News


Letters 05/17/2017

posted May 17, 2017, 9:38 AM by Pam Ellingson

Learn more about the Dutch names

More about Dutch Names

 Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list - and let us know their Dutch connection and contact info. Please send any pertinent info to be included in the next Letter.  If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, "remove me" -- and I will do so immediately! I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone, and do not publish email addresses on the list because of possible scammers.

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Our official website:  www.DutchCousins.org
Webmaster Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin
(At the front page, "Gathering 2017”)  Vince pointed out that sometimes clicking on the DutchCousins.org hyperlink goes to some "My Site" thing.  Just Google Dutch Cousins and go from there, Or be sure to put in www.DutchCousins.org  It's our organization's website.
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THE LOW DUTCH COUSINS ARE COMING TO KENTUCKY!

At Frankfort September  7th to the 9th, and then to Harrodsburg the 10th and 11th.   Put it on your calendar now.  We have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL - We loved it last time. 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky  Better call soon - only 30 rooms in our block.  502-227-5100  BE SURE TO GIVE THE GROUP CODE: Dutch Cousins 2389
Our Treasurer Janice Cozine of Kentucky and the 2017 Gathering Coordinator Mr. Lynn Rogers of Ohio (and me - Oklahoma) are working out the details.  It will be memorable - we can guarantee you that!

I’m getting the biennial newsletter together.  My daughter Judi is so smart! She helped me with the registration page and got it so people can fill it out online and the amounts fill in automatically and total.  She is going to come down to OKC tomorrow and teach me how to do it!  I think they call it clickable forms or something like that. Exciting! I love learning new tricks.
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DAR, SAR, 1812, 0IWUS:  We are working on having some special information being made available to the cousins at the gathering.  For instance, we know that some people are interested in learning more about and applying for Sons of American Revolution or Daughters of American Revolution, Daughters of the War of 1812,  Order of Indian Wars of the US … groups that many of us belong to and many others of our Dutch cousins are eligible for.  I’m looking for volunteers to help with that.  Hello!  Where are you Daughters? … and Sons …? and others?
I have also requested a speaker on DNA and what that might tell us.  Any suggestions welcome.
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SENT BY: Larry Vanice
Your list from the latest newsletter: Van Nuys, Vannice, Van Nis, Vannys, Vannuyse, van Huys, van Hyte
Carolyn, I can add Vanice with authority, because it is the spelling used by my branch, except for one of my father’s brothers who reverted to Van Nuys.
Also, I have seen the names Van Nice, Vanhuis, Van Huis and Van Eys, but I do not know if Van Eys was the same family.

The first Van Nuys in America was  Aucke Janse van Nuys.
Also known as: "Albert Jansz", "Auke Janse van Nuyse", "Aucke Jans Van Huys", "Aucke Jansen"
“Presumed from his name to be from Nuis, Marum, Groningen, The Netherlands”  https://www.geni.com/people/Aucke-Janse-van-Nuys/3455846
So van Nuyse  and van Nuis could be other variations.

Have you seen this about Van Nuys, CA was thinking of being a sister city with Nuis, Holland?  http://vnnc.org/2015/02/local-council-to-consider-making-van-nuis-in-holland-the-sister-city-of-van-nuys-in-america/  I looked at Nuis on Google Earth and see it is a tiny, tidy place with small newish houses and brick streets.

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SENT BY: Hendrik Edelman
The term “low dutch” is unknown in the Netherlands. The Dutch word is: Nederduitsch.
The (American) Dutch Reformed Church is called Nederduits Hervormde Kerk in contemporary documents

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SENT BY:  Larry Vanice
Back in the 1950’s the old Allen County Public Library had a small genealogy room with some good stuff.  I found the Vanice family history (original 1916 edition) on the shelf and traced my line.  Hard to imagine how Carrie Allen got all that data in 1916 without the benefit of computers and the LDS.  Mind you, she did print some incorrect information, probably fuzzy memories from old folks.

Now the new library has that amazing genealogy department.  The shelf now has a University Microfilms facsimile of the 1916 book, but the camera skipped one page.  And they have a copy of the book that was hand typed on letter size paper, copying every word of the 1916 book because there were no Xerox machines when it was typed.  That book includes the page that was missed in the facsimile.  I don’t know what the ACPL did with that original book they had.  My first cousin whose father was the oldest brother of his generation inherited the original book bought in 1916 by my grandparents.  I bought a DVD of the University Microfilms facsimile on eBay, which is missing the one page, of course.

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SENT BY: Tamara Fulkerson
Library of Congress releasing digital catalog records!!!
Excerpt:
The Library of Congress announced today that it is making 25 million records in its online catalog available for free bulk download at loc.gov/cds/products/marcDist.php. This is the largest release of digital records in the Library’s history.

The records also will be easily accessible at data.gov, the open-government website hosted by the General Services Administration(GSA). Until now, these bibliographic records have only been available individually or through a paid subscription……covers a wide range of Library items including books, serials, computer files, manuscripts, maps, music and visual materials.  The free data sets cover more than 45 years, ranging from 1968, during the early years of MARC, to 2014.  Each record provides standardized information about an item, including the title, author, publication date, subject headings, genre, related names, summary and other notes.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services, and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

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SENT BY:Larry Vanice of Fort Wayne Indiana (home of the enormous Allen County Genealogy Research Center)
A long time ago, some old guy explained aging to me.  He said, “You never feel older, it just hurts more.”  Now I know that he was right and wish I could remember his name.

You might mention that the book, A Record of the Family of Isaac Van Nuys (or Vannice) of Harrodsburg, Kentucky, Son of Isaac Van Nuys of Millstone, New Jersey by Carrie E Allen 1916 goes back to Aucke Van Nuys arriving in New Amsterdam in 1652 and lists many branches of the family, along with many marriages to other Low Dutch people.  I expect most of the Cousins can find at least one of their ancestors mentioned.  I have never seen an original 1916 book for sale, but there are several ways to get a personal paper or electronic copy, probably all missing that one page.  The book is also on the Ancestry website.

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SENT BY: Marilyn Douglas
KINGSTON -- From 6 to 7 p.m. May 24, Senate House State Historic Site on 296 Fair St. will present a free panel discussion exploring the constraints and rights women experienced under the Dutch, British and Americans during the colonial period and the American Revolution.
Featured panelists for "A Woman Shall Have the Right" are Jennifer H. Dorsey, associate professor of history at Siena College; Maeve Kane, assistant professor of history at University at Albany and Maria Vann, director of the Maritime Museum at Battleship Cove.
Each will provide an overview of the legal privileges and common household rules that shaped the lives of women, and compare and contrast the differences between the Dutch, British and Americans.
The museum will be open for self-guided tours of the historic rooms and exhibits, including the new exhibit Kingston's Stockade: New Netherland's Third City starting at 5 p.m.
Thanks Marilyn
Marilyn E. Douglas, Vice President
New Netherland Institute
Cultural Ed Center, Room 10D45
222 Madison Avenue
Albany NY 12230

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SENT BY: Lilly Martin of Syria
Dear Carolyn,
You wrote:
“As I understand it, 50 families came to Mercer County Kentucky by 1800. The "50 families" were associated with 19 Dutch names.”
Your #4 listed: Brewer, Brouwer.

Your listed spelling variations were: Brewer, Brouwer, Bruner
I will explain it: The immigrant was named Adam BROUWER.  Brouwer is the DUTCH spelling, which refers to an occupation, like "Brewing Beer" for example.
By the time his descendant left New Jersey and went to Kentucky, by way of Conewago, PA, the name was Brouwer or Brower.
By the time they settled in Mercer Co, KY the accepted spelling was BREWER, which is the ENGLISH translation of the DUTCH occupation of BROUWER.

If you look at the vast majority of descendants of Adam Brouwer, the immigrant, you will find by 1800 they were using BROWER as the spelling. The Kentucky group is one of the oldest to use BREWER as the spelling. However, there was a man in early Monmouth Co, NJ who used BREWER spelling, and I feel it was because his wife Deborah Allen was of ENGLISH background, and not DUTCH, and this influenced the family to use BREWER.
In other words,  the relatives of the Mercer Co KY group, who did not leave NY and NJ, but remained there, were mainly using BROWER as the surname, and their descendants today are using BROWER.
I feel you should add BROWER to your list of spelling variations. Concerning the name BRUNER: I have never seen that as connected to any Brouwer original line, and if I am wrong, I would like to hear more about it.
Best regards,
Lilly Martin

 (Note: Hope you stay safe there in Syria, Cousin.  You are in our prayers)
Many of these variations in spelling came from a website about Conewago Colony:
and from the book “Taxables of the Low Dutch Settlement of the Conewago” by Arthur Weaner, available online from the Adams County PA Historical Society.

Name spellings weren't standardized several generations ago, and many people spelled even their own name in a variety of ways. In addition, many people couldn't write and those who wrote for them when the need arose, sometimes had minimal spelling skills or simply spelled phonetically, writing down what they heard.

In his book, “Finding Our Wooden Shoes Vol II,” (partially online, see hot links page) Jim Cozine says this: “Here are Some notes on Dutch spelling ‑‑ The following letters were virtually interchangeable in medieval Dutch ‑ c and k, j and y, and f and v. Some of the changes from Old Dutch (sometimes called Low German) to Modern Dutch that appear so many times in our name are: 's' became 'z' ‑ but old 'z' becomes 's' ‑ they appear to remain interchangeable even today; 'ij' or 'y' became' i'; ‘k’ became 'c'.”

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NOW THIS SOUNDS LIKE FUN!  I ASSUME THIS IS COXSACKIE NEW YORK?

SENT BY: Marilyn Douglas
The Bronck Museum in Coxsackie marks 400 years since the birth of Pieter Bronck, the Dutch settler who built the original stone house at the museum.
Visitors can spend some time with Pieter himself, his wife, one of his grandchildren and even his famous great-great-grandson Judge Leonard Bronck.
Since birthday cakes didn't exist in "Pieter's World," a mound of 400 Dutch speculaas cookies will be served. Admission is free.
There will be live music, food, wagon rides, goats (one of the most commonly owned farm animals of Bronck's at the time and place) early amusements and games for children, craft demonstrations and the first tasting of Pieter's Brew, a new and specially crafted beer prepared by Crossroads Brewery in Athens, which is planned to be similar to the beer served back then.

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SENT BY:
Carolyn Leonard, 2017 President, Dutch cousins of Kentucky
Now preparing for 9/8/2017 Dutch Cousins Gathering
E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com
On my web page, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins:  http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard/DutchCousins/DutchCousins.html
 and LowDutchHeritage: http://www.carolynbleonard.com/CarolynBLeonard.com/LowDutchHeritage/LowDutchHeritage.html
Dutch letters are archived on our official web page, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson
Barbara Whiteside has a Facebook page, Dutch Cousins in Kentucky, that you may find interesting, but it is not our official FB page.

Copyright © 2017 Buffalo Industries, LLC, All rights reserved.
Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins - both newly-discovered and long-loved.

