for the 2017 Gathering is hoping to make the Westerfield Massacre a focus because of general interest.  The precise location is not known at present, and probably never will be beyond all reasonable doubt.  But, there is an attempt to identify the possibilities, together with the issues with different interpretations.  As a part of that effort, an exhaustive list of sources/references is being compiled.  If you have a special interest in this project, please let us know!

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Sent by Helene (Mrs. David Smock)

So sad to receive this news of the passing of our SMOCK family Expert. He has been a member and contributor to Dutch Letters for several years.

Dear friend,

Thank you for the friendship and the enjoyment you brought to David’s life.

Gratefully,

Hélène

David Smock, 86, died 10 December 2015 at home in Weston Florida of heart failure. He is survived by is loving wife of 65 years, Hélène, who nursed him through his illness, his daughter, Marie-Hélène Daniels, his son, Hendrik Smock, grandchildren, Jacqueline Daniels, Michael Daniels and Julie Daniels, his two great-grandchildren, Vicenza Daniels and Vance Daniels, and his brother, Jon Smock, a lawyer in Sacramento California.

Although David was born in Michigan, his family moved to Florida in the early thirties and he grew up in Miami Shores.  A graduate of Miami Edison high school, David won a trip to Holland for winning first prize in an essay contest, “The Dutch influence on American civilization“, sponsored by the Centennial Commission of Holland Michigan.  He was escorted on his trip by Professor Clarence de Graaf of Hope college Grand Rapids, Michigan.  After graduating from the University of Miami, David went to Washington D.C. where he began his long career.  Involved in national security work, he was assigned to embassies overseas:  Saigon Vietnam, Santiago Chili, Port-au-Prince Haiti, La Paz Bolivia, Santo domingo Dominican Republic, Buenos Aires Argentina and Panama.  David was an accomplished linguist and could have taught french and spanish  in a university.

In the Washington D.C. area, the home was in McLean, Virginia, where the family lived between posts.

Having some Dutch ancestry, one of David’s hobbies was the history of the Netherlands in which he became a veritable scholar.  Genealogy was an other hobby and his extensive accumulation of datas is the result of half a century of dedicated research.

David will be remembered for is love, his generosity, his genteel qualities, his complete integrity and his great wisdom.  He was the true gentleman.  He will greatly be missed.

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Sent by Judy Cassidy

David Smock was such a kind and generous man, We spent days working together for several years. He had an amazing career prior to his retirement.  It would be great if someone could come up with the burial location of Barney Smock, his most frustrating mystery.

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note from Carolyn (herself)

Barney Smock is in my family line too so we agonized over it together.  I think I did find where he is buried, but no way to prove.  The farm where he lived in Mercer County has a cemetery and a little church – Hebron.  It is near Salvisa. We walked the cemetery and tried to find records but they don’t go back that far.

I will really miss David. He knew everything about the Smock family and several other Dutch families, and he was always willing to help everyone.

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Sent by JACK TAYLOR

The  Walloons  who came to New Netherlands from The Netherlands. 

Jack TAYLOR 

 

The Netherlands was a melting pot of religious refugees at the time of immigration from The Netherlands to New Netherlands.  One of the groups were Walloons from the French speaking area of Belgium who had settled around Leyden. After a few years some immigrated to New Netherlands.  Check out the links below for history & names.  My specific interest is a direct ancestor Jack LAMBERT (married to a DeBAUN.

 

Language has a major role in defining the difference regions of Belgium.

 

Below is a map of Belgium.  The yellow part is Flanders where the predominant language is a Dutch Dialect. Red is the Walloon Region were a French Dialect predominates.  Blue is where German is the predominant language.  Brussels is in orange.
Untitled.jpg

 

  1. Link to Walloons in New Netherlands

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~truax/nether.html

 

  1. Link to Walloon history

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walloons

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Sent by Carolyn (herself)

Merry Christmas to all my Dutch Cousins wherever you are!  Got good news at the doctor’s today. I get to start putting 25% weight on my leg and go back in a week to see if the healing is holding up okay.  Jon and I are as well as can be expected these days, and looking forward to having all our family around this weekend — about 20 expected for dinner on Saturday so we are busy and happy.  Here is my blog about Christmas Cards.  With love and hugs to all!