Our mailing address is:
Buffalo Industries, LLC
6812 Newman Drive
Oklahoma City, OK 73162

Add us to your address book

Letters 05/15/2015

posted May 17, 2017, 9:06 AM by Pam Ellingson   [ updated May 17, 2017, 9:08 AM ]

Exciting news! New Addition to Dutch Cousins staff
  

'WHO IS THAT BEARDED MAN?

Exciting news!  Vince Akers' son Zach has agreed to be our official IT person to help with tech problems at the 2017 Dutch Cousins Gathering. At the 2015 gathering, Zach assisted videographer Jack Taylor with recording Vince's presentation on the history of the Old Mud Meetinghouse.

Look on the www.DutchCousins.org website, scroll down the left side to Old Mud Meetinghouse, click on that name, and you'll see the links to the Pictorial History.  Click on one and it will take you direct to the YouTube video of the 2015 presentation by Vince as recorded by Zach and Jack.


 Zach (Zachary N. Akers) graduated from the Ohio Institute of Photography and from IUPUI with degrees in Media Arts from IU and Computer Science from Purdue.  He works for a company who handles the websites for 20 state governments.

Zach handles the IN.gov website for the Indiana governor and lieutenant governor along with any problems thrown his way (like Dutch Cousins!).  He and his wife live in the heart of the Low Dutch settlement area in Johnson County, Indiana.

Besides that, Zach bears a remarkable resemblance to the ancestor Epke Jacobse. (at least his beard does).
WELCOME ZACH AKERS! Be sure to give him lots of hugs when you see him in Frankfort.

Letters 05/15/2017

posted May 17, 2017, 8:39 AM by Pam Ellingson   [ updated May 17, 2017, 8:54 AM ]

Wondering if your family is on the Dutch Name List?
Are you Ready to laugh and have fun?

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list - and let us know their Dutch connection and complete contact info.

_______________________________________

Please feel free to send any pertinent info to be included in the next Letter.  If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, "remove me" -- and I will do so immediately !I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone, and do not publish email addresses on the list because of possible scammers.

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                                      Our official website:  www.DutchCousins.org

Webmaster Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin

(At the front page,"Gathering 2017”)  Vince pointed out that sometimes clicking on the DutchCousins.org hyperlink goes to some "My Site" thing.  Just Google Dutch Cousins and go from there.  It's the organization's website.

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THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT September  8-10,  2017.   Put it on your calendar now.

We will have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL - We loved it last time. 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky  Better call soon - only 30 rooms in our block.  502-227-5100 BE SURE TO GIVE THE GROUP CODE:  Dutch Cousins 2389

Our Treasurer Janice Cozine and the 2017 Gathering Coordinator Mr. Lynn Rogers are working out the details.  It will be memorable - we can guarantee you that!
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I got sidetracked by the annual Writers Federation Conference (wow what a week!) and by a visit from a granddaughter moving all the way from Oklahoma to Savannah to be with her new soldier-husband, and then came Mother's Day weekend with all the kids and grandkids coming from everywhere.  But I am back on the Dutch newsletter and registration blank and will have it to you before you can say ... Epke Jacobse!

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DAR, SAR, 1812, 0IWUS:  We are working on having some special information being made available to the cousins at the gathering.  For instance, we know that some people are interested in learning more about and applying for Sons of American Revolution or Daughters of American Revolution, Daughters of the War of 1812,  Order of Indian Wars of the US, the Holland Society of NY and on… groups that many of us belong to and many other lineage groups our Dutch cousins are eligible for.  I’m looking for volunteers to help with that.  I am also seeking a speaker on DNA and what that might tell us.  Any suggestions welcome.
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SENT BY: Carolyn Leonard (herself)
As I understand it, 50 families came to Mercer County Kentucky by 1800.  The "50 families" were associated with 19 Dutch names. Please correct me if this is wrong.

- Banta, Bonta
- Bergen,
- Bodine,
- Brewer, Brouwer
- Cosart, Cossart
- Cozine, Cosine
- Demaree, Demarest
- Dorland,
- Duree,
- Monfort,
- Riker, Ryker
- Shuck,
- Smock,
- Stagg,
- Terhune,
- VanArsdale, (many spellings)
- Van Nuys,
- Voris, Vorhees,
- Westervelt, Westerfield

... and now, here’s the list of Dutch name variations. If you know a variation or a Low Dutch name I have left off, please let me know.

- Banta, Bonta, Banter, Bohon
- Bergen, (Berkas?)
- Bice, Boice, Boyce, Dice, Buys, Buijs, Boyce
- Bodine, Bedine
- Bogert, Bogart
- Brewer, Brouwer, Bruner
- Brinkerhoff, Brinkerhof, Blinkerhoff, Tickerhoof, Tickerhuff
- Brokaw, Broca, Burcaw, Bercaw, Barklow, Degraw

- Carnine, Conyn, Conine, Canine, Carmine, Cole
- Cosart, Cozzart, Cossatt, Cassat, Canine, Cazatt, Cersart, Crosser, Kennine, Kinnine, Cozatt, Cozarte, Cozart, Cozad, Cosarte, Cossarte
- Comingo, Comingore, Comonger, Commonger
- Conover, Cochenauer, Covenover, Covinover, Cownoyen, Cownover, (Cowenhoven?), Coshon, Cleton, Chamberlain
- Covert, Coovert, Kosvert, Kovert, Cover
- Cozine, Cosine, Casine, Crosine, Cousine, Kosijn, Cosijn, Consyn, Consine, Consynze, Cosin, Cosyns, Cosynsen, Cosynsze, Cousyn, Cousny, Couzine, Crozine, Cosyne

- Debaun, Debond, Debound, Deband, Deboun
- Demaree, De Marest, Des Marest, Dumeree, Dimaree, Deamorist, Demarist, DeMaris, Demarest
- Demott, DeMotte, Dedaum
- Dorland, Darland, Dorling, Darling, Durlind, Derlind
- Duree, Durie, Diree, Duryee, (originally du Ryzs) Dates, Durboraw

- Fulkerson, Holgerson, Volkertszen
- Fleuty, Fonteyn, Fontine, Yeury

- Huff, Hough, Huffman, Hite, Hoff, Houghtalins
- Konning, Koning, King, Koenig, Kyle, Conninck
- Latshells, Lashel, Latchel, Lasshels, Lassheles
- Lys, List
- Lyster, Lister, Loyster, Leister, Loister, Louster, Luyster

- Monfort, Monfor, Munfort, Monford, Minefore, Menfore, Montfort, Monfoort
- Riker, Ryker, Rykker
- Rinerson, Rynearson, Rynersen, Ripperdan

- Scomp, Schamp, Deschamps
- Shuck, Schenck
- Slot, Lock
- Smock, Smok, Smoak, Schrock
- Snedeker, Snyder, Snider
- Stagg, Stegge, Stage, Stechk
- Terhune, Terheuns
- Tewmey, Toomey, Tumey

- VanArsdale, Van Arsdalen, Vanosdel, Vanorden, Van Ordon, Vanorsdale, Vann Ausdell, VanArsdall, VanArder, Vanarsdall, Van Norsdell, Van Norsdall, Van Aersdaelen, Van Nosdall, Fenosdal, Fenorsdall, Fanosdol, Van Ausdall, Vananglin, Van Ansdale, Van Orsdel, Van OsdoL  (INCLUDES: Includes many variations of Van Arsdalen thru Van Norsdall)
- VanDiver, Vandiveer, Vandivier, Vandine, Vandyke, VanDevere, Vandervier
- Vanderbilt, Vanderbelt, Van Derbilt
- Vanderipe, Van DerRipe
- Vanderslice, Van Derslys

- Van Dyne, Van Dine, Vandine, Finine, Fintine, Vanande, Vantine
- VanDyke, Findike, Wandike, Vandyke
- VanHarling, Van Herling, Van Harlingen
- VanZant, Vanzent
- Vanmeter, Van Meter
- Van Nuys, Vannice, Van Nis, Vannys, Vannuyse, van Huys, van Hyte
- Vaughn, Vann
- VerBryck, Verbrike, Verbryke
- Voris, Vorhees, Voorhees, Vores, Voress, Van Voorhees, Voorheese, Van Vorous, Voras, Van Voorkiss, Vource, Vorce, Voorus, Voorheez (and MANY more variations. Go to the website vanvoorhees.org)

- Westerfield, Westervelt, Vesterbilt, Winterbill
- Whitenack, Whiteneck, Weytekneght
- Williamson
- Wyckoff, Wikoff, Wickoff
- Yeury - see Fleuty

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SENT BY:Martha Banta Boltz
What a darn cute building -- love the stair steps roofline!   I plan on being at the Dutch Cousins Reunion in Frankfort, my first last year was so much fun!

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SENT BY:Carolyn Corbin McCoy
Hi, Carolyn,

I have been a member of your Low Dutch Cousins group for some time because I am also descended from Low Dutch who went to New Amsterdam from the Netherlands. From there, my Ringo ancestors went to New Jersey, then to Virginia (instead of Pennsylvania) and then to Kentucky.

I've just been doing some more research on my Dutch ancestors and see from a Sons of the American Revolution application that I am a distant cousin of Catherine Westevelt (b. 1811), daughter of Casparus Westevelt and Jane Ryder. So I guess I can legitimately belong to your group.

I haven't been to any of your reunions, but I thoroughly enjoy your newsletters and appreciate all you do for your organization.  Maybe one of these days I can get to a reunion.

Sincerely,

Carolyn Corbin McCoy
Descendant of Phillip Ringo, Aefje van Tienhoven, and Pieter van Stoutenburg

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SENT BY: Kim Allison Ross
For your Dutch Cousins.  I’m always glad to share what I find as maybe someone on your list may be able to use it.

Jan LOOTS

John Lodts, or Loots, a native of Norwich, England, came to this country in 1694, and in the fall of 1695 married Hilletje Powless, widow of Lubbert Lubbertsen Westervelt, Jr., of Bergen (now Jersey City). He removed to Bergen County and purchased a large portion of section 6, adjoining Lydecker on the south, on which he settled.  Upon his death his lands were inherited by his sons, John and Paulus Loots; his daughters, Tryntie, wife of Henry Wierts Banta, and Gessie, wife of Daniel Commegar. KoelofE Lubberts Westervelt, a brother of the first husband of Loots's wife, purchased a strip north of Loots in section 6, as did also Cornelius, Hendrick, Dirk, and Seba Banta, the sons of Bpke Jacobs. The purchases were all made in 1695. The combined purchases of Loots, Westervelt, and the Bantas, according to references in old deeds, must ha^e included all of section 6, which extended north nearly as far as Tenafly. Descendants of the deMotts, Demarests, and Eomaines subsequently acquired parts of section 6.

Source:  “Genealogical History of Hudson and Bergen Counties, New Jersey”.  Source location:  Cornell University Library.


Publisher:  The New Jersey Genealogical Publishing Company, 114 Fifth Avenue, New York  Year:  1900  The Winthrop Press New York

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SENT BY: Rodney Dempsey
The Miller Center is where Red Orchard Park is located. Mr. Miller was an Under Secretary to a couple of Secretaries of the U.S.
U.S. Department of Agriculture. He donated his Red Orchard Farm to the community upon his death. It is a source of pride for the Shelby County community. Joan Brown, a retired naturalist, who worked previously with the KY Department of Fish and Wildlife operates the "Nature"' part of the Park.
Walt Reichert, a retired Newspaper reporter and columnist, is the Horticulture Agent for the Shelby County Cooperative Extension Center.  He leads the Shelby County Master Gardeners, who participate in beautifying the Park.
 The Red Orchard park is not in any way supposed to be a "show place", but definitely is a up and coming nature center. I think the Dutch Cousins will really enjoy their visit there September 9 at the Westervelt Massacre re-enactment.
Rod

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SENT BY:Carolyn Leonard
president, Dutch cousins of Kentucky

Now preparing for the 2017 Dutch Cousins Gathering - September 8-11
Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org by webmaster Pam Ellingson
Barbara Whiteside has a facebook page that you may find interesting, but it is not our official page, Dutch Cousins in Kentucky

Don't throw your research away!

posted May 2, 2017, 7:29 AM by Pam Ellingson

Preserve your research for the ages
Here is the perfect way to ensure that your work on your Low Dutch genealogy is not lost! Donate your research materials and documents (published or unpublished) to the Harrodsburg Historical Society (HHS) Research Library, Low Dutch Repository. Bring your records to donate with you to the gathering in September.

NEW! Save your research for posterity!

HARRODSBURG HISTORICAL SOCIETY,

MERCER CO RESEARCH LIBRARY

HHS -- Organized in 1907 in beautiful downtown Harrodsburg, Kentucky

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE: Your genealogy and historical research on your Low Dutch family will have value to others besides you and your own descendants.  Perhaps there is no one else in your family interested in history, and you want your research to be passed on to someone who will appreciate it. What a shame if your years of work and research were wasted and lost. It may be years (if ever) before some descendant is ready to dig through those files to find the vital info they need – and if you place it in the HHS repository it will be available when they are ready. What better way to share what you have learned and possibly help others to find those missing links in their own family trees.

SPECIAL COLLECTION: The collection will be kept separate from other Library holdings. The historical archive will be filed in acid-free containers and housed in a climate-controlled area. The collection will be publicized and showcased, as it becomes possible to do so. As a beginning, the Library is dedicating (2) two-drawer lateral files to this special interest area. (We hope it will grow to fill a designated room in the Morgan Row location, and in time to a special location such as in the restored Old Mud Meetinghouse.)

RECOGNITION: The donations will be filed by Dutch surname in separate collection containers i.e. COMINGORE (The Georgia Napier Collection).  If there is more than one collection of the same surname, each person's donation will be kept in a separate acid-free folder or container, provided by the library.

BE KIND: The HHS librarian/docents are volunteers, so be kind to them. Docents are educators, trained to further the public's understanding of the cultural and historical collections of the institution.

WHAT TO DONATE:  They want old photos, newspaper clippings, maps, vital records, and other reference material. Think of it like a time capsule. The collection will not have space for a million copies of papers. Your collection should be cataloged or indexed, and sources for the documents should be included before donation, so the records are usable by library patrons.

HOW TO PREPARE YOUR COLLECTION FOR THE REPOSITORY

- TURN IT LOOSE:  Remember, you are donating your material. That means you will be giving it up, so make sure you are finished with your own research and have copies of the items you want to have on hand. You will no longer have any rights to the documents and will only be able to access them by appointment like any other visitor. (see  info on Researching in Person, and Research Requests on next page)

- IDENTIFY YOUR DUTCH NAMES, and place those names prominently on each folder. For example: COZINE (The James Cozine Collection); VORIS (The Larry Vories Collection); DEMAREE (The Vincent Akers Collection); TERHUNE (The Paul and Barbara Terhune Collection); DORLAND (The Judy Cassidy Collection); etc.

- WHAT TO DONATE:  Family Group Sheets and charts, Bibles and Bible records, Originals or copies of Deeds, Wills, Obits, court records, Revolutionary War data, old letters, family photos and stories, published or unpublished genealogy books. Any bit of thread that ties our Kentucky Low Dutch to the colonies in Conowago, Berkeley, New Jersey and New Amsterdam; and not just the Dutch in Mercer County but all of Kentucky. The land was so costly some chose other counties, many settled in Henry Co.

- BIBLES: Do not tear out the family sheets, they want the whole Bible; especially the copyright data page. They maintain a collection of family Bibles in the archives room.

- SEPARATE: Original records, deeds, etc should be in separate folders from current copies and group sheets. Items should also be separated according to subject.

- IDENTIFY SOURCES: and mark each item to show it came from your collection.

- NO INK OR TAPE: Do not use ink to mark ORIGINAL records, use pencil only; and no cello tape, staples or paper clips, as in time these will disfigure the document.

- PLACE IN FOLDERS: Place each subject in separate labeled filing folders.  If you have acid-free folders and want to use them, that is fine but not required. The library has acid-free folders, which are purchased from Gaylord.com.

- LIST EVERYTHING: Make a list of what you are donating, one for you and one for the library -- the more organized the information is, the better.

- DO NOT DONATE INSECTS: Be very careful there is no insect infestation that could travel with your books, papers etc and destroy them.

- HOW TO DELIVER: Mark OUTSIDE of envelopes, boxes, etc. “FOR LOW DUTCH SPECIAL COLLECTIONS.”  Items may be delivered to the HHS in person or by mail:  HHS, Attn. Carolyn Worley, P.O. Box 316, Harrodsburg, KY 40330, or by FEDX, UPS, etc: HHS, Attn. Carolyn Worley, 220 S. Chiles Street, Harrodsburg, KY 40330.  (Library is open limited hours Tuesdays through Saturdays, and a note on door directs delivery next door if closed.) If you have any questions, feel free to call.

- TOUCHING THE FILES: Clean hands are important as even hand lotion may leave stains on old paper. Gloves will be available for use at the library.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

RESEARCHING IN PERSON: The Harrodsburg-Mercer County Research Library is not funded by any agency other than Harrodsburg Historical Society and is manned by volunteer docents. The library is open limited hours from Tuesdays through Saturdays; specifically Tuesdays 10 to 4 pm; Wednesdays through Saturdays 1:00 to 4:00. Researchers should call first to be sure the library is open in case of bad weather, family emergencies, etc. If advised, docents will make every effort to be sure the library is open and materials are available.

COST TO RESEARCH:  If you are a member of the Harrodsburg Historical Society, there is no charge for researching in person. Annual memberships are available for $20.00 a year donation and include a quarterly newsletter, The Olde Towne Ledger, which contains genealogical references.  Non-members may research for a nominal fee of $5.00 per day.

RESEARCH REQUESTS: The Library recommends a minimum donation of $15.00 per hour for research service requests.  Any donations to the HHS, a 501(c)(3) organization, are tax deductible. Donation money is used to improve the library, and to make additions to the collections. You should send a retainer in advance with your request for research.  If your answers are found in less time, the excess can be returned if requested. Please prioritize needs in order of significance, and include names with approximate dates where possible.  To keep research time to a minimum, you should explain in clear, concise statements or on charts, the information you have already collected and what you hope to prove.

WHAT IS AVAILABLE IN THE HHS LIBRARY:  Bring your wireless laptop – WiFi is available free! The HHS Research Library at Morgan Row’s genealogy section contains family files, Bible Records, cemetery records, tax and census records, newspapers, books of history and genealogy, and MANY original court documents of local families. They have purchased microfilmed death certificates for the entire state of Kentucky, 1911 to 1957, as well as early Mercer County newspapers and Washington County newspapers. There are numerous shelves of Kentucky history as well as research books from surrounding counties and states. A microfilm reader is available as well as copy machines and electrical plug-ins for your computer. The Library has compiled many books of early records and reference, which are available for purchase, either in person or by mail. For more info, see the web page: http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kymercer/hhs/

ACROSS THE STREET:  Also available are records at the Mercer County Courthouse, located across the street from the Research Library.  Records at the Courthouse include wills and probate records, marriages, and deeds.

HARRODSBURG HISTORICAL SOCIETY
MERCER COUNTY RESEARCH LIBRARY
Attn: Carolyn Worley
P. O. Box 316
220 South Chiles Street
Harrodsburg, Kentucky   40330-0316
Phone:  859-734-5985

E-mail – library@harrodsburghistorical.org


Letters 04/27/2017

posted Apr 29, 2017, 1:59 PM by Pam Ellingson   [ updated Apr 29, 2017, 3:13 PM ]

Are you ready for the Gathering?
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SENT BY:  Yvette Hoitink, a professional genealogist in the Netherlands and owner of Dutch Genealogy Services.
A kruidenier is a grocery (the shop) or grocer (the occupation). The word kruiden means spices, and reminds of the colonial origins of the word, when people would go to the kruidenier to buy pepper and nutmeg from the East Indies.

Since the 1960s, most kruideniers have been replaced by supermarkets.
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Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list - and let us know their Dutch connection and contact info. Please send any pertinent info to be included in the next Letter.  If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, "remove me" -- and I will do so immediately !I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone, and do not publish email addresses on the list because of possible scammers.
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Our official website:  www.DutchCousins.orgWebmaster Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin(At the front page,"Gathering 2017")
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THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT September  8-10,  2017.   Put it on your calendar now.We will have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL - We loved it last time. 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky  Better call soon - only 30 rooms in our block.  502-227-5100Our Treasurer Janice Cozine and the 2017 Gathering Coordinator Mr. Lynn Rogers are working out the details.  It will be memorable - we can guarantee you that! They will be giving us more information very soon.  We are working on getting the bi-ennual newsletter together hopefully will have it ready to send by Monday.————————————————————————————

SENT BY:  Luther Davenport

Are any of the Dutch Cousins also McAfee descendants?  I know later generations intermarried. There is a McAfee descendants reunion also planned for july 22

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SENT BY:  Joyce Collins

I won't be able to make this year's gathering.
Hope it is as wonderful as past ones have been.

Love,
Cousin Joyce Collins (Westerfield)

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SENT BY:  Anne Tangeman

Hello,  I have registered for a room for my sister and self, just cannot locate the place to register for the reunion.

> Please help.
>> Thanks, Anne Tangeman

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SENT BY:  Kerin Smith

Hi:  We won't be able to attend this year.  We always have two family reunions that weekend, and we will be attending the other one this time.  This reunion is for my Henderson cousins, down the line from the List, Brewer, Banta, Demeree, Covert, and Van Vorhees families. Maybe others I missed.  :)  Hope you all have a good reunion.

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SENT BY:  Marsha Smither

Can you please add me to your email list for the Dutch Cousins.
I am a Montfort descendant.
My grandfather was Dallas Montfort,
Gg grandfather was James Clarance Montfort,  ggg grandfather was
Henry James, and the list goes on.

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SENT BY:  Jack Taylor

 The Roosevelts,’ Documentary Series on PBS


Sue and I just finished this series.  I highly recommend it. It concentrates on 3 ROOSEVELTS, Teddy, Eleanor & Franklin. It is in depth and several hours long. We watched it on Netflix.

Because we who have so many lines that trace back to New Netherlands the question comes up: "How am I related to the ROOSEVELT Family?"

There were only about 2000 immigrant families in New Netherlands when Governor  Peter Stuyvesant made his immortal give up speech to the English: "Pour me another beer." This stopped immigration from The Netherlands to New Netherlands (NY, NJ, & DE).

Because of language, religion, & some kinship these families became quite clannish. In my case I have found no intermarriage outside of those 2000 families in the first 6-7 generations in America.  I have found 23  family lines and continue to find others.

One intriguing name popped up in that series that ties most of us to a girl friend of FDR's  It seems that AliceSOHIER was one of FDR's early girl friends that turned him down.  David Des MAREST's wife was a SOHIER. This David is the one who had the French Patent in the Hackensack area of NJ.

There are many Roosevelt Family Trees on Line.  Here is one.  See if any of those intermarriages make you a cousin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roosevelt_family

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SENT BY: from Kim Allison Ross:

there is information on Hilletje Pouluse in this book  titled, “The American Ancestry of Frederic Louis Huidekoper and Reginald Shippen.” She's not referred to as that in the book.  The attachments I sent were what I have so far transcribed from the book since I can't copy/paste from it.  I'm assuming since I can't, no one else can either.   These documents can be uploaded to on-line trees.  The source book & pages are cited.

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SENT BY:  Nancy Marion Tayloram very interested about the dutch gathering on Sept 8 9 and 10. I would like to be put on the mailing list.

I plan on coming to tje gathering if possible. My great grandmother was Missouri Cozine————————————————————————————

SENT BY:

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org

Copyright © 2017 Buffalo Industries, LLC, All rights reserved.

Our Dutch Cousins MISSION STATEMENT: We are descendants of the Low Dutch who settled New Amsterdam, moved to New Jersey, migrated to near Gettysburg, and made history when they later populated the Kentucky frontier. Our Dutch Cousins goal is to research, share and preserve the genealogy and history of our common Low Dutch heritage, including but not limited to, the restoration and preservation of the Old Mud Meetinghouse near Harrodsburg, KY. We meet every two years to renew our love for each other. Our mission is to honor the memory of these ancestors and enjoy the friendship of cousins - both newly-discovered and long-loved.

Our mailing address is:
Buffalo Industries, LLC6812 Newman DriveOklahoma City, OK 73162
Add us to your address book
Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Letters 03/30/2017

posted Apr 9, 2017, 4:03 PM by Pam Ellingson

The Cousins are Coming ... to Frankfort on September  8.  Watch for Registration forms coming next week!


Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list - and let us know their Dutch connection and contact info. Please send any pertinent info to be included in the next Letter.  If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, "remove me" -- and I will do so immediately !I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone, and do not publish email addresses on the list because of possible scammers.

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THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT September  8-10,  2017.   Put it on your calendar now.

We will have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL - We loved it last time. 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky  Better call soon - only 30 rooms in our block.  502-227-5100

Our Treasurer Janice Cozine and the 2017 Gathering Coordinator Mr. Lynn Rogers are working out the details.  It will be memorable - we can guarantee you that! They will be giving us more information very soon.  Our Secretary Denise Meredith Perry is also working on getting the annual newsletter together.

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SENT BY Jack TAYLOR

Low Dutch Cemetery, Straban Township, Adams County, Pennsylvania

http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM3GAD_Low_Dutch_Cemetery_

Straban_Township_Adams_County_Pennsylvania

I took this picture  ca 1987 of my wife, Sue, and a man who was cleaning the Conewago Dutch Cemetery .  For an old cemetery that had not been used since the very early 1900's it looked well kept.  He showed us where someone or ones more recently had tried to dig up a grave, but gave up when it became to difficult.

We also visited a second Low Dutch Cemetery in the area.  It was not well kept.

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SENT BY Lynn Rogers, Dutch Cousins coordinator DC17

To those interested in a memorial for the Westerfield Massacre:

Form a group to consider a memorial?

What kind, http://history.ky.gov/kentucky-historical-markers/ or other?

Contact Bullitt Co Hist for input?

Start a fund?

Place to put memorial/marker?

inscription?

Whether you wish to be a member of the group or not, please respond to me.

Is it ok to share your email with the rest of the group?

Thanks, Lynn

Mr Lynn Rogers

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SENT BY King & Sharon Cole

I would like clarification, what makes a person a Dutch Cousin?  Is it simply Dutch ancestry or is it Dutch ancestry that also migrated to Kentucky?  My friend has Dutch ancestry, but his line moved from New York to Indiana.

King and I look  forward to seeing our cousins and the meeting in September.  We have reservations at Elkhorn Campground.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN: Our programs are built around Dutch ancestry that migrated from “the old states back east” to Kentucky (Dutch Cousins of Kentucky) and I doubt that others would enjoy it that much. Having said that, many of our Kentucky Dutch moved to Indiana when that state opened up.  We have always been inclusive rather than exclusive and if someone says they are a descendant we don’t ask for papers or proof.  We’ve been asked this question before and I would like to hear how others feel about it.

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SENT BY Carolyn (herself)

Don’t forget HARRODSBURG HISTORICAL SOCIETY is accepting materials for the LOW DUTCH ARCHIVES. They want old photos,newspaper clippings, maps, vital records, and other reference material. Think of it like a time capsule. Your collection should be cataloged or indexed, and sources for the documents should be included before donation, so the records are usable by library patrons. Contact HHS via phone: (859) 734-5985 or their website; harrodsburghistorical.org for hours of operation . For more information on donations to the archives refer to http://www.dutchcousins.org/harrodsburg-low-dutch-repository

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SENT BY Joseph R. Jones

By accident a couple of months ago, I came across a reference to “Dutch Huguenots” in Kentucky.  Since I have French Huguenot ancestors who lived among and married Dutch and German protestants in the Hudson Valley, I was intrigued, and I have finally begun to gather enough material for a talk about the Low Dutch Colony for my journal club (and perhaps for the Kentucky Huguenot Society).  Your Dutch Cousins website is very well done, and I am going to add something to my talk about it and about the on-going support of the Dutch Cousins for the Old Mud Meeting House.

As I understand it, you will be meeting again in Harrodsburg in September, and if possible, I will drive over from Lexington, where I live, to see what your group does.

I have a couple of questions:
(1)  How many members do you now have on your rolls?

(2)  Is Vincent Akers alive and well?  I have an address and phone number, but I cannot get a response.  I wrote to the town where he was living in 2007, and the administrator told me that she would see what she could find out, but after two weeks, I no longer expect a reply.  I have listened to his talk on Youtube, which I found fascinating.  In the next couple of weeks I will be visiting Old Mud and the Six Mile Meeting house to take photos.

Thanks for publishing all of the good Low Dutch material and for keeping up such an interesting and entertaining web-site.

———————————————————————————

SENT BY Carolyn Leonard, President, Dutch Cousins 2016-2017
E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org

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Letters 03/13/2017 - A Dutch Wedding in Old Mud!

posted Mar 19, 2017, 12:38 PM by Pam Ellingson   [ updated Mar 19, 2017, 12:47 PM ]

EXCITING news: A Dutch wedding in our Old Mud Meetinghouse! New information about the Dutch Cousins Gathering in September.

Dutch Letters 13 March 2017
Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list - and let us know their Dutch connection and contact info. Please send any pertinent info to be included in the next Letter.  If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, "remove me" -- and I will do so immediately !I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone, and do not publish email addresses on the list because of possible scammers.
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Our official website:  www.DutchCousins.org
Webmaster Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin(At the front page,"Gathering 2017")

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THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT September  8-10,  2017.   Put it on your calendar now.We will have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL - We loved it last time. 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky  Better call soon - only 30 rooms in our block.  502-227-5100 
Our Treasurer Janice Cozine and the 2017 Gathering Coordinator Mr. Lynn Rogers are working out the details.  It will be memorable - we can guarantee you that! They will be giving us more information very soon.  Our Secretary Denise Meredith Perry is also working on getting the annual newsletter together.
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APOLOGIES!  We failed to show the full name of our Hospitality team on the tentative schedule :  Carol & Gene Heathcoat of Denton Texas.
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SENT BY: LYNN ROGERS
We need help! Carla Gerding has arranged the bus trips for our group in the past, but won’t be able to help us this year. Is there anyone who would like to work with a bus company to arrange the excursion on Sept 9 from Frankfort to Shelbyville and return?

The date for our 2017 Gathering was selected to coincide with the Reenactment of the Long Run Massacre/Floyds Defeat in Shelbyville. Lately there has also been a resurgence of interest in a similar historical event, the Westerfield Massacre.  Thus, we Dutch Cousins have a great opportunity to learn about the unrelenting threat of indian attack which our ancestors endured. They had to be resilient and strong!

So, we a need a volunteer to make arrangements for the bus for our trip to the Reenactment and return.  It would involve making arrangements with some charter bus company and then maintaining a roster of those who sign up.  Information from previous trips is available.  If you are willing, please hit reply and let me know.  I’ll forward your info to Mr Lynn Rogers, who is our coordinator for our 2017 Gathering.
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SENT BY  Jack TAYLORRE: "original SENT BY Larry Voreis

"Many years ago in a visit to the Gettysburg, PA, area in search of my Conewago Dutch Heritage I visited the Historical Society which was located in Gettysburg College that has Lutheran ties.

The librarian that I asked about the Conewago Dutch Colony was quick to tell me that the Germans were in the area before the Dutch.  I hope there is no prejudice that would tend to not allow the historical marker.
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SENT BY Suzanne O’Donnell

I'm a Westerfield descendant! I always heard that I had Dutch ancestry, but I never knew from which family line.
My family link:
Jakobus Westerveld
Samuel L. Westerfield
Peter J. Westerfield
Carey Allen Westerfield
Mary Margaret Westerfield m. Benjamin Lewis Davis
Arthur Davis
Oria Lyle Davis
Mary Sue Davis m. Neal J. Damm

Welcome Suzanne!
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A DUTCH WEDDING BY A DUTCH DESCENDANT IN OUR OLD MUD MEETINGHOUSE!
SENT BY Hope Steele

Please add me to the Dutch Cousins email list. I am a
 decendant of the Cozine family that settled in Mercer County. My great-grandmother was a sister to Ralph Anderson's grandfather. Also, my fiance & I will be getting married at the Old Mud Meetinghouse on May 6th, 2017, & I hope to have some nice photos of the property to share with the cousins afterwards! :)
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Please make reservations now, or save this information where you can find it!

SENT BY JANICE COZINE, Dutch Cousins Treasurer & Registration  Chair

Hello to all the cousins!

Hope you're all getting excited and making plans for our 2017 DC gathering in Frankfort, KY, Sept. 8, 9, & 10. The Ky History Center is happy to host us again this year and we're happy to make plans to go back.

Lynn Rogers' plans for our Shelbyville, Ky trip to the Long Run Massacre reenactment is going strong.

This part of history will touch several of our cousin ancestors and will definitely take us all back in time and show what our pioneer families endured in early Kentucky.

You won't want to miss the bus.

Our Kentucky weather is beautiful that time of year.

To help with making arrangements for your stay, the contact info is listed below;

To contact the Capital Plaza Hotel, call 502-291-3093, be sure to ask for the Dutch Cousins Group Code # 2389. If you're making arrangements through the hotel web site, it is    WWW.CAPITALPLAZAKY.COM
This will ensure you get the room discount for our group
If you want to stay at one of Frankfort's RV parks, the info is;
1. ELKHORN CAMPGROUND - Located about 4 miles from down town Frankfort.
165 N. SCRUGGS LANE
OFF US HWY 460 E.
502-695-9154
elkhorncampground.com

2. KENTUCKY RIVER CAMPGROUND - Located about 8 miles NE from down town.
1489 STEELE BRANCH ROADOFF US 127 NORTH
502-227-2465
kyrivercampground.com

The 2 closest/main airports would be;The Louisville International Airport in Louisville, Ky and the Blue Grass Airport in Lexington, Ky.

Can't wait to see everyone again and hopefully meet some new cousins, as well.

Blessings to all
Janice
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SENT BY Carolyn B. Leonard

I will be speaking at the OKLAHOMA PRAIRIES DAUGHTERS OF REVOLUTION (DAR) meeting tomorrow night March 14 on TO ISRAEL, WITH LOVE, a video of the beauty and uniqueness (Dictionary says that is a real word) of the land and historical sites. Many to most of our Dutch Cousins are eligible for membership in these linage society groups such as DAR, SAR, DAUGHTERS OF 1812, actually many already are members.
http://www.toisraelbook.com/ToIsraelBook/Welcome.html
http://www.dar.org/natio…/become-member/chapters-by-state/OK
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SENT BY E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com
On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritageDutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org
—————————————————————————————————————————————
Carolyn Leonard

Letters 02/10/2017

posted Feb 17, 2017, 11:58 AM by Pam Ellingson

Dutch Cousins Meeting coming up soon!

Feel free to share these items, just credit DUTCH LETTERS (date), free genealogy round robin published by Carolyn Leonard. Anyone who wishes to be added to the mailing list, send an email to me at Editor234@gmail.com and say they would like to be on the list - and let us know their Dutch connection.  If you want to be removed from the mailing list, just hit reply and say, "remove me" -- and I will do so immediately !I promise we do not share our mailing list with anyone, and do not publish email addresses on the list because of possible scammers.

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Our official website:  www.DutchCousins.org

Webmaster Pam Ellingson of Wisconsin

(At the front page,"Gathering 2017")

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THE COUSINS ARE COMING TO FRANKFORT September  8-10,  2017.   Put it on your calendar now.

We will have special rates at CAPITAL PLAZA HOTEL - We loved it last time. 405 Wilkinson Blvd, Frankfort, Ky 502-227-5100

Our Treasurer Janice Cozine and the 2017 Gathering Coordinator Mr. Lynn Rogers are working out the details.  It will be memorable - we can guarantee you that! They will be giving us more information very soon.  Our Secretary Denise Meredith Perry is also working on getting the annual newsletter together.

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SENT BY Rodney Dempsey

Carolyn, can you answer Dennis' question : "Is the history of the Waterfield Massacre in book form? "

NOTE:  CAN ONE OF YOU WESTERFIELD BUNCH ANSWER THIS? I forwarded him the digital copy sent by Ron Belcher. I thought that was attached to the Dutch Letters earlier?

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SENT BY Joan Murray

I meant to email you after you sent out the info on the Westerfield Massacre.  I think it is very appropriate for our entire group, and particularly this year because we are going to be focusing for one day on the Long Run Massacre.  I think all the Low Dutch families interest all of us even though we may not have a direct line running through them.   Joan

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SENT BY Larry Voreis

About ten years ago when I visited with Arthur Weaner he took me to the location of Rev. Cozine's home which was located on the west side of the main road from York to Gettysburg and Chamberstown. The Conewago Church was near the Rev. Cozine's home, on the east side of the road. Arthur was trying to get a historical marker installed at the site of the church, without success. Somewhere I have a record of our visit, but it may take me a while to find it.

My guess is Cozine's homestead was near the tannery, as there is no mention of a tannery in the inventory of the estate of the Reverend.

Regards,Larry

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SENT BY Diana Todd

??? Is there a document copy of John Ryker's testimonial ?

Where can we find the document (s) if there is a document?

I think John Ryker is my 7x great grandfather.

NOTE FROM CAROLYN - This article is coming to you in SEVEN installments - all very interesting. The 7th installment has all the footnote and source information.

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SENT BY RODNEY DEMPSEY

I have a strong inclination to believe that it can be traced back to some of the Demotte's in Grandmother Dempsey's linage inher genealogy.

The Town was named after a DeMotte who was in Congress. The Reformed Church is the religion that the Dutch practiced and brought with them to America.

The Old Dutch Meeting House in Mercer County, KY was the first Church built west of the Alleghenies.  The Dutch residents, under Father Banta, migrated to Pleasureville, KY and then to Southern Indiana ,including  Jasper, Huntingburg, and Otwell, Grandmother Dempsey's birthplace.

It well could have happened that some Demotte's moved north and settled DeMotte.   Interesting! Maybe our friend Carolyn B. Leonard can publish something in our Old Dutch Newsletter that could shine some light on the matter.

I hope that we can get some Demotte's to attend our next biannual meeting in Frankfort this year.

Rodney P. Demsey

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Newsletter with all info and registration forms coming soon.
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE OF THE 2017 DUTCH COUSINS GATHERING
SENT BY carolyn leonard
THURSDAY 4 TO 7 PM Sept 7, 2017
Set up and Working Box Lunch
Early Registration - Janice Cozine & team
Tee-Shirt Sales - Carol Karwatka & team
Display Tables setup:  Lynn Rogers & team
Silent auction table - Bill & Gayle Hoag
Book Table - Joan Murray
Video of 2015 presentation by Vince on Old Mud -  Jack Taylor
———————————————————————————————
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE FRIDAY SEPT 8, 2017
9 to 10:00 - Networking and Registration – Janice Cozine & Team
Hospitality:  Carol & Gene
T-Shirt Sales - Carol Karwatka's Team
Visit displays - Lynn Rogers
Silent Auction - Bill & Gayle Hoag
Book Table - Joan
10:30 Meeting begins:
Flag Ceremony: Flags - SAR?
Welcome to Kentucky - Steve Henry (if no conflict with Ms America)
Welcome to Cousins - President
Introductions - President (team - each chair reports)
Announcements - Lynn Rogers, Coordinator
11:00 break
11:15 Update on School House Restoration - Amalie Preston
11:30: TBA – (something from KGS?)

Prayer (who) - Box Lunch
12:00  Business Meeting (Officers and Registered Cousins) Box Lunch
2:00 Business meeting disbands
break
2:15 Textiles from the 19th century, learn how our ancestors made amazing fabric creations for their homes from start to finish. (Maybe Joann Adams, waiting for confirmation)
3:15 break
3:30 TBA (Special Kentucky Dutch info)
4:00  break
4:15 (The Westerfield Massacre discussion -Vince Akers, Steve Henry, Lynn Rogers, James Moore)
5:00 break
6:00 Prayer (?)
dinner is served
6:30 President introduces the keynote speaker, Vince Akers:  "Massacres and Defeats!"
       These Tragic and Terrifying Events
       Tell the Story of Our Low Dutch Ancestors
       Settling on the Kentucky Frontier
Slide show similar to the one on Old Mud with people, locations, documents and illustrations.  It will cover not only the Westefield Massacre, Long Run Massacre and Floyd's Defeat, but also Starm's Defeat, the Duree Massacre, the Dutch Defeat, the 1786 Low Dutch Tract problems, the Tick Creek Massacre, the Chenoweth Massacre, the Smock and Cozine family attacks and Daniel Ketchum's captivity.
---------------
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE Saturday, Sept 9, 2017
9:00  Coffee with Carol & Gene; Registration with Janice, Visit displays
Tee-Shirt Sales – Carol Karwatka
Display Tables:  Lynn Rogers
Silent auction table - Bill & Gayle Hoag
10:00 Meeting begins:
Flag Ceremony: Flags - SAR?
Welcome to Kentucky - Steve Henry
Welcome to Cousins - President
Introductions - President (team - each chair reports)
Announcements - Lynn Rogers, Coordinator
Winners announced
11:00  Meet KY Genealogical Society (Pres. Johnna Waldon)

11:30:  TBA Box Lunch
TAKE DOWN DISPLAYS AND SILENT AUCTION.

12:00  GROUP PHOTO - Charlie Westerfield - wear your Dutch cousins T shirts & hats
Silent Auction ends..

1-5:30 - Those not going to Shelbyville can visit the Kentucky History Research Center.
1:00   Bus departs for Shelbyville Reenactment (30 minute drive)
5:00 Bus returns to Frankfort
5-6 - Break
6:00 Prayer and dinner is served
6:30:   Keynote speaker Eddie Price, REMEMBER THE RAISIN!  Entertainment at its best.
=============================
SUNDAY at Old Mud - and Monday at HHS Library Research  (more info coming soon)
The Harrodsburg Historical Society Library (address) will be open for research Monday September 11 from 10 till 3, especially for Dutch Cousin researchers. We have an incredible amount of research materials available on the Low Dutch settlement here, including the library donated by David Smock of Florida.

Old Mud Meeting house restoration is complete and we have had some weddings and receptions already held there.

Restoration at the 1890 Old Mud Schoolhouse is on hold for now due to winter weather, but the interior is cleared and ready to start as weather permits. Generations of groundhogs kept coming back so we decided to pour a layer of concrete to prevent them from piling up dirt underneath the new/old flooring when it is installed. (who?) donated the fencing from Ralph Anderson’s Farms. We used that fencing to cover the floors in Old Mud, and will use the last of the Ralph Anderson fencing to make oak flooring for the schoolhouse.  Plans are to have men/womens bathrooms, kitchenette, and a reception area at the front.
--------------------------------------------------
SENT BY: carolyn

Carolyn Leonard

E-mail me: Editor234@gmail.com

On my webpage, www.CarolynBLeonard.com read the pages: DutchCousins and LowDutchHeritage

Dutch letters are archived on our official webpage, www.DutchCousins.org

Westervelt Massacre in Kentucky in 1780 By Ronald Clay Belcher

posted Feb 7, 2017, 3:58 PM by Pam Ellingson   [ updated Apr 23, 2017, 4:35 PM ]

Displaying

Permission received from Bluegrass Roots for the Dutch Cousins. 

Westervelt Massacre in Kentucky in 1780
By Ronald Clay Belcher
(Mr. Belcher requested and received permission from Bluegrass Roots via Fran Salyers for us to reprint this article just for the Dutch Cousins. The article is quite lengthy and will be issued in several installments. You may wish to print and save, which is permitted.)

[Please see the Spring 2011 Bluegrass Roots for Mr. Belcher’s article “Samuel Westervelt (Westerfield) in the
Kentucky Territory in 1779”]

Frontier settler Jacobus Westervelt arrived in Kentucky early in the spring of 1780.(footnote 1)

By mid-April, Jacobus and his fellow brethren from the Dutch Reformation Congregation settled at Beargrass Creek, where the Louisville suburb of St. Matthews is now located. There they built a settlement at Beargrass Creek called Low Dutch Station. In the summer of 1780, Jacobus Westervelt hired John Thixton to guide the family from Low Dutch Station to Harrod’s Town. Thirty settlers joined the Westervelt family, forming a caravan of about forty-one people. At the end of their first day of travel, the travelers set camp for the night a few miles below Low Dutch Station. Twenty men, women and children were killed during the night when Native Indians attacked the sleeping settlers. This tragic event became known as the “Westervelt Massacre”.

The historical collection of Lyman Copeland Draper (f.2) includes testimonials by H. R. Stafford (f.3), Mrs. Strong (f.4) and Mrs. Campbell (f.5) accounts of the massacre. John Ryker’s testimonials at the Indiana court during 1834 and 1835 (f.6) are pertinent to the timing for the Westervelt Massacre. Also helpful is a partial history of the Westervelt family in America, maintained by Westerfield descendants (f.7).

In his testimonial, Stafford described the route traveled by the Westervelt caravan to a trail that connected Low Dutch Station with Harrod’s Town, following Beargrass Creek. Stafford’s description matches exactly a popular and well-known buffalo trail, called Harrod’s Trace, found on the 1784 Filson Map of Kentucky. (f.8) Stafford recalled that the Westervelt caravan traveled about twelve miles before setting camp for the night.

The juncture of Broad Run and Floyd’s Fork is about 12 miles from Low Dutch Station, located at the frontier trail leading to Harrod’s Town. Landmarks of Thixton and Thixton Lane are situated in the vicinity of Floyd’s Fork and Broad Run. Both landmarks are co-incidental to the location and circumstance of the Westervelt massacre. Guide John Thixton escaped the massacre, his probable starting point a community called Thixton today.

John Thixton navigated a wilderness terrain and reached safety at Clear’s Station, his likely route a modern county road called Thixton Lane.

A narrow region of land lying east of Floyd’s Fork bounded by Broad Run on the south and Pope’s Lick on the north was described by early frontier explorer Thomas McCarty as “notorious” during 1779. The Westervelt Massacre in 1780 was a factor contributing to that notoriety. The frontier region described by McCarty was also the tragic site for Floyd's Defeat and the Long Run Massacre, both in 1781.(f.10)

The Westervelt caravan departed Low Dutch Station and traveled Beargrass Creek to its end. They then followed Chenoweth Run to Floyd’s Fork and continued along Floyd’s Fork to the mouth of Broad Run. The site guide, John Thixton, chose to set camp for the night in an area that McCarty described as a “great buffalo trace crisscrossed at Broad Run”.

The vicinity at Floyd’s Fork and Broad Run is the likely site for the Westervelt massacre when examining details found in the separate escape scenario recalled by Samuel Westervelt (f.11) and John Thixton (f.12) and the partial accounts of Maria Westervelt (f.13).

Samuel Westervelt arrived in Kentucky one year prior to the 1780 arrival of his parents and siblings. Samuel Westervelt entered Kentucky by way of Cumberland Gap and apparently wintered at the vicinity of Ft. Boonesborough and White Oak Station.(f.14)

Following the 1780 Westervelt massacre, Samuel along with his sister, whose given name was not specified, reached safety at Bullitt Lick.

Given Samuel’s previous experience and knowledge of the frontier, their journey of fifteen miles was readily managed.

The escape scenario for John Thixton noted that he departed from the massacre at 3:00 a.m. Thixton apparently reached safety about four hours later, having run for most of his ten-mile journey. Thixton’s journey neared its end when the sound of early morning rooster crowing was heard, around 6:00 a.m.Thixton oriented his route and found safety at Clear’s Station. Thixton’s
rapid pace eliminated any chance of pursuit by the Indians. His early arrival allowed couriers to be dispatched to warn nearby settlements.

Westerfield Massacre, part 2, Bluegrass Roots Journal

Maria Westervelt’s account recalled secluding herself and three of her children in a sinkhole. Later that day, Maria left without her children and with some difficult gained entrance to a fortification, resulting in an alarm being raised. Most likely, Maria found safety at Brashear’s Station, a fortification within walking distance, about eight miles, reachable given her delayed start time. Brashear’s Station was in distance about four miles from Clear’s Station, from which a courier was apparently dispatched following Thixton’s news of the massacre.

In the absence of a valid citation for the site of the Westervelt massacre, fact, historical observations, testimonials and landmarks must suffice. The massacre most likely occurred where Floyd’s Fork joins Broad Run, a location of ‘notorious’ reputation situated about two miles above the border with Bullitt County and about 12 miles below Low Dutch Station. Survivors
of the massacre reached safety at Clear’s Station, Brashear’s Station and Bullitt Lick, or Shanklin’s Outpost.

About the first of July of 1780, British Colonel Byrd, accompanied by 700 Indian allies, invaded the Kentucky Territory and captured Ruddle’s Fort and Martin’s Fort. Byrd’s exact whereabouts and plans were unknown, heightening concern amongst settlers and causing alarm throughout Kentucky. The magnitude
of that event curtailed any semblance of normal life for settlers between July and the month of September.

After receiving the news, Colonel George Rogers Clark levied frontier settlers to serve as attachments to his military force. Clark conducted a military campaign on Indian encampments and villages situated in Kentucky and into southern Ohio. Settlers were recruited for military duty. Settlements were left undermanned requiring defenses to be strengthened prior to departure. Frontier militiamen undertook their own preparations for the military campaign. Fearful of Clark’s plans, many Native Indians returned to their villages and encampments to protect their own families. About 470 men, women and children were taken captive by the invading force. (footnonte15).

The Ryker family and the Westervelt family were fellow brethren of the Dutch Reformed Congregation at Low Dutch Station. John Ryker provided court testimony at the Indiana court later in his life. In 1834 Ryker recalled his 1780 military service against the Indians included the months of July, August and early September. Several Dutch settlers at Low Dutch Station, including men from the Banta family, served with Clark’s militia, many of whom served for the three months.(f.16)

Byrd’s invasion and Clark’s retaliatory campaign, attested by the Ryker testimonial and others at Low Dutch Station, significantly narrows the timing for the Westervelt’s intended removal from Low Dutch Station to Harrod’s Town. Due to the threat, July, August, and September are effectively eliminated as possible dates for that relocation.

Forty-one settlers, most of whom were women and children, were unlikely to undertake the risk of such a move and were further hampered due to men being unavailable. The frontiersmen returning from Clark’s campaign in early and late September faced numerous tasks and demands, given their ex- tended absence. Crops, repairs, family needs and winter preparations were of immediate priority. It is extremely unlikely that the Westervelt summer relocation occurred between 1 July 1780 and end of summer.

The Westervelts probably tried to relocate in early summer, according to historical circumstances. Low Dutch Station proved to be at a dangerous locale, encouraging the Westervelts to seek removal. The immediate area east of Low Dutch Station was controlled by hostile bands of Native Indians. On 21 June 1780, the first day of summer, Jacobus Westervelt registered ownership of 400 acres of land along Silver Creek, situated two day’s journey beyond Harrod’s Town.(f.17)

Jacobus’ land registration likely prompted the Westervelt relocation to Harrod’s Town. Squire Boone and Colonel John Harrod traveled Harrod’s Trace to settlements along Beargrass Creek in the spring of 1780. Boone successfully recruited thirteen families to relocate to Squire Boone Station. Harrod encouraged settlers to relocate to Harrod’s Town, where Jacobus Westervelt elected to go. Relocation to Harrod’s Town was the first segment of the move. The Westervelts likely planned their second relocation to Silver Creek during the spring of 1781.

A removal to Harrod’s Town in early summer allowed time to plant crops, and harvest and preserve food for winter. Kentucky experienced a near famine in 1780 (f.18), one so severe that one bushel of corn cost the equivalent of 400 acres of
land. This famine is evidenced by the household items (f.19)
listed in the 1781 probate proceedings for massacre victim, Jan Westervelt.

The relocation from Low Dutch Station necessitated additional trips, each roundtrip consuming about ten days. An early summer removal allowed the Westervelts to complete additional trips prior to the onset of winter.

Westerfield Massacre, part 3, Bluegrass Roots Journal

James Swan relocated his family to Beargrass Creek on a Sunday evening in preparation for departing with the Westervelt caravan, apparently on Monday morning.(20)  In Mrs. Strong’s testimonial, she recalled the massacre occurred on a Monday, meaning the group was attacked on Monday night. The massacre occurred at 3:00 a.m., pushing the event into early Tuesday morning. In early summer, prior to 1 July 1780, the most likely time for the Westervelt relocation to Harrod’s Town, only one suitable Tuesday is found on the calendar from that year, occurring on 27 June. The actual date for the Westervelt massacre is not found in any historical citation.

Circumstantial information, combined with known historical facts and testimonials, adds credence for the Westervelt massacre to have occurred at 3:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 27 June 1780.

A likely roster for those traveling with the Westervelt caravan is shown below. Details from the Draper collection state the Westervelt caravan consisted of ten families, interpreted to mean male heads-of-household. The Westervelt family was joined by thirty additional settlers, increasing the size of the group
to about 41 settlers. Eight heads-of-households are authenticated.

The two heads-of-household lacking citation may be John Van Leeve and John Dorland, brethrens of the Dutch Reformed Congregation at Low Dutch Station.

John Van Leeve and John Dorland are believed killed by Indians in 1780. Their wives, Margareta Van Leeve and Catherina Dorland, survived the Indian attack as did Maria Westervelt. Van Leeve and Dorland, similar to the Westervelts, were temporary residents at Low Dutch Station, intending to relocate in 1780 or spring of 1781. The Dorland and Van Leeve families may have planned to remain at Squire Boone Station for the second day of travel.

Squire Boone’s wife, Jane Van Cleaf, was a cousin of Margareta Van Leeve and Catherina (Van Leeve) Dorland. The widows Van Leeve and Dorland received 400-acre land grants in 1781 pursuant to frontier hardships they endured in 1780. On that same occasion, land grants were also given to massacre survivors Maria Westervelt, Mary McGlaughlin, Barbara (P) lyburn and John Thixton. (f. 21)

Westerfield Massacre, part 4, Bluegrass Roots Journal

The roster below is assembled from my research.

Individuals or events without a definitive citation are shown in an italicized font.
 
Reconstructed Roster of the Westervelt Caravan - Summer of 1780
  1. Jacobus Westervelt, husband/ father (f. 22 )                                        killed
a.Maria Westervelt, wife/mother escaped
b.unknown Westervelt, daughterkilled 
c.Lea Westervelt, daughterkilled 
d.Samuel Westervelt, adult son escaped
e.Leah Westervelt, daughter escaped
f.Isaac Westervelt, son escaped
g.William Westervelt, son escaped
h.Rebecca Westervelt, daughter escaped
i.Catrina Westervelt, daughter escaped
j.Deborah Westervelt, daughter captive
Notes: Catrina, Rebecca, Deborah and Leah are accounted for after 1780. This identifies Lea Westervelt
and a sister of unknown given name as the two Westervelt daughters killed.
  1. Jan Westervelt, husband/father   (cousin of Jacobus) (f.23)  killed
    1. Anaetje Westervelt, wife/mother                      killed
    2. Gerritt Westervelt, son                                     killed
  1. Leah Westervelt, daughter                              killed
  2. Marya “Polly” Westervelt, daughter       captive
  1. unknown Westervelt, child, b. abt. 1774          killed
  2. unknown Westervelt, child, b. abt. 1776          killed
  3. g.   captive Antie Westervelt, infant dau.        killed
Notes: Gerritt, Leah and Marya are born at or before 1771; Antie born at 1779. An eight year period with no children born is possible, although unlikely. Two Westervelt children of unknown given name are included in the list above, shown as (e) and (f). Jan Westervelt’s probate of his estate is recorded at Jefferson County in 1781, apparently the result of no known surviving descendants. Jacobus Westervelt’s estate was not probated, apparently due to surviving descendants.
  1. James Swan, husband / father (f.24)         killed
a.    unknown Swan, wife / mother    killed
b.   Betsy Swan, daughter (Westervelt cousin)      killed
c.   James Swan (Jr.), son         escaped
Notes: Mrs. Swan is not afterward encountered in records at Kentucky, likely killed. Circumstantial evidence for James (Jr.?) after 1780 has caused his name to be added.
  1. James McGlaughlin, husband /father (f. 25)    killed
  2. a. Mary McGlaughlin, wife / mother escaped b. James (Jr.) McGlaughlin, son      escaped
Notes: Mary resided at Beargrass Creek after the massacre. An entry dated 20 January 1783 in the diary kept by Colonel. William Fleming recalled teenager James McGalalan, likely McGlaughlin, was wounded by Indians while hunting near Beargrass Creek on 19 January 1783.
  1. Thomas Plyburn/Pyburn, husband / father (f.26)  killed
  2.  a. Barbara Plyburn/Pyburn, wife escaped
Note: Barbara resided at Beargrass Creek after the massacre.
  1. John Thixton, frontier guide (f.27)      escaped
  2. Note: Suffered minor wound to back of neck during the massacre.
  3. William Thixton, frontier guide (cousin of John Thixton) (f.28)       escaped
  4. Note: Suffered minor wound to back of hand during the massacre.
  5. Thomas Pearce, frontier guide (f.29)   escaped
  6. Note: Suffered a painful wound during the massacre.
  1. John Dorland, husband, killed
  2. a. Catherine (Van Leeve) Dorland, wife, escaped
  3. John Van Leeve, husband, killed
  4. a. Margareta Van Leeve, wife, escaped
 
Roster Summary Notes: Listed above are 35 of the 41 settlers; 17 killed, 2 taken captive and 16 escaped. Six others settlers remain unaccounted for, three of whom were stated as killed; three others apparently escaped. More research is needed; however, my own opinion is that most of those unaccounted settlers are likely children of surname Dorland; children of surname Swan or McGlaughlin are secondary choices to complete the list.

Westerfield Massacre, part 5, Bluegrass Roots Journal

Account of the Massacre in the Draper Collection

The following summary of the massacre is derived from details extracted from the Westerfield family account and testimonials found in the Draper Collection:

Around 3:00 a.m. on a Tuesday morning in the summer of 1780, the Westervelt settlers were attacked by Native Indians. Darkness, surprise and strength in numbers favored the attacking foe. Survivors from the attack recounted hearing hacking sounds, chop- ping, “crackling of skulls, plundering and scream- ing”, joined by the sound of volleys discharged from muskets. In moments, about half the members of the Westervelt group were slaughtered despite valiant attempts by the men to protect the women and children. Fewer than half of the approximately forty settlers managed to escape.

Jacobus Westervelt, said to weigh 333 pounds, died from a gun shot wound. Apparently, a projectile first struck the flintlock on Westervelt’s rifle, and then the ricochet lodged in his brain. The lead guide, John Thixton, awakened by the noise and commo- tion, wrestled free his rifle and struck his assailant. Thixton’s blanket was peppered through with shot. Thixton suffered a wound to his neck while escaping into the darkness, after stumbling over an unseen log.

A few hours later John Thixton gained safety at Clear’s Station in Bullitt County. Guide William Thixton es- caped into the darkness with wounds to the back of his hand. Guide Thomas Pearce also escaped although he suffered a painful wound and was said to “holler most dreadfully when his wounds were dressed”. Six men are believed to have been killed while protecting the women and children.

In the aftermath of the fighting, three Indians donned the oversized great coat belonging to Jacobus Westervelt and danced jubilantly in celebration.
The escape scenarios for Samuel Westervelt, Leah Westervelt, Maria Westervelt and three children who accompanied Maria are mentioned above.

Maria Westervelt and Samuel Westervelt re- turned to the site of the massacre on Wednesday. They dug a large hole and buried 20 companions, the majority of which were family members. A daughter of Jacobus and Maria Westervelt and a daughter of Jan and Anaetje Westervelt were taken captive by the attacking foe.

At first, the youngster Gerritt Westervelt survived the massacre. The horrific tragedy of the massacre witnessed by young Gerritt led the lad to become hysterical, causing the Indians to become distraught.

They subsequently killed and scalped the wailing boy in the aftermath of the massacre. Betsy Swan suffered a severe wound to her shoulder during the massacre. Betsy’s wound made her unsuitable for the rigors of travel. Betsy was soon killed and scalped. British authorities paid a bounty of £5 to the Indians for each scalp taken. Each of the twenty settlers killed by the Indians was scalped.

Settlers taken captive by the Indians were either kept at camps or taken to Ft. Detroit where they were frequently sold as slaves or prisoners, a typical sum being £5. Captives were made to carry plundered items to Ft. Detroit for the Indians to sell or trade. Likely, captives Deb and Polly Westervelt were kept at an Indian village in southern Ohio until the spring of 1781. They were likely taken to Ft. Detroit in April  At Ft. Detroit, Deb and Polly were sold as slaves to a French house, badly abused.

News of Deb and Polly’s arrival at Ft. Detroit reached Low Dutch Station, likely in the late summer of 1781.

Maria Westervelt, a 46-year-old widow who survived the Westervelt Massacre, gathered together provisions, a saddle, and on horseback sought rescue. From Low Dutch Station, Maria journeyed the buffalo trail, her likely route past the site of the Westervelt Massacre, continued past Squire Boone’s cabin before joining the Alanant-o-wamiowee Trail leading to Licking Creek. Maria Westervelt crossed the Ohio River likely following Byrd’s “War Trail”, covering more than 400 miles of hostile wilderness territory controlled by Indian allies of the British mili- tary. Maria arrived as the fall season came to an end and received the unwanted news that Deb and Polly Westervelt had since been transported to Montreal.

Harsh weather forced Maria to remain throughout the winter at Ft. Detroit. Maria returned to Kentucky the following spring or summer, the year of 1782. On her return to Low Dutch Station, Maria was pursued by Indians and the horse upon which Maria was mounted was shot out from underneath her. Collecting her saddle and necessities, Maria fled and outmaneuvered her attackers for a distance of four miles where she reached safety.

If not daring enough, Maria mounted a horse stolen from the Indians and made good her getaway. Maria’s journey on horseback traversed a rugged and hostile terrain whose distance exceeded 800 miles, her circumstance unknown to family and friends at Low Dutch Station. Although unsuccessful in her rescue of Deb and Polly Westervelt, Maria proved to be a frontier woman of strenuous determination and capable to the extreme. Her actions are legendary by their very nature.

On 4 October 1782, the Indian captors transported Debra and Polly Westervelt to Niagara. (f.31) At war’s conclusion, the Legislature of Virginia ransomed freedom for two hundred surviving Kentucky men, women and children held captive at war’s end. By the time of the Legislature’s final approval in December of 1782, those captives were well on their way homeward. Most likely, Debra and Polly arrived at Low Dutch Station during December of 1782, possibly early spring of 1783.

Their homeward route from Niagara to Kentucky is believed to have passed through Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Debra and Polly reunited with surviving family members in Kentucky, having endured the most horrid of experiences.

Westerfield Massacre, part 6, Bluegrass Roots Journal

A timeline for events and people associated with the Westervelt(s) at 1780 follows:

1780 – Widow Pyburn/Plyburn returned to Floyd’s Station on Beargrass Creek
1780 – Widow McGlaughlin returned to Floyd’s Station on Beargrass Creek
1781 – Maria Westervelt departed for Ft. Detroit
1781 – Samuel Westervelt served as executor for the estate of Jan Westervelt
1781 – William Brashear, founder of Brashear’s Station, was killed in an Indian attack 1781 – Squire Boone Station attacked, Squire badly wounded by gunshot
1781 – Massacre at Long Run and Floyd’s Defeat, slightly north and east of the Westervelt Massacre
1781 – Land Grants of 400 acres given to massacre survivors - widows Westervelt, McGlaughlin, Dorland, Van Leeve and Pyburn; also, guide John Thixton
1781 – Westervelt caravan’s guide, Thomas Pearce, recorded a land survey at Jefferson County Court32 1782 – Maria Westervelt returned from Ft. Detroit
1782 – Samuel Westervelt married Catherine Monfort 1783 – Leah Westervelt married William Stafford
1783 – Col. Floyd who owned the property at Low Dutch Station was killed in an Indian ambush in Bullitt County
1783 –James McGlaughlin (Jr.), believed to be a Westervelt Massacre survivor, was badly wounded by Indians while hunting near Floyd’s Station
1784 – Captive Deb Westervelt married James Baxter
1785 – 10th child of Jacobus and Maria Westervelt who was not at the massacre is James Westervelt/ Westerfield. James led a wagon train from Berkeley County, Virginia, to the vicinity of Ft. Pitt where he then led a flatboat flotilla to Limestone, Kentucky; the group was attacked at night by Indians near Ruddle’s Station33
1786 – Squire and Jane Boone sold 5,945 acres to the Dutch settlers who established Low Dutch Station34 1786 – Likely Westervelt massacre survivor and widow, Catherine Dorland, remarried
1792 – Westervelt massacre survivor, Isaac Westervelt, married Polly Smock 1793 – Westervelt massacre survivor, Catrina Westervelt, married John Brazleton
1796 – Westervelt massacre survivor, Rebecca Westervelt, married William Brazleton; Rebecca later in life served as Mother Superior at Shakertown, Kentucky
1795-1800 – Maria Westervelt helped found the Old Mud Meeting House near Harrodsburg 1807 – Westervelt caravan’s guide, John Thixton, died at Bullitt County

Jacobus Westervelt and Maria Demarest are my 5th great grandparents. This Westervelt lineage emigrated in 1662 from Holland and arrived by ship at New Amsterdam, now Long Island and Manhattan, New York. (f.35)

Generations of the Westervelt lineage is shown below:
- Lubbert Westervelt b 1660 in Holland

…… +Hilletje Pouluse
………2. Jan Westervelt b 1686 in NJ
………… +Dirckje Hubbertse Blauvelt
………………3. Gerrit Westervelt b 1724 in NJ
………………… +Marytje Brouwer
……………………4. Jan Westervelt b 1744 in NJ
……………………… + Anaetje Dey
………………3. Jacobus Westervelt b 1712 in NJ
………………… + Debora Van Schyven
……………………4. Jacobus Westervelt b 1737 in NJ
……………………… + Maria Demarest
…………………………5. Jacobus (James) Westervelt b 1755 in NJ
…………………………… + Phoebe Cozine
………………………………6. James Cozine Westerfield b 1783 in VA
………………………………… + Catherine Sotore
……………………………………7. David Cozine Westerfield b 1825 in KY
……………………………………… + Ann Coovert
…………………………………………8. John Anderson Westerfield b 1866 in KY
…………………………………………… + Lottie Lear Strevels
………………………………………………9. Lillie Florence Westerfield b 1911 in KY
………………………………………………… + Roy Belcher
……………………………………………………10. Cecil Lee Belcher b 1929 in KY
……………………………………………………… + Margaret Lucille Girtley
…………………………………………………………11. Ronald Clay Belcher b 1948

Over two and a quarter centuries have passed since the Westervelt Massacre. Important massacre details have not been documented. Likely, the massacre occurred on 27 June 1780 at the juncture of Floyd’s Fork and Broad Run and involved about forty one frontier settlers. The Westervelt story, most tragic in circumstance, was not an isolated event for early pioneers in Kentucky.

My birth occurred in 1948 at Campbellsville, KY. I soon moved to Bullitt County and afterward graduated from Murray State University. I first read the Westerfield family account sometime around 1962 (f.36).

My research into the event of the massacre began seven years ago and included excursions to Bullitt Lick, Clear’s Station, Brashear’s Station, Chenoweth Run, Low Dutch Station, Broad Run, Floyd’s Fork, Brooks’ Stations, Shanklin’s Outpost, Thixton and Thixton Lane.

The reader is encouraged to independently research the massacre event prior to making reliance on my research.

Westerfield Massacre, part 7, Bluegrass Roots Journal

FOOTNOTES

By Ronald Clay Belcher
(Mr. Belcher requested and received permission from Bluegrass Roots via Fran Salyers for us to reprint this very interesting article just for the Dutch Cousins. The article is quite lengthy and will be issued in several installments. You may wish to print and save, which is permitted.)

1 Akers, Vincent. The Low Dutch Company, a history of the Holland Dutch settlements of the Kentucky frontier. De Halve Maen, Vol. LV, New York City, Summer 1980. Page 4, 21.

2    Draper, Lyman Copeland. 1735. Collection of Lyman Copeland Draper Manuscripts [Microfilm]. Louisville Public
Library. Louisville, KY.

3 Draper, Lyman Copeland. 1735. Correspondence from Hiriam R. Stafford, 1865. Reel 8, Vol. 24, Series CC, Page 145-1, 145-2, 145-3.

4   Draper, Lyman Copeland. 1735. Shane–Mrs. Strong Interview. Reel 77, Vol. 13, Series CC, Page 11-12.

5   Draper, Lyman Copeland. 1735. Shane–Campbell Interview. Vol. 13, Series CC, Page 84.

6 Pension Application John Ryker, 1834 and 1835, Jefferson County Court, Indiana. The National Archives and Records Service, Washington, D.C. 1969. Microcopy 8014, Roll 2107. Page 624-630.

7 Westervelt family account entitled “A Brief History of the Westerfield Family in America”Original author is believed to be E. A. Westerfield. Other versions are credited to Rosa E. Williams, Thomas W. Westerfield, Alvin Westerfield and Bower Westerfield, likely others as well, varies between 3-8 pages.

8 Filson, John. Filson’s Kentucke [Map]: Willard Rouse Jillson, Sc. D. Lennox Hills Publication & Distribution Co. New York. 1972.

9 Jobson, Robert C, Lt. Col. A History of Early Jeffersontown and Southeastern Jefferson County, Kentucky. Jobson, Robert C., Lt. Col. Gateway Press, Inc. Baltimore. 1977. Page 5-7.

10 Yater, George H. Two Hundred Years at the Falls of the Ohio: A History of Louisville and Jefferson County. The Heritage Corporation of Louisville and Jefferson County, 1979. Page 23.

11  Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Campbell Interview.

12  Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Mrs. Strong Interview.

13  Draper, Lyman Copeland. Correspondence from Hiriam R. Stafford.

14 Belcher, Ronald Clay. Samuel Westervelt (Westerfield) at Kentucky Territory in 1779. Bluegrass Roots. Kentucky

Genealogical Society. Vol. 38, No. 1, Spring 2011, Page 25-28.
15 Coleman, J. Winston. The British Invasion of Kentucky. Lexington, KY: Winburn Press. 1951.

16 Akers, Vincent. The Low Dutch Company, a history of the Holland Dutch settlements of the Kentucky frontier. De Halve Maen. Vol. LV. No. 3. Fall 1980. Page 12.

17 Lincoln County Court Records, Book 1, page 75, Entry 726, Virginia Treasury Warrant, James Westervelt, Silver Creek Watercourse, 21 June 1780. Kentucky.

18 Murray, Joan England. 1985. The Bantas of Pleasant Hill, Kentucky: their ancestors and descendants. Palatine, Ill. (1281 N. Linden Ave., Palatine 60067): J.E. Murray. Page 26.

19 Early Kentucky Settlers—The Records of Jefferson County, Kentucky. From the Filson Club History Quarterly. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, 1988. Page 13-16.

20  Draper, Lyman Copeland. 1735. Neil Interview. Page 26.

21  Early Kentucky Settlers—The Records of Jefferson County, Kentucky. Page 19-21.

22 Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

23 Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

24 Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

25 Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

26 Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

27 Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

28 Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

29  Draper, Lyman Copeland. Shane–Strong Interview.

30 McHenry, Chris. 1981. Rebel Prisoners at Quebec, 1778-1783 being a list of American prisoners held by the British during the Revolutionary War. The Haldeman Papers. [Lawrenceburg, Ind.]: C. McHenry.

31  McHenry. Rebel prisoners at Quebec, 1778-1783.

32  Early Kentucky Settlers—The Records of Jefferson County, Kentucky. Page 10.

33 Westervelt family account entitled “A Brief History of the Westerfield Family in America”. Page 2

34  Murray. The Bantas of Pleasant Hill. Page 34.

35 Westervelt, Walter Tallman, and Wharton Dickinson. 1905. Genealogy of the Westervelt family. New York: Press of T.A. Wright.Page 1-2, 24-25, 33, 51.

36 Westervelt family account entitled “A Brief History of the Westerfield Family in America”. Page 1-8

Letters 01/21/2017 More about Westerfield Massacre

posted Feb 7, 2017, 3:52 PM by Pam Ellingson


By Ron Belcher, a descendant who has spent many years in research. (This is the first installment of this VERY interesting story by Mr. Belcher)

Jacobus Westerfelt, who died at the massacre, had a brother named Jan (born 1734, #224, pg. 37 of the Walter Tallman Westervelt's book of the Westervelt Genealogy that I have attached to this e-mail for reference). That Jan was not at Kentucky.

Jan who was at the massacre was born in 1744 (#228, page 55, married Anaetje Dye). Jan was the son of Gerritt Westervelt (#74, page 37, born 1724). Gerritt was the son of Jan Westervelt (#19, page 28, born 1686). Walter Tallman Westervelt listed three known children of Jan and Anaetje as Gerret, Marya and Lea who match by given name three of those who died at the massacre.

Jacobus (Jacobus Jr.) at the massacre was born in 1737 (#225, page 37, married Maria DeMarest). Jacobus was the son of another Jacobus (#70, page 36, born 1712). This second Jacobus (Jacobus Sr.) was the son of Jan Westervelt (#19, page 28, born 1686).

Thus Jacobus and Jan were first cousins who were the grandchildren of Jan Westervelt who himself was born in 1686.

There apparently were three girls at the massacre who were known as Lea and/or Leah based upon different source documents. Most frequently, Jan's daughter is referred to as Leah, however, Walter Tallman Westervelt lists her name as Lea. Gets confusing. Lea and Leah were frequently Anglicized to be the same spelling, sometimes interchangeable.

The Ms. Strong interview by Draper was on microfiche, Louisville Public Library. Here are my transcribed notes for that Draper Source:

v  Draper manuscripts, interview called Shame – Campbell. Original source: Draper, Lyman Copeland. 1735. Collection of Lyman Copeland Draper Manuscripts [Microfilm]. Louisville Public Library. Louisville, KY.  Series CC, Vol. 13, p 84, Also, Vince Aker’s article in de halve maen, summer 1780. Ms. Strong was living at Cincinnati when the interview was conducted. At her earlier age she was a settler at Beargrass Creek (New Holland Station/Low Dutch Station), Jefferson CO, KY.

…Westerfelt’s family killed going to Harrodsburgh, near Bullit’s lick. (Bullit’s Lick is in Bullitt County, Kentucky.) Samuel Westerfelt, and his sister got back. This the same summer of 1780…

Interview with Miss Campbell, a settlerat the New Holland, Low Dutch Station, founded at May of 1780 by the newly arrived Dutch settlers.

Regarding the Swans (James, father and daughter, Betsy).  I was forwarded this information a few years back and will simply pass it along as it is pertinent to the Westervelt roster, timing and route of travel.

… On Sunday, Jas Swan was moving from 'tother side of Linn's Station somewhere, up to Floyd's to go with these Westerfelts next morning. The Indians attacked him between Linn's Station and Floyd's, and came so near that they got the loading from under the girl on horseback and she clung to the mane while the horse ran off with her to the station. He had moved up what else he had and left this for the last. He was on foot with his gun beside her. They jerked the load from under her. About 12 years she was. And she pitched on the horse's mane & clung on. Her father got in through the woods.

An early portion of the journey by the Westervelt Caravan obviously was departure from Linn Station southward toward Harrod's Town. For its starting point, guides originated at Floyd's Station, Westervelt from Low Dutch Station, Swan from Linn Station. Starting point for other travels might be determined with further research - which I

have not undertaken as it wouldnot materially affect the massacre events, roster or timing in history.


Regardless, I will sign off for now. My apologies if any of this is confusing or unclear. I had to hurry just a bit as my schedule is quite busy today. I did request approval from Bluegrass Roots and will let you know soon. regards for now - Ron

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